• Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
266
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Q: Write a memorandum for the President making a specific policy proposal.   Explain why you think it is important, what issues it raises, and why you think the  President should support your proposal.  Please limit your memo to 500 words.        To:   Mr. Barack Obama, President of the United States  From:  Sajjad Jaffer, a newly naturalized American    SUBJECT: FIXING THE AMERICAN BRAIN DRAIN    Compelling research shows that with enhanced global communication, US  companies and innovators are shifting from relying solely on knowledge existing  within organizations to connecting with outside sources that can be accessed  worldwide.  In a networked economy, the internet is increasingly rendering  irrelevance to physical borders and organizational silos.     Our immigration policies have not kept up with this reality.  The flaws identified  below show that they are designed to support brain drain and job losses while  attracting and retaining low value immigrants at the expense of American  taxpayers:    FLAW #1: ADVERSE SELECTION  There are 1 million skilled workers on temporary work visas (H1‐B) awaiting  conversion to permanent resident status, currently capped at 120,000 per year.1    Rather than wait a decade for this conversion, during which they are restricted from  switching jobs, the smart, young ones with advanced degrees are leaving for better  opportunities in India and China.  If they have been educated at US universities on  fellowship grants, we have in effect, subsidized India and China’s economies.  One can only speculate the value of an immigrant who is willing to wait for 10 years  while stuck in a single job.    FLAW #2: DOMESTIC INNOVATION V. JOB EXPORTS  In 2007, 5 of the top 6 users of the H1‐B program were Indian outsourcing  companies.  Most of their employees are deputed to the US on temporary work  assignments with no intent of ever setting roots here.  Meanwhile, domestic innovators such as Google are number 16 on this list and our  oldest university, Harvard, is at number 70.                                                           1 Wadhwa, 2007b 
  • 2. FLAW #3: DIVERSITY SANS MERITOCRACY  The Diversity Immigrant visa (DV) program offers 50,000 green cards annually to  randomly selected persons from countries with low rates of immigration to the US,  paying no attention to exceptional skills or economic contribution potential.    RECOMMENDATIONS  1. Award green cards to foreigners educated at US universities upon  graduation, bypassing the H1‐B probationary process, subject to security and  background checks.  They should repay their entire subsidized grants and  fellowships should they decide to forfeit their US residency for opportunities  abroad.     2. Institute a Singapore style system whereby preference for green cards are  given to individuals making at least $75,000 per year consistently over 5  years to ensure retention of high value taxpayers.  Alternative criteria could  include number of patents filed or number of jobs created over this period.    3. Eliminate the Diversity Immigrant (DV) program in its entirety.    4. Create a separate visa class for outsourcing firms so that their quotas do not  compete with companies looking to fill jobs domestically.    Skilled immigrants matter to the health and dynamism of our economy, as has been  repeatedly stated by our nation’s leading CEOs.  They have started over 50% of  Silicon Valley’s companies and have contributed to more than 25% of our global  patents.2  Immigrant founded companies have created 450,000 high tech jobs  contributing $52 billion in revenues.3  Mr. President, implementing these meritocratic recommendations will ensure jobs,  tax dollars, and patents are retained within our shores rather than lost to our global  competitors.       (Sources:  Excluded due to space limits.  Available upon request)                                                             2 Wadhwa, 2009  3 Wadhwa, 2007a 
  • 3. Sources  2009, A Ponzi Scheme that Works. The Economist    2010, Will China Achieve Science Supremacy?  The New York Times    Barrett, Craig, 2006, America Should Open its Doors Wide to Foreign Talent.  Financial  Times    Chesbrough, Henry, 2003, Open Innovation.  Harvard Business School Press    Fallows, James, 2010, How America can Rise Again. The Atlantic    Friedman, Thomas L., 2010, Is China an Enron? (Part 2). The New York Times    Hagell III, John, and Seely Brown, John, 2005, The Only Sustainable Edge: Why  Business Strategy Depends on Productive Friction and Dynamic Specialization.  Harvard University Press    Hagell III, John, and Seely Brown, John, 2005, Innovation Blowback: Disruptive  Management Practices from Asia. McKinsey Quarterly    Hagell III, John, Seely Brown, John and Davison, Lang, 2009, Measuring the Forces of  Long Term Change: The 2009 Shift Index. Deloitte Center for the Edge    Immelt, Jeffrey, et al, 2009, How GE is Disrupting Itself.  Harvard Business Review    LaFraniere, Sharon, 2010, Fighting Trend, China is Luring Scientists Home.  The New  York Times    Levensohn, Pascal, 2009, Innovation at Risk­ The Impact of the Capital Markets Crisis  on the Next Generation of American Emerging Growth Companies.  Levensohn  Venture Partners    Palmisano, Samuel, 2006, The Globally Integrated Enterprise.  Foreign Affairs, Vol.  85, Number 3    Porter, Alan L. et al, 2009, International High Tech Competitiveness: Does China Rank  # 1?  Technology Analysis and Strategic Management, Vol. 21, no. 2, 173‐193    Saxenian, AnnaLee, 2006, The New Argonauts: Regional Advantage in a Global  Economy.   Harvard University Press    Tapscott, Dan and Williams, Dan, 2006, Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration  Changes Everything. Portfolio Hardcover    Wadhwa, Vivek, 2007a, Open Doors Wider for Skilled Immigrants. Businessweek
  • 4.   Wadhwa, Vivek, 2007b, The Reverse Brain Drain. Businessweek    Wadhwa, Vivek, 2009, Why Skilled Immigrants are Leaving the US. Businessweek    Wadhwa, Vivek et al, 2009, America’s Loss is the World’s Gain. Duke University, UC  Berkeley, Harvard Law School, and Kauffman Foundation         
  • 5.