critical suburbs

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critical suburbs

  1. 1. Critical Urban Areas Initiative v@w, March 2007
  2. 2. Critical Areas Initiative <ul><li>It’s a National Program led by Land Planning and Cities Secretary of State and an intrument of City Policy. </li></ul><ul><li>It intends to intervene in neighbourhoods that present critical vulnerabilities and aims integrated socio-territorial interventions </li></ul><ul><li>It started with an experimental phase in three territories (Cova da Moura – Amadora; Lagarteiro – Porto and Vale da Amoreira – Moita). </li></ul><ul><li>Seven ministries are involved (presidential, environment, labour and social security, internal affairs, health, education and culture). </li></ul>
  3. 3. Six Main Principles <ul><li>mobilizing projects expected to have structural impacts </li></ul><ul><li>integrated projects with a socio-territorial base </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation -driven interventions </li></ul><ul><li>strategic coordination and participation of local actors </li></ul><ul><li>mobilizing new ways of financing / integrated financing mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>sustainability and durability of the results and effects. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Talking about... <ul><li>a step forward in a territorial approach and sustainable communities in Portugal’s city policy </li></ul><ul><li>an experimental initiative on three territories (three different critical areas) </li></ul><ul><li>building a transversal participation process </li></ul><ul><li>14 months on a shared path of learning towards establishing a Community of Practice (CoP’s). </li></ul>
  5. 5. In CD we talk about... <ul><li>social, economic, cultural factors related to </li></ul><ul><li>the ‘production’ of the territories </li></ul><ul><li>(people, space and time) and their ‘ways of </li></ul><ul><li>living’ </li></ul>The relational dimension of approaches in Communities Development <ul><li>policies, policy instruments, planning and </li></ul><ul><li>evaluation, designing solutions ( why and </li></ul><ul><li>what for ) </li></ul><ul><li>solutions to make it operational </li></ul><ul><li>( how , skills ) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Talking about... <ul><li>Places </li></ul><ul><li>Organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Power </li></ul>
  7. 7. Talking about... generative relational processes in the social ‘production’ of Places Organizations as crucial actors in the social action system multiplying Power by sharing Power and learning from the Power of territories (proximity)
  8. 8. Challenges: <ul><li>How to involve different actors (inter-ministerial, local organizations and communities) in order to shift the focus of the action to the territory </li></ul><ul><li>How to move from a sum of sectoral interventions to a territorial (area, place,...) focused intervention </li></ul><ul><li>How to intervene in order to make desirable and effective changes to lives of residents </li></ul><ul><li>How to do all these things to ensure the generative relational processes are dynamic </li></ul>
  9. 9. Steps: <ul><li>Procedures for the Action Plan (who will be engaged, doing what, how it will work, milestones, expected outputs) </li></ul><ul><li>Identification of groups of local partners that can be involved and selection of technical staff to support partners groups </li></ul><ul><li>Launching of building up participative action plans, financial engineering and action management model </li></ul><ul><li>Partners Agreements: Preparation and formalization </li></ul><ul><li>Launching the action </li></ul>
  10. 10. Who is involved? Local Work Group LPG’s LPG – Local partners Group ITW ITW – Inter-Ministerial Team work TSG’s HNI EG HNI – Housing National Institute EG – Expert Group TSG – Technical Support Group FP FP – Financial partners SLAU SLAU – Strategic local action Unit
  11. 11. LOCAL MANAGEMENT MODEL (intervention stage) Project’s Local Teams Executive Commission Inter-ministerial Working Group Technical Support Group Monitoring Commission
  12. 12. Lessons (so far...) <ul><li>confidence and trust building – “faces” and commitments </li></ul><ul><li>permanent reification of locus decision (LPG) and validation of all decisions </li></ul><ul><li>technical support and recognizing other skills within groups </li></ul><ul><li>exchanging information and reflection + sharing seminars </li></ul><ul><li>“ a good diagnosis” as a basis to focus the territories’ action plans </li></ul><ul><li>breakthrough thinking to promote innovation and change </li></ul><ul><li>timing and rhythms in the participatory process </li></ul><ul><li>to promote a model of organization and management that is action-driven and not funding-driven </li></ul>
  13. 13. Skills and learning process <ul><li>Sharing values and caring for differences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diversity of experiences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharing values and rules </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Central and local actors meeting together </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Formal and informal positions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To include skills as a starting point to action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>To build a common vision </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>From a focus on target groups to a focus on target areas </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>From a focus on organisations to a focus on the community </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Join forces to build networks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Include risk and uncertainty in local dynamics </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Different actors…. <ul><li>Acting at different scales </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing different levels of experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing different levels of responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>With different sources of resources </li></ul><ul><li>With different locus of control regarding the resources </li></ul>
