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MU PR Summer 2011 Syllabus

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  • 1. JOURNALISM 7256 (ONLINE) SUMMER 2011 MISSOURI SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM  INSTRUCTOR  INFORMATION    Saleem  Alhabash,  M.A.   The  best  way  to  communicate  with  me  is  Doctoral  Candidate   through  email.  I  check  my  email  pretty  Missouri  School  of  Journalism   frequently.  If  you  send  me  an  email,   expect  to  receive  a  response  within  48  246  Walter  Williams  Hall   hours.  In  case  of  emergency  or  if  you  have  Phone:  (573)  864-­‐1722   a  critical  issue  that  needs  to  be  addressed  E-­‐mail:  sa334@missouri.edu   immediately,  feel  free  to  contact  me  by  Skype:  Saleem.Alhabash   phone  or  send  an  urgent  (!)  email.  In  Office  hours:   addition,  I’d  be  more  than  happy  to  set-­‐up  By  appointment  only  –  via  phone  or  Skype   a  time  to  talk  by  phone  or  Skype.       COURSE  DESCRIPTION    This  course  provides  an  introduction  to  public  relations  (PR),  a  profession  growing  worldwide  in  size,  scope  and  prominence.  We  will  learn  the  basic  principles  and  theories  of  public  relations,  explore  different  types  of  public  relations  activities  and  strategies,  examine  a  range  of  public  relations  cases,  and  practice  different  types  of  public  relations  planning  and  writing.  This  online  course  is  structured  to  help  engage  students  with  one  another  online  for  a  dynamic  two-­‐way  communication.  Online  communication  in  the  form  of  blogging  or  conversation  threading,  is  highly  encouraged.  I  will  function  more  as  a  mediator/facilitator  to  draw  out  conversation.  
  • 2. 2         THE  ART  OF  PR  The  study  and  practice  of  public  relations  are  grounded  in  persuasion  of  public  opinion  and  image  making.  PR  has  developed  into  a  dynamic,  multi-­‐dimensional  field  that  utilizes  theory  to  inform  the  practice  of  day-­‐to-­‐day  activities  and  long-­‐term  strategic  visions.  There’s  hardly  any  functioning  organization  –  be  it  corporate,  not-­‐for-­‐profit,  or  governmental  –  that  does  not  utilize  public  relations  in  one  way  or  another.  Organizations  depend  on  PR  practitioners  and  managers  to  promote  a  favorable  image  and  maintain  a  strong  reputational  identity  with  its  different  publics.  While  integrated  marketing  campaigns  remain  core  to  the  PR  field,  practitioners  and  managers  also  implement  communication  strategies  for  the  purpose  of  managing  conflicts  and  crises  before  and  as  they  unfold.  The  work  of  PR  practitioners  is  becoming  even  more  complex  with  all  the  technological  advances  we’re  currently  observing.  The  use  of  new  and  social  media  is  becoming  necessary  for  communicating  and  maintaining  relationships  with  an  organization’s  publics.  In  sum,  PR  is  composed  of  many  parts.  It  is  part  media  relations,  part  marketing  and  advertising,  and  part  strategic  management.  For  many  practitioners  and  managers,  PR  is  not  for  the  weary  of  heart,  but  rather  for  the  adrenaline  junkie  that  can  harness  the  art  of  multi-­‐tasking  and  critical  thinking  at  a  moment’s  notice.           COURSE  OBJECTIVES     To  foster  a  deeper  understanding  of  what  public  relations  practitioners  do  and  the  settings  in   which  they  work.     To  develop  an  understanding  of  contemporary  theories  of  public  relations  and  apply  them  to   solving  practical  problems.       To  become  familiar  with  public  relations  functions  such  as  media  relations,  internal   communications,  community  relations,  public  affairs,  issues  management  and  crisis   communications.     To  understand  the  basics  of  public  relations  project  planning  and  develop  components  of  a   communication  plan.     To  improve  your  writing  quality  and  your  ability  to  effectively  target  your  communications.     To  provide  a  forum  for  students  to  discuss  and  apply  public  relations  strategies  and  techniques.            
