Climate                 Change                 & Food                 Security15 Nov’11                     CCCEA         ...
Climate Changes in India Increase in surface  temperature by 0.4  degree C over the  past century. Warming trend  along ...
Climate Changes in India Cooling trend in  northwest India and parts  of South India. Regional monsoon  variations: incr...
Climate Changes in India Observed trends of multi-  decadal periods of more  frequent droughts, followed  by less severe ...
Climate Changes in India Records of coastal  tide gauges in the  north Indian ocean for  the last 40 years has  revealed ...
Per-capita Carbon –dioxide emission (Metric     Tons)25      20.012015                                       11.71        ...
Impacts of Climate Changes Water resources Agriculture and food production Health Forests Coastal areas Vulnerabilit...
National Action Plan for Climate Change (NAPCC) Protecting the poor and vulnerable  sections of society through  sustaina...
National Action Plan for Climate Change (NAPCC) Efficient and cost effective strategies  for end use Demand side  Managem...
Core of NAPCC - National    Missions     National Solar Mission:The      NAPCC aims to promote the      development and u...
Core of NAPCC - NationalMissions National Mission on  Sustainable Habitat: To  promote energy efficiency as a  core compo...
Core of NAPCC - NationalMissions National Mission for Sustaining the  Himalayan Ecosystem: The plan  aims to conserve  bi...
Core of NAPCC - National     Missions National Mission for Sustainable  Agriculture: The plan aims to support  climate ad...
Source: New Indian Express
Rural Livlihoods - Resources   The livelihoods of the rural poor are directly    dependent on environmental resources.    ...
Rural PoorPaying the mostClimate change will only exacerbate the vulnerabilities of the rural poor. As climate- sensitive,...
India’s ruralpoor, who have leastcontributed toClimate Change, willpay some of theproblem’s heaviesttolls.
In the life of a  farmer climate  Variability andExtreme events are more important    than climate       change
Climate Change /Variability in Semi-aridregionsPrecipitation is less thanpotential evapo-transpiration.Low annual rainfall...
Climate Change / Variability in Semi-arid                         regionsClimate Variability and extremes are an expectedc...
Food Security in India
“VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT AND ENHANSING ADAPTIVE CAPACITY TO CLIMATE                             CHANGE IN SEMI-ARID AREAS...
GSBC PROJECTINTEGRATED APPROACH
Major challenges of AgricultureClimate change -     Soil fertility      Water   variability -                       manage...
100                                                        200                                                            ...
Crop       Water Soil      ClimateEnergy   Environment
Field levelinterventions                       ACTIVITY                       CAPACITY                     DEVELOPMENT    ...
INCREAS                                                                                                                ED ...
RITUAL /                                                                                                           SPIRITU...
Biocharculture Biocharculture is the process of using Biochar,         including cultivation of crops• Biochar is the char...
Biocharculture Adaptation      benefits                                                                Lessen the impact  ...
CONTROL AND BIOCHAR -OKRA                Farmers focus                80% ON CROP                20% ON SOIL
BIOCHAR COMPOST
APPLICATION IN THE FIELDS
OKRA - CONTROL AND BIOCHAR PLOTSCONTROL             BIOCHAR COMPOST            4 KGS           8 KGS   12 KGS
BIOCHAR           CONTROL1.5 FEET                       6 FEET
Adaptation                Initiatives               Requirement    Objective1   Better         SMC conservation          ...
Adaptation                 Initiatives                 Requirement  Objectives3 Diversify      Crop diversification from ...
Adaptation                     Initiatives              Requirement  Objectivr4 Strengthening         Health care system ...
BIOCHAR RESULTSGSBC PROJECT, 2009 (DORUGHTPREVAILED DURING THEGROWING SEASON)
Methane Emissions from paddy fields
Biochar – livestock urine
BIOCHAR URINALS                  TAPPING NITROGEN FROM                  URINE OF ANIMALS AND                  PEOPLE USING...
BIOCHAR INDIA | BIOCHARCULTURE | GOOD STOVE | GEO | GOODPLANETBIOCHAR LINKSTerra Preta Info - Indian conext   Biochar Urin...
Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy Chief Executive Officer [CEO],GEOECOLOGY ENERGY ORGANISATION            [GEO]
Climate change food security
Climate change food security
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Climate change food security

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Climate Change and Food Security presentation made at Dr. MCR HRD to the government officials from various departments by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy on 15 Nov 11

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  • Biochar is a part of the solution for cotton crop sustainable cultivation, there is a need to create large scale awareness among the farmers to continue traditional best practices of Biochar application and also adopt appropriate best technologies for improving the fertility of the soils and their sustainability.
