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Fall Protection

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  • 1. Fall Protection
  • 2. Types of falls 1a
  • 3. Types of falls Falls from same level • Slips • Trips • High frequency rate • Low injury severity rate 1a
  • 4. Types of falls 1b
  • 5. Types of falls  Falls from an elevation • Relatively low frequency rate • High injury severity rate 1b
  • 6. Types of falls  Falls from an elevation • Relatively low frequency rate • High injury severity rate  Specific potential fall hazards 1b
  • 7. Common fall protection 2a
  • 8. Common fall protection  Guardrail systems and toeboards 2a
  • 9. Common fall protection  Guardrail systems and toeboards  Handrail and stair rail systems 2a
  • 10. Common fall protection  Guardrail systems and toeboards  Handrail and stair rail systems  Designated areas 2a
  • 11. Common fall protection 2b
  • 12. Common fall protection  Hole covers 2b
  • 13. Common fall protection  Hole covers 2b
  • 14. Common fall protection  Hole covers  Safety net systems 2b
  • 15. Common fall protection  Hole covers  Safety net systems 2b
  • 16. Common fall protection  Hole covers  Safety net systems  Ladder cages 2b
  • 17. Common fall protection 2c
  • 18. Common fall protection  Ramps and bridging devices 2c
  • 19. Common fall protection  Ramps and bridging devices 2c
  • 20. Common fall protection  Ramps and bridging devices  Slip-resistant floors 2c
  • 21. Common fall protection  Ramps and bridging devices  Slip-resistant floors 2c
  • 22. Common fall protection  Ramps and bridging devices  Slip-resistant floors  Effective housekeeping 2c
  • 23. What happens during a fall? 3a
  • 24. What happens during a fall?  Person loses his/her balance 3a
  • 25. What happens during a fall?  Person loses his/her balance 3a
  • 26. What happens during a fall?  Person loses his/her balance  Body unintentionally moves from an upright position to a prone, or semi-prone position 3a
  • 27. What happens during a fall? 3b
  • 28. What happens during a fall?  Free-fall velocity at impact when falling 12 feet is nearly 20 M.P.H. 3b
  • 29. What happens during a fall?  Free-fall velocity at impact when falling 12 feet is nearly 20 M.P.H. 3b
  • 30. What happens during a fall?  Free-fall velocity at impact when falling 12 feet is nearly 20 M.P.H.  Person hits the ground in less than one second from this distance 3b
  • 31. Why falls are dangerous 4a
  • 32. Why falls are dangerous Falls are dangerous because of three primary elements: 4a
  • 33. Why falls are dangerous Falls are dangerous because of three primary elements:  The free-fall distance the worker falls 4a
  • 34. Why falls are dangerous Falls are dangerous because of three primary elements:  The free-fall distance the worker falls  The shock absorption at impact 4a
  • 35. Free-fall distance 5a
  • 36. Free-fall distance  The uncontrolled length of travel before a worker hits the floor, ground, or before fall arrest equipment activates 5a
  • 37. Free-fall distance  The uncontrolled length of travel before a worker hits the floor, ground, or before fall arrest equipment activates 5a
  • 38. Free-fall distance  The uncontrolled length of travel before a worker hits the floor, ground, or before fall arrest equipment activates  Measured from the foot level before the fall, to the foot level after the fall 5a
  • 39. Free-fall distance 5b
  • 40. Free-fall distance  Free-fall distance should be limited to a few feet so as to prevent injury from: • collisions with grade level • collisions with obstructions near the work site • pendulum-like swings that result in collision with objects 5b
  • 41. Shock absorption at impact 6a
  • 42. Shock absorption at impact  Varies according to the types of fall protection equipment used 6a
  • 43. Shock absorption at impact  Varies according to the types of fall protection equipment used 6a
  • 44. Shock absorption at impact  Varies according to the types of fall protection equipment used  Shock-absorbing lanyards reduce the probability of injury 6a
  • 45. Body weight of the worker 7a
  • 46. Body weight of the worker  Falls have more severe impact on heavy workers 7a
  • 47. Body weight of the worker  Falls have more severe impact on heavy workers  “The bigger they are, the harder they fall.” 7a
  • 48. Body weight of the worker  Falls have more severe impact on heavy workers  “The bigger they are, the harder they fall.”  Heavy workers may have larger waistlines, preventing fall arrest equipment from fitting properly 7a
  • 49. Fall arrest systems 8a
  • 50. Fall arrest systems  Used when engineering controls are not feasible or sufficient to eliminate the risk of a fall 8a
