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Dr Neil Jacobs, JISC: Open publishing - its future and what it offers you as a researcher

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  • 1. Open publishing: its future and what it offers you as a researcher
    Dr Neil Jacobs
  • 2. What is “open”?
    Permissions
    Cost
    Time
  • Why might you care?
    Swan, A. (2010) The Open Access citation advantage: Studies and results to date. Technical Report , School of Electronics & Computer Science, University of Southampton. http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/18516/
  • 6. Is this convincing?
    A General OA Advantage: the advantage that comes from citable articles becoming available to audiences that had not had access to them before, and who would find them citable
    An Early Advantage: the earlier an article is put before its worldwide potential audience may affect subsequent citation patterns
    A Selection Bias: authors make their better articles Open Access more readily than their poorer articles
    A Quality Advantage: better articles gain more from the General OA Advantage because they are by definition more citable than poorer articles
    `
  • 7. Why might Oxford care?
    Widespread use of repositories gives:
    £115m p.a. efficiency savings (mainly researchers saving time in reading / writing)
    £172m p.a. benefits to the UK economy (innovation, improved practice)
    Cost-benefit ratios (depending on assumptions) up to 50:1 and more
    (before any potential subscription cancellations)
    Bibliometrics... Impact... Reporting... Planning...
    REF
    Research Councils mandates, reporting
    (Houghton, J, et al, 2009, Economic implications of alternative scholarly publishing models: Exploring the costs and benefits: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/reports/2009/economicpublishingmodelsfinalreport.aspx)
  • 8. Is this convincing?
    Issues with the transition to OA
    Funding OA publishing
    Transparency in payments
    Practical arrangements
    Getting researchers to put papers into repositories!
    What would it take?
    Need to be much clearer about how benefits arise to UKplc
    Future of learned societies reliant on subscription income
    Longer term future of publishing – data, blogs, facebook...
  • 9. How to be open: 1. doctoral theses
    Electronic management, submission and sharing of theses
    Real need for an opt-out in some cases...
    But also red herrings...
    UK E-Thesis Service – EThOS
    Theses harvested from Oxford’s repository
    Theses digitised if not available electronically
    UK service, but part of wider European and international network
  • 10. How to be open: 2. research papers
    Put your papers in Oxford’s repository ORA
    Papers will feature in Google Scholar, EconomistsOnline, etc, and be easily accessible by the people you want to read and cite them
  • 11. How to be open: 2. research papers
    ora.ouls.ox.ac.uk
  • 12. How to be open: 2. research papers
    Put your papers in Oxford’s repository ORA
    Papers will feature in Google Scholar, Econlit, etc, and be easily accessible by the people you want to read and cite them
    Publish in an Open Access Journal.
    185 journals in business and management and 143 journals in economics
    Funding from Research Councils – need to include in project bids
  • 13. How to be open: 2. research papers
    www.doaj.org
  • 14. How to be open: 2. research papers
    Put your papers in Oxford’s repository ORA
    Papers will feature in Econlit
    Publish in an Open Access Journal.
    185 journals in business and management and 143 journals in economics
    Funding from Research Councils – need to include in project bids
    Working papers from the following organisations are already available via Repec:
    Saïd Business School
    Department of Economics
    Nuffield College
    Nuffield Centre for Experimental Social Sciences
    Centre for the Study of African Economies
    Queen Elizabeth House
  • 15. What about copyright?
    It’s yours!
    Many publishers ask you to give it to them when you publish papers
    to develop electronic publications and their delivery to meet customer needs and create maximum dissemination of authors' work.
    to protect authors' moral rights and their work from plagiarism, unlawful copying and any other infringement of copyright.
    to recoup copyright fees from reproduction rights organizations to reinvest in new initiatives and author/user services
    to provide an efficient service for permissions.
    But if you no longer own your work, then there are limits on what you can do with it, in particular
    Can you put it on the web for others to read?
  • 16. What about copyright?
    www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/
  • 17. What about copyright?
    It’s yours!
    Many publishers ask you to give it to them when you publish papers
    to develop electronic publications and their delivery to meet customer needs and create maximum dissemination of authors' work.
    to protect authors' moral rights and their work from plagiarism, unlawful copying and any other infringement of copyright.
    to recoup copyright fees from reproduction rights organizations to reinvest in new initiatives and author/user services
    to provide an efficient service for permissions.
    But if you no longer own your work, then there are limits on what you can do with it, in particular
    Can you put it on the web for others to read?
    There are alternatives
  • 18. What about copyright?
    http://copyrighttoolbox.surf.nl
  • 19. What about copyright?
  • 20. How to be open: 2. research papers
    You can probably make your research papers openly available, by:
    Putting them in ORA
    check SherpaRoMEO for your rights
    Publishing in an open access journal (get funding for this)
    Check DOAJ for open access journals
    • In either case, you may want to publish using a “licence to publish” rather than handing over your copyright.
    • 21. And you may want to ask your repository manager and/or publisher for:
    • 22. Detailed usage statistics – who has downloaded your papers?
    • 23. Detailed citation statistics – who has cited your papers?
  • How to be open: 3. monographs
    Important because they are disappearing..
    And that changes scholarship...
    But more complex because
    Business models are different
    Less funding, especially in arts, humanities and social sciences
    Electronic-only has been difficult (but Kindle changes that?)
    Nevertheless, pilots underway
    Negotiate with your publisher for some rights
  • 24. How to be open: 4. data
    Legally
    Whose is it? (and what does that mean?)
    In some cases, consent issues
    Freedom of Information and equivalent regulations for environmental data
    Research practice
    Researchers have rights to derive results and papers from their data
    But there is are both research and public benefits in some data being more widely available
    Policy initiatives
    Research Councils agreeing a common position; data management plans...
    Data.gov.uk
    Infrastructure
    Universities are developing significant capacity
    (inter)national, eg UK Data Archive, NERC Data Centres, EBI
  • 25. Open Science?
    ?? Research communication is changing, part of much wider changes in the ways in which research is done
    Open notebook science, sharing data live, as it is collected
    Publish in open formats for tools (egtextmining)
    Open Access journals and repositories
    Open peer commentary, annotation, tagging
    Open innovation models with more permissive IPR models
    Only publish a summary report of the research
    Publish in PDF for human readers
    Subscription-based journals
    Anonymous peer review
    Relations with commercial sector via consultancies and joint projects with closed IPR model
    ?
    Neil Jacobs: n.jacobs@jisc.ac.uk

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