  • Climate change food security

    1. 1. Climate Change & Food Security15 Nov’11 CCCEA Dr. MCR HRD Institute of AP
    2. 2. Climate Changes in India Increase in surface temperature by 0.4 degree C over the past century. Warming trend along the west coast, in central India, the interior peninsula, and northeastern India.
    3. 3. Climate Changes in India Cooling trend in northwest India and parts of South India. Regional monsoon variations: increased monsoon seasonal rainfall along the west coast, northern Andhra Pradesh and North- western India, decreased monsoon seasonal rainfall over eastern Madhya Pradesh, North- eastern India, and parts
    4. 4. Climate Changes in India Observed trends of multi- decadal periods of more frequent droughts, followed by less severe droughts. Studies have shown a rising trend in the frequency of heavy rain events and decrease in frequency of moderate events over central India from 1951 to 2000. 4
    5. 5. Climate Changes in India Records of coastal tide gauges in the north Indian ocean for the last 40 years has revealed an estimated sea level rise between 1.06- 1.75 mm per year. The available monitoring data on Himalayan glaciers indicates recession of some glaciers. 5
    6. 6. Per-capita Carbon –dioxide emission (Metric Tons)25 20.012015 11.71 9.4 9.87105 3.6 4.25 1.020 USA Europe Japan China Russia India World average
    7. 7. Impacts of Climate Changes Water resources Agriculture and food production Health Forests Coastal areas Vulnerability to extreme events Bioenergy Livelihoods Environment Economy Ecology 7
    8. 8. National Action Plan for Climate Change (NAPCC) Protecting the poor and vulnerable sections of society through sustainable development sensitive to climate change Achieving national growth objectives through a qualitative change in direction, ecological sustainability, mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. 8
    9. 9. National Action Plan for Climate Change (NAPCC) Efficient and cost effective strategies for end use Demand side Management. Technologies for adaptation and mitigation of greenhouse gases emissions. Promote sustainable development - Regulatory and voluntary mechanisms 9
    10. 10. Core of NAPCC - National Missions  National Solar Mission:The NAPCC aims to promote the development and use of solar energy for power generation and other uses with the ultimate objective of making solar competitive with fossil-based energy options.  National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency: Current initiatives are expected to yieldThese National Missions are being institutionalized by therespective Ministries/ Departments. 2012. savings of 10,000 MW by
    11. 11. Core of NAPCC - NationalMissions National Mission on Sustainable Habitat: To promote energy efficiency as a core component of urban planning. National Water Mission: With water scarcity projected to worsen as a result of climate change, the plan sets a goal of a 20% improvement in water use efficiency through pricing and other measures.
    12. 12. Core of NAPCC - NationalMissions National Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem: The plan aims to conserve biodiversity, forest cover, and other ecological values in the Himalayan region, where glaciers that are a major source of India’s water supply are projected to recede as a result of global warming. National Mission for a “Green India”: Goals include the afforestation of 6 million hectares of degraded forest lands and expanding forest cover from 23% to 33% of India’s territory.
    13. 13. Core of NAPCC - National Missions National Mission for Sustainable Agriculture: The plan aims to support climate adaptation in agriculture through the development of climate-resilient crops, expansion of weather insurance mechanisms, and agricultural practices. National Mission on Strategic Knowledge for Climate Change: To gain a better understanding of climate science, impacts and challenges, the plan envisions a new Climate Science Research Fund, improved climate modeling, and increased international collaboration. It also encourage private
    14. 14. Source: New Indian Express
    15. 15. Rural Livlihoods - Resources The livelihoods of the rural poor are directly dependent on environmental resources. land Water Forests Energy Are vulnerable to weather and climate variability groundwater forestwater stress soil fertility levels habitats increases declines recede disappear.
    16. 16. Rural PoorPaying the mostClimate change will only exacerbate the vulnerabilities of the rural poor. As climate- sensitive, natural ecosystems deteriorate, subsi stence will slip further out of reach.
    17. 17. India’s ruralpoor, who have leastcontributed toClimate Change, willpay some of theproblem’s heaviesttolls.
    18. 18. In the life of a farmer climate Variability andExtreme events are more important than climate change
    19. 19. Climate Change /Variability in Semi-aridregionsPrecipitation is less thanpotential evapo-transpiration.Low annual rainfall of 25 to60 centimeters and havingscrubby vegetation withshort, coarse grasses; notcompletely arid.
