PAGE 1        INTREPID MINES LIMITED     TUJUH BUKIT PROJECT  REPORT ON MINERAL RESOURCES,                LOCATED IN EAST ...
TUJUH BUKIT2.0 CONTENTS2.0        CONTENTS...................................................................................
TUJUH BUKIT    15.6 Analytical Methods ......................................................................................
TUJUH BUKITLIST OF FIGURESFigure 1: Location of the Tujuh Bukit Project, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia. ..................
TUJUH BUKITFigure 58 :   Deposit-wide long section, Au in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone) .......................
TUJUH BUKITLIST OF TABLESTable 1 : Inferred Oxide Resource at Tumpangpitu as reported in January 2011 .......................
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                             Page 13.     SUMMA...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                   Page 23.7    Development and...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                      Page 34.     INTRODUCTION...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                         Page 45.     RELIANCE ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                     Page 56.         PROPERTY ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                    Page 6Figure 2: IUP Production Operation (o...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                            Page 7Surface  righ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                             Page 87.     ACCES...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                            Page 9 8.     HISTO...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                    Page 10suggested  that  app...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                       Page 11 9.     GEOLOGICA...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                          Page ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                          Page ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                     Page 14observations, since...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                     Page 15Figure 6 : Regional...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                       Page 169...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                  Page 17Intrep...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                     Page 18breccias,  and  wit...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                            Page 19Due to limit...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                               ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                           Page 21The broader E...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                        Page 22                ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                            Page 23structurally...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                          Page 24Porphyry  Cu‐A...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                          Page ...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                            Pag...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                           Page 27argillic  and...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                           Page...
TUJUH BUKIT                                                                                                         Page 2...
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu

1,898 views

Published on

Paran endyane yo

Published in: Design, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,898
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
60
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Tumpengan Tumpang Pitu

  1. 1. PAGE 1 INTREPID MINES LIMITED TUJUH BUKIT PROJECT REPORT ON MINERAL RESOURCES, LOCATED IN EAST JAVA, INDONESIA TECHNICAL REPORT FOR INTREPID MINES LIMITED LEVEL 1, 490 UPPER EDWARD ST. SPRING HILL, QLD 4004 AUSTRALIA 21 JUNE 2011 PHILLIP L. HELLMAN, BSC (HONS 1), DIP ED, PHD, MGSA, MAEG, FAIGHELLMAN & SCHOFIELD PTY LTD TEL: +61 2 9858 38633/6 TRELAWNEY ST, EASTWOOD FAX: +61 2 9858 4077NSW 2122 AUSTRALIA EMAIL: hellscho@hellscho.com.au
  2. 2. TUJUH BUKIT2.0 CONTENTS2.0   CONTENTS................................................................................................................................. 2 LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... 4 LIST OF TABLES ....................................................................................................................................... 6 LIST OF APPENDICES ............................................................................................................................... 6 3.  SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................. 1  3.1  Property..................................................................................................................................... 1  3.2  Location .................................................................................................................................... 1  3.3   Ownership ................................................................................................................................. 1  3.4   Geology and Mineralization ..................................................................................................... 1  3.5   Exploration Concept ................................................................................................................. 1  3.6   Status of Exploration ................................................................................................................ 1  3.7   Development and Operations.................................................................................................... 2  3.8   Qualified Person’s Conclusions and Recommendations .......................................................... 2 4.  INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................... 3 5.  RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTS ............................................................................................... 4 6.  PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATION ............................................................................... 5 7.  ACCESS, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES, INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHYSIOGRAPHY ............... 8 8.  HISTORY .................................................................................................................................... 9 9.  GEOLOGICAL SETTING ........................................................................................................... 11  9.1 Regional Geology ........................................................................................................................ 11  9.2 Local Geology ............................................................................................................................. 16  9.3 Deposit Geology .......................................................................................................................... 21 10.  DEPOSIT TYPES....................................................................................................................... 39 11.  MINERALIZATION..................................................................................................................... 39  11.1 Katak ..................................................................................................................................... 39  11.2 Gunung Manis ....................................................................................................................... 41  11.3 Candrian ................................................................................................................................ 42  11.4 Tumpangpitu ......................................................................................................................... 43 12.  EXPLORATION ......................................................................................................................... 57 13.  DRILLING ................................................................................................................................. 64  13.1   Drilling Contractor and Drilling Statistics .............................................................................. 66  13.2 Drilling Equipment .................................................................................................................. 66  13.3 Down hole Surveys ................................................................................................................. 67  13.4 Drill Hole Collar Survey and Topographic Survey ................................................................. 67  13.5 Summary Results of Drilling ................................................................................................... 67 14.  SAMPLING METHOD AND APPROACH..................................................................................... 68  14.1 Core Processing Protocols ....................................................................................................... 69  14.2 Measurement of Specific Gravity............................................................................................ 71  14.3 Sampling Intervals................................................................................................................... 71  14.4   Core Recovery Data ................................................................................................................ 72  14.5   Comparison of Sludge Samples versus Core Samples ........................................................... 73 15.   SAMPLE PREPARATION AND SECURITY ................................................................................. 75  15.1   Sample Splitting, Packaging and Labelling ............................................................................ 75  15.2   Procedures Employed to Ensure Sample Integrity ................................................................. 75  15.3   Use of IMN Employees in Sampling Procedure ..................................................................... 76  15.4   Sample Security and Transport ............................................................................................... 76  15.5 Analytical Laboratories ........................................................................................................... 77 HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  3. 3. TUJUH BUKIT 15.6 Analytical Methods ................................................................................................................. 78  15.7   QAQC Procedures Employed ................................................................................................. 