Maltese business culture guide - Learn about Malta

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http://businessculture.org - Find out about business culture in Malta. This guide is part of the Passport to Trade 2.0 project which examined European Business culture in 31 countries looking at …

http://businessculture.org - Find out about business culture in Malta. This guide is part of the Passport to Trade 2.0 project which examined European Business culture in 31 countries looking at business communication, business etiquette, business meeting etiquette, internship and student placements, cost of living, work-life-balance and social media guide.

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  • 1.            |  1     businessculture.org Business Culture in Malta   http://businessculture.org/southerneurope/business-culture-in-malta/ Content Template This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the view only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 2.            |  2     TABLE  OF  CONTENTS   Business  Culture  in  Malta  .........................................................................................................  4   Xenophobia: being a foreigner in Malta ...............................................................................................5   International Business in Malta.............................................................................................................6   General Education ................................................................................................................................6   Educational standards ...........................................................................................................................6   Other Issues such as transportation infrastructure ................................................................................7   Cultural taboos ......................................................................................................................................7   Business  Communication  ..........................................................................................................  8   Face-to-face communication .................................................................................................................8   Language Matters .................................................................................................................................8   Business Relationships ...........................................................................................................................8   Making contact......................................................................................................................................8   Personal Titles .......................................................................................................................................9   Business  Etiquette  ..................................................................................................................  10   Corporate Social Responsibility ..........................................................................................................10   Punctuality ..........................................................................................................................................10   Gift giving ............................................................................................................................................10   Business Dress Code ............................................................................................................................11   Bribery and corruption........................................................................................................................11   Business  Meeting  Etiquette  ....................................................................................................  12   Importance of Business Meeting .........................................................................................................12   Business Meeting planning ..................................................................................................................12   Negotiation process .............................................................................................................................13   Meeting protocol .................................................................................................................................13   How to Run a Business Meeting .........................................................................................................13   Follow up letter after meeting with client............................................................................................14   businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 3.            |  3     Business meals .....................................................................................................................................14   Business Meeting tips ..........................................................................................................................15   Internship  and  placement  .......................................................................................................  16   Work experience .................................................................................................................................16   Internship and Placement advice ........................................................................................................16   Social security and European health insurance ..................................................................................16   Safety ...................................................................................................................................................16   Do I need a visa? .................................................................................................................................17   Internship and placement salary .........................................................................................................17   Internship and placement accommodation ........................................................................................17   Cost  of  Living  ...........................................................................................................................  