Cypriot business culture guide - Learn about Cyprus
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Cypriot business culture guide - Learn about Cyprus

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http://businessculture.org - Find out about business culture in Cyprus. This guide is part of the Passport to Trade 2.0 project, which examined European Business culture in 31 countries looking at ...

http://businessculture.org - Find out about business culture in Cyprus. This guide is part of the Passport to Trade 2.0 project, which examined European Business culture in 31 countries looking at business communication, business etiquette, business meeting etiquette, internship and student placements, cost of living, work-life-balance and social media guide.

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Cypriot business culture guide - Learn about Cyprus Cypriot business culture guide - Learn about Cyprus Document Transcript

  •            |  1     businessculture.org Business Culture in Cyprus   Content Template http://businessculture.org/southerneurope/business-culture-in-cyprus/ Last updated: 8.10.2013 businessculture.org   Content  Cyprus   This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the view only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  •            |  2     TABLE  OF  CONTENT   Business  Culture  in  Cyprus  ........................................................................................................  4   Xenophobia: being a foreigner in Cyprus ............................................................................................ 5   General Education ............................................................................................................................... 5   Other Issues such as transportation infrastructure ............................................................................... 6   Cultural taboos ..................................................................................................................................... 6   Business  Communication  ..........................................................................................................  7   Face-to-face communication ................................................................................................................ 7   Language Matters................................................................................................................................. 7   Business Relationships .......................................................................................................................... 7   Making contact ..................................................................................................................................... 7   Personal Titles ...................................................................................................................................... 7   Business  Etiquette  in  Cyprus  .....................................................................................................  8   Corporate Social Responsibility ........................................................................................................... 8   Punctuality ............................................................................................................................................ 8   Gift giving ............................................................................................................................................. 8   Business Dress Code ............................................................................................................................. 8   Bribery and corruption ......................................................................................................................... 8   Business  Meeting  Etiquette  ......................................................................................................  9   Importance of Business Meeting .......................................................................................................... 9   Business Meeting planning ................................................................................................................... 9   Negotiation process .............................................................................................................................. 9   Meeting protocol .................................................................................................................................. 9   How to Run a Business Meeting .......................................................................................................... 9   Follow up letter after meeting with client ............................................................................................. 9   Business meals .................................................................................................................................... 10   Business Meeting tips.......................................................................................................................... 10   businessculture.org   Content  Cyprus  