80  15.8   QAQC Results ........................................................................................................................ 83 16.  DATA VERIFICATION ............................................................................................................... 84 17.  ADJACENT PROPERTIES ......................................................................................................... 85 18.   MINERAL PROCESSING AND METALLURGICAL TESTING ....................................................... 86  18.1  Sulfide Testwork ..................................................................................................................... 86  18.2  Summary of Oxide Testwork .................................................................................................. 86  18.3  Metcon Metallurgical Program ............................................................................................... 91  18.4  KCA Metallurgical Test Program ........................................................................................... 95  18.5  Ore and Waste Acid Neutralization Potential ......................................................................... 97  18.6  Future Work ............................................................................................................................ 97  18.7  Ore Processing ........................................................................................................................ 97 19.  MINERAL RESOURCE AND MINERAL RESERVE ESTIMATE .................................................. 100 20.  OTHER RELEVANT DATA AND INFORMATION....................................................................... 130  20.1   Porphyry Resource................................................................................................................ 130  20.2   Summary Of Preliminary Economic Assessment For The Tujuh Bukit Oxide Project ........ 135 21.  INTERPRETATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS............................................................................... 144  21.1  Interpretations and Conclusion of the Porphyry Resource ................................................... 144  21.2  Interpretations and Conclusion of the Oxide Resource ........................................................ 144 22.   RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................................................ 144  22.1  Recommendations for the Porphyry resource ....................................................................... 144  22.2  Recommendations for the Preliminary Economic Assessment of the Oxide Resource........ 145 23.  REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................ 151 24.  DATE AND SIGNATURE PAGE ............................................................................................... 153 25.   ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR TECHNICAL REPORTS ON DEVELOPMENT PROPERTIES AND PRODUCTION PROPERTIES........................................................................................... 154 26.   ILLUSTRATIONS .................................................................................................................... 154 HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  4. 4. TUJUH BUKITLIST OF FIGURESFigure 1: Location of the Tujuh Bukit Project, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia. .................................................................... 5 Figure 2: IUP Production Operation (outlined in red). ................................................................................................................. 6 Figure 3: IUP Exploration outlined in red. ................................................................................................................................... 6 Figure 4: Regional geology. ...................................................................................................................................................... 12 Figure 5: Location of the Tujuh Bukit project. ........................................................................................................................... 13 Figure 6 : Regional geology of the southeast corner of Java (Jawa Timur). .............................................................................. 15 Figure 7 : Distribution of mineral prospects ............................................................................................................................... 16 Figure 8 : Lithology of the Tumpangpitu prospect region ........................................................................................................... 17 Figure 9 : Lithology of the Tujuh Bukit project as mapped by Placer (2000-2001). ................................................................... 18 Figure 10 : Reduced-to-Pole magnetic image ........................................................................................................................... 20 Figure 11 : Lithology cross-section 11060 mN at Tumpangpitu ................................................................................................. 22 Figure 12 : Distribution of alteration styles at the Tumpangpitu prospect as mapped by GVM-Placer ...................................... 23 Figure 13 : Outcrop of crystal lithic tuff with possible fiame from the Salakan Prospect. ........................................................... 24 Figure 14 : Matrix-supported lithic-crystal tuff from hole GTD-34 (Zone A - Tumpangpitu) ....................................................... 25 Figure 15 : Nine locations where sediments are encountered at Tumpangpitu (Nov. 2010). .................................................... 26 Figure 16 : Images of sedimentary textures in fresh to incipiently propylitic-altered sediments ................................................ 28 Figure 17 : Interbedded, fine-grained volcanic sandstones (propylitic)...................................................................................... 28 Figure 18 : Images of laminated and banded sediment in drill hole GTD-10-162 ...................................................................... 29 Figure 19 : Very coarse grained tonalite (CT): GTD-09-42 (667m)............................................................................................ 32 Figure 20 : Mill breccia from an interpreted diatreme complex at Zone B.................................................................................. 34 Figure 21 : Clast of intense porphyry quartz vein stockwork ..................................................................................................... 35 Figure 22 : Left - Clast of quartz-magnetite alteration (potassic zone) ...................................................................................... 35 Figure 23 : Left - Clast of porphyry related Qtz-magnetite-pyrite altered rock ........................................................................... 35 Figure 24 : Left - Accretionary lapilli from GTD-09-60 ............................................................................................................... 36 Figure 25 : Charcoal wood fragments embedded within chlorite-clay altered mill (diatreme) .................................................... 36 Figure 26 : Muddy matrix breccias (GTD-09-107; 162.10m and 163m)..................................................................................... 37 Figure 27 : Cross-section 11220 mN at Tumpangpitu. .............................................................................................................. 38 Figure 28 : Plan of 5 planned drill holes that were subsequently drilled at Katak. ..................................................................... 40 Figure 29 : Plan of 5 planned drill holes that were subsequently drilled at Katak. ..................................................................... 40 Figure 30 : Alteration map at Gunung Manis ............................................................................................................................. 42 Figure 31 : Location of the Candrian porphyry prospect ............................................................................................................ 43 Figure 32 : Vuggy massive silica (vu-Hsi) alteration of lithic tuff ................................................................................................ 44 Figure 33 : Alteration section 11,200 mN (Placer grid) at Zone A.............................................................................................. 45 Figure 34 : Alteration section 10,910 mN (Placer grid) at Zone C, ............................................................................................ 46 Figure 35 : Alteration section 9045370 mN (UTM grid) at Zone B ............................................................................................. 47 Figure 36 : Plan of the principal porphyry Cu-Au-Mo intersections at Tumpangpitu (yellow bars), ........................................... 48 Figure 37 : Resource block model section 11040 mN (Placer grid) at Tumpangpitu. ................................................................ 49 Figure 38 : Alteration section 11040 mN (Placer grid) at Tumpangpitu (Nov. 2010). ................................................................ 50 Figure 39 : Top-left, GTD-10-167 (403m) Qtz-Mo (B-vein) with Py center-line. ........................................................................ 52 Figure 40 : Average grade of As in oxide drill holes for 3 oxidation classes (fresh, strong, complete) ...................................... 53 Figure 41 : Enrichment factor of As in oxide Zones A-F ............................................................................................................ 53 Figure 42 : Core from the porphyry zone in GTD-09-112 (731.20m depth). .............................................................................. 55 Figure 43 : Core from the porphyry zone in GTD-10-163 .......................................................................................................... 55 Figure 44: Distribution of Au anomalies in -80 mesh soil samples at Tumpangpitu, ................................................................ 60 Figure 45 : Distribution of Cu anomalies in -80 mesh soil samples at Tumpangpitu, ................................................................ 61 Figure 46 : Left – Aeromagnetic data flown by Golden Valley Mines (circa 1999) .................................................................... 63 Figure 47 : Distribution of drill holes at Tumpangpitu as of 9th May 2011. ................................................................................. 65 Figure 48 : Summary of core recovery for the diamond drilling programs at Tumpangpitu. ...................................................... 73 Figure 49 : Plots of Au in core and in corresponding sludge samples for Tumpangpitu. ........................................................... 74 Figure 50 : Plots of Cu in core and in corresponding sludge samples for Tumpangpitu. ........................................................... 