    20. 20. Climate Change / Variability in Semi-arid regionsClimate Variability and extremes are an expectedcharacteristic of semi-arid lands.The people vulnerable to droughts, which triggerfrequent subsistence crises In Andhra PradeshIncreasing cropfailures, dislocation, famine, poverty, increases 2009 witness tostratification and the social inequities. • 50 years old drought • 100 years old flood
    21. 21. Food Security in India
    22. 22. “VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT AND ENHANSING ADAPTIVE CAPACITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN SEMI-ARID AREAS OF INDIA” Policies/Structures Vulnerability Adaptability Rural Poverty Livelihoods DiversificationCommunity Empowerment Energy Bio Diversity Agriculture Production Water Resources Climate Change Appropriate Skills Water Management SCENARIO 123 AFPRO Human / Social Natural / Environmental / Physical Economic / Political
    23. 23. GSBC PROJECTINTEGRATED APPROACH
    24. 24. Major challenges of AgricultureClimate change - Soil fertility Water variability - management extremes Impact of Burning of crop Alkalinity of soils hazardous residue pesticides and nitrogen
    25. 25. 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 0 195152 195253 195354 195455 195556 195657 195758 195859 195960 196061 196162 196263 196364 196465 196566 196667 196768 196869 196970 197071 197172 197273 197374 197475 197576 197677 197778 197879 197980 198081 198182 198283 198384 198485 198586 198687 198788 198889 198990 199091 199192 199293 199394 199495 199596 199697 199798 199899 199900 200001 200102 200203 200304 200405 200506 200607 R2 = 0.1374Mahabubnagar District Rainfall Pattern 200708 200809 200910 y = -4.6207x + 851.14 201011 201112 201213 201314
    26. 26. Crop Water Soil ClimateEnergy Environment
    27. 27. Field levelinterventions ACTIVITY CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT FACILITATION RESEARCH
    28. 28. INCREAS ED PRODUC SOIL SPIRITU CARBON TEMPER AL TION SEQUES ATURE TRATION REGULAT ED CREMAT BELIEFS ION TERMITE MOISTUR S / ANTS E CULTUR REPULSI RETENTI AL ON ON ALTARS RITUALS ENER GY EARTHW WATER ORMS SOIL FESTIVA CONSER INCREAS AMENDMENT LS VATION E BIOC HAR NITROGE N/ BIOMASS BIOCHAR PHOSPH COMPOS OROUS T FOOD RETENTI INSECT PRESE ON REPEL RVING SOIL LENT FOOD MICROBE S NURSERI FILTERI DENSITY PESTICID ES CLEANI NG INCREAS ES NG MEDIA E ADBSOR BTION GOOD STOVESSOAK MEDICI • TLUDsPITS NE • Other stoves POULTRY - CH4 PRACTICES REDUCTI ONBIOCH AR MATTR WASTE SOURCEURINAL ESS MANAGE S CROP S MENT (BIOMAS RESIDUE • Sludge S) BIOCH TOOTH ANIMALS AR POWD BRICKS ER AQUAR AIR POULTR LIVESTOC IUM / QUALITY FYM / K - URINE Y LITTER TERRA WATER • CO2 / COMPOST AND RIUMS TREAT CH4 DUNG MENT Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, GEO http://e-geo.org | http://biocharculture.com
    29. 29. RITUAL / SPIRITUAL / AGRICUTU SANITATIO SOIL ANIMALS ENERGY HABITAT HEALTH WATER RELIGIOUS RE N / PRACTICE S APPLICATIO PADDY N IN ANIMAL BIOCHAR SOURCE FIRE / ALTAR METHANE PLACES TO BIOCHAR URINALS FROM / YAGNAS / EMISSIONS TAP BRICKS CLEANING EFFICIENT AGNIHOTRA REDUCTION URINE, SANI TEETH TLUD COOK TATION AND STOVESBIOCHAR EMISSIONS REDUCTION BIOCHAR PESTICIDE & TOILETS COMPLEX BIOCHAR IN FIRE DURING CHEMICALS AQUARIUMS WATER FESTIVALS AFFECTS RUMINANT AS BY PURIFICATIO MITIGATION ANIMALS PRODUCT N– METHANE BIOCHAR IN FROM BIOCHAR COLOR, ODO EMISSIONS CATTLE GASIFIER TABLETS R, REMOVAL EMMISIONS REDUCTION SHEDS STOVES, BOI OF HARMFUL REDUCTION AS FEED LERS ETC ELEMENTS, FROM FARM ADDITIVE BIOCHAR IN ETC. CREMATION YARD POULTRY S MANURES FARMS CLEANING AND PLATES / COMPOSTS UTENSILSBIOCHAR SOAKING IN CHARCOAL BIOCHAR INCOMPOST WITH PRODUCTIO FOOD AS ANIMALS N FROM NATURAL / CROP BIOCHAR IN PART OF URINE AND BIOMASS / ARTIFICIAL RESIDUE FRIDGES, MA FOOD EXCRETA - WASTE FIRES IN MANAGEME TTRESSES, E BATHING PREPARATIO VALUE MANAGEME FORESTS / NT TC. NS ADDITION NT FIELDS, ETC.