  • 3. 3       MY  PHILOSOPHY  My  teaching  philosophy  rests  upon  helping  students  in  becoming  professional  strategic  communication  practitioners  and/pr  develop  an  understanding  of  PR’s  role  in  contemporary  organizations.  I  believe  that  education  is  the  sum  of  instructor-­‐student  and  student-­‐student  interactions.  Both  the  instructors  and  students  are  held  responsible  for  making  this  course  a  success,  and  maximizing  their  benefits  and  rewards  from  it.  To  this  end,  I  have  carefully  constructed  the  course  by  selecting  the  latest  and  seminal  practical  and  scholarly  readings  that  will  help  you  in  understanding  the  basics  of  public  relations.  Please  know  that  I  do  value  your  opinions  and  contributions  to  the  course.  I  want  all  students  to  feel  comfortable  in  sharing  their  opinions.  I  believe  the  topic  of  this  course  –  Public  Relations  –  is  inherently  interesting,  and  believe  that,  particularly  in  this  course,  students  have  a  lot  to  contribute.  My  aim  is  to  cultivate  an  atmosphere  where  we  are  all  courteous,  respectful,  and  thoughtful.       READINGS    There  are  two  required  textbooks  for  this  course.  I’ve  also  put  together  a  list  of  additional  readings  (see  below  for  more  details).      REQUIRED  TEXTBOOKS       Title:  Public  Relations  Today:  Managing  Competition  and  Conflict           Authors:  Cameron,  G.;  Wilcox,  D.;  Reber,  B.;  &  Shin,  J.               Edition/Year:  1st  edition  /  October  4,  2007   ISBN:  978-­‐0205492107       Publisher:  Allyn  &  Bacon             Title:  Public  Relations:  Campaigns  and  Techniques:  Building  Bridges  into  the   21st  Century     Authors:  Matera,  F.;  Artigue,  R.           Edition/Year:  2000   ISBN:  0-­‐205-­‐15815-­‐3      
  • 4. 4      ADDITIONAL  READINGS  In  several  weeks,  there  will  be  other  assigned  readings  consisting  of  book  chapters,  scholarly  journal  articles,  and  industry  reports/materials.  All  such  readings  are  posted  on  Blackboard  in  the  “Readings”  section.  They  are  organized  in  folders  according  to  where  they  appear  on  the  course  schedule.      If  you  are  having  any  technical  difficulties  (i.e.  logging  in,  accessing  the  Bulletin  Board,  etc.)  please  contact  the  IAT  Services  Help  Desk  toll-­‐free  at  (573)  882-­‐2000  or  by  e-­‐mail  at  doit@missouri.edu.         EXPECTATIONS    You  are  expected  to  be  prepared  for  and  participate  in  all  online  course  activities  and  complete  assignment  in  a  timely  fashion.  If  you  believe  you  have  a  legitimate  reason  for  non-­‐participation,  it  is  your  responsibility  to  inform  me  IN  ADVANCE.  I  realize  there  may  be  some  weeks  when  the  readings  seem  more  challenging  than  others,  when  your  schedule  is  more  hectic  than  usual  or  when  you  may  be  feeling  under  the  weather.  There  may  also  be  times  when  you  experience  technology  glitches.  Please  contact  me  as  soon  as  possible  to  let  me  know  about  special  situations  or  circumstances.  I  will  try  to  show  some  flexibility  as  long  as  it  does  not  become  a  recurring  or  chronic  issue.           EVALUATION  CRITERIA    Assignments  will  be  graded  under  the  following  scale:       A   The  work  is  rigorous,  creative,  and  shows  a  thorough  knowledge  of  the  materials.  An  excellent   piece  of  work  written  in  a  clear  and  concise  manner.  Few,  if  any,  errors  of  fact  or  writing.   The  work  has  a  few  errors,  but  shows  a  good  effort  at  comprehending  the  material.  Clear,   B   understandable  writing  with  some  care  and  expression  of  knowledge.  Discussion  needs  more   clarity,  more  development  and/or  more  examples.  The  work  may  be  missing  some  of  the   subtleties  of  the  argument.   An  adequate  but  superficial  completion  of  the  assignment.  Few  examples  used  or  discussion   C   or  argument  is  unsubstantiated.  Sources  are  poorly  cited,  many  errors  of  fact,  inadequate   writing  and  grammar.   F   Assignment  not  completed  or  turned  in  extremely  late.    NOTE:  You  are  required  to  submit  all  assignments  on  time.  Late  submission  will  result  in  a  letter-­‐grade  deduction  off  the  top  for  each  late  day.      