74 Figure 51 : Contoured elevation model showing block model limits ........................................................................................ 100 Figure 52 : Location of new mineralised intercepts (red) ......................................................................................................... 101 Figure 53 : Example of sectional interpretation of Cu mineralised zone .................................................................................. 102 Figure 54 : Relationship of elevation to Cu mineralization shell and elevated Cu drill hole intercepts .................................... 102 Figure 55 : Deposit-wide cross section, Cu in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone) ................................................... 106 Figure 56 : Deposit-wide long section, Cu in 6m composites (sulfide zone) ............................................................................ 107 Figure 57 : Deposit-wide cross section, Au in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone).................................................... 108 HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  5. 5. TUJUH BUKITFigure 58 : Deposit-wide long section, Au in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone) .................................................... 109 Figure 59 : Deposit-wide cross section, Mo in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone) .................................................. 110 Figure 60 : Deposit-wide long section, Mo in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone) .................................................... 111 Figure 61 : Deposit-wide cross section, As in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone) ................................................... 112 Figure 62 : Deposit-wide long section, As in 6m composites (transition and sulfide zone) .................................................... 113 Figure 63 : Cu:Au relationship, 6m composites, sulfide mineralization ................................................................................... 113 Figure 64 : Cu:Mo relationship, 6m composites, sulfide mineralization .................................................................................. 114 Figure 65 : Cu:As relationship, 6m composites, sulfide mineralization ................................................................................... 114 Figure 66 : Au:As relationship, 6m composites, sulfide mineralization ................................................................................... 114 Figure 67 : Modelled variograms for Cu (from top: down hole, 040 and 130 directions, UTM) .............................................. 116 Figure 68 : Modelled down-hole variogram for Au .................................................................................................................. 117 Figure 69 : Modelled down-hole variogram for As .................................................................................................................. 117 Figure 70 : Modelled down-hole variogram for Mo ................................................................................................................. 117 Figure 71 : Location of resource in relation to Cu mineralization ............................................................................................ 118 Figure 72 : Location of Exploration Potential in relation to Inferred Resource ........................................................................ 121 Figure 73 : Combined drill holes and block model (oblique section) ....................................................................................... 122 Figure 74 : Legend for sections .............................................................................................................................................. 123 Figure 75 : Oblique section 3, drill hole GTD-08-42 and block model .................................................................................... 123 Figure 76 : Oblique section 6, drill holes and block model ...................................................................................................... 124 Figure 77 : Oblique section 7, drill holes and block model ...................................................................................................... 124 Figure 78 : Oblique section 8, drill holes and block model ...................................................................................................... 125 Figure 79 : Oblique section 9, drill holes and block model ...................................................................................................... 125 Figure 80 : Oblique section 10, drill holes and block model .................................................................................................... 126 Figure 81 : Location of oblique sections in relation to drill holes and block model ................................................................. 127 Figure 82 : Combined drill holes and block model (oblique section) -gold .............................................................................. 128 Figure 83 : Combined drill holes and block model (oblique section) - molybdenum ............................................................... 128 Figure 84 : Combined drill holes and block model (oblique section) - arsenic ........................................................................ 129 Figure 85 : Legend for composite sections for Au, Mo & As ................................................................................................... 129 Figure 86 : Oblique oxide section 9, new results from GTD-11-194 ....................................................................................... 131 Figure 87 : Oblique section 16, new results from GTD-11-201 ............................................................................................... 132 Figure 88 : Oblique section 18, new results from GTD-11-203 ............................................................................................... 133 Figure 89 : Oblique oxide section 6, new results from GTD-11-205 ....................................................................................... 134 Figure 90 : Oblique porphyry section 10, new results from GTD-11-206 ................................................................................ 135 Figure 91: Summary - Standard Bias Plot Lab: Intertek Method; FA30 Method: Au.............................................................. 162 Figure 92: Summary - Standard Bias Plot Lab: Intertek Method: GA02 Method: Cu ............................................................. 162 Figure 93: Charts for Standard: OREAS 53Pb Lab: Intertek ................................................................................................. 163 Figure 94: Check Assays - Au (FA30/Au-AA25); Cu (GA02/ME-OG62); Ag (GA02/ME-OG62)............................................ 165 Figure 95: Field Duplicate Charts (Au, Cu, Ag)...................................................................................................................... 166 Figure 96: Laboratory Repeatability Summary Report (Lab: Intertek) ................................................................................... 167 HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  6. 6. TUJUH BUKITLIST OF TABLESTable 1 : Inferred Oxide Resource at Tumpangpitu as reported in January 2011 ..................................................................... 58 Table 2 : Number of core samples assayed per sampling interval (Tumpangpitu) .................................................................... 71 Table 3 : Summary of core recovery for the diamond drilling programs at Tumpangpitu .......................................................... 72 Table 4 : Method and detection limits for elements analysed in the Tumpangpitu drilling program. ......................................... 78 Table 5 : List of OREAS standards (CRM’s) used in the Tujuh Bukit Project ............................................................................ 82 Table 6 : List of OREAS standards (CRM’s) used in the Tujuh Bukit Project ............................................................................ 82 Table 7 : Summary Results of Metcon Test Program ................................................................................................................ 86 Table 8 : Summary of KCA Test Work ....................................................................................................................................... 88 Table 9 : Summary of KCA Column and Projected Field Recoveries ........................................................................................ 89 Table 10 : KCA Core Photograph Category Summary .............................................................................................................. 90 Table 11 : Metcon Composite Samples ..................................................................................................................................... 91 Table 12 : Head Assays ............................................................................................................................................................. 92 Table 13 : Comparison of Expected, Assayed, & Average Calculated Head Grades ................................................................ 92 Table 14 : Metcon Baseline Cyanidation Test Summary ........................................................................................................... 93 Table 15 : Effect of Higher Cyanide Concentration on Residue Grades .................................................................................... 94 Table 16 : Metcon Comminution Test Summary ........................................................................................................................ 94 Table 17 : Metcon Analyses of Final Leach Solutions ............................................................................................................... 95 Table 18 : Column Leach Test and Expected Field Recoveries ................................................................................................ 96 Table 19 : Cyanide Consumption ............................................................................................................................................... 97 Table 20 : Summary of assayed intervals within interpreted copper mineralised zone ........................................................... 103 Table 21 : Summary of 6m composites within interpreted copper mineralised zone (only sulfide intervals) ........................... 103 Table 22 : Summary of 6m composited densities within interpreted copper mineralised zone ............................................... 103 Table 23: Summary, by hole, of 6m composites within interpreted porphyry zone(sulfide intercepts only) ............................ 104 Table 24 : Block model extents ................................................................................................................................................ 118 Table 25 : Summary of Inferred Resources, sulfide zone ........................................................................................................ 