  •            |  3     Internship  and  placement  .......................................................................................................  11   Work experience................................................................................................................................. 11   Social security and European health insurance ................................................................................. 12   Safety .................................................................................................................................................. 12   Do I need a visa? ................................................................................................................................ 12   Internship and placement salary ........................................................................................................ 12   Internship and placement accommodation ........................................................................................ 13   Cost  of  Living  ...........................................................................................................................  14   Money and Banking ........................................................................................................................... 14   Traveling costs .................................................................................................................................... 14   Work-­‐life  Balance   ....................................................................................................................  15   National holidays ................................................................................................................................ 15   Working hours .................................................................................................................................... 15   Social  Media  Guide  .................................................................................................................  16   Search and Social Media Marketing for International Business ........................................................ 16   businessculture.org   Content  Cyprus  
  •            |  4     Business  Culture  in  Cyprus   The following is a very short introduction to Cyprus. External links at the end of this page provide you with more in depth information concerning different topics. The following video gives you an overview of the general facts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHSLN1_IsLQ Cyprus is a country located in the Eastern Mediterranean, and is the third largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. The Republic of Cyprus is member of the European Union with a population of about 800,000 inhabitants, of which approximately 84% are Greek Cypriots, 12% Turkish Cypriots and the remaining 4% belonging to minority ethnic groups like Maronites, Armenians, Latins and foreign workers. Cyprus has a Mediterranean and semiarid climate with mild winters and warm to hot summers. It snows only in the mountains in the central part of the island, while rain occurs mainly in winter, with summers being generally dry. Cyprus is in the Eastern European Time Zone and adheres to EET (UTC +2) during the winter and EEST (UTC +3) during the summer. The history of Cyprus spans almost 9,000 years of civilization, throughout the Persian, Egyptian, Roman, Byzantine and Venetian empires. The Hellenisation of Cyprus started sometime after 1400 BC, when the first Greeks came to the island. Indeed the Greek influence continues to this day with the diffusion of their language, culture and religion. In 1571, the island was invaded by the Turks and Cyprus became part of the Ottoman Empire until the 1st World War although it was administered by the British Government from 1878. Cyprus was declared a Crown colony in 1925 and proclaimed independence from the United Kingdom in 1960. Τhe Republic of Cyprus has been divided into two main parts since 1974: the southern area controlled by the Republic covers about 59% of the island’s area; and the northern side businessculture.org   Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  5   of the island remains under Turkish control. Northern Cyprus is considered to be an occupied territory of the Republic by the international community, and the UN has operated a peacekeeping force on the island since 1964. . Nicosia is the capital of Cyprus, known as Lefkoşa by the Turkish Cypriots, and it is divided by the ‘Green Line’, a border that separates both the city and the country in two. The economy of the Republic of Cyprus is characterised by the dominant role of the private sector, with the Government providing policies in order to promote and maintain investments and support private initiatives. The domestic market is small and companies are often small businesses. For this reason, all the sectors of the economy are oriented towards the international markets. Cyprus exports primarily to European countries and, in particular, the UK, Greece and Germany. The main exports are manufactured goods like clothing, pharmaceutical products, wine, cement, furniture and agricultural products. Cyprus acceded to the European Union in 2004 and has been a member of the Eurozone, using the Euro as official currency, since 2008. The Republic of Cyprus is a unitary presidential constitutional Republic. Cyprus is divided into six administrative districts, which are headed by a District Officer. The main function of the local representative is to coordinate the activities of all the Ministries in the District. Local government representatives are elected by universal suffrage and provide administrative and public services to citizens in towns and rural areas (Municipal Council) and in villages (Community Council), respectively. Xenophobia:  being  a  foreigner  in  Cyprus   People in the Republic of Cyprus are warm, friendly and welcoming. Although Cypriots are mainly Christian (Greek – Orthodox), religious freedom is guaranteed by the Constitution. The majority of Cypriots speak Greek, but English is widely spoken. French and German are also spoken, especially in tourist areas, although not as widely as English. General  Education   Education is free and compulsory for students in Cyprus until they are 15 years of age. There are three levels of public education: Primary School, Secondary School and High School. Secondary School is further divided into two levels, whereby the Lower Secondary School offers a general education, whereas the Upper Secondary School provides a more specialized education. Apart from the public school system in Cyprus, there are many private schools that offer primary and secondary education, including those following other educational systems, mainly English and French. When students complete secondary education with a leaving certificate, they are able to continue into higher education. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  6   Other  Issues  such  as  transportation  infrastructure   Smoking etiquette: Smoking is prohibited in all public places and also in private cars, if there are passengers under the age of 16. Mobile etiquette: Cypriots tend to talk more on their mobile phones compared to most other Europeans. According to a study on Social Attitudes to Road Traffic Risk in Europe, Cypriots talk on their mobile phones while driving, although the use of a mobile telephone with your hands while driving has 2-4 penalty points and a fine of approximately €85. Cultural  taboos   You should avoid speaking about politics and the division of the island, because it’s a sensitive issue both for the Greek and Turkish communities. Even though the Turkish occupation of Northern Cyprus is not officially recognised as legitimate by the international community, the Turks themselves believe in their entitlement and see themselves as citizens of the ‘Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus’ rather than as invaders or a minority group. Visitors to both sides of the island should be aware of the religious sensitivities and wear conservative clothes that cover the legs and arms when visiting churches and monasteries, out of respect. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  7   Business  Communication   Face-­‐to-­‐face  communication   Cypriots consider telephone calls and other formal communications important, but they prefer to establish personal relationships. For this reason, they like to have face-to-face meetings for doing business. Language  Matters   The majority of Cypriots speak Greek, but English is widely spoken and considered to be the primary language of business in Cyprus. Turkish is the official language of Northern Cyprus; French and German are also spoken, especially in tourist areas, although not as widely as English. The linguistic situation in Cyprus is described by some people as diglossic (or bidialectal) with ‘Standard Modern Greek’ and the ‘Greek-Cypriot Dialect’ co-existing. Language policy is closely related to social, political and national factors and this explains why the SMG (Standard Modern Greek) variant had been chosen as the ‘proper’ language of Cyprus, which is taught in state schools. Business  Relationships   The cornerstones of the business environment in Cyprus are respect, personal trust and hospitality. Most Cypriots prefer face-to-face contact such as meetings, rather than telephone conversations or written communications. Cypriots consider the building of personal relationships with business partners to be a very important aspect of their business. Making  contact   A first contact with your Cypriot partner should be by email or by telephone to arrange a place and time for the meeting. Business cards should be produced in both Greek and English to facilitate communications and demonstrate an appreciation of the culture. During a first meeting you should bring a brochure or other promotional material from the company you represent to leave with your partner. Personal  Titles   In Cyprus you should address your partner formally, using the surname preceded by Mr. or Ms. and professional titles. Once a relationship becomes more personal, your counterpart should naturally invite you to use their first name. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  8   Business  Etiquette  in  Cyprus     Corporate  Social  Responsibility   Despite the recent financial crisis, businesses in Cyprus still operate responsibly. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a necessary condition for sustained social progress. In Cyprus many companies, banks and other private organisation carry out a series of activities and behaviours as part of their CSR programmes, which include volunteering, environmental protection and restoration, charitable professional services and corporate community leadership. Punctuality   In Cyprus, it is important to arrange appointments well in advance by formally requesting a meeting, agreeing a time and date and confirming your attendance in writing. Punctuality is expected, although it is possible that your Cypriot partner will arrive at the meeting late. Gift  giving   Small gifts are well accepted by Cypriot business partners. You should give something useful for the office such as small corporate gifts branded with your company logo. You should know that gifts are generally not opened when they are received. If a Cypriot invites you to their home for a meal, you should bring a small gift such pastries or flowers, but avoid white lilies, which are typically associated with funerals. Business  Dress  Code   The dress codes for business meetings in Cyprus are the same as for most other European countries. It is best to adopt a conservative approach and wear formal business attire, such as a dark coloured suit with tie for men and a skirt or pant suit for women. Bribery  and  corruption   Cyprus ranks 66 in the Corruption Perceptions Index 2012 prepared by The Global Coalition against Corruption Transparency International. In Cyprus, corruption constitutes a criminal offence and is regulated by the Penal Code, the Prevention of Corruption Law, and the Public Service Law. A new law has also been enacted, which includes rules on openness and transparency to reduce the opportunities for corruption. Moreover, Cyprus is a member of the Council of Europe’s Multidisciplinary Group on Corruption. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  9   Business  Meeting  Etiquette     Importance  of  Business  Meeting   Cyprus ranks 66 in the Corruption Perceptions Index 2012 prepared by The Global Coalition against Corruption Transparency International. In Cyprus, corruption constitutes a criminal offence and is regulated by the Penal Code, the Prevention of Corruption Law, and the Public Service Law. A new law has also been enacted, which includes rules on openness and transparency to reduce the opportunities for corruption. Moreover, Cyprus is a member of the Council of Europe’s Multidisciplinary Group on Corruption. Business  Meeting  planning   In order to set up an initial business meeting, you should request an appointment in advance by writing to the company and then confirm with a follow-up telephone call or email. After the confirmation, an agenda should be circulated by the host company that outlines the main points of discussion for the meeting. Negotiation  process   Negotiations will not take place during an initial meeting because this is considered too soon in the business relationship. So, it is important to be patient and allow plenty of time for discussions to take place. Cypriots enjoy the art of negotiation and like haggling before a deal is reached.  Meeting  protocol   When meeting, Cypriots usually smile and shake hands while maintaining direct eye contact. On entering the meeting room, you could greet your partners in Greek with ‘kaliméra’ for ‘good morning’ or ‘kalispéra’ for ‘good evening’. At the end of the meeting, you should say goodbye to each person individually. How  to  Run  a  Business  Meeting   You should arrive punctually for a business meeting, but you can expect that you may need to wait for your Cypriot partner to arrive. Your host should introduce you to the other participants at the meeting. You should begin by introducing the company you represent with a brief but complete presentation. During a meeting, be prepared for a flexible approach to the agenda with some changes in the topics to be discussed and allow for frequent interruptions. Follow  up  letter  after  meeting  with  client   businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  10   Negotiations and discussions will normally continue after the meeting, before a partnership is established or a deal reached. You should maintain personal contacts and share as much information as possible about the negotiation or project, in order to nurture the trust of your Cypriot business partner. When the negotiations are finished and if a deal is successfully reached, you should prepare a written contract, which will be strictly followed and respected by your Cypriot partner. Business  meals   It is usual for your Cypriot counterpart to offer you a coffee before the meeting starts or for a break in the discussions, to go outside of the office to a local coffee shop. You should not refuse to drink coffee or tea with your host as this would be considered very impolite. A business meeting can often be followed by a lunch in the office or a dinner at a local restaurant, organised by your Cypriot partner. In traditional local restaurants, there is not always a menu and you should ask your host what they recommend or ask the waiter what they suggest. A popular drink is Cypriot Brandy, which has a good mild taste and Cypriots sometimes drink it sour with lemon squash. Starters typical of the region include ‘Yemista’, which are stuffed vegetables, and the famous ‘Koupepia’ made with stuffed vine-leaves.. Meat dishes are typically in the form of ‘Souvla’ which is cubed pieces of lamb or chicken skewered and grilled, or ‘Shieftalies’, which are small sausages, or ‘Kleftiko’, which is made with lamb or goat wrapped in foil and baked in the oven. A traditional meal can’t be complete without the famous Halloumi, which is a salted semi-firm cheese similar to Feta. Business  Meeting  tips   Throughout Cyprus, you should maintain a high level of professionalism and pay attention to what you are saying, so that you do not inadvertently offend someone. In Northern Cyprus, you should remember to avoid pointing your finger directly at anyone and showing the bottom of your shoes or soles of your feet, if you are not wearing shoes, as such gestures are considered extremely offensive. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  11   Internship  and  placement     Work  experience   There is no national legislation in Cyprus addressing student placements as yet. Placements are available and are organized by the universities, the professional body of architects and engineers, and other stakeholder associations. According to the Passport to Trade 2.0 survey on placements, only 9.5% of Cypriot respondents consider that the existing information on placements is adequate, while 38.1% considered them inadequate and 33% did not have an opinion. The internet and universities are considered the most important sources of information on placement opportunities. Students who are required to complete compulsory placements as part of their studies, which are eligible under the Erasmus programme, can receive support for travelling to other European member countries to complete work or