  • 5. 5         WEEKLY  LESSON    You  are  expected  to  complete  the  readings  every  week  before  engaging  in  the  activities  designed  for  the  week.  I  will  provide  you  with  weekly  lesson  notes  that  can  be  accessed  through  the  “Lessons”  section  on  Blackboard.  These  lesson  notes  are  designed  to  complement  and  amplify  the  assigned  readings,  not  to  replace  them.         WEEKLY  DISCUSSION  BOARD  POSTINGS     [90  POINTS]   WEEKLY,  WEEKS  2  –  7      The  weekly  discussion  board  postings  are  analogous  to  class  participation  for  on-­‐campus  students,  which  is  a  key  component  of  any  course.  Beginning  with  Week  Two,  you  are  required  to  make  two  (2)  postings  each  week  that  are  all  thoughtful,  well-­‐reasoned  and  well  written.      The  FIRST  POST  should  answer  the  questions  based  on  your  understanding  of  the  readings  and  the  background  research  that  you  have  done  to  expand  on  the  readings  using  real-­‐world  examples  and  cases.  This  post  should  be  around  250-­‐300  words  in  length.  You  are  expected  to  use  the  American  Psychological  Association  (APA)  style  when  referencing  the  readings  and  other  sources.  NOTE  that  sources  like  Wikipedia  and  blogs  are  not  considered  scholarly  sources.  You  won’t  receive  credit  for  late  posting  –  the  interactions  on  the  discussion  board  are  crucial  for  a  successful  course.      The  SECOND  POST  should  be  a  response  to  other  students’  posts.  It  can  be  shorter  than  the  first  post,  yet  needs  to  be  thorough  and  insightful.      IN  GENERAL,  postings  should  react  to  and  expand  upon  the  readings.  You  may  choose  to  summarize  and/or  question  information  that  caught  your  attention.  Add  as  much  as  you  want  to  thread  discussions.  We  learn  best  when  we  engage  in  communication.  The  discussion  board  can  offer  unexpected  findings  or  concepts  requiring  further  clarification.  Postings  of  current  issues  in  the  business  world,  trends  in  the  marketplace,  and  news  reports  are  always  welcomed.  Each  posting  is  expected  to  be  of  excellent  writing  quality,  so  please  check  your  grammar  and  spelling  before  submitting  your  posts.      The  postings  will  start  on  Week  Two  until  Week  Seven,  making  a  total  of  six  postings.        THE  FIRST  POST  IS  DUE  EVERY  MONDAY,  11:30  p.m.  CST    THE  SECOND  POST  IS  DUE  EVERY  WEDNESDAY,  11:30  p.m.  CST    
  • 6. 6    Following  is  the  grading  criteria  for  each  weekly  posting.       FIRST  POST  -­‐  Did  the  post  address  important  points  from  the  readings?  Did  it  show  GRADING  CRITERIA   15  points   depth  of  thinking  and  good  synthesis  of  the  main  ideas  discussed  in  the  readings?   Did  the  post  include  examples  and  ideas  from  other  sources?     SECOND  POST  –  Response  provides  evidence  of  thoughtful  reflection  of  the  issue   5  points   and  addresses  what  you  learned  from  other  students’  postings.  Responses  also   addressed  questions;  invited  others  to  have  their  say;  and  remained  “on  topic.”   TOTAL  POINTS   20  points       ASSIGNMENTS     [90  POINTS]   JUNE  24  &  JULY  15    Throughout  the  semester,  you  will  be  given  THREE  assignments.  In  each  assignment  you  will  be  required  to  answer  some  questions,  analyze  a  specific  case  study,  or  complete  an  assignment  that  is  relevant  to  what  you’ve  learned  in  the  course.  Each  assignment  should  be  typed  single-­‐spaced  in  a  12-­‐point  font  with  1-­‐inch  margins  with  the  student’s  name,  email  address,  and  date  on  the  front  page.  Documents  should  be  saved  in  Word.doc  or  Word.docx.  Save  the  document  with  YOUR  LAST  NAME  (i.e.,  Smith.docx).  The  number  of  pages  should  be  a  maximum  of  2  pages,  single-­‐spaced  (i.e.,  equivalent  to  4  pages,  double-­‐spaced).  