119 Table 26: Production Statistics ............................................................................................................................................... 137 Table 27: Summary of Pre-Production Capital Costs ............................................................................................................. 139 Table 28 : Operating Costs ...................................................................................................................................................... 141 Table 29 : Summary of Financial Results ................................................................................................................................ 141 Table 30 : Internal Standards - Lab: Intertek; Method: FA30 ................................................................................................... 161 Table 31: Internal Standards - Lab: Intertek; Method: GA02 .................................................................................................. 161 Table 32: Internal Standards - Lab: Intertek; Method: GA30 .................................................................................................. 161 Table 33: Internal Blanks – Lab: Intertek ................................................................................................................................ 164 Table 34: Field Duplicates - ½ Core and Sludge samples ...................................................................................................... 165 LIST OF APPENDICESAppendix 1. Details of drill hole locationsAppendix 2. QA/QC Report by D LulofsHELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  7. 7. TUJUH BUKIT Page 13. SUMMARY3.1 PropertyThe Tujuh Bukit Project comprises two exploration tenements (“IUPs”) covering a total area of 11,621.45 hectares.  3.2 LocationThe property is located approximately 205 kilometers southeast of Surabaya, the capital of the  province of East Java, Indonesia  and 60 kilometers southwest of the regional center of Banyuwangi.  The  property  is  centerd  near  8°  35’  20.6”  S  and  114°  01’  08”  N  and  is  bound within UTM co‐ordinates 163,000‐179,000 E and 9042000‐9055000 N.   3.3 OwnershipThe IUP (Izin Usaha Pertambangan) ‐Explorasi and IUP Operasi and Produksi were granted to PT.  Indo Multi  Niaga  ("IMN")  on 25th  January  2010  by  the  Bupati of Banyuwangi  (Regional Administrator,  Banyuwangi,  East  Java)  under  decree  number  188/05/KP/429.012/2007. Intrepid Mines Limited (“Intrepid”) and IMN have signed a Joint Venture agreement enabling Intrepid to hold an 80% economic interest in the Tujuh Bukit Project.   3.4 Geology and MineralizationThe principal styles of mineralization that are the focus of exploration and delineation drilling on  the  Tujuh  Bukit  Project  are  high‐sulfidation  epithermal  Cu‐Au‐Ag  mineralization  and porphyry  Cu‐Au  mineralization.  The  rocks  within  the  porphyry  environment  become intensely altered by the passage of hot saline fluids of varying pH and by the late descent of cool oxidized ground‐waters that are out of equilibrium with the host rocks.   These  areas  of  rock  alteration  are  typically  zoned  at  the  district‐scale,  a  feature  that  can provide vectors to porphyry Cu‐Au ore in magmatic‐related hydrothermal systems. Porphyry deposits  contain  the  vast  majority  of  the  copper  resources  of  the  Pacific  island  arcs  and significant amounts of gold, silver and molybdenum. Porphyry copper‐gold deposits tend to be  large,  fairly  uniformly  mineralized  and  relatively  low‐grade  deposits  with  great  vertical extent.    3.5 Exploration ConceptThe  project  is  of  an  advanced  nature,  with  well  understood  geological  potential  and  an Inferred  Resource.  It  will  progress  by  infill  drilling,  step‐out  drilling,  drilling  to  depth  and follow‐up of geophysical (e.g. magnetic) and geochemical targets around the immediate area of identified mineralization.   3.6 Status of ExplorationResource delineation and step‐out drilling.  HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  8. 8. TUJUH BUKIT Page 23.7 Development and OperationsNone as yet.   3.8 Qualified Person’s Conclusions and RecommendationsIn the Qualified Person’s opinion, the character of the property is of sufficient merit to justify continued drilling. HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  9. 9. TUJUH BUKIT Page 34. INTRODUCTIONThis technical report is prepared by P. L. Hellman, an Independent Consultant to Intrepid, to comply with NI 43‐101 reporting guidelines. Technical information and data contained in the report or used in its preparation are sourced from reports compiled by previous workers of the  property together with internal reports of the current tenement holders as well as the authors  own  observations  whilst  visiting  the  site  and  working  with  data  from  the  site generated by others.   This report documents the second Inferred Resource estimate at the Tumpangpitu porphyry Cu‐Au  prospect  in  East  Java,  Indonesia.  The  Tumpangpitu  Prospect  forms  a  part  of  the broader Tujuh  Bukit Project.  The  objective  of  the  report  is  to estimate  the  second  Inferred Mineral Resource and to assess the merits of continued drilling on the Prospect  The  property  has  been  visited  by  the  Author  on  four  occasions  from  November  2007.  The initial visit was focused on drilling programs at Tumpangpitu Prospects Zones C and A which were aimed at defining oxide gold‐silver resources. These have been separately reported in other NI 43‐101 reports (Hellman, 2008, 2009 & 2011). Later visits included reviews of drilling on the deeper sulfide porphyry copper‐gold system. The Author observed the progress of the drilling programs in the Zones C and A oxide areas, visited the site office at Pulau Merah and provided  advice  on  sampling,  QA/QC,  geological  logging,  geotechnical  data  acquisition  and general  data  handling  protocols.  The  Author  inspected  the  property  over  several  days  in October  2010  and  observed  drilling  activities,  drill  core  and  participate  with  on‐site discussions  with  staff.  The  Author  also  inspected  the  property  in  December  2010  and observed drill core handling in the Tumpangpitu core yard as well as attending meetings in the site office at Pulau Merah.  HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  10. 10. TUJUH BUKIT Page 45. RELIANCE ON OTHER EXPERTSThe  author  of  this  report  is  an  Independent  Qualified  Person  and  has  relied  on  various datasets and reports that were provided by Intrepid, and project consultants to support the interpretation of exploration results discussed in this report on mineral resources. The data that was provided  to the author was deemed to be in good stead, and is  considered to  be reliable.  The  author  is  not  aware  of  any  critical  data  that  has  been  omitted  so  as  to  be detrimental  to  the  objectives  of  this  report.  There  was  sufficient  data  provided  to  enable credible and well constrained interpretations to be made in respect of data.  Assay  data  is  handled  by  an  independent  database  bureau  that  receives  electronic  results directly from the laboratory. The data is then directly transferred to the Author.  Statements  regarding  tenement  status,  legal  right  to  mine  and  explore,  environmental liability  have  been  accepted  in  good  faith  from  Intrepid  and  are  outside  the  expertise  of Hellman & Schofield Pty Ltd. HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  11. 11. TUJUH BUKIT Page 56. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION AND LOCATIONThe  Tujuh  Bukit  Project  comprises  two  adjoining  IUPs  (Izin  Usaha  Pertambangan)  –  an  IUP Exploration of 6623.45 hectares and an IUP Production Operation of 4998 hectares ‐ located approximately 205 kilometers southeast of Surabaya, the capital of the province of East Java, Indonesia and 60 kilometers southwest of the regional center of Banyuwangi. The Project is centered  near  8°  35’  20.6”  S  and  114°  01’  08”  N  and  is  bound  within  UTM  co‐ordinates 163,000‐179,000 E and 9042000‐9055000 N. The tenements are located  within  the desa of Sumberagung, Kecamatan Pesanggaran, Kabupaten Banyuwangi (Figure 1).  The IUP Exploration (Number – 188/9/KEP/429.011/2010) abuts and surrounds to the south, west and north the IUP Production Operation. It was issued on 25 January 2010 for a period of  4  years  (Figure  2).The  IUP  Production  Operation  (Number  –  188/10/KEP/429.011/2010) was also issued on 25 January 2010 for a period of 20 years (Figure 2).The IUPs were issued in compliance with the new Indonesian Mining Law (Law number 4 Year 2009) and concerning the Extension Application and Adjustment of the pre‐existing  KP Exploration to become an IUP Exploration, and the KP Exploitation to become an IUP Production Operation.  The pre‐existing KP‐Explorasi (Kuasa Pertambangan or exploration mining permit) had been granted to PT. Indo Multi Niaga on 16 February 2007 by the Bupati of Banyuwangi (Regional Administrator, Banyuwangi, East Java) under decree number 188/05/KP/429.012/2007. This followed directly from an initial SKIP tenure period and a subsequent one year period under tenement  license  KP‐General  Survey  (decree  No.  188/57/KP/429.012/2006  granted  on  20 March, 2006).  Figure 1: Location of the Tujuh Bukit Project, Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia.HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  12. 12. TUJUH BUKIT Page 6Figure 2: IUP Production Operation (outlined in red).(Green areas are generalised representations of areas of Protection Forest).Figure 3: IUP Exploration outlined in red.Green areas are generalised representations of areas of Protection Forest.HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  13. 13. TUJUH BUKIT Page 7Surface  rights  in  the  area  are  held  by  the  Department  of  Forestry  and  include  farmland, production forests, protected forest areas, and some villages. The villages are located within the  IUP  area  but  not  in  any  of  the  areas  identified  for  exploration  at  this  point.  The  IUPs require annual rent payments and submissions of quarterly reports regarding the company’s activities on the tenement to the regional government.  The  tenement  boundaries  were  located  with  GPS  coordinates  and  the  boundary  of  the tenements has subsequently been surveyed and marked with a concrete pegs.  The  main  mineralized  prospect,  Tumpangpitu,  is  located  in  the  southeast  portion  of  the tenement  and  covers  an  area  of  about  3  by  2  kilometers.  The  other  significant  prospect, Salakan, is located in the northwest part of the tenement and covers an area of about 6.0 by 4.0  kilometers.  Other  prospects  at  Gunung  Manis,  Katak  and  Candrian  lie  to  the  east  of Tumpangpitu.  No  historical  mining  activity  has  been  conducted  within  or  near  to  the boundaries of the tenement.  