  • 51. Fall arrest systems  Used when engineering controls are not feasible or sufficient to eliminate the risk of a fall  Fall arrest systems should match the work situation 8a
  • 52. Fall arrest systems 8b
  • 53. Fall arrest systems  Fall arrest systems should: • prevent a worker from falling more than 6 feet • prevent a worker from contacting any lower level during arrest of a fall 8b
  • 54. Fall arrest systems 8c
  • 55. Fall arrest systems  Fall arrest systems should: • limit the maximum arresting force on an employee to 1800 pounds when a worker uses a body harness • bring a worker to a complete stop • limit the deceleration distance a worker travels to 3 1/2 feet 8c
  • 56. Fall arrest systems 8d
  • 57. Fall arrest systems  Fall arrest systems should: • have sufficient strength to withstand twice the potential energy impact of a worker falling a distance of 6 feet - or- • have sufficient strength to withstand the free-fall distance permitted by the system, whichever is less 8d
  • 58. Personal fall protection 9a
  • 59. Personal fall protection  Personal fall arrest systems 9a
  • 60. Personal fall protection  Personal fall arrest systems  Positioning device system 9a
  • 61. Personal fall protection  Personal fall arrest systems  Positioning device system  Personal fall protection system for climbing activities 9a
  • 62. Training 10a
  • 63. Training  Equipment inspection 10a
  • 64. Training  Equipment inspection  Application limits 10a
  • 65. Training  Equipment inspection  Application limits  Methods of use 10a
  • 66. Training 10b
  • 67. Training  Anchoring and tie-off techniques 10b
  • 68. Training  Anchoring and tie-off techniques  Emergency rescue plans and implementation 10b
  • 69. Training  Anchoring and tie-off techniques  Emergency rescue plans and implementation  Maintenance procedures 10b
  • 70. Vendor/Supplier 11a
  • 71. Vendor/Supplier Comprehensive instructions for fall arrest system use and application, provided by the supplier, should consist of: 11a
  • 72. Vendor/Supplier 11b
  • 73. Vendor/Supplier  The force measured during the sample force test 11b
  • 74. Vendor/Supplier  The force measured during the sample force test 11b
  • 75. Vendor/Supplier  The force measured during the sample force test  Maximum elongation measured for lanyards during the force test 11b
  • 76. Vendor/Supplier 11c
  • 77. Vendor/Supplier  Deceleration distance for deceleration devices measured during the force test 11c
  • 78. Vendor/Supplier  Deceleration distance for deceleration devices measured during the force test 11c
  • 79. Vendor/Supplier  Deceleration distance for deceleration devices measured during the force test  Caution statements on critical-use limitations 11c
  • 80. Vendor/Supplier 11d
  • 81. Vendor/Supplier  Application limits 11d
  • 82. Vendor/Supplier  Application limits 11d
  • 83. Vendor/Supplier  Application limits  Proper hook-ups 11d
  • 84. Vendor/Supplier 11e
  • 85. Vendor/Supplier  Anchoring tie-off techniques 11e
  • 86. Vendor/Supplier  Anchoring tie-off techniques 11e
  • 87. Vendor/Supplier  Anchoring tie-off techniques  Proper climbing techniques 11e
  • 88. Vendor/Supplier 11f
  • 89. Vendor/Supplier  Methods of inspection, use, cleaning, storage 11f
  • 90. Vendor/Supplier  Methods of inspection, use, cleaning, storage 11f
  • 91. Vendor/Supplier  Methods of inspection, use, cleaning, storage  Lifelines 11f
  • 92. Reporting fall hazards 12a
  • 93. Reporting fall hazards  Employees will not experience repercussions from reporting hazards 12a
  • 94. Reporting fall hazards  Employees will not experience repercussions from reporting hazards  Employees should report unsafe equipment, conditions, procedures 12a
  • 95. Reporting fall hazards 12b
  • 96. Reporting fall hazards  Equipment repair receives top priority 12b
  • 97. Reporting fall hazards  Equipment repair receives top priority 12b
  • 98. Reporting fall hazards  Equipment repair receives top priority  Under no circumstances will defective equipment be used 12b
  • 99. Reporting fall hazards 12c
  • 100. Reporting fall hazards  When fall conditions exist: • Take short steps • Keep toes pointed out • Walk on the whole foot when crossing rough or slippery surfaces • Avoid making sharp turns 12c
  • 101. Reporting fall hazards 12d
  • 102. Reporting fall hazards  Disciplinary actions for failure to use equipment 12d
  • 103. Housekeeping 13a
  • 104. Housekeeping  Effective housekeeping prevents falls 13a
  • 105. Housekeeping  Effective housekeeping prevents falls  Keep high work areas free from: • Tools • Materials • Debris 13a

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