Your  written  work  should  be  of  professional  quality;  spelling,  grammar  and  punctuation  count.  Please  make  sure  that  all  of  your  work  is  your  own  and  that  all  sources  of  information  (when  applicable)  –  whether  from  books,  scholarly  journals,  newspapers,  magazines  or  the  Internet  –  are  accurately  quoted  and  attributed.  If  you  are  unsure  how  to  cite  and  attribute  information,  you  may  refer  to  the  APA  writing  and  formatting  style  at:  http://owl.english.purdue.edu/.      Since  public  relations  practitioners  are  held  to  deadlines,  all  assignments  are  due  on  the  specified  date.  Late  assignments  will  be  graded  down  one  grade  per  day.  For  example,  a  paper  that  would  have  received  an  A  had  it  been  turned  in  on  time  would  receive  a  B  if  it  was  turned  in  on  the  following  day  and  a  C  if  it  was  turned  in  two  days  late.      To  turn  in  your  assignments,  go  to  the  Assignments  tab  in  Blackboard.  Click  on  the  link  below  each  assignment’s  title.  Attach  your  Word  document,  add  any  comments  you  may  have,  and  then  click  “submit.”  Please  be  sure  you  click  “submit”  and  not  “save.”  
  • 7. 7         FINAL  PROJECT     [120  POINTS]     JULY  29    The  final  project  for  this  class  consists  of  PR  case  study  presented  in  the  form  of  a  PowerPoint  presentation  (15-­‐18  slides)  and  paper  (maximum  15  pages,  double-­‐spaced).  The  case  study  should  analyze  a  campaign  or  an  organization,  and  highlight  how  the  strategies  and  tactics  used  can  be  applied  to  a  different  situation,  preferably,  your  own  work/organization.  More  details  about  the  components  of  the  final  project  will  be  given  later.  While  your  completed  project  will  not  be  due  until  July  29,  you  should  be  working  on  it  since  the  beginning  of  the  semester.      FINAL  PROJECT  PROPOSAL  [20  points]:  You  are  expected  to  submit  the  topic  and  a  2-­‐page   summary  of  your  final  project  by  Friday,  July  1,  11:30  p.m.  CST.  I  will  offer  feedback,   suggestions  and  critiques  to  help  you  develop  your  idea.    FINAL  PROJECT  [100  points]:  The  final  project,  the  campaign  proposal,  will  be  graded.  You  are   expected  to  submit  the  final  project  by  Friday,  July  29,  11:30  p.m.  CST.       GRADING    GRADING  SCALE   A   90  –  100%   B   80  –  89.99%   C   70  –  79.99%   F   0  –  69.99%    GRADING  RUBRIC  ITEM   POINTS   PERCENTAGE  Weekly  Discussion  Board  Postings  [6  postings  x  15  points]   90  POINTS   30%  ASSIGNMENTS  [3  papers  x  30  points]   90  POINTS   30%  Final  Project  [20  +  100  points]   120  POINTS   40%   TOTAL  POINTS   300  POINTS   100%    
  • 8. 8         COURSE  POLICIES    Academic  Honesty  Academic  honesty  is  fundamental  to  the  activities  and  principles  of  a  university.  All  members  of  the  academic  community  must  be  confident  that  each  persons  work  has  been  responsibly  and  honorably  acquired,  developed  and  presented.  Any  effort  to  gain  an  advantage  not  given  to  all  students  is  dishonest  whether  or  not  the  effort  is  successful.    Academic  misconduct  includes  but  is  not  limited  to  the  following:    Cheating  on  assignments  or  aiding  other  students  to  cheat.  Any  effort  to  gain  an  advantage   not  given  to  all  students  is  dishonest  whether  or  not  the  effort  is  successful.    Stealing  the  intellectual  property  of  others  and  passing  it  off  as  your  own  work  (this  includes   material  found  on  the  Internet).    Failing  to  quote  directly  if  you  use  someone  else’s  words,  and  cite  that  particular  work  and   author.  If  you  paraphrase  the  ideas  of  another,  credit  the  source  with  proper  citation.  