Under the Terms of the Alliance Agreement, Intrepid was granted an option to acquire up to an 80% economic interest in the Tujuh Bukit Project. The agreement recognizes the potential to increase the area held under IUP up to a 25km radius from the existing IUP boundaries.  Intrepid  has  earned  its  80%  economic  interest  in  the  project  through  project  funding  of A$5M (to earn 51%) and through funding further exploration for an additional A$3M to earn an additional 29% stake.   Intrepid then free carries IMNs 20% towards completion of a Feasibility Study but this free carry is limited to an additional A$42M. The Alliance Agreement includes payments to IMN upon meeting various conditions.   Upon  meeting  conditions  for  the  80/20  economic  interest,  the  parties  then  fund  on  a  pro‐rata basis equal to their percentage interest. Standard dilution clauses apply  if either  party elects not to fund.   Intrepid advises that there is no knowledge of any environmental liabilities associated with the project. A permit is required to conduct exploration activities within areas of protected and production forest and these have been issued by the Department of Forestry for work on this project.   This  report  is  the  fifth  on  mineral  resource  estimates  from  this  prospect  area  within  the Tujuh Bukit Project.  HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  14. 14. TUJUH BUKIT Page 87. ACCESS, CLIMATE, LOCAL RESOURCES, INFRASTRUCTURE AND PHYSIOGRAPHYThe  project  area  encompasses  Gunung  Tumpangpitu  (489  m  ASL)  and  surrounding  hill country which graduates into alluvial plains near to sea level. The majority of landforms are steep  and  rugged  with  poorly  drained  ephemeral  streams  having  only  seasonal  discharges. Streams  and  creeks  on  the  northern  side  of  Gunung  Tumpangpitu  drain  into  Sungai  Gede which flows actively for 8‐10 months of the year.  The region has a wet and dry season climate typical of tropical equatorial countries. The wet season is subject to seasonal influence of the northwest monsoon from November to March. Rainfall in the mountain ranges to the north ranges between 1725‐3500mm/year decreasing toward the coast to 1110‐1850mm/year (Campbell, 2000). Temperatures range from 26‐31oC during the day down to 22‐24oC overnight. Relative humidity is typically high, ranging from 80 to 100%. Whilst the agreeable climate allows exploration activity to continue year‐round, prolonged dry weather may result in a lack of local water sources for drilling which then must be sourced from Sungai Gonggo some 4‐6 kilometers to the east of Tumpangpitu.  On  the  lower  slopes,  government‐owned  teak  plantations,  classified  as  Hutan  Produksi (Production  Forest),  are  common  and  are  administered  by  the  Perhutani  (Forestry Department), Banyuwangi. Remnant stands of forest on the upper slopes and top of Gunung Tumpangpitu  are  classified  as  Hutan  Lindung  (Protected  Forest).  Permits  are  required,  and have  been  issued,  from  the  Perhutani  for  undertaking  exploration  within  Protected  and Production Forest areas.  In lowland alluvial areas, or areas where tree plantations have been harvested, local farmers grow  cash  crops  such  as  corn,  rice,  coconut,  bananas,  chili,  tobacco,  vegetables  and  citrus. The area also supports a small local fishing industry.  Road access to the project is afforded via sealed road from Surabaya (8 hours) and Denpasar, Bali  (7  hours).  Roads  are  single  lane  and  conditions  vary  from  good  to  poor  and  are  in  a constant  state  of  repair.  The  trip  from  Bali  includes  a  1‐2  hour  ferry  crossing  of  the  strait between Bali and Java.   Helicopter access is available to the project from Bali. IMN has a helicopter on full time hire at  site  and  periodically  uses  the  helicopter  to  transfer  passengers  to  site.  The  flight  takes about 40 minutes.  Domestic  and  international  flights  operate  daily  to  Surabaya  and  Denpasar  from  Jakarta, Singapore and Australia.   HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  15. 15. TUJUH BUKIT Page 9 8. HISTORYThe  project  area  was  first  explored  by  PT.  Hakman  Platina  Metalindo  and  its  JV  partner, Golden  Valley  Mines  of  Australia.  Golden  Valley  Mines  identified  the  potential  of  the Tumpangpitu  and  Salakan  areas  as  prospective  targets  for  porphyry  copper  type mineralization following a regional (1:50,000) drainage and rock‐chip geochemical sampling program  conducted  during  December  1997  –  May  1998.  Subsequently,  a  rapid  detailed surface geochemical sampling program was conducted over Gunung Tumpangpitu resulting in  seven  targets  being  identified  for  drilling.  An  initial  drilling  program  of  5  diamond  drill holes – GT‐001 to GT‐005 – was conducted during March – June 1999.  In February 2000 Placer Dome Inc. (Placer) entered into a Joint Venture with Golden Valley Mines  to  earn  51%  of  the  project  and  assumed  operational  control  of  the  exploration program.  In  order  to  better  define  targets  for  follow‐up  drilling  on  Tumpangpitu  32.75 kilometers  of  grid‐based  geochemical  and  IP  surveys  were  completed  between  April‐May 2000. Anomalous bedrock geochemistry  demonstrated marked consistency with  prominent ridges or topographic highs, trending to the northwest, consisting dominantly of vuggy silica altered breccia.  The  results  of  the  IP  survey  demonstrated  strong  correlation  between  the  near‐surface resistivity anomalies and the outcropping vuggy silica zones. Deeper chargeability anomalies (>200‐400  m  below  surface)  were  recorded  in  the  northern  portion  of  the  grid.  Placer targeted the shallow resistivity anomalies for high sulfidation style Au‐Ag mineralization with a further 10 diamond drill holes – GT‐006 to GT‐014.  On the basis of the results from the second drilling program a further 14 holes were designed (2,700m). However, Placer withdrew from the project due to the combined influences of the relatively  low  metal  prices  at  the  time  (i.e.,  the  project  did  not  appear  to  meet  corporate thresholds of size and grade) together with an unstable economic and political climate across much of south‐east Asia (the Asian Financial Crisis).  There is no report or record of further work being conducted on the project by Placer‐GVM and the area became vacant by the time IMN applied for a KP General Survey in 2006 over the project area.   In  June  2006  Hellman  and  Schofield  Pty  Ltd  (“H&S”,  an  independent  geological  consulting group from Australia) assisted a previous Joint Venture of IMN with an Australian company in assembling  exploration  data  and  designing  a  drilling  program  aimed  at  advancing  the Tumpangpitu prospect in order to report resource estimates according to the JORC Code and Guidelines.   H&S  was  able  to  provide  an  indication  of  the  size  of  potential  mineralization  within  the variably oxidized gold‐silver enriched zone above the deeper copper mineralization by using the  limited  available  drilling  data  along  with  soil  sample  geochemical  results.  This  study HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  16. 16. TUJUH BUKIT Page 10suggested  that  approximately  3m oz  Au  Equivalent  (“AuEq”  was  based  on  $650/Oz  Au  and $10/Oz Ag) was a reasonable amalgamated target size in oxide Zones A, B & C.  Overall indications of potential may be expressed using cautionary language and with grade and tonnage ranges. It should never be assumed that suggested grades and tonnages from these types of studies will be realized, they are solely used in the context of understanding the types of drilling targets and broad scale of mineralization.  On March 30, 2007 a Term Sheet was signed between Emperor Mines Ltd. (later to become Intrepid.  through  the  merger  of  Emperor  Mines  and  Intrepid)  and  IMN  and  IndoAust  Pty. Ltd., which was followed by an Alliance Agreement between Emperor Mines Ltd, and IMN in April 2008. Drilling on the project by IMN and Intrepid commenced in September 2007 with hole GTD‐07‐015.  Additional  historical  drill  hole  assays  became  available  between  February  and  August  2007 enabling a slightly more informed view of the geological potential. The September 2007 H&S study of Geological Potential used Ordinary Block Kriging of 2m composited AuEq data within polygon extrusions.   This report documents the drilling completed by IMN and Intrepid  during the period 2008‐2011 on the porphyry copper‐gold mineralization.   HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  17. 17. TUJUH BUKIT Page 11 9. GEOLOGICAL SETTING9.1 Regional GeologyThe Tujuh Bukit project lies on the south coast of East Java, within the central portion of the Sunda‐Banda magmatic arc which trends southeast from northern Sumatra to west Java then eastward through east Java, Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa and Flores.  The  Sunda‐Banda  volcanic  arc  developed  during  subduction  of  the  north‐moving  Indo‐Australian plate beneath the Asian continental plate margin. The Sunda‐Banda arc of Middle Miocene  to  Pliocene  age  is  thought  to  have  initiated  by  subduction  reversal  following  an Oligocene  compressive  event  that  was  associated  with  the  northward  emplacement  of ophiolite  and  island  arc  assemblages  onto  the  Sunda  margin  and  associated  formation  of melanges, ophiolite fragments and deformation zones offshore from western Sumatra (Daly et  al.,  1991;  Harbury  and  Kallagher,  1991).  The initiation of  northward subduction  beneath the Sunda‐Banda arc migrated eastward following this collision event. The western segment of  the  arc,  west  of  central  Java,  developed on continental crust  on  the  southern margin  of Sundaland whilst the arc east of Central Java developed on thinner island arc crust (Carlisle and Mitchell, 1994).   There are substantial tectonic variations along the length of the Sunda‐Banda arc, and these variations  have  been  the  subject  of  studies  to  understand  along‐arc  variations  in  magma chemistry.  Subduction  is  highly  oblique  along  the  northwest  segment  of  the  arc,  along Sumatra  and  towards  the  Andaman  Islands  and  Burma  (Moore  et  al.,  1980).  The  strike‐slip Sumatra  Fault  takes  up  much  of  the  oblique  convergence  between  the  plates.  Along  this northwest portion of the arc, very thick sedimentary sequences from the Bengal and Nicobar fans are transported into the subduction zone. Further to the southeast, subduction is near perpendicular  to  the  Sunda‐Banda  arc,  off‐shore  from  Java,  and  only  a  very  thin  cover  of sediment  enters  the  subduction  zone.  Further  to  the  east,  incipient  areas  of  collision  are occurring along the arc where fragments of the Australian continental margin are accreting against the Banda arc (e.g. Timor).    There  are  also  variations  in  dominant  styles  of  mineralization  along  the  arc.  