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Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
Web service introduction 2
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Web service introduction 2

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  • 1. Introduction to Web Service - 2 <br />SagaraGunathunga<br />( Apache web Service and axis committer)<br />
  • 2. CONTENTS<br />
  • 3. WS specification overview<br />There are some standard bodies to define specification related to <br />Web Services generally known as WS-* specifications . <br /><ul><li> SOAP
  • 4. WSDL
  • 5. WS- Addressing
  • 6. WS-security
  • 7. WS- Policy
  • 8. WS- Reliable Messaging
  • 9. WS -evening </li></ul>WS- Notification<br />WS-MetadataExchange<br />WS-Resource Framework<br />WS-Transaction<br />WS-AtomicTransaction<br />WS-BPEL <br />
  • 10. WS- Addressing <br />SOAP does not provide a standard way to specify<br /> where a message is going ? <br /> how to return a response ?<br />where to report an error ?<br />transport protocol such as HTTP , JMS can be used to define those properties .<br />
  • 11. e.g. HTTP Headers<br />Host URI<br />The type of the <br />message being <br />conveyed is SOAP <br />SOAP Action<br />
  • 12. Conclusion <br />
  • 13. WS – Addressing and WSDL <br />
  • 14. WS – Addressing <br />WS-Addressing was originally authored by Microsoft, IBM, BEA, Sun, and SAP and submitted to W3C for standardization. The W3C WS-Addressing Working Group has refined and augmented the specification in the process of standardization.<br />http://xml.coverpages.org/ws-Addressing.html<br />http://www.w3.org/TR/ws-addr-core/<br />
  • 15. Asynchronous communication<br />The address of the sender of the <br />message, the addresses for return <br />reply or fault messages are given <br />current message has id “uuid:someid” <br />and it is related with another message <br />that has id “uuid:someotherid” and the <br />type of the relationship is “Reply”<br />
  • 16. Dynamic endpoint addressing<br />Endpoint is any addressable resource to which SOAP message can be sent (Web Service client or application, a SOAP router or any SOAP aware entity<br />The most logical way to include endpoints is to use WSDL “Service” element, however WSDL does not allow extensibility of this element, therefore EndpointReference is defined.<br />&lt;From&gt;, &lt;ReplyTo&gt;, &lt;FaultTo&gt; tags convey an “EndpointReference”<br />
  • 17. WS – Security <br />
  • 18. WS – Security <br />Identification <br />Authentication <br />
  • 19. Authorization <br />Message integrity <br />Confidentiality<br />
  • 20. Security Extensions<br />WS – Security stack<br />WS-<br />Secure<br />Conversation<br />WS-<br />Federation<br />WS-<br />Authorization<br />WS-Policy<br />WS-Trust<br />WS-Privacy<br />WS-Security<br />XKMS<br />SAML<br />XACML<br />SPML<br />Soap Foundation<br />XML<br />Encryption<br />XML<br />Digital<br />Signature<br />14<br />06.03.2005<br />
  • 21. WS – Security stack<br />
  • 22. WS – Security stack<br />
  • 23. Message Security vs. Transport Security<br />Message level Security - Advantages<br />Message level Security - Disadvantages<br />
  • 24. Message Security vs. Transport Security<br />Transport level Security - Advantages<br />Transport level Security - Disadvantages<br />
  • 25. WS - Reliable messaging<br />
  • 26. WS - Reliable messaging<br />
  • 27. WS – interoperability (WS- I)<br />
  • 28. WS-I Goals<br /><ul><li>Achieve Web services interoperability
  • 29. Integrate specifications
  • 30. Promote consistent implementations
  • 31. Provide a visible representation of conformance
  • 32. Accelerate Web services deployment
  • 33. Offer implementation guidance and best practices
  • 34. Deliver tools and sample applications
  • 35. Provide a implementer’s forum where developers can collaborate
  • 36. Encourage Web services adoption
  • 37. Build industry consensus to reduce early adopter risks
  • 38. Provide a forum for end users to communicate requirements
  • 39. Raise awareness of customer business requirements</li></li></ul><li>WS- I Deliverables<br /><ul><li>Profiles
  • 40. Defined set of specifications or standards at specific version levels
  • 41. Guidelines and conventions for using these specifications together in ways that ensure interoperability
  • 42. Sample applications
  • 43. Use cases and usage scenarios based on customer requirements
  • 44. Sample code and applications built in multiple environments
  • 45. Demonstrate profile-based interoperability
  • 46. Test tools and supporting materials
  • 47. Tools that test profile implementations for conformance with the profiles
  • 48. Supporting documentation and white papers</li></li></ul><li>WS- I Deliverables<br /><ul><li>Basic Profile
  • 49. Basic Profile 1.0 and 1.1
  • 50. More than 200 interoperability issues resolved in the Basic Profile 1.0; conventions around messaging, description and discovery
  • 51. Simple SOAP Binding Profile 1.0</li></ul>— Derived from Basic Profile requirements related to serialization of an envelope and its representation in the message<br /><ul><li>Sample Applications and Testing Tools for the Basic Profile</li></ul>• Attachments Profile 1.0<br /><ul><li>Complements the Basic Profile 1.1 to add support for conveying interoperable, SOAP with Attachments (SwA) with SOAP messages</li></li></ul><li>WS- I Basic profile 1 <br /><ul><li>What is a profile?
  • 52. A set of specifications at specific version levels
  • 53. Guidelines and conventions for using the specifications together</li></ul> WS- I BP 1.0<br />SOAP 1.1<br />WSDL 1.1<br />UDDI 2.0<br />XML 1.0 (Second Edition)<br />XML Schema Part 1: Structures<br />XML Schema Part 2: Datatypes<br />The Secure Sockets Layer Protocol Version 3.0<br />RFC2246: The Transport Layer Security Protocol Version 1.0<br />RFC2459: Internet X.509 Public Key Infrastructure Certificate and CRL Profile<br />RFC2616: HyperText Transfer Protocol 1.1<br />RFC2818: HTTP over TLS<br />RFC2965: HTTP State Management Mechanism <br />
  • 54. WS Composition <br /><ul><li>I n most of the real world scenarios it is required to interact with several services in a predefine or dynamic order.
  • 55. Businesses requires to quickly adapt to customer needs and market conditions EAI and B2B interactions (through web services)
  • 56. Needs to be flexible internally and externally
  • 57. Without a common set of standard, each organization is left to build their own set of proprietary business protocols
  • 58. Leaving little flexibility for true web services collaboration</li></li></ul><li>Web Service Composition<br />
  • 59. Static – Dynamic WS Compositions<br />
  • 60. BPEL - Overview<br />
  • 61. BPEL – example process <br />
  • 62. BPEL - code sample<br />&lt;sequence&gt;<br /> &lt;receive partner=”buyer” … operation=”sendOrder” container=”request”/&gt;<br /> &lt;invoke partner=”supplier” … operation=”request” container=”order”/&gt;<br /> &lt;reply partner=”buyer” … operation=”response” container=”proposal”/&gt;<br /> &lt;/sequence&gt;<br />
  • 63. BPEL – sample <br />
  • 64. Thank You<br />Aeturnum Lanka (Pvt) Ltd<br />197, Stanley Thilakaratna Mw, Nugegoda 10250, Sri Lanka<br />Phone: +94 11 5518177 | Email: info@aeturnum.com<br />Web: www.aeturnum.com | www.athiva.com<br />

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