Please   ask  your  instructor  if  you  have  questions  about  what  constitutes  plagiarism  or  how  to   correctly  cite  sources.      When  in  doubt  about  plagiarism,  paraphrasing,  quoting  or  collaboration,  consult  with  your  instructor.      Dishonesty  and  Misconduct  Reporting  Procedures  MU  faculty  are  required  to  report  all  instances  of  academic  misconduct  to  the  appropriate  campus  officials.  Allegations  of  classroom  misconduct  will  be  forwarded  immediately  to  MUs  Vice  Chancellor  for  Student  Services.  Allegations  of  academic  misconduct  will  be  forwarded  immediately  to  MUs  Office  of  the  Provost.  In  cases  of  academic  misconduct,  the  student  will  receive  at  least  a  zero  for  the  assignment  in  question.    Professional  Standards  and  Ethics  The  School  of  Journalism  is  committed  to  the  highest  standards  of  academic  and  professional  ethics  and  expects  its  students  to  adhere  to  those  standards.  Students  should  be  familiar  with  the  Code  of  Ethics  of  the  Society  of  Professional  Journalists  and  adhere  to  its  restrictions.  Students  are  expected  to  observe  strict  honesty  in  academic  programs  and  as  representatives  of  school-­‐related  media.  Should  any  student  be  guilty  of  plagiarism,  falsification,  misrepresentation  or  other  forms  of  dishonesty  in  any  assigned  work,  that  student  may  be  subject  to  a  failing  grade  from  the  instructor  and  such  disciplinary  action  as  may  be  necessary  under  University  regulations.    
  • 9. 9    University  of  Missouri-­‐Columbia  Notice  of  Nondiscrimination  The  University  of  Missouri  System  is  an  Equal  Opportunity/  Affirmative  Action  institution  and  is  nondiscriminatory  relative  to  race,  religion,  color,  national  origin,  sex,  sexual  orientation,  age,  disability  or  status  as  a  Vietnam-­‐era  veteran.  Any  person  having  inquiries  concerning  the  University  of  Missouri-­‐Columbias  compliance  with  implementing  Title  VI  of  the  Civil  Rights  Act  of  1964,  Title  IX  of  the  Education  Amendments  of  1972,  Section  504  of  the  Rehabilitation  Act  of  1973,  the  Americans  With  Disabilities  Act  of  1990,  or  other  civil  rights  laws  should  contact  the  Assistant  Vice  Chancellor,  Human  Resource  Services,  University  of  Missouri-­‐Columbia,  130  Heinkel  Building,  Columbia,  Mo.  65211,  (573)  882-­‐4256,  or  the  Assistant  Secretary  for  Civil  Rights,  U.S.  Department  of  Education.    Accommodations  If  you  have  special  needs  as  addressed  by  the  Americans  with  Disabilities  Act  and  need  assistance,  please  notify  me  immediately.  The  school  will  make  reasonable  efforts  to  accommodate  your  special  needs.  Students  are  excused  for  recognized  religious  holidays.  Please  let  me  know  in  advance  if  you  have  a  conflict.    ADA  Compliance  If  you  have  special  needs  as  addressed  by  the  Americans  with  Disabilities  Act  (ADA)  and  need  assistance,  please  notify  the  Office  of  Disability  Services,  S5  Memorial  Union,  882-­‐4696,  or  the  course  instructor  immediately.    Reasonable  efforts  will  be  made  to  accommodate  your  special  needs.    Religious  Holidays  Students  are  automatically  excused  for  recognized  religious  holidays.  Let  your  instructor  know  in  advance  if  you  have  a  conflict.    Intellectual  Pluralism  The  University  community  welcomes  intellectual  diversity  and  respects  student  rights.  Students  who  have  questions  concerning  the  quality  of  instruction  in  this  class  may  address  concerns  to  either  the  Departmental  Chair  or  Divisional  leader  or  Director  of  the  Office  of  Students  Rights  and  Responsibilities  (http://osrr.missouri.edu/).  All  students  will  have  the  opportunity  to  submit  an  anonymous  evaluation  of  the  instructor(s)  at  the  end  of  the  course.  