18   Money and Banking ............................................................................................................................18   Traveling costs.....................................................................................................................................18   Work-­‐life  Balance   ....................................................................................................................  19   National holidays.................................................................................................................................19   Working hours .....................................................................................................................................20   Health insurance .................................................................................................................................20   Social  Media  Guide  .................................................................................................................  21   Search and Social Media Marketing for International Business .........................................................21   businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 4.            |  4     Business  Culture  in  Malta   The following is a very short introduction to Malta. External links at the end of this page provide you with more in depth information concerning different topics. The following video gives you an overview of the general facts: (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=iOAlNUzl1jI) The Maltese archipelago located in the Mediterranean Sea, is made up of three main islands: Malta, Gozo and Comino and two other uninhabited islands, Cominotto and Filfla. The largest island is Malta of which Valletta, the capital, is the cultural, administrative and commercial centre of the archipelago. Malta is small and densely populated; the official population in 2011 is about 419.000. The majority of Maltese people are bilingual and fluent in both Maltese and English. Italian is also widely spoken. Official publications are written in both Maltese and English and most business and commercial documents are in English. The main religion in Malta is Roman Catholic, but freedom of religion is guaranteed as a constitutional right. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 5.              |  5   The climate is mild and temperatures vary between an average maximum of 30 °C in summer to an average minimum of 9° C in Winter. Historically, Malta has been ruled by Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Normans, Castilians, Knights of St John, the French and finally the British. The period of British rule began in the the early nineteenth century and continued for the next 160 years. Malta became an independent state on the 21st September 1964 and 10 years later it was declared a republic. Malta is a member of the Commonwealth and of the United Nations. In 2004 Malta became an EU Member State and from January 2008 it adopted the Euro as the official currency. The Republic of Malta is a representative democracy: the President of the Republic who is also Head of State and has a mainly representative role, is elected every five years by the House of Representatives. The Parliament is composed of the House of Representatives, (ilKamra tad-Deputati), which has 65 members elected every five years. The Prime Minister is appointed by the President of the Republic and represents the Executive power. The legal system is based on English common law. Judges are appointed by the President, on the advice of the Prime Minister. Since 1993 Malta has been divided into 68 local councils or localities which are responsible for the administration of regions or cities. Most financial, fiscal and commercial legislation is based on British law. Malta has a diversified economy which relies mainly on tourism, financial services and manufacturing industries, such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, light engineering and healthcare. Recent Government policy in the tourism sector has focused on diversification of the tourist offerings promoting not only the ‘sun and sea’ aspects of Malta as a destination but also emphasising the cultural and historical attractions for visitors. The Financial Services sector has grown significantly and the Government recognises its importance – in particular insurance, investment services, call centres and e-commerce. Xenophobia:  being  a  foreigner  in  Malta   Maltese people are friendly and courteous. Like people of other Mediterranean cultures, they are usually informal but they prefer to create an atmosphere of trust before doing business. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 6.              |  6   During conversations and business meetings your Maltese counterpart may speak in an animated and excitable way and this is just a normal manner of expression. The Maltese have a strong sense of their own identity and yet are very Mediterranean with a typical European life style. They are proud of their tolerant traditions and customs and are very tolerant of other customs or religious beliefs. For this reason there are many mixed marriages in Malta. Malta has a rich cultural and social life that includes musical concerts, art exhibitions and the traditional religious processions. International  Business  in  Malta   Attitudes and values form the basis of any culture. They reflect the ways people think and behave. Knowledge of a culture’s attitudes and values can therefore be of significant importance if you wish to communicate with your Maltese counterparts effectively. General  Education   The educational system is based on the British model: and public instruction is provided free of charge. There are a large number of private schools and most of these are Catholic. Since 1987 following a Church-State agreement the instruction is also free. Since 1974, education has been compulsory for all children between the ages of 6-10 (Primary education). On passing their entrance examinations, students enter Secondary education and after five years (aged 16 ) they obtain the “Secondary Education Certificate” (SEC). Once secondary education ends students can go on to study in a college or, if they don’t pass their exams, they can choose to attend a HigherSecondary School or a specialised private institution. Tertiary Education is mainly provided by the University of Malta (UoM) which uses the European ECTS credits system. There are also several Tertiary Education Colleges which provide training in specific areas of study (Art & Design, Computer Technician and IT, Engineering). Malta is also a popular year-round destination for students to learn English as a second language (ESL) and offers many program options. Educational  standards   Opportunities and high quality education in Malta have been increased during the last years. Government established many measures in order to ensure that both public and private businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 7.              |  7   education offered is regulated and audited. Lifelong Learning Education has become very important in Maltese Education system. Many courses have been implemented to enable people who have studied years ago to continue developing their competencies and skills. Other  Issues  such  as  transportation  infrastructure   Smoking etiquette. Since the introduction of a smoking ban in 2005 smoking in all enclosed public places is prohibited. Mobile etiquette. People often use their mobile phones in public places. It is illegal to use a mobile phone while driving, but it’s not unusual see bus drivers talk on the phone at any time Mobile Services. Prepaid SIM cards are readily available at many retail locations and markets throughout Malta allowing you to obtain a local mobile number. In Malta there are no area codes and usually mobile numbers have eight digits. The prefix of the fixed line telephone numbers are 21 and 27 while mobile telephone numbers have the prefix 79, 77 or 99. If you want to call Malta from abroad, you should first dial the international access code, then the country code +356 and the specific mobile number. Internet Access. Free WiFi is available at many cafes and restaurants, and some public access areas including Malta International Airport. All McDonald’s restaurants provide free WiFi as well as several WiFi hotspot providers offering WiFi services for fees ranging from €3/hour to daily and weekly options. Sense of humour. Maltese people have a strong sense of irony and a good sense of humour. Cultural  taboos   Maltese people tend to be quite open minded but generally politics, religion and family are serious subjects for them and not ones that should necessarily be discussed at first meetings. If you do discuss one of these topics, especially during a first meeting, go with the flow because disagreeing might create a bad impression and get you off on the wrong foot. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 8.              |  8   Business  Communication   Effective communication is important to establish good relationships, especially when making contact with business partners and setting up meetings. Knowledge of the basic rules of business communication together with specific information about the cultural differences, attitudes and values of your foreign partners should help you to start successful negotiations and to generate more business opportunities. Face-­‐to-­‐face  communication   In order to have effective communication with the Maltese people, it’s important to be clear and concise, using short and simple phrases and avoiding idioms or too many colloquial expressions. Eye contact during a meeting is essential but it’s better to avoid gazing at your counterpart for long periods , as this can be considered intrusive. Language  Matters   People are bilingual: they speak Maltese and English. All official publications are available both in English and Maltese. Many Maltese understand and speak Italian well and German is recently being studied more frequently by younger people. People in Malta are very friendly and hospitable. In first business meetings they shake hands and introduce themselves, also presenting their business cards. Business  Relationships   People usually establish friendly and helpful personal relationships.Business relations are based on trust: Maltese people must feel that they know you well before establishing a partnership. Written presentations are useful especially before a first meeting. The organisational management structures in Malta are not rigid. Hierarchical lines are determined by the degree of familiarity. Making  contact   In Malta it’s normal practice to have a personal or professional connection (referrals, testimonials, etc) before asking for a meeting with a businessman or woman. If nobody can businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 9.              |  9   introduce you, you should address your letter requesting a meeting directly to the owner or the chairman of the company. Email contact is rapidly becoming an acceptable means of communication with a business to request a meeting or to enquire about products and services. There are several networking opportunities that are both business and expat oriented. Malta hosts regular meetings of Toastmasters, who meet on the second Tuesday of every month and in 2011 BNI (Business Network International) launched several chapters in Malta. There are also several LinkedIn groups which are active in promoting business and making introductions including Network Malta, Malta Entrepreneurs, and Business Professionals in Malta. Personal  Titles   At a first meeting or during formal communication with a Maltese partner, you would usually address your counterpart as Mr or Mrs, but in day-to-day business it’s not unusual to move to first name terms. It’s better to ask how your counterpart would prefer to be addressed to avoid any embarrassment. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 10.              |  10   Business  Etiquette     Attitudes and values are vital to doing business abroad. Conversely, ignorance of these important issues can result in a cultural barrier that may inhibit the communication process, thus having a negative effect on the success of activities in a given country. How important is work-life balance for Maltese people? How do they value fairness in business? An understanding of these issues may prove invaluable when doing business. All too often these matters are neglected during the preparation phase, despite their importance for business success. The following section will introduce you to the essential attitudes and values shared among Maltese people and highlight their implications for business practice. Corporate  Social  Responsibility   The environment is Malta’s most important resource and. there are many natural reserves and areas of ecological importance in the country. Government, through the activities of the Ministry for Rural Affairs and the Environment, carries out policies for the promotion, protection, management and sustainable development of the environment. To support the formulation of environmental policy, the Directorate of Environment Policy and Initiatives was created in September 2005. The Malta Environment and Planning Authority (MEPA) is the organisation responsible for the implementation of Government policies. Punctuality   Scheduling an appointment before a business meeting is very important. You should phone to request the meeting at least two weeks in advance and establish the time and the place with your Maltese counterpart. Punctuality is expected although it is not a rigid rule. Gift  giving   Small or symbolic gifts such as a corporate gift or something typical of your country are very much appreciated, in particular desserts, socks or beverages. However if you come to a meeting empty handed it is not a problem. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 11.              |  11   Business  Dress  Code   In Malta there are no specific dress rules, however it is advised to dress conservatively for business meetings. Men should wear a suit or jacket and tie and women should wear an elegant, but not necessary conventional suit in a dark or subtle colour. Less formal clothing is acceptable in some business sectors such as advertising, public relations, IT or other creative industries. Bribery  and  corruption   In Malta many organizations are involved in fighting corruption (Malta Police, the Security Service, the Auditor General’s Office, the National Audit Office and the Permanent Commission against Corruption) but there is no official body that coordinates all the anticorruption activities. In 2004 Malta signed all the Council of Europe conventions on corruption and has ratified the Council of Europe’s Civil Law Convention on Corruption. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 12.              |  12   Business  Meeting  Etiquette     When organising and attending meetings in Malta you should consider the general principles of business etiquette but to have maximum success you should also consider local culture and attitudes. This is true especially when you organize the meeting (the date, the location) and decide the contents (the agenda), when you meet the people (greetings) when you decide the right strategies for conducting the relationship during and after the meeting (negotiations, business meals, gift giving). Importance  of  Business  Meeting   Usually, a Maltese person, wishing to establish contact with a foreign business, will ask for the owner or the chairman of the company. Initially, it is likely that a number of emails and/or telephone calls will then be exchanged along the way. However, once it is determined that there is the potential for some form of business relationship a face-to-face meeting is set up. Face-to-face meetings are especially likely to take place in Malta. When travelling is a problem, where for example one of the parties is outside of Malta, web conferencing is becoming an ever more acceptable medium for meetings. The use of web conferencing facilities initially does not exclude that at some point one of the parties may travel to carry to attend face-to-face meetings. First meetings are generally follow a conservative approach and protocol because the Maltese want to get to know their counterpart better before talking business. Thus, time taken to establish a relationship is very important before getting down to business. Punctuality is expected and appreciated. A meeting is considered a process of exchanging information: you should expect many questions and try to give prompt and clear replies. Business  Meeting  planning   A meeting with a manager or the owner of a Maltese company should be fixed after a written communication or a phone call directly to them or to their executive secretary.. You should explain in detail who you are, give information about your company and the reason you are contacting him or her. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 13.              |  13   It’s better, before a business meeting, to establish an agenda because Maltese businessmen and women will follow it strictly.All the information about the meeting and the participants must be confirmed in a fax or email. Negotiation  process   You should be prepared to spend a lot of time on business transactions and have patience, because the negotiation process tends to be long. The communication style of Maltese partners during the negotiation is usually direct and they prefer pragmatism and people who are matter-of-fact rather than emotional. Negotiations are usually reserved and polite. Do not interrupt someone while they are speaking. Before reaching an agreement the Maltese will look in minute detail at the legal aspects and all the conditions in the written contract. Informal or unwritten forms of an agreement are frowned upon.  Meeting  protocol   People in Malta are very friendly and hospitable. In initial business meetings they will shake hands and introduce themselves, also presenting their business cards. When you come into an office or when you meet your business counterpart, you should say “bongu” (good morning) or “bonswa” (good evening) and before leaving “sah ha” (good bye). Although the Maltese speak good English, this small effort with the Maltese language will be appreciated. How  to  Run  a  Business  Meeting   During a business meeting you will probably give a presentation using appropriate graphics or distribute written material about your company. It is better when possible to send copies of all materials you intend to use in advance. Detailed brochures and price lists show that you are taking an interest in the company and are willing to work with them. Usually, Maltese negotiators are good listeners and don’t interrupt their counterparts. You should however expect many questions and requests for explanations at the end of your presentation because Maltese businessmen and women will want to make sure that they clearly understand every aspect of your proposal. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 14.              |  14   Follow  up  letter  after  meeting  with  client   When you return to your office following a meetin, it is important to confirm the agreement reached and follow up. Maltese partners use the same rules and follow up procedures as other EU partners: they will prepare the minutes of the meeting which summarise all the decisions taken and then circulate these to all those involved in the business relationship. Generally, Maltese businessman and women tend to move quickly and after the quite protracted negotiations mentioned above, deals are usually closed in a matter of few weeks. Business  meals   Generally, meals are rich: the first course is a pasta dish, followed by meat or fish, fruits and desserts, generally accompanied by wine. Usually a cup of coffee is served to finish the meal. The main business areas such as St. Julians, Sliema, and Valletta, the capital, offer a good selection of international cuisines. Maltese food is influenced by Italian, Spanish, African and east Mediterranean traditional cuisines. Fresh fish dishes are especially recommended like the Maltese speciality Lampuki Pie made with lampuki fishes and cauliflowers. Famous local dishes are: rabbit cooked in different ways. You could order a meal based on rabbit: spaghetti with rabbit sauce, followed by a Fenek (rabbit cooked in wine) or fried or stewed rabbit. At the end of your meal you could finish with fresh fruits (figs, orange, grapes) or with nuts and the traditional Helwa tat-Tork, a sweet mixture of almonds. Maltese wine is good and the local beer is excellent. A famous homemade liqueur is the Bajtra Liqueur which is made from prickly pears. During the meal Maltese people normally drink wine and commonly use the expression “Evviva” (i.e. Cheers) as a toast. In restaurants as in other public places, smoking is not permitted. Tipping is optional, but if you receive particularly good service you could leave an additional 10% on top of the cost of the meal. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 15.            |  15     Business  Meeting  tips   Accepting your counterpart’s invitation for lunch or dinner; is a good way to gain trust. If you are invited to someone’s home, accept with pleasure and remember to take a gift with you, such as chocolates or a bottle of wine or spirits. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 16.              |  16   Internship  and  placement     Work  experience   The International & EU Office at the University of Malta and at the Institute of Tourism Studies provides information about application procedures, English language requirements, course requirements, accommodation, visas, health care, tuition fees and financial support. To access a work placement in Malta, the essential requirements are: students must be at least 18 years old and be at undergraduate junior or senior levels. There are also private organisations who manage internship and work placement programmes (including Erasmus and other funded EU programmes) offering the opportunity to develop key employability skills and also to gain work experience. Internship  and  Placement  advice   Before have an internship and/or a placement experience students and SMEs should know practical issues such as safety, social security, visa, accommodation, costo of living and other formalities. Social  security  and  European  health  insurance   All citizens who have a European Health Card (EHIC) are entitled to free health care in all European countries, including Malta. In particular, citizens of the United Kingdom and Australia can access free medical and hospital care in Malta for stays of up to one month, because there is a bilateral agreement between Malta and these countries. Non-EU citizens need private health insurance that will cover medical expenses abroad, including medical evacuation and travel insurance. It is important to check which activities are covered by your insurance policy. Safety   Malta is considered to be one of the safest countries in the world with little in the way of violent crime or political disturbances. You should still however follow common-sense personal security rules, in particular in urban and tourist areas. You should make sure that your valuables are secure and be aware of pickpockets and purse snatchers. Begging on the streets is almost non-existent in Malta businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 17.            |  17     Do  I  need  a  visa?   Nationals of several countries such as EU Member States, the USA and most Commonwealth countries, don’t need a visa to enter Malta for a stay of less than 3 months: for longer stays they should apply for a uniform residence permit. Information regarding visa applications and Embassies can be found on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ website. Internship  and  placement  salary   Usually internships are unpaid. Students accepted to participate in programmes managed by private organisations must pay a fee for the support services they will receive. There are companies affiliated with the University of Malta, the Institute of Tourism Studies and private organizations who will offer a salary to those students who have at least 1 year of work experience in the same or in a related position. Paid employment in Malta can be found with tour operators and in hotels, bars and restaurants in tourist areas. Internship  and  placement  accommodation   The University of Malta has a Residence which welcomes people who travel to Malta to expand their academic qualifications , take an academic holiday or visit their University colleagues. Some private organisations have their own accommodation system offering all amenities at competitive rates. Students can also consider renting a room in an apartment located in town and sharing costs with other students. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 18.              |  18   Cost  of  Living     The cost of living in Malta depends on the lifestyle you intend to enjoy . Accommodation is expensive in Valletta, Sliema and St Julian’s, but in the South of the island it is much cheaper. Food and drink prices also vary depending on the location: items sold in tourist areas are more expensive than in other areas. Supermarkets or tiny “hole in the wall” type outlets which sell pastizzi, pizza and pies, are the best choice for those on a budget because of their lower costs. Some examples of average prices are: soft drink from 1 to 1.50 euros; water 0.80 euros, sandwich from a cafeteria 1.50- 2.00 euros, bread 0.80 euros. Money  and  Banking   To open a bank account in Malta, you will need to provide some documentation for example, a copy of your passport and a utility bill proving your address. In addition, you will need a reference from a bank that you currently hold an account with. Traveling  costs   Flights for all destinations arrive at Malta International Airport (MLA, also known as Luqa by locals). Buses, taxis and dedicated airport shuttle services are frequent and reliable. There are also fast and frequent ferries to and from Italy. Students and researchers who participate in an EU Mobility Programme usually receive a grant which should cover the cost of travelling to Malta. Others, who make their own arrangements or use the assistance of a private organisation, should pay all their own costs, including travel costs. The transport system in Malta is efficient. Buses are the main form of public transport and offer a cheap and frequent service to many parts of Malta and Gozo. Fares across the island cost less than € 2.30 (Malta ID holders pay € 1.30). Taxi costs are € 15 for short hops and not much more than € 35 for a trip across the island; from the airport the official fares are from € 10 to € 30. The Maltese drive on the left, as in the UK. The speed limits are 80kph (50mph) on highways and 50kph (30mph) in urban areas). It’s advisable to have at least third party insurance. Foreigners who have an EU licence may drive in Malta until their license expires and those who have a non-EU driving license may drive in Malta for up to 12 months, but must then apply for a Certificate of Local Registration of Visitor’s Driving Licence, which is issued on the spot and is free of charge. Visitors driving their own car do not need to have their licence endorsed. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 19.            |  19     Work-­‐life  Balance     The Maltese Government has introduced laws and family-friendly policies in order to promote a positive work life balance for its people – these include free and affordable childcare. From the 1st of January 2012 maternity leave increased from 14 to 16 weeks. Child care is essential if women are to fulfill their role in the workplace, although women who work full time tend to have more difficulties balancing work and family. Usually, parents dedicate their weekends to family and children. National  holidays   • The main national holidays are: • 1st January – New Year’s Day • 10th February – St. Paul’s Shipwreck • 19th March – St. Joseph • 31st March – Freedom Day • March / April (date changes) – Good Friday • 1st May Labour/Worker’s Day • 7th June Sette Giugno • 29th June – St Peter and St Paul (L-Imnarja) • 15th August The Assumption (Santa Marija) • 8th September Our Lady of Victories • 21st September – Independence Day • 8th December – Immaculate Conception • 13th December Republic Day businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 20.            |  20     • 25th December – Christmas Day Working  hours   The Maltese employees in the private sector generally work 40 hours per week. Offices are open from Monday to Friday generally from 08.00 till 17.00. Many small businesses and retail shops close for a few hours in the afternoon. It is always best to check opening hours . Working hours are from 09:00 to 13:00 and from 16:00 to 19:00 from Monday to Saturday. On Saturdays, most shops are open only in the morning. Shops in tourist areas do not normally close at lunchtime and usually remain open until 22:00 in summer. Health  insurance   In Malta there is an high standard of health care and there are good and modern hospitals and regional health centres. The Government offers a free health service to all citizens, persons who work in Malta and even tourists, although there is also a private healthcare system. The Ministry of Health is currently investing time and effort to improve the public healthcare sector in Malta and Gozo through the use of new technologies. The main benefits to citizens and patients of healthcare services online via the E-health Portal are: the reduction of queues at hospitals and health centres; the automation of the process for the services offered; the accessibility to the general public is h 24. businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 21.              |  21   Social  Media  Guide     The results of the 7th eCommerce Survey carried out by the Malta Communication Authority September 2010 show that 65% of the population uses the Internet and 33% of those use it for Social Networking. The presence of businesses and business pages on social media is growing, in fact at the end of 2012 there were over 13 million local business pages on Facebook, with 8 million of those pages regularly active. According to the latest statistics, approximately 150 million people visit Facebook every day, so the potential for increasing your audience is incomparable when compared to print advertising or email marketing. The ICON report on Social Media Marketing in Malta, in 2011, on the use by businesses of social media as part of their marketing efforts, shows that 85% of local marketers use social networks as part of their marketing strategies and activities to grow their business. Facebook is the preferred tool, but 50% of the participants also want to learn more about LinkedIn, Twitter and Foursquare. Companies involved in the research know that Social Media is important for their business but they don’t’ know or they are not able to monitor and measure the effect of Social Media on their business. Search  and  Social  Media  Marketing  for  International  Business   Learn how to use social media for business from one of Salford Business School’s latest business management courses. The course was jointly researched by the Passport to Trade 2.0 project team and prepared in collaboration with some of the leading digital marketing agencies in the UK. This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) can help businesses and individuals to make the best use of search and social media platforms. The course is called Search and Social Media Marketing for International Business and is applicable to students looking for placements abroad as well as businesses thinking about new trade links; it comprises the following twelve topics: businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 22.            |  22     How to develop a personal brand online (1/12) • • Whether you are a student beginning a job search or a business person planning a new business venture, personal branding can make a difference. Learn about personal branding and why it is important for you. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=l9LYw0mgtn4&feature=player _embedded How to use Twitter (2/12) • • Learn the basics of using Twitter to develop an individual or business profile. Remember to use hash tag #SSMMUoS to share your learning journey on this course so far! http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=9CVY3pp91Dc&feature=playe r_embedded How to use Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) (3/12) • • Learn the principles of SEO to ensure that your website and any social media profiles are found by individuals searching for your name, products and services. These basic principles of SEO include keyword research, on-page optimisation and off-page optimisation. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=zw27cRcwtM0&feature=player _embedded businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 23.            |  23     How to use social media for international business development (4/12) • • Social media networks break down the traditional country barriers, but do you know which networks are relevant for the country you are interested in trading with? Find out in this video how to identify the relevant networks and what social media strategies you might be able to use on these networks. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=Bx-B56AHS4c&feature= player_embedded How to use Facebook (5/12) • • Facebook is currently the largest social media network in the world and it can benefit you as a business as well as an individual. Learn how to develop a Facebook business page and see how other businesses use it and what strategies work for them. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=UmRGn-vdcO8&feature= player_embedded How to use YouTube (6/12) • • YouTube was identified as the second largest social network amongst younger internet users as part of the Passport to Trade 2.0 project. Learn how to optimise your video content in order to reach wider audiences for your profile. http://www.youtube.com/watch? feature=player_embedded&v=G2 0OVpmTBss businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 24.            |  24     How to use LinkedIn (7/12) • • LinkedIn is one of the three main professional social networks – the others being Xing and Viadeo which are also popular in several European countries. Learn how to make the most of LinkedIn for your profile. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=N6e_EAUQqic&feature=playe r_embedded How to use Google+ (8/12) • • • Google+ is the second largest social network as of January 2013. It is one of the fastest growing social networks and one that has the biggest impact when it comes to search engine results integration for anyone who uses Google as their main search engine. Learn how to make the most of Google+ for you and your digital profiles. http://www.youtube.com/watch? feature=player_embedded&v=8ti 3SPHkEWw How to use copywriting online (9/12) • • Copywriting is a process of translating technical specifications and product descriptions into engaging and understandable customer focused text. Learn about the basic techniques in structuring your online content here. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=5f1hx_f2ONI&feature=player_ embedded businessculture.org   Content  Malta  
  • 25.            |  25     How to stay legal on social media (10/12) • • Everything and anything you do and say online can be potentially viewed by anyone who has internet access. Always respect the law and familiarise yourself with new options offered to you through a creative commons licence which is popular online. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=eQxDpiHsdk&feature=player_embedde d How to use monitoring and reporting (11/12) • • Whether you are an individual or a business spending time on social media – there has to be a return on your engagement online. How do you justify your engagement on social media to your boss? Listen to the industry experts in this area and see what you might be able to measure in respect of your on-line engagements. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=LbEq7jsG0jg&feature=player_ embedded How to blog (12/12) • • http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=OqVjR7oI8Rs&feature=player _embedded businessculture.org   • Blogging is a process of writing text and sharing content with others. It can help your customers or friends to keep in-touch regardless of social media platforms. Think about the voice you might want to adopt and who your audience might be. Share your thoughts with us by writing a blog post about this MOOC. Tweet us the link to your post on the #SSMMUoS Twitter hash tag. Content  Malta  
  • 26.              |  26   Passport  to  Trade  2.0  Project  Partnership   Five Universities: Lead partner: Salford Business School, University of Salford, United Kingdom Elena Vasilieva Aleksej Heinze Alex Fenton URENIO research unit at Aristole University of Thessaloniki, Greece Christina Kakderi Nitsa Papadopoulou TSE Entre Research Centre Turku School of Economics, University of Turku, Finland Satu Aaltonen Elisa Akola Institute for Information System Research University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany Verena Hausmann Susan Williams Petra Schubert Valahia University of Targoviste, Romania Adriana Grigorescu Leonardo Badea Three Small & Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) Spin, Italy Carmine Antonio Donato Dorella De Tommaso Technology Development & Innovation – TDI LTD Bulgaria Milanka Slavova Ivan Stoychev TIS Praha, Czech Republic Anna Klosova Richard Adekeye businessculture.org   Content  Malta