  15. 15. Sustainable Communities (Bristol, 2005) Sustainable Communities are places where people want to live and work, now and in the future They demand skills for their leadership “ Place-making” Skills (technical, administrative, governance-related and others) <ul><li>Territorial Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Community Commitment </li></ul><ul><li>Partnership Work </li></ul><ul><li>Project Management </li></ul><ul><li>Community governance system </li></ul><ul><li>Cross-fertilisation related work </li></ul>Sustainable Communities Participated and well lead Well equiped (infrastructures) With good services Environmental friendly Well designed and built Fair for all Creative and innovative Active, inclusive and secure
  16. 16. Sustainable Communities (Bristol, 2005) New Capacities | Basic skills <ul><li>... inclusive vision </li></ul><ul><li>... project management </li></ul><ul><li>... leadership </li></ul><ul><li>... breakthrough thinking </li></ul><ul><li>... team work | partnership work (within and among teams based on purposes) </li></ul><ul><li>... remove obstacles | “make things happen” </li></ul><ul><li>... managing processes | managing change </li></ul>Sustainable Communities Participated and well lead Well equiped (infrastructures) With good services Environmental friendly Well designed and built Fair for all Creative and innovative Active, inclusive and secure
  17. 17. New Capacities | Basic skills Sustainable Communities (Bristol, 2005) 8. ... financial management 9. ... stakeholders management 10. ... analysis, decision-making, learning through mistakes, evaluation 11. ... communication 12. ... conflict resolution 13. ... pay attention to “endusers” and assure feedback Sustainable Communities Participated and well lead Well equiped (infrastructures) With good services Environmental friendly Well designed and built Fair for all Creative and innovative Active, inclusive and secure
  18. 18. One structured bricolage... Colective and integrated practices of intervention ... made with different actors... ... in the co-production of commitments... ... in networking! Starting-point!
  19. 19. <ul><li>that adds... </li></ul><ul><li>... to improvement, vision (to be built together) </li></ul><ul><li>... to answers, questions (... they were always the best way to get good answers!) </li></ul><ul><li>... to planning, monitoring (in a sustainable collective learning sense) </li></ul><ul><li>... to instruments, action (in a community of practice, in a network, in a compromise...) </li></ul>One structured bricolage... Colective and integrated practices of intervention
  20. 20. <ul><li>... act at different levels </li></ul><ul><li>... have different experiences </li></ul><ul><li>... share different levels of responsabilities </li></ul><ul><li>... have different sources / types of resources </li></ul><ul><li>... have different levels of resource control </li></ul>... Made with different actors who... A bricolage Colective and integrated practices of intervention
  21. 21. ... in a co-production of commitments that involves... A structuring bricolage is done with different actors Colective and integrated practices of intervention <ul><li>Sharing values and respecting differences (ethics dimension) </li></ul><ul><li>Building rules that will lead the action (e.g.: locus of decision, defining proceedings, timing and responsibilities) </li></ul><ul><li>Co-operation between central, regional and local actors </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Con-versive’ capacity between formal and informal positions </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Building the shared vision to be the action’s starting point </li></ul><ul><li>Shifting the focus from “target-groups” to “places” or “territories” </li></ul><ul><li>Shifting the focus from each “organization” to “communities” </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporating Risk and Uncertainty in the capacity of action </li></ul>... in a co-production of commitments that envolves... A structuring bricolage is done with different actors Colective and integrated practices of intervention
  23. 23. ... in networking! ... It’s not enough to choose partners... all partners must choose the intervention project at stake ... Building the action identity (good diagnosis | vision sharing | co-production of the action programme) ... Managing different moments (timing) and drawing attention to the “cues” (orchestra effect!) Colective and integrated practices of intervention One structured bricolage made with differents actors, in the co-production of compromises...
  24. 24. ... in networking! ... Proximity is a co-production of action arguments (pay attention to the left-out, stand-out, left-behind and stand-behind!) ... Management of risk, of uncertainty, of conflicts ... Generativity, creativity and innovation (potentialities and small steps count too!!!!!!) Colective and integrated practices for intervention One structured bricolage made with differents actors, in a co-production of compromises...
  25. 25. For debate... Considering the multiplicity of actors involved in these processes, with a performance at different levels, different degrees of responsibilities, different types of resources and ways of controlling them...
  26. 26. For debate... <ul><li>How to build the bridge between principles and fundamental ethical values and technical skills? </li></ul><ul><li>What skills can be expected to be enhanced when individual and collective processes (of groups, organizations, community) of empowerment are developed? </li></ul><ul><li>How does knowledge (formal and informal) and the agents enhancing capacity building articulate to deal with information and skills gaps in order to face inadequate responses to the new actors and new challenges set by generative action systems? </li></ul>
  27. 27. Thank You!!!!

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