Genealogy SA is the leading South Australian family
history and genealogy resource.
We aim to expand our South Australian ...
Genealogy.
What is it and where did it come from?
 Genealogy is the study of families and tracing their
lineage and histo...
The History of Genealogy
 In feudal European countries Genealogy evolved to people
trying to prove kinship and relationsh...
Genealogists or Family Historians?
 Genealogists focus on establishing kinship, and the
data of events, dates and places....
Family Historians
• A family historian is interested in the family stories,
in what forebears did and when and why, who th...
Hobby Historians
• Why is family history research being popularised
through TV programs like “Who Do You Think You Are?”
•...
Big Deal for Baby Boomers?
• Genealogy seems to be an attractive hobby for baby
boomers, who don’t know much about their e...
Boomers and the Internet Bonanza
• Baby boomers are computer literate, internet savvy, and are
conditioned to seeking out ...
More Than the Family Tree
There is much more than births, marriages, and deaths.
• When did these events happen, how old w...
The Core Data Set
Every event in a personal history can be described by a data set.
• Name
• Relationship
• Event
• Date a...
Starting Your Family History
 Always work backwards from the known (which is yourself and what
you know) to the unknown (...
Family History Societies
 People in a community with a common interest in family history
may join together in family hist...
 The only South Australian state focussed family history Society, and the
largest in SA with about 2000 current members
...
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Genealogy for beginners

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  • Note: Comment on establishing relationships, need for proofs, not just going onto Ancestry for 24 hours and proving you are related to William the Conqueror Joke: Records before Noah hard to document as lost in the flood
  • Some hobby genealogists have very large data bases, say 50,000 names. Family historians look at individual family members lives in fine detail, and family historians are more likely to become addicted Stories about employing professional genealogists. Eg British Naval Historian. Local Irish historical society Will use genealogist as the common term
  • Genealogy for beginners

    1. 1. Genealogy SA is the leading South Australian family history and genealogy resource. We aim to expand our South Australian collection, to build our connections to family history resources worldwide, and to improve access and services for our Members
    2. 2. Genealogy. What is it and where did it come from?  Genealogy is the study of families and tracing their lineage and history.  In many cultures the son’s identity related to his father – “like father like son.” This often related to family occupation.  In middle eastern cultures the son’s identity related to his father and also the extended male lineage - hence the importance of knowing one’s ancestry.  Probably the oldest and most well known genealogy of this sort is that of Jesus Christ in which his lineage was traced back through King David all the way to Adam
    3. 3. The History of Genealogy  In feudal European countries Genealogy evolved to people trying to prove kinship and relationships to rulers and nobles, so as to confirm the legitimacy of any claims to position, wealth and power.  In later times, as society evolved into classes, it became important to demonstrate that a prospective marriage partner came “from a good family.”  When Genealogy crossed the Atlantic to America, the emphasis shifted to relationships to the “founding fathers’ – the Mayflower descendants.  In Australia there is reverse snobbery – where prestige attaches to convict descendants, or Ned Kelly’s family
    4. 4. Genealogists or Family Historians?  Genealogists focus on establishing kinship, and the data of events, dates and places.  Professional genealogists may conduct research for others, study wider populations, publish, lecture, or be involved in data processing and IT  Hobby genealogists generally pursue their own family history and ancestry. Some hobby genealogists have family trees with tens of thousands of “relatives”
    5. 5. Family Historians • A family historian is interested in the family stories, in what forebears did and when and why, who they were and how did their lives unfold. • Family historians usually complete their history and find another pastime • The hardest task for the family historian is to write up and publish their history
    6. 6. Hobby Historians • Why is family history research being popularised through TV programs like “Who Do You Think You Are?” • Why has Ancestry.com been expanding TV advertising for its family history subscription website? • Why is genealogy now such a fast growing and long lasting hobby in many western societies? • How can a hobby whose focus is dead people become so popular?
    7. 7. Big Deal for Baby Boomers? • Genealogy seems to be an attractive hobby for baby boomers, who don’t know much about their extended families and previous generations, so those with time on their hands are now taking the opportunity to catch up. • Baby boomers have mainly experienced a nuclear family environment rather than the extended family environment of previous generations. • They have been much more geographically mobile and lost touch with other family members. • TV and other electronic media have supplanted family conversation, much of which in past times would have involved family relationships and family issues.
    8. 8. Boomers and the Internet Bonanza • Baby boomers are computer literate, internet savvy, and are conditioned to seeking out information on the web. • Genealogy’s increasing popularity is being fuelled by the internet, with increased access to family history information, and easier communication between more and more enthusiasts. • A widespread expectation is that the baby boomer genealogist will try and do as much as possible from home using the internet, and will be prepared to spend money to obtain information.
    9. 9. More Than the Family Tree There is much more than births, marriages, and deaths. • When did these events happen, how old were the people concerned, what were the circumstances? • Where did these events happen, why were the people there, and if they moved somewhere else why, where to and how? How and why are people connected to these places? • What did these people do, their occupations, community status, public service, and condition in society? Why and how did these things happen, and how has it affected us today? • What were their living conditions and lifestyles, and how did community, national and world events impact on their lives?
    10. 10. The Core Data Set Every event in a personal history can be described by a data set. • Name • Relationship • Event • Date and qualifier • Place and qualifier • Source Document
    11. 11. Starting Your Family History  Always work backwards from the known (which is yourself and what you know) to the unknown (which is your forebears)  Talk to older family members – before they die. They will usually be pleased to find someone taking an interest and be willing to share information and stories. Document what you are told but don’t believe everything. Memories can be incomplete, prejudiced, or just repeating family folklore. Sometimes you will find confusion and contradictions and conflicts. So maintain a healthy scepticism.  Seek to acquire family records, photos, letters and other documents.  Always try to get at least two separate sources of proof for each event.  Early on in your project think about how and to whom you want to present your family history when completed. Don’t feel confined to a hardcopy publication when you can include paper, photos, images, video and audio, and publish on CD, DVD, or on the web. Make sure you consider privacy, ethical and copyright requirements.
    12. 12. Family History Societies  People in a community with a common interest in family history may join together in family history societies.  These are usually collaborative or cooperative ventures where members help each other in:  Preserving local historical records particularly those relating to family histories.  Collecting, collating and compiling family history information aggregates (indexes) for their particular community.  Helping each other with research techniques and methods as well as information resources.  Using their experience, knowledge and skills to help newcomers.  By joining together increasing their ability to access information from wider afield, eg through greater purchasing power.  Many society members enjoy the social aspects, the mutual recognition and encouragement, the celebration of success, and the sharing with others
    13. 13.  The only South Australian state focussed family history Society, and the largest in SA with about 2000 current members  Microfilm copies SA Births, Deaths and Marriages district certificates, and indexes for these, plus newspaper records  About 3000 SA family histories  South Australian Cemetery records  Shipping lists and passenger records  Access to key subscription websites and through these interstate and overseas BDM indexes, Census and other family history information

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