In  northern Sumatra  in  the  Aceh  province,  mineralization  is  characterized  by  porphyry  Cu‐Mo  systems and high‐sulfidation deposits (e.g. Miwah and Martabe). In contrast, southern Sumatra, west Java and central Java are typified by a lack of known porphyry systems but an abundance of low‐sulfidation  epithermal  deposits  or  prospects/vein  systems.  Examples  include  Tambang Sawah,  Rawas,  Lebong  Donok,  Lebong  Simpang  and  Seung  Kecil  in  southern  Sumatra,  plus the  Cikotok  and  Jampang  districts,  Gunung  Pongkor  and  Cikondang  in  west  Java  and Trenggallek  in  central  Java.  Further  the  east,  in  east  Java  and  then  through  Lombok  and Sumbawa,  there  is  a  reappearance  of  porphyry  and  high‐sulfidation  epithermal  systems along  the  eastern  arc  segment,  including  the  Tumpangpitu  high‐sulfidation  epithermal  and porphyry  system  on  Intrepid’s  Tujuh  Bukit  project,  The  Selodong  high‐sulfidation  and HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  18. 18. TUJUH BUKIT Page 12porphyry  district  including  the  Motong  Botek  porphyry  system  on  Lombok,  and  the  Batu Hijau porphyry Cu‐Au system on Sumbawa.     The Sunda‐Banda arc comprises both Miocene to Pliocene volcanics and younger Quaternary volcanics. The arc has migrated not only from west to east over time but also from south to north  (Van  Bemmelen,  1970;  Whitford  et.  al.,  1979;  Katili  1989  and  Claproth  1989).  This migration  is  clearly  evident  by  the  east‐west  alignment  of  deeply  dissected  Miocene  to Pliocene volcanic centers along the south coast of Java, Lombok and Sumbawa and a parallel east‐west  alignment  of  juvenile  and  active  Quaternary  volcanoes  that  define  the  present active arc further north along central Java and northern Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa (Figure below). Figure 4: Regional geology.Relationship of the older, Miocene age, eroded volcanic centers (blue rings) that host mineralization at Trenggalek (lowsulfidation epithermal veins), Tujuh Bukit (high-sulfidation epithermal and porphyry system), Selodong (high-sulfidationepithermal and porphyry system), and Batu Hijau (porphyry system), relative to the younger, Quaternary arc volcanoes to thenorth which collectively make up the east-west trending present day Sunda-Banda arc.The Sunda‐Banda arc is segmented by a series of arc‐normal structures that trend NNE and which  are  evident  in  topographic  data‐sets  (Figure  4).  Tectonic  factors  appear  to  have localized  volcanic  centers  of  the  Miocene  arc  at  positions  near  the  southwest  margins  of these  transfer  structures.  Contemporaneous  continental  to  deep‐ocean  clastic  sediments were deposited on the margins of the volcanic centers.   HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  19. 19. TUJUH BUKIT Page 13The  Tujuh  Bukit  project  is  located  (Figure  5)  near  the  southeast  margin  of  a  ~50‐km‐wide annular zone of strongly dissected topography that is interpreted to represent the relics of a former  andesitic  stratovolcanic  center  in  East  Java.  This  deeply  dissected  volcanic  center appears to be eroded to near its roots, close to the volcanic‐basement contact (Rohrlach and Norris, 2006). Areas of similar topographic character occur along a WNW‐ESE linear zone that also  encapsulates  an  area  in  southern  Sumbawa  (which  hosts  the  Pliocene‐age  Batu  Hijau deposit ‐ 1640 mt @ 0.44% Cu, 0.55% Mo, 0.35 g/t Au; 3.7 Myr old (Figure 4). Figure 5: Location of the Tujuh Bukit project.It occurs on the southeast flank of a deeply incised Miocene-age volcanic center that is ~50 km in diameter (black dottedoutline).This eroded volcanic center lies SSW of the Quaternary volcano Gunung Raung which forms part of a largercomposite stratovolcano in east Java. Access to the Tujuh Bukit project area is by ferry from Gilimanuk (Bali) to Banyuwangi(regional center of Jawa Timur – East Java), and then by road through Genteng and Jajag to the project site.Figure 6 portrays the geology over an area of approximately 70 km x 25 km in southeast Java. The broad stratigraphic succession of the area as defined on the 1:100,000 geology map of the  Blambangan  Quadrangle  is  described  below  and  comprises  various  formations  of  the Lampon Group of Late Tertiary Age.    Batuampar Formation  The  oldest  rock  in  the  area  comprise  the  Batuampar  Formation  of  Lower  Miocene  age.  It comprises  a  volcanic‐dominated  succession  of  volcanic  breccia  (pyroclastic  deposits),  tuff, sandstones and andesite lava with limestone intercalations. These rocks are described in the regional  1:100,000  map  as  "being  strongly  altered",  verified  by  Intrepid‐IMN  field HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  20. 20. TUJUH BUKIT Page 14observations, since these rocks host mineralization at the Tumpangpitu prospect and at the Salakan  prospect.  The  volcanics  of  the  Batuampar  Formation  comprise  the  roots  of  the eroded  volcanic  structure  depicted  in  Figure  5.  Within  the  immediate  environs  of  the Tumpangpitu prospect the Batuampar Formation is dominated by intensely advanced argillic altered  coarse  pyroclastic  lithic  tuffs  and  very  subordinate  (<  3%)  limestone,  marl  and volcanic sandstone. The limestone intercalations may become important as a source of lime for  mineral  processing  or  control  acid‐mine  drainage  in  the  future,  as  the  Tumpangpitu prospect progresses towards production stage.     Batuan Intrusives  Intrusive stocks of Middle Miocene age intrude the Batuampar Formation volcanic rocks and are  almost  certainly  responsible  for  the  widespread  alteration  within  that  formation.  They are mapped on the 1:100,000 Blambangan Quadrangle as comprising porphyry andesite and granodiorite, and are confined to the southeast corner of the Tujuh Bukit project area (Figure 6). Although these intrusives are not mapped in the Salakan prospect area on the 1:100,000 scale map, they are likely to lie at shallow depth below the prospect. Intrusive bodies have been observed around the eastern periphery of the Salakan prospect by Intrepid‐IMN where they  are  coincident  with  magnetic  bodies.  The  magnetic  tonalites  intersected  by  the  deep drilling at Tumpangpitu are likely to be members of the Batuan Intrusive suite.   Jaten Formation  The  Jaten  Formation  of  Middle  Miocene  age  comprises  mixed  sediments  and  tuffaceous sediments  (sandstone,  conglomeratic  sandstone,  tuffaceous  sandstone,  calcareous sandstone,  claystone,  tuff  and  tuffaceous  limestone)  which  outcrop  only  in  one  mapped locality,  between  the  Batuampar  Formation  on  the  Capil  promontory  and  the  fault‐bound sliver of Wuni Formation to the north.        Wuni Formation  The  Wuni  Formation  is  of  Late  Miocene  to  Pliocene  age  and  comprises  of  breccia, conglomerate, sandstone, tuff, marl and limestone. It outcrops only in two isolated localities and  is  covered  by  extensive  blankets  of  Quaternary  marine  sediment  (limestones  of  the Punung Formation) and transported Quaternary sediments of largely volcanic origin (Kalibaru Formation) along the distal southern flanks of Gunung Raung.        HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  21. 21. TUJUH BUKIT Page 15Figure 6 : Regional geology of the southeast corner of Java (Jawa Timur).Punung Formation  The  Punung  Formation  comprises  a  Quaternary  sequence  of  reefal  limestone,  bedded limestone  and  marl  which  forms  a  flat‐lying  and  recently  emergent  shallow  marine stratigraphic  unit.  The  extensive  exposure  of  Punung  Formation  limestones  on  the Blambangan  peninsula  is  likely  contiguous  with  the  isolated  outlier  of  Punung  Formation exposed north of the Capil promontory. More restricted outcrops of limestone occur in the Tujuh Bukit district in at least two localities.   Kalibaru Formation  The Kalibaru Formation comprises a Quaternary sequence of breccia, conglomerate, tuff and tuffaceous  sandstone  which  covers  extensive  areas  on  the  eastern  side  of  the  Tujuh  Bukit property. The Kalibaru Formation appears to represent part of an extensive outwash sheet of volcanic  detritus  that  is  largely  derived  from  the  Quaternary  Mount  Ruang  composite stratovolcano  to  the  north.  Near  the  Tujuh  Bukit  project,  these  Quaternary  sediments  lie directly on the older Miocene‐age altered volcanic sequence of the Batuampar formation.      HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  22. 22. TUJUH BUKIT Page 169.2 Local GeologyTwo areas of high topographic relief occur on the Tujuh Bukit property (Figure 7). The first of these  occurs  on  the  southern‐most  peninsula,  coincident  with  the  Tumpangpitu  porphyry and  high‐sulfidation  epithermal  deposit,  where  extensive  silicification  associated  with  an advanced  argillic  blanket  overlies  the  Tumpangpitu  porphyry  system.  This  series  of  hills extends to the east at lower elevation and cover the Katak porphyry prospect, the Candrian porphyry  prospect  and  the  Gunung  Manis  low‐sulfidation  epithermal  prospect.  The  second area  of  high  topographic  relief  extends  from  the  southern  end  of  the  western  peninsula northeast‐ward  to  the  higher  hills  that  are  coincident  with  the  Salakan  prospect.  Again, extensive areas of silicification associated with advanced argillic alteration are responsible for the erosional resistance of this elevated area at Salakan on the Tujuh Bukit property.            Figure 7 : Distribution of mineral prospectsYellow outlines relative to topography mark various prospects. Numerous other exploration targets have been defined northand east of Salakan based on interpretations of helibourne-acquired magnetic data (not plotted).  Understanding  of  the  surface  geology  (lithology)  of  the  Tujuh  Bukit  project  area  is  quite general  in  nature  due  to  lack  of  detailed  geological  mapping  over  the  entire  region.  This understanding however is steadily growing as more detailed infill mapping is undertaken by HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  23. 23. TUJUH BUKIT Page 17Intrepid,  and  as  interpretations  of  a  regional  magnetic  dataset  are  progressively  ground‐truthed.    A lithology map over the Tumpangpitu area, and the hilly terrain east of Tumpangpitu, was generated by PT Hakman Platina Metallindo prior to or during 1999 (Figure 8). This mapping identified  a  dominantly  diorite  and  microdiorite  substrate  which  had  been  intruded  by extensive  granodiorite  bodies  east  of  Tumpangpitu  and  by  smaller  quartz‐diorite  bodies  in and  around  Tumpangpitu.  These  intrusions  are  considered  equivalent  to  the  Batuan Intrusives  described  above.  This  map  appears  to  be  of  “reasonable”  accuracy  given  the regional reconnaissance scale of the map, and known geology in and around Tumpangpitu.        Figure 8 : Lithology of the Tumpangpitu prospect regionIn the area east of Tumpangpitu as mapped by PT. Hakman Platina Metalindo (1999). These mapped sequences comprisevolcanic breccias of the Batuampar Formation and more abundant Batuan Intrusives.  