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An ethnographic study of the culture in a Diagnostic Imaging department (DID) - some personal reflections

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Ruth Strudwick's presentation for the 2010 Salford Postgraduate Annual Research Conference (SPARC) at the University of Salford

Ruth Strudwick's presentation for the 2010 Salford Postgraduate Annual Research Conference (SPARC) at the University of Salford

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    An ethnographic study of the culture in a Diagnostic Imaging department (DID) - some personal reflections An ethnographic study of the culture in a Diagnostic Imaging department (DID) - some personal reflections Presentation Transcript

    • An ethnographic study of the culture in a Diagnostic Imaging Department (DID) Ruth Strudwick Senior Lecturer & DProf Student SPARC conference, 10 – 11 June © copyright rests with the author. Please cite appropriately
    • Research question
      • Aim
      • To explore the culture in a DID with the primary focus on diagnostic radiographers (DRs)
      • Objectives
      • To describe the culture in a DID and highlight the current cultural issues that face DRs
      • To explore how people learn to become a DR and how they become professionally socialised
      • To look at how DRs communicate and interact within the DID
    • My study
      • An ethnographic study of the culture in a Diagnostic Imaging department (DID)
      • Exploring the culture in a DID with the primary focus on DRs
    • Research methods
      • Observation - 4 months to reduce the “Halo effect” (Asch, 1946) and “Hawthorne effect” (Bowling, 2002; Vehmas, 1997)
      • Interviews – with a cross-section of staff from the DID, a purposive sample of 10 key-informants (Bowling, 2002)
      • Examination of documents – part of original plan, but abandoned
    • Results Views about research, CPD and evidence-based practice Extended role and barriers Dealing with radiation Use of knowledge and teaching Visible product Structure, organisation, routine – the way things are done Workflow, pressure for rooms and prioritisation Blame culture Behaviour in different areas Depersonalising patients Interaction with computers and equipment Seeing the bigger picture Characterising the role of the DR Structure and environment Team working and communication between DRs Interprofessional relationships DR – radiologist relationships Discussion and story telling Transfer of information in the DID Role modelling Use of dark humour Task focussed interactions Time pressures and waiting times Patient assessment Avoiding confrontation Categorising patients Ethical dilemmas Involvement with patients Relationships with colleagues Relationships with patients
    • Studying “in my own nest”
      • There has been much written about this (Bonner and Tolhurst, 2002; Cudmore and Sondermeyer, 2007; Roberts, 2007)
      • Benefits and pitfalls, e.g. already know the profession, the cast of characters and the terminology but it may be difficult to distance yourself and develop the ‘outsider’s’ perspective (Roberts, 2007; Allott and Robb, 1998)
    • Personal reflections
      • As a researcher:
      • Collecting the data
      • Ethical issues
        • Consent from all (Johnson, 2004)
        • Intervention (Dixon-Woods, 2003; Hobbs and May, 1993; McGarry, 2007)
        • ‘ Wildebeest perspective’ (Johnson, 1997)
        • Bottom line of acceptable practice (Johnson, 2004)
      • Leaving the field – the ‘silent space’ (Coffey, 1999)
    • Personal reflections
      • As a practitioner:
      • Studying my profession in depth
      • Unflattering results!
        • Apathy to research, CPD and EBP
        • Lack of understanding and awareness of other professions
        • Poor communication with patients
      • Making a positive contribution
    • Personal reflections
      • As an educator:
      • Role modelling
      • Informal learning
      • Lack of reflection in/about practice
    • Conclusions
      • Preparation
        • For dilemmas
        • For attachment to field and participants
        • For findings
      • Personal development
        • Exploration of self and identity
        • More critical
      • Presenting work
    • Any questions?
    • References
      • Allott M and Robb M (Eds)(1998) Understanding Health and Social Care – An Introductory Reader. Sage, London.
      • Asch S E (1946) Forming impressions of personality. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. 41, 258-290.
      • Bonner A and Tolhurst G (2002) Insider-outsider perspectives of participant observation. Nurse Researcher 9, 4, p7-19.
      • Bowling A (2nd Ed) (2004) Research methods in health – investigating health and health services. Open University Press, Maidenhead.
      • Coffey A (1999) The Ethnographic Self. Sage, London.
      • Cudmore H, and Sondermeyer J (2007) Through the looking glass: being a critical ethnographer in a familiar nursing context. Nurse Researcher 2007, 14:3, pp25-35.
      • Dixon-Woods M (2003) What can ethnography do for quality and safety in health care? Quality and Safety in Health Care , Oct.2003, 12, 15, p326-327.
      • Hobbs D & May T (Eds.) (1993) Interpreting the field – Accounts of ethnography. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
      • Johnson M (1997) Observations on the neglected concept of intervention in nursing research. Journal of Advanced Nursing , 1997, 25 p23-29.
      • Johnson M (2004) Real world ethics and nursing research. Nursing Times Research. 2004: 9: 251-261.
      • McGarry J (2007) Nursing relationships in ethnographic research: what of rapport. Nurse Researcher 2007, 14, 3, p7-14.
      • Roberts D (2007) Ethnography and staying in your own nest. Nurse Researcher 2007, 14:3, pp15-24.
      • Vehmas T (1997) Hawthorne effect: shortening of fluoroscopy times during radiation measurement studies. British Journal of Radiology , 70: 838, p1053-1055.