study placements. This is especially beneficial to students, as companies often prefer to recruit employees who have previous work experience, although the lack of it won’t always be an obstacle. For a number of professional degree programmes, placements are a compulsory part of the qualification. Graduates from technical programmes in architecture or engineering must have at least 12 months of practical experience in order to be officially qualified and legally able to work and sign documents, and this is regulated by legislation (the statutes) of the professional body of architects and engineers. Practical work placements are also compulsory for university students who are pursuing education studies, whereby students are placed in elementary or pre-elementary schools in Cyprus to teach for one semester. In Erasmus student placements, monitoring is done by the University, although students have the freedom to arrange their own placements. The present curriculum currently offered by the University of Cyprus does not provide for any industrial training or vocational practice during term-time. So the vast majority of students use the 3-month summer break to complete placements, without conflicting with lessons or examinations. In the University of Cyprus, students are matched with placements by criteria set out by the individual departments, after students submit a ‘Form of Interest’ showing the available host organisations. The originating and host organisations are bound by the Training Agreement, along with the student. Therefore, the work program of the student is predefined and agreed between the three parties before the beginning of each placement. The Training Agreement for placements is equivalent to the Learning Agreement for studies and is an important document for the monitoring of each placement. For summer placements, the Universities Careers Offices are responsible for promoting the program of summer placements both among employers and students. Promotional activity businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •            |  12     may include flyers, leaflets, a webpage and personal contacts. The implementation period is June to August with a minimum and maximum duration of 4 to 10 weeks, respectively. Social  security  and  European  health  insurance   Medical care provided by Government healthcare providers is free of charge in public hospitals and health centres, provided you present a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) and form of identification. However, it is important to note that healthcare provided by any private healthcare providers will not be covered, unless you have additional private medical insurance specifically to cover the services required. Therefore, you should ensure that you are not referred to a private facility without having private insurance in place or the ability to pay the fees on arrival. In the main cities, there are doctors who speak English. Also, it is important to note that the EHIC is not valid in northern Cyprus and visitors will require private medical insurance. Safety   Although Cyprus generally is considered a safe country, there is an underlying threat of terrorism. Millions of foreigners visit Cyprus every year and most visits are trouble-free. Cyprus has a strict policy regarding its tolerance towards drugs. Driving standards are considered poor; therefore, it is recommended that you drive with caution. Generally, it is advised that comprehensive travel and medical insurance should be taken before travelling, especially if travelling to northern Cyprus. • • • The emergency telephone number is 112. The electric voltage in the country is 220 V; 50 Hz Tap water is safe to drink in most of the cities. Do  I  need  a  visa?   Visas are not required for visitors to Cyprus from a list of 58 countries where mutual agreements are in place for up to a maximum stay of 90 days. Also, visas are not required for citizens of the European Union, although students who wish to study or work in Cyprus should acquire the relevant permit from the Civil Archive and Migration Department. Student visas are normally issued for a specific educational institution. Therefore, students who decide to change to another educational institution have to obtain a new residence permit. Internship  and  placement  salary   Student placements may or may not be salaried, depending on the organisation that is sponsoring the placement. In the case of summer placements, students will normally receive a nominal payment, which will vary depending on the employer. The employer is also businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  13   responsible for ensuring that any students are covered by the company’s liability insurance throughout the duration of the placement. Internship  and  placement  accommodation   For accommodation, there are many hotels ranging from large and luxurious to small and simple. There are also youth hostels and camping sites with all the necessary facilities. Foreign students, attending classes at the University of Cyprus, may apply for accommodation to the Housing Office of the University. Students are accommodated in single study bedrooms, either in student apartments near the campus or in student halls of residence. Priority is given to students registered for a full academic year and/or students who submit their housing applications early together with receipts proving deposit payments. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  14   Cost  of  Living     Living in Cyprus can be considered moderately inexpensive, when compared with Western Europe. Cyprus has value-added tax (VAT) equal to 18%, which is automatically added to the cost of goods and services. This tax is not refundable to visitors from within the European Union. Money  and  Banking   The Euro (€) is the Republic of Cyprus’ unit of currency. All major currencies can be exchanged in banks and hotels in Cyprus, although it may be difficult to get change for a €500 note. Traveling  costs   The Euro (€) is the Republic of Cyprus’ unit of currency. All major currencies can be exchanged in banks and hotels in Cyprus, although it may be difficult to get change for a €500 note. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  15   Work-­‐life  Balance     The concept of a work-life balance is a major trend in modern society. However, the ability to achieve such a balance is being put under pressure with the aging society, economic downturn and current trends in family formation. Employment regulations have been implemented in order to reach a better work-life balance, but part-time work is not well developed in Cyprus, like in other new European Union member states. Both men and women report difficulties in finding more time to spend with their family, especially with their children. The family plays a central role in Cypriot social structure, where there are strong ties both within the nuclear family and the extended family. National  holidays   In Cyprus there are public holidays and many other traditional ones. Important public holidays are: 1st January (New Year’s Day), 25th March (Greek Independence Day), 1st May (Labour Day), 1st October (Cyprus Independence Day). There are, another four public holidays on dates which are variable; these are Green Monday (50 days before the Greek Orthodox Easter), Good Friday and Easter Monday (Greek Orthodox Easter), as well as Pentecost. Working  hours   Normal office hours are between 8.30am to 1pm and from 2pm to 5.30pm, although some offices will take a longer lunch break or work shorter days during the summer months. Government offices open between 7.30am to 8.30am and then close between 2.30pm to 3.30pm. Banks are open from 8.30am to 4.45pm on Mondays and from 8.30am to 1pm on Tuesday to Friday. Shops are open from 9am to 7pm on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Friday, closing for lunch at 1pm; and 9am to 1pm on Wednesdays and Saturdays. businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  16   Social  Media  Guide     According to Internet World Stats data in October 2012, there were nearly 600,000 internet users in Cyprus in mid-year 2012, representing more than half of the population. The most frequent group of internet users are students (99.5% of the total student population) and individuals aged between 16 to 24 years old (91.7%). By contrast, only 7.8% of individuals aged between 65 and 74 years old use the internet. Men are using the internet more frequently than women with a percentage of 61.2% and 54.3%, respectively. Internet users in Cyprus are more frequently using the internet to find information about goods or services (90,6%), and sending/receiving e-mails (75.6%) (Statistical Service of the Republic of Cyprus, Report of December 2012). According to Socialbakers, currently, there are 580,920 Facebook users in Cyprus with a 52.68% penetration in terms of the general population and a 99.33% penetration in terms of the current online population. As far as the do’s and don’ts of social media are concerned, available data are limited to a number of surveys conducted over the last years. These surveys show that most Cypriots are relatively conservative in the way they use the internet and share information. More specifically, according to the online survey conducted by the Passport to Trade 2.0 project, most of the respondents suggested that the real first and last name should be used for personal profiles and speaking to people you do not know in real life is generally not acceptable. The majority also think that it is inappropriate to criticize others in abusive terms. In general, users seem to expect that social network providers should provide a trustworthy environment, securing privacy, anonymity, access control, and data usage transparency (Ktoridou et al., 2012). In a recent survey, Ktoridou et al (2012) found that the majority of the people in Cyprus who participated in social media, claimed to be aware of social security risks in general (68.6%), although 15.1% were not aware of such risks and 16.2% did not even know what a security risk was. Contrary to the perceptions examined above, it is impressive that the people in Cyprus who are social media users accept connection requests from complete strangers, showing that university students are willing to add users that they don’t even know into their circle. Search  and  Social  Media  Marketing  for  International  Business   Learn how to use social media for business from one of Salford Business School’s latest business management courses. The course was jointly researched by the Passport to Trade 2.0 project team and prepared in collaboration with some of the leading digital marketing agencies in the UK. This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) can help businesses and individuals to make the best use of search and social media platforms. The course is called Search and Social Media Marketing for International Business and is applicable to students looking for placements businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •            |  17     abroad as well as businesses thinking about new trade links; it comprises the following twelve topics: How to develop a personal brand online (1/12) • • Whether you are a student beginning a job search or a business person planning a new business venture, personal branding can make a difference. Learn about personal branding and why it is important for you. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=l9LYw0mgtn4&feature=player _embedded How to use Twitter (2/12) • • Learn the basics of using Twitter to develop an individual or business profile. Remember to use hash tag #SSMMUoS to share your learning journey on this course so far! http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=9CVY3pp91Dc&feature=playe r_embedded How to use Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) (3/12) • • Learn the principles of SEO to ensure that your website and any social media profiles are found by individuals searching for your name, products and services. These basic principles of SEO include keyword research, on-page optimisation and off-page optimisation. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=zw27cRcwtM0&feature=player _embedded businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •            |  18     How to use social media for international business development (4/12) • • Social media networks break down the traditional country barriers, but do you know which networks are relevant for the country you are interested in trading with? Find out in this video how to identify the relevant networks and what social media strategies you might be able to use on these networks. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=Bx-B56AHS4c&feature= player_embedded How to use Facebook (5/12) • • Facebook is currently the largest social media network in the world and it can benefit you as a business as well as an individual. Learn how to develop a Facebook business page and see how other businesses use it and what strategies work for them. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=UmRGn-vdcO8&feature= player_embedded How to use YouTube (6/12) • • YouTube was identified as the second largest social network amongst younger internet users as part of the Passport to Trade 2.0 project. Learn how to optimise your video content in order to reach wider audiences for your profile. http://www.youtube.com/watch? feature=player_embedded&v=G2 0OVpmTBss How to use LinkedIn (7/12) businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •            |  19     • • LinkedIn is one of the three main professional social networks – the others being Xing and Viadeo which are also popular in several European countries. Learn how to make the most of LinkedIn for your profile. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=N6e_EAUQqic&feature=playe r_embedded How to use Google+ (8/12) • • • Google+ is the second largest social network as of January 2013. It is one of the fastest growing social networks and one that has the biggest impact when it comes to search engine results integration for anyone who uses Google as their main search engine. Learn how to make the most of Google+ for you and your digital profiles. http://www.youtube.com/watch? feature=player_embedded&v=8ti 3SPHkEWw How to use copywriting online (9/12) • • Copywriting is a process of translating technical specifications and product descriptions into engaging and understandable customer focused text. Learn about the basic techniques in structuring your online content here. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=5f1hx_f2ONI&feature=player_ embedded businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus  
  •            |  20     How to stay legal on social media (10/12) • • Everything and anything you do and say online can be potentially viewed by anyone who has internet access. Always respect the law and familiarise yourself with new options offered to you through a creative commons licence which is popular online. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=eQxDpiHsdk&feature=player_embedde d How to use monitoring and reporting (11/12) • • Whether you are an individual or a business spending time on social media – there has to be a return on your engagement online. How do you justify your engagement on social media to your boss? Listen to the industry experts in this area and see what you might be able to measure in respect of your on-line engagements. http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=LbEq7jsG0jg&feature=player_ embedded How to blog (12/12) • • http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=OqVjR7oI8Rs&feature=player _embedded businessculture.org     • Blogging is a process of writing text and sharing content with others. It can help your customers or friends to keep in-touch regardless of social media platforms. Think about the voice you might want to adopt and who your audience might be. Share your thoughts with us by writing a blog post about this MOOC. Tweet us the link to your post on the #SSMMUoS Twitter hash tag. Content  Cyprus  
  •              |  21   Passport  to  Trade  2.0  Project  Partnership   Five Universities: Lead partner: Salford Business School, University of Salford, United Kingdom Elena Vasilieva Aleksej Heinze Alex Fenton URENIO research unit at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece Christina Kakderi Nitsa Papadopoulou TSE Entre Research Centre Turku School of Economics, University of Turku, Finland Satu Aaltonen Elisa Akola Institute for Information System Research University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany Verena Hausmann Susan P. Williams Petra Schubert Valahia University of Targoviste, Romania Adriana Grigorescu Leonardo Badea Three Small & Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) Spin, Italy Carmine Antonio Donato Dorella De Tommaso Technology Development & Innovation – TDI LTD Bulgaria Milanka Slavova Ivan Stoychev TIS Praha, Czech Republic Anna Klosova Richard Adekeye businessculture.org     Content  Cyprus