A  complete  lithology  map  also  exists  from  the  period  of  exploration  by  Placer  (2000‐2001) and is shown in Figure 9. This map shows similar geology to the map above, only with a more restricted distribution of lithic tuffs mapped by Placer. In this respect, the PT Hakman  map (above) appears more correct  than the Placer map. The Placer map however,  also includes lithology  over  the  Salakan  prospect  area,  where  diorites  are  mapped  intruding  subvolcanic HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  24. 24. TUJUH BUKIT Page 18breccias,  and  with  diorite  intruded  by  quartz  diorites.  The  extensive  distribution  of  the mapped breccia, however, suggests that it is more likely to be volcaniclastic in origin rather than a subvolcanic breccia as labelled.          Figure 9 : Lithology of the Tujuh Bukit project as mapped by Placer (2000-2001). Reasonably  complete,  though  generalised,  reconnaissance  maps  were  subsequently generated  by  IMN  in  2006  over  the  Salakan  and  Tumpangpitu  prospects.  However,  the  PT Hakman lithology map (Figure 8) is considered to be more reliable in the Tumpangpitu area.                  Mapping subsequently undertaken by Intrepid (2009‐2010) covers three more local and non‐contiguous areas:   1)   The coastline west of Tumpangpitu  2)   The Katak porphyry prospect, and   3)   The Gunung Manis low‐sulfidation epithermal prospect.   These  local  maps  are  of  appropriate  quality  and  detail  to  understand  the  geology  in  these three areas. It is planned to progressively extend these maps to cover the entire region over and east of Tumpangpitu. Consequently, both of the main prospect areas (Tumpangpitu and Salakan) require significantly more detailed mapping to be undertaken. HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  25. 25. TUJUH BUKIT Page 19Due to limited mapping information, a significant portion of the geological understanding of the regional lithology comes from drilling cross‐sections. The structural understanding of the project area comes largely from interpretation of regional magnetic datasets.  The local to deposit‐scale lithology is discussed in Section 9.3 below whilst the deposit‐scale alteration patterns are discussed in Section 11 (Mineralization) since alteration is intimately related to mineralization events.            Within  the  broader  area  of  the  Tujuh  Bukit  project,  an  extensive  volcanic‐dominated succession of volcanic breccia (pyroclastic deposits), tuff, sandstones, and andesite lava with limestone  intercalations  occurs,  consistent  with  government  map  descriptions  of  this volcano‐sedimentary sequence (Batuampar Formation).   In  areas  of  low‐terrain,  these  sequences  are  overlain  by  Quaternary  to  recent  alluvial deposits,  particularly  around  the  Pancer  coastal  embayment  south  of  Salakan  and  also northwest and east of the Salakan hills.   The Batuampar Formation is intruded by numerous plutons and stocks that are identified in all  generations  of  regional  mapping,  in  Intrepid/IMN  drilling,  and  extensively  identified  in magnetic data where they are recognized as magnetic features typical of I‐type calc‐alkaline magmas. These are the Batuan Intrusives described above. Intrusive members recognized by Intrepid  include  microdiorite,  diorite,  hornblende‐diorite,  quartz‐hornblende‐diorite hornblende  andesite  porphyry  and  tonalite.    In  addition  to  the  mapped  distribution  of intrusions, members of this suite have been identified south of Tumpangpitu and extensively along the eastern periphery of Salakan. Several of these intrusives (either mapped or inferred from magnetic data) are geochemically anomalous at surface.   Intense hydrothermal alteration has obscured a substantial portion of the original protolith textures  of  many  rocks  in  the  district,  particularly  parts  of  the  advanced  argillic  lithocap  at Tumpangpitu.   The  structural framework of the Tujuh Bukit  district is best  interpreted using  the heliborne magnetic data‐set. Figure 10 shows a Reduced‐To‐Pole (RTP) magnetic image of the broader Tumpangpitu Batholith and the East Salakan Batholith.   The aggregation of high‐amplitude magnetic anomalies within and around the eastern half of the Salakan prospect are interpreted as Batuan intrusives, as are the linear array of magnetic highs  that  trend  northwest  through  the  Tumpangpitu  Batholith.  The  image  is  overlain  by  a structural  interpretation  conducted  by  Chris  Moore  of  Moore  Geophysics.  1st  order  fault corridors trend northwest, one passing near the  northeast margin  of the Tumpangpitu and East Salakan batholiths, the other passing under Pancer Bay. A third sub‐parallel to low‐angle northwest‐trending  structure  dissects  the  Tumpangpitu  Batholith  in  approximately  equal halves.  This  fault  structure  localises  a  series  of  at  least  eight  discreet  magnetic  high anomalies over at least a 16 km structural strike length. These discrete magnetic anomalies are interpreted as intrusive stocks emplaced along this structure. Consequently this district‐scale  structure  was  likely  active  during  mid‐Miocene  Batuan  stage  magmatism.  This  key HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  26. 26. TUJUH BUKIT Page 20regional  fault  (labelled  “metallogentically  fertile  structure”)  hosts  the  magnetic  diorite intrusion at the Katak porphyry system and the inferred magnetic intrusions immediately SSE of the Gunung Manis low‐sulfidation epithermal vein array.     Figure 10 : Reduced-to-Pole magnetic imageThis is broadly coincident with the eastern half of the Tujuh Bukit property. Black lines are interpreted regional faults. Bluedashed lines envelope deep-seated batholiths, white outlines define structurally-controlled magnetic intrusive centers whilstyellow outlines define a NW array of porphyry centers at Tumpangpitu. Details of this image are discussed in the text of thereport. HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  27. 27. TUJUH BUKIT Page 21The broader East Salakan Batholith and Tumpangpitu Batholiths are about 5 km in diameter. At  East  Salakan,  the  batholith  appears  to  be  intruded  in  its  core  by  a  highly  magnetic intrusive about 1.5 km in diameter, and which is surrounded by a complex annual rim or zone of magnetite destruction interspersed with small discrete magnetic highs (between the two yellow outlines within the East Salakan Batholith). This magnetic pattern has the hallmarks of a  large  hydrothermal  system  developed  around  the  periphery  of  the  intrusive  core  at  East Salakan.         Other 2nd order fault sets observed in the data shown in Figure 10 and trend ENE and WNW.   The overall geometry of these structures, forming braided to  complex arrays of parallel and curved, en echelon faults is reminiscent of major transcurrent fault systems.   Thus  the  district‐scale  structural  picture  is  of  a  regional  NW‐trending  structural  corridor which  is  likely  to  be  a  major  crustal‐scale  and  near  arc‐parallel  strike‐slip  fault  zone.  This transcurrent  fault  system  potentially  guided  the  emplacement  of  the  two  large  batholiths beneath the eroded volcanic center. The erosional level within the Tujuh Bukit district is at the  right  level  to  expose  the  top  of  porphyry  systems  whilst  preserving  the  lower  parts  of their  respective  epithermal  environments,  in  other  words,  around  the  sub‐volcanic  brittle‐ductile  transition.  This  opportune  level  of  erosion  has  produced  the  complex  magnetic patterns characteristic of terrains that preserve the apical levels of multiple intrusive stocks typical of the carapace of deep‐seated batholiths.  9.3 Deposit GeologyThe  Tumpangpitu  deposit  comprises  a  high‐sulfidation  Cu‐Au‐Ag  epithermal  system  that  is telescoped onto a large underlying and Au‐rich porphyry Cu‐Au‐Mo system.  In  general  terms,  the  overall  mineralizing  system  broadly  comprises  a  deep,  magnetic tonalite  intrusion  that  has  intruded  into  an  older  and  more  extensive  feldspar‐hornblende diorite stock. This older diorite intrusion has in turn intruded a cover sequence of lithic and crystal‐lithic  volcanic  breccias  that  lie  at  shallow  levels  of  the  deposit.  These  volcaniclastic tuffs and breccias conformably overlie a sequence of sediments that are ‘partly’ constrained to dip inward towards the tonalitic intrusive center. The interface between the tonalite stock, which  is  interpreted  to  be  the  progenitor  of  porphyry  ore,  and  the  overlying  intrusive  and extrusive country rocks is characterized by the presence of one or more extensive diatreme breccia  bodies  and  numerous  smaller  hydrothermal  breccias  bodies.  The  upper  portions  of the  intensely  altered  and  fluid  metasomatised  tonalite  stock  are  transitional  upward  to intrusive  breccias  (breccias  with  upward  entrained  interstitial  melt)  which  in  turn  are transitional at shallower levels to hydrothermal breccias as fluids have progressively exsolved from the entrained and decompressing melt.      HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  28. 28. TUJUH BUKIT Page 22   Figure 11 : Lithology cross-section 11060 mN at TumpangpituDeep porphyry holes (26, 29, 56, 112, 172, 182 and 192) are projected onto the 050-230° section.The high‐sulfidation epithermal component of the Tumpangpitu mineralizing system can be divided into four sub‐types based on oxidation intensity, metal grade and metal suite.      1)      Completely  oxidized  high‐sulfidation  ore  (Au‐Ag  strongly  enriched;  Cu  severely  leached).  2)      Partially  oxidized  high‐sulfidation  mineralization  (Au‐Ag  +/‐  Cu;  Cu  is  strongly  leached).   3)    Unoxidized but low‐grade high‐sulfidation mineralization (Au‐Ag‐Cu).          Au‐Ag grade is significantly lower than the overlying oxide component.   4)    Unoxidized but higher‐grade high‐sulfidation mineralization (Au‐Ag‐Cu) in deeper  structural conduits and proximal to inferred upflow zones.   Components  3)  and  4)  only  are  reported  for  the  current  porphyry  resource  estimation, however all four components of the high‐sulfidation mineralization are discussed in Section 11 of this report.      The  geology  of  the  Tumpangpitu  prospect  in  the  shallow  epithermal  environment  is dominated  by  intense  hydrothermally  altered  (silica‐clay‐alunite‐pyrite)  andesitic  lithic volcanic  breccias, diatreme breccias,  hydrothermal breecias  and diorite,  with the alteration footprint covering an area in excess of 4 km x 2.5 km. The broader envelope of argillic altered volcanics  and  intrusives  are  cross‐cut  by  several  northwest‐trending  and  potentially HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  29. 29. TUJUH BUKIT Page 23structurally‐controlled  zones  of  hydrothermal  breccias  which  are  advanced  argillic  altered (vuggy  silica,  silica‐alunite,  silica‐alunite‐clay,  silica‐clay‐alunite  and  silica‐clay).  