  • 10. 10         TENTATIVE  SCHEDULE    This  is  a  tentative  schedule,  which  is  subject  to  change.  Changes  will  be  announced  either  through  Blackboard  announcements  or  emails.  Please  make  sure  you  check  the  class  Blackboard  site  and  your  email  daily.      Since  this  is  an  8-­‐week  course,  the  schedule  is  relatively  packed.  Each  week,  you  are  required  to  read  about  four  to  six  (4-­‐6)  book  chapters  or  articles.  Make  sure  you  complete  the  readings  before  Monday.      ABBREVIATION  KEY:  CAMERON  ET  AL   Public  Relations  Today:  Managing  Competition  and  Conflict  MATERA  &  ARTIGUE   Public  Relations;  Campaigns  and  Techniques:  Building  Bridges  into  the  21st  Century    WEEK  1   JUNE  6  –  10     DEFINING  PR!   FOCUS    Public  relations  defined    What  PR  can  and  cannot  accomplish    Historical  origins  of  PR    PR  role  in  organizations    Overview  of  PR  practitioners  and  their  work    State  of  the  profession  today    PR  ethics  and  legal  issues   READINGS    CAMERON  ET  AL  –  Chapters  1,  3,  4,  &  7    MATERA  &  ARTIGUE,  Chapter  3    NPR  story  on  Bernays    PRSA  Code  of  Ethics    Check  out:  PRmuseum.com     ASSIGNMENT   Virtual  Class  Introductions  |  MONDAY,  JUNE  6  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    WEEK  2   JUNE  13  –  17       INTERNAL  VS.  EXTERNAL  COMMUNICATION   FOCUS    Identifying  internal  stakeholders  and  understanding  their  importance    Internal  communication  strategies  and  techniques    Identifying  and  prioritizing  external  stakeholders    External  communication  strategies  and  techniques    Developing  and  using  key  messages    Community  relations  and  philanthropy    Reputation  management  and  enhancement   READINGS    MATERA  &  ARTIGUE,  Chapters  7  &  8    LATTIMORE  ET  AL.,  Chapters  10  &  11  (on  Blackboard)    Ketchum  –  Corp.  Tackle  world’s  woes  (on  Blackboard)    SINGH  ET  AL.,  2007  (  on  Blackboard)   ASSIGNMENT    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #1.1  |  MONDAY,  JUNE  13  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #1.2  |  WEDNESDAY,  JUNE  15  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    ASSIGNMENT  #  1:  BUSINESS  MEMO  |  FRIDAY,  JUNE  17  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    
  • 11. 11      WEEK  3   JUNE  20  –  24         MEDIA  RELATIONS  &  COMMUNICATION  PLANNING   FOCUS    The  changing  media  landscape    Roles  of  journalists  vs.  PR  practitioners    Agenda-­‐building    Media  relations  tools  and  tips  for  working  with  journalists    Components  and  structure  of  a  communication  plan    Strategies  and  tactics    Budgeting  and  implementation   READINGS    CAMERON  ET  AL,  Chapters  5  &  6    MATERA  &  ARTIGUE,  Chapter  4   Press  release  writing  links  [REFER  TO  THESE  LINKS  FOR  NEXT  WEEK’S  ASSIGNMENT]    http://www.press-­‐release-­‐writing.com/press-­‐release-­‐template/    http://www.pressrelease365.com/how-­‐to-­‐write-­‐a-­‐press-­‐release.htm   ASSIGNMENT    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #2.1  |  MONDAY,  JUNE  20  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #2.2  |  WEDNESDAY,  JUNE  22  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    WEEK  