Climate change policy drought

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Presentation made to state level officers at Dr MCR HRD IAP, by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy

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  • Biochar is a part of the solution for cotton crop sustainable cultivation, there is a need to create large scale awareness among the farmers to continue traditional best practices of Biochar application and also adopt appropriate best technologies for improving the fertility of the soils and their sustainability.
  • Climate change policy drought

    1. 1. Drought Risk Mitigation and Management <br />09 Aug’11<br />Climate Change and Drought Scientific and Policy Issues<br />Dr. N. SaiBhaskarReddy<br />Chief Executive Officer [CEO], <br />GEOECOLOGY ENERGY ORGANISATION [GEO] <br />http://e-geo.org<br />_______________________________<br />Center for Disaster Preparedness (CDP)<br />Dr. MCR HRD Institute of AP<br />
    2. 2. Climate Changes in India<br />Increase in surface temperature by 0.4 degree C over the past century. <br />Warming trend along the west coast, in central India, the interior peninsula, and northeastern India. <br />Cooling trend in northwest India and parts of South India.<br />Regional monsoon variations: increased monsoon seasonal rainfall along the west coast, northern Andhra Pradesh and North-western India, decreased monsoon seasonal rainfall over eastern Madhya Pradesh, North-eastern India, and parts of Gujrat and Kerala.<br />
    3. 3. Climate Changes in India<br />Observed trends of multi-decadal periods of more frequent droughts, followed by less severe droughts. <br />Studies have shown a rising trend in the frequency of heavy rain events and decrease in frequency of moderate events over central India from 1951 to 2000. <br />Records of coastal tide gauges in the north Indian ocean for the last 40 years has revealed an estimated sea level rise between 1.06-1.75 mm per year. <br />The available monitoring data on Himalayan glaciers indicates recession of some glaciers.<br />3<br />
    4. 4. Per-capita Carbon –dioxide emission (Metric Tons)<br />
    5. 5. Impacts of Climate Changes<br />Water resources<br />Agriculture and food production<br />Health<br />Forests<br />Coastal areas <br />Vulnerability to extreme events<br />Bioenergy<br />Livelihoods<br />Environment<br />Economy<br />Ecology<br />5<br />
    6. 6. National Action Plan for Climate Change (NAPCC) <br />Protecting the poor and vulnerable sections of society through sustainable development sensitive to climate change<br />Achieving national growth objectives through a qualitative change in direction, ecological sustainability, mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.<br />Efficient and cost effective strategies for end use Demand side Management.<br />Technologies for adaptation and mitigation of greenhouse gases emissions.<br />Promote sustainable development - Regulatory and voluntary mechanisms <br />6<br />
    7. 7. Core of NAPCC - National Missions<br />National Solar Mission:TheNAPCC aims to promote the development and use of solar energy for power generation and other uses with the ultimate objective of making solar competitive with fossil-based energy options.<br />National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency: Current initiatives are expected to yield savings of 10,000 MW by 2012.<br />National Mission on Sustainable Habitat: To promote energy efficiency as a core component of urban planning. <br />National Water Mission: With water scarcity projected to worsen as a result of climate change, the plan sets a goal of a 20% improvement in water use efficiency through pricing and other measures.<br />These National Missions are being institutionalized by the respective Ministries/ Departments.<br />
    8. 8. Core of NAPCC - National Missions<br />National Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem: The plan aims to conserve biodiversity, forest cover, and other ecological values in the Himalayan region, where glaciers that are a major source of India’s water supply are projected to recede as a result of global warming.<br />National Mission for a “Green India”: Goals include the afforestation of 6 million hectares of degraded forest lands and expanding forest cover from 23% to 33% of India’s territory.<br />National Mission for Sustainable Agriculture: The plan aims to support climate adaptation in agriculture through the development of climate-resilient crops, expansion of weather insurance mechanisms, and agricultural practices.<br />National Mission on Strategic Knowledge for Climate Change: To gain a better understanding of climate science, impacts and challenges, the plan envisions a new Climate Science Research Fund, improved climate modeling, and increased international collaboration. It also encourage private sector initiatives to develop adaptation and mitigation technologies through venture capital funds.<br />