These  zones of more siliceous alteration form multiple parallel ridges (2.5 km x 300 m) trending northwest across  the  prospect  (Figure  12),  and  they  trend  parallel  to  regional  structures  that  are evident in aeromagnetic imagery.     Figure 12 : Distribution of alteration styles at the Tumpangpitu prospect as mapped by GVM-PlacerShowing the locations of 14 historical drill holes (GVM – Holes 1 to 5 and Placer – Holes 6 to 14). The  geology  of  the  deeper  portions  of  the  Tumpangpitu  prospect  is  characterized  by alteration  and  vein  assemblages  characteristic  of  porphyry  systems  (Section  11).  A  large tonalite  intrusion  is  encountered  in  the  lower  parts  of  the  deepest  drill  holes  at Tumpangpitu.  This  tonalite  intrusion  has  a  broad  apex  in  the  vicinity  of  cross‐sections 11040mN to 11360mN and plunges to greater depths to the SW and NE. The geometry of the intrusion in detail is still being refined by infill drilling and magnetic modelling.    An interpreted diatreme breccia body (ovoid in plan and upward flaring) with a diameter of approximately  500m  occurs  below  the  Zone  C  area  of  the  oxide  zone.  This  breccia  is dominated  by  polymict  mill  breccia  in  its  middle  and  upper  parts,  and  has  roots  that penetrate down into the tonalite intrusions.  At deeper levels near the tonalite intrusion, the breccia has increasing characteristics of an intrusion breccia. This breccia is a major feature on two of the porphyry cross‐sections, and clasts of porphyry mineralization are incorporated into the breccia (detailed descriptions provided in Section 9.3.4). Steeply‐oriented structural feeders to high‐sulfidation mineralization have been intersected over‐printing this diatreme breccia.  Both  these  observations  suggest  that  the  timing  of  diatreme  emplacement  was broadly syn‐mineral with respect to the porphyry system.    HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  30. 30. TUJUH BUKIT Page 24Porphyry  Cu‐Au‐Mo  mineralization  occurs  within  a  carapace  or  shell  of  magnetite,  quartz‐magnetite  and  quartz  vein  stockwork  that  occurs  within  and  around  the  periphery  of  the causative tonalite intrusion, overprinting both the outer margins of the intrusion as well as the proximal country rock. This mineralization occurs dominantly within areas characterized by  phyllic  overprint  of  potassic  alteration  and  lesser  areas  of  potassic  alteration  within  the tonalite intrusion.     9.3.1 Volcaniclastic Breccias  Volcaniclastic breccias are a major rock type on the Tujuh Bukit project area (Figure 13 and Figure  14).  They  comprise  dominantly  lithic  tuff  and  crystal  lithic  tuff  of  andesitic  (?) composition,  and  are  characteristically  intensely  argillic  and  advanced  argillic  altered.  They occur in the upper part of many oxide drill cross‐sections at Tumpangpitu, particularly in the Zone A area which lies on the northeast side of the prospect, but are also observed occurring widely around the eastern flank of the deposit,  as well as around the Katak porphyry system 2 km northeast of Tumpangpitu, where the breccias are intruded by the Katak diorite body. Volcaniclastic  breccias  are  also  present  around  the  northern  and  eastern  fringes  of  the Salakan prospect.   These volcaniclastic breccias are believed to be part of the Batuampar Formation described above.  The  breccias  tend  to  be  heteorolithic  in  lithology  and  clast  alteration  intensity.  The volcanic breccias at Tumpangpitu are increasingly being viewed as part of an extensive and large diatreme breccia complex that has poor internal layering.     Figure 13 : Outcrop of crystal lithic tuff with possible fiame from the Salakan Prospect.HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  31. 31. TUJUH BUKIT Page 25    Figure 14 : Matrix-supported lithic-crystal tuff from hole GTD-34 (Zone A - Tumpangpitu)This shows a strong alignment of flattened fiame-like pyroclasts. Sample from a zone of Hsi-cy alteration (silica-clay) withclay-altered clasts and phenocrysts fragments, and silicified matrix. In  cross‐section,  the  breccias  that  occupy  the  Zone  A  hill  (Gunung  Tumpangpitu)  were previously  interpreted  as  coarse  lithic  tuffs,  but  are  currently  interpreted  as  remnants  of  a larger  diatreme  breccia  body.  Current  interpretations  have  these  massive  units  dipping radially  inward  at  a  gentle  angle  towards  the  porphyry  core.  Crystal  tuffs  and  broadly conformable sediments mapped along the coastline west of Tumpangpitu dip gently to the southeast, whilst other parts of the same sediment package further south along the coastline dip  to  the  northeast.  On  the  Zone  A  oxide  drill‐grid,  the  shallow  lithic  tuffs  (currently  re‐interpreted  on  the  two  porphyry  cross‐sections  as  diatreme  breccias)  are  thought  to  dip towards  the  southwest,  based  on  the  dips  of  concordant  acid  alteration  zones.  These geometries  collectively  suggest  a  radially  inward‐dipping  series  of  volcanic  ejecta.  The polymict  nature  of  clasts  in  the  lithic  tuffs  (or  diatreme  breccias)  is  consistent  with  a  near‐vent source. Two possible scenarios for this pattern can be considered:  Deflation of an underlying magma chamber causing structural subsidence above and around the chamber.   Inward‐dipping  blankets  of  volcanic  ejecta  developed  around  the  inner rim of  one or  more diatreme  bodies  within  the  region.  If  this  is  the  case,  these  volcanic  breccias  must  have erupted onto the substrate rather than be intruded by it. The relationship between the old diorite  intrusion  and  the  overlying  volcaniclastic  breccias  continues  to  be  investigated  to resolve the relative timing.     9.3.2   Sediments  A sedimentary sequence is widespread within the stratigraphic pile at Tumpangpitu (Figure 15), and occurs at RLs near and below sea‐level. The sedimentary sequence is likely to be a HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  32. 32. TUJUH BUKIT Page 26turbidite  accumulation  of  sedimentary  breccia,  juvenile  volcanic  sandstone  or  wacke  and lesser mudstone, intercalated with rare marine limestone.      Figure 15 : Nine locations where sediments are encountered at Tumpangpitu (Nov. 2010).Shapes are coastal outcrops whilst bars are subsurface drill-hole intersections of sediment units. Black and red dots show thedistribution of drilling at Tumpangpitu. This  sedimentary  sequence  is  overlain  by  andesitic  volcanics  on  the  northeast  side  of Tumpangpitu (Holes GTD‐08‐46 and GTD‐09‐94).  The sediments are interpreted to dip inward towards the porphyry center. Controls on dips are  reasonably  well  constrained  on  the  southwest  flank  of  the  porphyry  system,  but  are poorly constrained on the northeast flank of the system. It is postulated that the inward dip of  these  sediments  is  related  to  the  geometry  of  a  diatreme‐related  porphyry  system. Geometric  similarities  are  tentatively  being  made  by  B.  Rohrlach  (Intrepid  chief  geologist) with the Marcapunta deposit in central Peru, where a diatreme and dome complex is rooted above  a  porphyry  system,  with  400‐500m  inward  subsidence  of  sediments  within  the  host stratigraphic pile.        The  sedimentary  sequence  at  Tumpangpitu  shows  increasing  degrees  of  metasomatism (hydrothermal  alteration)  and  veining  as  the sediments  approach  the  porphyry  center.  The degree of hydrothermal overprint observed in these sediments range from near fresh (Area 1 coastline  and  GTD‐08‐26),  to  propylitic  altered  and  fractured  (GTD‐08‐28),  to  intermediate HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  33. 33. TUJUH BUKIT Page 27argillic  and  argillic  altered  (GTD‐09‐94),  and  subsequently  to  strong  advanced‐argillic  and phyllic alteration (GTD‐08‐46 and GTD‐08‐42), often with intense overprinting stockwork.         Areas of the sedimentary sequence that occur in close  proximity  to the  main Tumpangpitu tonalite  body  are  intensely  disrupted  by  cross‐cutting  intrusive  breccias,  microdiorite  and tonalite  bodies  (potential  dykes).  The  occurrences  of  these  features  in  the  sediment sequence indicate close proximity to the main tonalite porphyry body.    The  sediments,  and  in  particular  the  calcareous  and  carbonaceous  component  of  these sediments,  show  increasing  signs  of  sulfidation  and  incipient  skarn  development  as  the tonalite porphyry body is approached, as evidence by:     Intense sulfidation (pyrite) in mudstone horizons, with anomalous Cu, Au and Zn in sulfidized  sediment (GTD‐08‐26).     Garnet  alteration  of  sediment  with  anomalous  Zn  reflecting  incipient  calcic  exoskarn  assemblages (GTD‐09‐94).    Garnet  and  vesuvianite  alteration  (skarn  assemblage)  in  local  carbonate  units  within  the  sedimentary package (GTD‐08‐46).    Incipient  magnetite skarn  type  replacement  of  sediments,  grossly  concordant  to  bedding at  the scale of drill core (GTD‐08‐42).  The collective observations above suggest increasing degrees of contact metamorphism and skarn development within reactive (non‐siliciclastic) units of the sediment package, in close proximity to the Tumpangpitu tonalite.  Clasts derived from the surrounding sediment host sequence are incorporated into some of the  major  diatreme  breccia  bodies,  particularly  in  GTD‐08‐29  where  the  mudstone component  of  the  sediments  is  intensely  brecciated,  with  clasts  of  sediment  incorporated into the cross‐cutting diatreme breccia. Various examples are provided in Figure 16 to Figure 18.   HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  34. 34. TUJUH BUKIT Page 28  Figure 16 : Images of sedimentary textures in fresh to incipiently propylitic-altered sedimentsFrom drill hole GTD-08-26, southwest of Zone C.    Figure 17 : Interbedded, fine-grained volcanic sandstones (propylitic)Includes recessively weathered tuffaceous? siltstone (Locality 2). Thicknesses of individual beds are similar to those in thetype section in drill hole GTD-08-26 where the sediments have a turbidite appearance. HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011
  35. 35. TUJUH BUKIT Page 29   Figure 18 : Images of laminated and banded sediment in drill hole GTD-10-162The sediments here are much more strongly metasomatized than in GTD-08-26 where they are almost unaltered.Nevertheless, textural similarities can be seen that identify these rocks in GTD-10-162 as sediments, namely centimetre-scale banding, finer laminations, and local preservation of cross-bedding textures. The sediments are overprinted by sparsenetworks of Fe-carbonate veins, potentially akin to those calcite veins observed in GTD-08-26. 9.3.3    Intrusives  The geology of Tumpangpitu deposit consists of a multiple intrusion complex with members that vary in composition (diorite to tonalite), in texture (equigranular to porphyritic) and in size  (small  dykes  to  stocks).  The  intrusive  rocks  observed  to  date  in  chronological  order include  coarse‐grained  diorite  (CD),  fine‐grained  Tonalite  (FT),  coarse‐grained  Tonalite  (CT), HELLMAN AND SCHOFIELD | JUNE 2011

×