4   JUNE  27  –  JULY  1         PUBLIC  AFFAIRS  &  CRISIS  COMMUNICATION   FOCUS    Building  and  maintaining  relationships  with  government  officials    Predicting  and  managing  issues    Importance  and  relevance  of  crisis  communication    Developing  and  testing  a  crisis  communication  plan    Measuring  and  rebuilding  reputation   READINGS    TENCH  ET  AL  (on  Blackboard)    CAMERON  ET  AL,  Chapter  2    COOMBS  1998  (on  Blackboard)    Langford  2005  (on  Blackboard)   ASSIGNMENT    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #3.1  |  MONDAY,  JUNE  27  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #3.2  |  WEDNESDAY,  JUNE  29  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    ASSIGNMENT  #2:  PRESS  RELEASES  |  FRIDAY,  JULY  1  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    FINAL  PROJECT  PROPOSAL  |  FRIDAY,  JULY  1  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    WEEK  5   JULY  4  –  8         MARKETING  COMMUNICATION  &  OTHER  ROLES   FOCUS    PR  in  the  marketing  mix    Positioning  a  product/service,  launching  a  new  project/service,  giving  new  life  to  an   older  product/service    Addressing  globalization  and  cultural  dynamics    Corporate  social  responsibility    Cause-­‐related  marketing    Investor  relations    Campaigns   READINGS    CAMERON  ET  AL,  Chapters  10,  11,  &  12    MATERA  &  ARTIGUE,  Chapter  9    FREEDMAN  2006  (on  Blackboard)   ASSIGNMENT    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #4.1  |  TUESDAY,  JULY  5  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #4.2  |  THURSDAY,  JULY  7  by  11:30  p.m.  CST  
  • 12. 12      WEEK  6   JULY  11  -­‐  15   GETTIN’  SOCIAL  WITH  PUBLIC  RELATIONS   FOCUS    The  new  ways  of  delivering  PR  messages    Blogs,  wikis  and  podcasts    Social  media,  social  network  sites,  and  video  games    Web  conferences    Grassroots  and  viral  PR   READINGS    CAMERON  ET  AL,  Chapter  9    DE  BLASIO  2007  (on  Blackboard)    GILLIN  &  SHWARTZMAN  2011,  Chapters  1  &  2    SMITH  ET  AL  2011,  Chapters  1  &  2   ASSIGNMENT    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #5.1  |  MONDAY,  JULY  11  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #5.2  |  WEDNESDAY,  JULY  13  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    ASSIGNMENT  #3:  SOCIAL  MEDIA  CAMPAIGN  |  FRIDAY,  JULY  15  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    WEEK  7   JULY  18  –  22     THEORIZING  ABOUT  PUBLIC  RELATIONS   FOCUS    How  theory  can  help  inform  PR  practice    Adjustment  and  adaptation  model    Matching  messages,  channels  and  audiences    Understanding  publics  and  public  opinion   READINGS    MATERA  &  ARTIGUE,  Chapter  5    OKAY  &  OKAY,  Chapter  18  (on  Blackboard)    CURTIN  &  RHODENBAUGH  2001  (on  Blackboard)    KIOUSIS  &  XU  2008  (on  Blackboard)   ASSIGNMENT    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #6.1  |  MONDAY,  JULY  18  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    BLACKBOARD  POSTING  #6.2  |  WEDNESDAY,  JULY  20  by  11:30  p.m.  CST    WEEK  8   JULY  25  -­‐  29     WORK  ON  FINAL  PROJECTS   FOCUS    Work  on  final  projects   READINGS    NO  READINGS   ASSIGNMENT    FINAL  PROJECT  |  MONDAY,  JULY  29  by  11:30  p.m.  CST