    30. 30. Biocharculture Biocharculture is the process of using Biochar, including cultivation of crops• Biochar is the charcoal produced from carbonaceous source material. Sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide in terrestrial ecosystems• Biocharculture is one of the means to integrate for sustainable cultivation and carbon sequestration.• Biochar is usually produced at around temperatures 300 to 600 degrees centigrade for example as found in the common biomass cook stoves.• Because of its macromolecular structure dominated by aromatic C, Biochar is more recalcitrant to microbial decomposition than uncharred organic matter
    31. 31. Biocharculture Adaptation benefits Lessen the impact of hazardousSecuring the crop pesticides and Reclaim the waterfrom drought and complex degraded soils, conservation,climate variabiiity chemicals & to reduce plant uptake. reducing Conversion of emissions and crop residue into increases in increasing the Biochar an option Increase in crop C, N, pH, andsequestration of and address yield available P to the greenhouse carbon plants gases sequestration Increase in the Reduction in Impacts of Temperature soil microbes / leaching of the bioBiochar last more regulation in the worms at the / chem fertilizersthan 1000 years. soil biochar and soil applied interface
    32. 32. CONTROL AND BIOCHAR -OKRA Farmers focus 80% ON CROP 20% ON SOIL
    33. 33. BIOCHAR COMPOST
    34. 34. APPLICATION IN THE FIELDS
    35. 35. OKRA - CONTROL AND BIOCHAR PLOTSCONTROL BIOCHAR COMPOST 4 KGS 8 KGS 12 KGS
    36. 36. BIOCHAR CONTROL1.5 FEET 6 FEET
    37. 37. Adaptation Initiatives Requirement Objective1 Better  SMC conservation - Support for management of  Addition of OM (compost, Labor Cost soil moisture manures, GM,GLM)  Cover crop, mulching, - Biomass residue incorporation availability2 Efficient use of  Minimising the ground - Credit support Ground water water usage for critical irrigation. - Community  Social regulations to support control competitive digging of bore wells Increasing  SRI under borewell and - Comm.support efficiency of tanks - Technical water use support Micro-irrigation methods - Credit/financial (drips, spriklers) support
    38. 38. Adaptation Initiatives Requirement Objectives3 Diversify  Crop diversification from - Drought , stress r crop / farm wheat, paddy to resistant varieties systems millets, Maize, Sorghum - Timely availability of  Mono cropping to seeds, contingency intercropping, mixed seeds cropping - Credit for seeds  Soil fertility improvement through cropping systems - CB on technology Encouraging horticulture - Good planting material  Biomass improvement/ - Timely availability of integration of Multi-Purpose implements Trees  Improved implements - Timely availability of drought power  Easing bullock constraint - Marketing support
    39. 39. Adaptation Initiatives Requirement Objectivr4 Strengthening  Health care system for - Support for man livestock preventive diseases power production system  Strengthening sheep and goat systems - Technical through CIG concept. support  Strengthening Fisheries production5 Promoting  Promoting back yard - Credit support alternate livelihood poultry activities for  Heifer rearing - Technical income  Ram lamb rearing support actvity6 Creating Buffers  Community managed - Infrastructure fodder banks  Seed Banks to maintain - Capacity buffer seed and seeds of Building contingent crops - Manpower
    40. 40. BIOCHAR RESULTSGSBC PROJECT, 2009 (DORUGHTPREVAILED DURING THEGROWING SEASON)
    41. 41. Methane Emissions from paddy fields
    42. 42. Biochar – livestock urine
    43. 43. BIOCHAR URINALS TAPPING NITROGEN FROM URINE OF ANIMALS AND PEOPLE USING BIOCHAR
    44. 44. BIOCHAR INDIA | BIOCHARCULTURE | GOOD STOVE | GEO | GOODPLANETBIOCHAR LINKSTerra Preta Info - Indian conext Biochar UrineBiochar Experiments Biochar UrinalsBiochar - Alkaline soilsBiochar - Alkaline soils report Biochar Soil lifeCharcoal production Termites EarthwormsBiochar ProductionMagh Biochar Retort  Pottery ShardsGEO mini metal kiln In soilsARTI - Charcoal CleaningBiochar Plants Biochar for CleaningProsopis JulifloraProsopis Juliflora report Green Buildings Biochar BricksStovesMagh series tlud woodgas or Rural Trashmicrogasifier stoves Biochar plusAnila GSBC PROJECT ON CNN
    45. 45. Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy Chief Executive Officer [CEO],GEOECOLOGY ENERGY ORGANISATION [GEO]
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