    9. 9. Source: New Indian Express<br />
    10. 10. Climate Change will put additional stress in rural areas<br />
    11. 11. Rural Livlihoods - Resources<br />The livelihoods of the rural poor are directly dependent on environmental resources.<br />Are vulnerable to weather and climate variability <br />
    12. 12. Rural Poor Paying the most<br />Climate change will only exacerbate the vulnerabilities of the rural poor. As climate-sensitive, natural ecosystems deteriorate, subsistence will slip further out of reach. <br />
    13. 13. India’s rural poor, who have least contributed to Climate Change, will pay some of the problem’s heaviest tolls.<br />
    14. 14. In the life of a farmer climate Variability and Extreme events are more important than climate change<br />
    15. 15. Climate Change / Variability in Semi-arid regions <br />
    16. 16. Climate Change / Variability in Semi-arid regions <br />In Andhra Pradesh 2009 witness to<br /><ul><li> 50 years old drought
    17. 17. 100 years old flood</li></li></ul><li>AFPRO<br />17<br />“VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT AND ENHANSING ADAPTIVE CAPACITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN SEMI-ARID AREAS OF INDIA” <br />Policies/Structures<br />Vulnerability<br />Adaptability<br />Rural Poverty<br />Livelihoods Diversification<br />Community Empowerment<br />Energy<br />Agriculture Production<br />Water Resources<br />Bio Diversity<br />SCENARIO 1<br />FACTORS INFLUENCING VULNERABILITY<br />Climate Change<br />Human / Social<br />Natural / Environmental / Physical<br />Economic / Political<br />Appropriate Skills<br />Water Management<br />
    18. 18. GSBC PROJECT <br />INTEGRATED APPROACH<br />
    19. 19. Major challenges of Agriculture <br />
    20. 20. Mahabubnagar District Rainfall Pattern<br />
    21. 21.
    22. 22. Field level interventions<br />ACTIVITY<br />CAPACITY<br />DEVELOPMENT<br />RESEARCH<br />FACILITATION<br />
    23. 23. BIOCHARCULTURE<br />Dr. N. SaiBhaskar Reddy, GEO<br />http://e-geo.org | http://biocharculture.com<br />
    24. 24. BIOCHARCULTURE<br />SOIL <br />AGRICUTURE<br />ANIMALS<br />ENERGY<br />HABITAT<br />SANITATION<br />HEALTH<br />WATER<br />RITUAL / SPIRITUAL / RELIGIOUS / PRACTICES<br />BIOCHAR URINALS<br />WATER PURIFICATION – COLOR, ODOR, REMOVAL OF HARMFUL ELEMENTS, ETC.<br />PADDY METHANE EMISSIONS REDUCTION<br />BIOCHAR BRICKS<br />FIRE / ALTAR / YAGNAS / AGNIHOTRA<br />APPLICATION IN ANIMAL PLACES TO TAP URINE, SANITATION AND EMISSIONS REDUCTION<br />SOURCE FROM EFFICIENT TLUD COOK STOVES<br />CLEANING TEETH<br />BIOCHAR<br />BIOCHAR TOILETS<br />PESTICIDE & COMPLEX CHEMICALS AFFECTS MITIGATION<br />BIOCHAR IN AQUARIUMS<br />FIRE DURING FESTIVALS<br />RUMINANT ANIMALS METHANE EMISSIONS REDUCTION AS FEED ADDITIVE<br />AS BY PRODUCT FROM GASIFIER STOVES, BOILERS ETC<br />BIOCHAR TABLETS<br />BIOCHAR IN CATTLE SHEDS<br />EMMISIONS REDUCTION FROM FARM YARD MANURES AND COMPOSTS<br />BIOCHAR IN POULTRY FARMS<br />CREMATIONS<br />BIOCHAR COMPOST<br />CLEANING PLATES / UTENSILS<br />SOAKING IN WITH ANIMALS URINE AND EXCRETA - VALUE ADDITION<br />CHARCOAL PRODUCTION FROM BIOMASS / WASTE MANAGEMENT<br />BIOCHAR IN FOOD AS PART OF FOOD PREPARATIONS<br />CROP RESIDUE MANAGEMENT<br />BIOCHAR IN FRIDGES, MATTRESSES, ETC.<br />NATURAL / ARTIFICIAL FIRES IN FORESTS / FIELDS, ETC.<br />BATHING<br />
    25. 25. Biocharculture<br />
    26. 26. Biocharculture Adaptation benefits<br />
    27. 27. CONTROL AND BIOCHAR - OKRA<br />Farmers focus<br />80% ON CROP<br />20% ON SOIL<br />
    28. 28. BIOCHAR COMPOST<br />
    29. 29. APPLICATION IN THE FIELDS<br />
    30. 30. OKRA - CONTROL AND BIOCHAR PLOTS<br /> CONTROL BIOCHAR COMPOST<br /> 4 KGS 8 KGS 12 KGS<br />
    31. 31. BIOCHAR<br />CONTROL<br />1.5 FEET<br />6 FEET<br />
    32. 32. Strategies to be followed in designing adaptations<br />
    33. 33.
    34. 34.
    35. 35. BIOCHAR RESULTS<br />GSBC PROJECT, 2009 (DORUGHT PREVAILED DURING THE GROWING SEASON)<br />
    36. 36. Methane Emissions from paddy fields<br />
    37. 37. Biochar – livestock urine<br />
    38. 38. BIOCHAR URINALS<br />TAPPING NITROGEN FROM URINE OF ANIMALS AND PEOPLE USING BIOCHAR<br />
    39. 39. OTHER BIOCHAR APPLICATIONS<br />BIOCHAR BRICKS, GREEN BUILDINGS<br />
    40. 40. Brick pieces<br />Slag<br />Quartz<br />Bone<br />Pottaryshards<br />Soil<br />Biochar /Charcoal<br />
    41. 41.
    42. 42.
    43. 43. MAGH SERIES BIOCHAR PRODUCING STOVES<br />GOOD STOVES<br />http://goodstove.com<br />
    44. 44. MAGH SERIES BIOCHAR PRODUCING STOVES<br />
    45. 45. NO SMOKING<br />
    46. 46. WATER – LESS <br />PLANTS<br />
    47. 47. BIOCHAR INDIA | BIOCHARCULTURE | GOOD STOVE | GEO<br />
    48. 48. Thank you..<br />

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