COM 100Information Cycle and Types of Information<br />Danielle Carlock<br />480 425 6765<br />d.carlock@sccmail.maricopa....
To do research it is important to understand…<br />How information is produced<br />Where it comes from<br />How it change...
When the Gulf oil spill happened this summer, how did the information start being shared?<br />
The Day of the Event<br />TV, Internet and Radio reports<br />May be brief, up to the minute, “breaking news”<br />May onl...
The Day After the Event..<br />Newspaper articles<br />Usually more detailed than the materials that appeared previously<b...
The Week of or Weeks after the event…<br />Weekly popular magazines and newspapers<br />Provide analysis of the event in l...
Six months to a year after the event….<br />Academic journals<br />Detailed, academic analysis and research regarding the ...
A Year to Years After the Event…<br />Books<br />Provide full length coverage and analysis of an event ; often placing the...
A Year to Years After the Event…<br /> Government Reports<br />Detailed, factual, and often statistical reports <br />Auth...
A Year to Years After the Event…<br />Reference Material (encyclopedias, textbooks, etc)<br />Factual information about th...
How is understanding the information cycle useful to a student doing research?<br />
TYPES OF INFORMATION SOURCES<br /><ul><li>Take a moment and brainstorm a list of all of the information sources you can th...
Com100 project infocycle
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Com100 project infocycle

  1. 1. COM 100Information Cycle and Types of Information<br />Danielle Carlock<br />480 425 6765<br />d.carlock@sccmail.maricopa.edu<br />
  2. 2. To do research it is important to understand…<br />How information is produced<br />Where it comes from<br />How it changes over time<br />
  3. 3. When the Gulf oil spill happened this summer, how did the information start being shared?<br />
  4. 4. The Day of the Event<br />TV, Internet and Radio reports<br />May be brief, up to the minute, “breaking news”<br />May only cover the who, what, where, when<br />Primarily written by journalists<br />Because of the newness of the event, sometimes the information can be inaccurate<br />Intended for a general audience<br />EX: CNN news coverage-first five minutes<br />
  5. 5. The Day After the Event..<br />Newspaper articles<br />Usually more detailed than the materials that appeared previously<br />May contain statistics, quotes, photographs, commentaries<br />Primarily written by journalists<br />Written for a general audience <br />EX: US Attacked <br />
  6. 6. The Week of or Weeks after the event…<br />Weekly popular magazines and newspapers<br />Provide analysis of the event in longer, more detailed stories than have appeared previously<br />Authors may be journalists, or experts/scholars in the area<br />Usually intended for a general audience<br />EX: The Road to September 11th<br />
  7. 7. Six months to a year after the event….<br />Academic journals<br />Detailed, academic analysis and research regarding the event<br />Is written by experts for an academic audience<br />Is peer reviewed<br />Includes references/bibliography<br />Usually uses technically language or jargon<br /> Young children's responses to September 11th: The New York City experience<br />
  8. 8. A Year to Years After the Event…<br />Books<br />Provide full length coverage and analysis of an event ; often placing the event in its broader context<br />May be scholarly or popular<br />May be intended for a broad or specialized audience<br />EX: <br />God's democracy : American religion after September 11 <br />9/11 and the future of transportation security <br />
  9. 9. A Year to Years After the Event…<br /> Government Reports<br />Detailed, factual, and often statistical reports <br />Authored by a panel, committee, or other governmental body<br />Intended for all audiences<br />EX: 9-11 Commission Report<br />
  10. 10. A Year to Years After the Event…<br />Reference Material (encyclopedias, textbooks, etc)<br />Factual information about the event<br />Summarizes the event<br /> Written by experts<br />Intended for a general audience<br />Encyclopedia Britannica-September 11th Attacks<br />University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2010) Available at http://www.library.illinois.edu/ugl/howdoi/informationcycle.html<br />
  11. 11. How is understanding the information cycle useful to a student doing research?<br />
  12. 12. TYPES OF INFORMATION SOURCES<br /><ul><li>Take a moment and brainstorm a list of all of the information sources you can think of (ex: magazines)</li></li></ul><li>Informaton sources by how reviewed<br />Peer reviewed<br />Scholarly journal articles; some scholarly books<br />Edited<br />Magazines<br />Newspapers<br />Most books<br />Some websites<br />Self published<br />Most websites<br />Video/audio files<br />Email lists/listservs<br />

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