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Ebnt observatory on combacting the sexual children exploitation in tourism eng

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  • 1. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT CONTENT Introduction pag. 1. Scenarios of disintermediaton and integration “ 2 4 2. Analysis of European online travel agencies and active in EU countries “ 11 3. The phenomenon examined through sector associations surveys “ 16 4. Interviews and analysis of Interpol and fraud squads of police departments (England and the Netherlands) “ 21 5. Update on implementation of EU 92/2011 Directive and comparison with previous editions of Observatory L.269 “ 25 ANNEX: A CONVERGENT ACTION European Council “Strategy for the Rights of the Child 2012-2015” ATTACHMENTS A.1. Online Travel Agency database A.2. Online Travel Agency survey A.3. Tour Operator and travel agencies database A.4. Tour Operator and travel agencies survey A.5. Letter and draft of interview to Police forces A.6. Email to the European Parliament 2
  • 2. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT Introduction This Observatory is an update and at the same time an evolution of the previous editions, which had defined some important points about this issue at an Italian and European level: • “spontaneous” awareness from the tourism industry regarding sexual exploitation of children seems to be limited all around the continent and in the various EU countries, this is verifiable through the analysis of the commercial portals, of communication tools and of the practically non existing reaction to an ad hoc survey; • the few cases encountered may be referred to the action of non profit organizations (Ecpat, Save the Children, ecc.) which managed to break through in the sector associations and big operators, managing to let them sign Code of Conduct, containing the principles of commitment, but not necessarily managing to verify the effectiveness of such commitment; • from another point of view, the contrast to this phenomenon lies in the hands of repressive tools, operating based on national norms, sometimes severe; in other cases (especially Italy) apparently more far seeing, but actually weaker from a practical point of view; • only recently (end of 2011) the European Union emanated a Directive (n.92) with the aim of promoting virtuous behaviours all around the continent, and to homogenize the attitude of national Institutions. But at the same time the tourism market has seen some noticeable structural improvements. One of these, the most relevant both in general and considering the specific issue analyzed, seems to be the so called disintermediation. All the main initiatives on the issue of the “struggle against sexual exploitation of children in the tourism sector” have always been accompanies in every country by an awareness raising campaign of travel agents and tour operators. 3
  • 3. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT This category of workers has in fact for decades represented the main filter - mediators between tourists and destinations, and in general, which sometimes (but without any systematic demonstration) for what concerns this specific social plague. Tourism trends nevertheless highlight that the role of agencies has significantly been reduced in favour of internet, which is today the most used channel for many functions (information, organization, etc.), and with which such a struggle will inevitably have to deal with in the following years. The ease with which information and booking may be accessed, and privately thanks to internet, may without doubt risk being an advantage to those who seek sex tourism, bypassing any possible form of control and human filter. And making obsolete those norms that provide for the obligation to citation as the Italian law 269 of 1998, admirable and innovative for other reasons. For this reason, in the present edition of the Observatory, a particular attention was dedicated to the technological evolution of the market, being sure that this represents not only the operative context in which this phenomenon developed, but also as a consequence the scenario in which contrast actions must operate. 1. Scenarios of disintermediation and integration The phenomenon of “disintermediation” in tourism is evident in the growth of “direct sales” of tourism services to the final customer from all actors involved in tourism. The traditional tourism supply chain, tour operators and travel agencies, is always more fragmented, with mutual invasions of positions and therefore roles regarding demand. Disintermediation may be intended as a phenomenon which becomes “multi-channeled”1: a tourism operator may in fact decide to reach the 1 4
  • 4. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT final customer through the traditional channel of travel agencies, or through direct sale, telephone or internet. The consumer, on the other hand, has the opportunity to choose based on its own inclination or specificity. The concept of disintermediation therefore does not express itself simply through the elimination of mediators from the distribution circuit, which would bring to a progressive loss of importance of travel agencies, substituted by new formats. It is opportune to speak about a multi-channeled approach, decomposition and recomposing of the tourism supply chain, with new criteria that modify relations between companies through online and offline sales, in which service suppliers, tour operators, travel agencies both online and traditional, call centers, etc. may find their place. The new concept is “to reach customers everywhere”. The last figures provided by Eurobarometer 2 on tourism trends in 2012 underline the importance of the web in the organisation of travels on behalf of European citizens. Internet has become, without a doubt, a superior channel compared to others for travel information and distribution. A truly unstoppable phenomenon, thanks to the continuous progress of technology and net access all over the world. It should be noted, for the sake of completeness, that such a predominance of the internet does not extend automatically also to the sale of tourism products, or parts of, that instead remain anchored to “pre-technologic” means. Modalities of travel planning (EU citizens - year 2012) Source: SL&A elaboration based on Eurobarometer data, 2013 In average, 53% of the (enlarged) European Union population uses internet to plan their vacations, with a peak of 75% in the Netherlands, Roberto Gentile, Agenzie di viaggi e network, Hoepli Editore 2 European Commission, Flash Eurobarometer 370, Attitudes of Europeans towards Tourism, 2013 5
  • 5. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT and 80% in Norway (not a EU country, but European). In general, figures demonstrate that those which use internet the most are northern Europeans, and those which use it the least are residents of Eastern, less developed countries. Bulgaria stops at 28%, while only 15% of the Macedonian population books vacations on internet. General technological advancement has an influence on this percentage, especially in terms of connection potential and access to the net. The second most used modality, even though way behind, is the traditional travel agency. An average of 19% of European citizens use this channel. Over a quarter of the population in countries such as Belgium, Germany and Austria, trust themselves to travel agencies, the people of Luxembourg being those which use them the most (36%). In Italy, as in many countries of the old continent, the percentage is closer to the European average, while in countries such as Denmark, Poland, Hungary and Lithuania, only one citizen out of ten uses agencies. Reasons in this case as well may be linked to the possibility of “access”, that is the amount of travel agencies and their diffusion in every State. Anyhow, the travel agency channel is characterized by professionalism, trust, and an increased sense of security guaranteed while purchasing a vacation. One European citizen out of ten organizes its vacation booking services directly at the destination. There is no logic which allows to aggregate States based on this, but it is possible to understand that countries such as Malta, Cyprus, Ireland and Denmark prefer to organize before departure, while at least three citizens out ten in countries such as Lithuania and Macedonia book on the spot. In any case, the way people choose to travel depends fro country to country based on the physical mediation networks, and is somehow stable in the medium period. What may be observed is an information “transfer” from the direct channel (word of mouth, parents, friends) to the telematic one (social network, reviews, storytelling, etc.). 6
  • 6. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 7
  • 7. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT Modalities of travel planning 2012 (data in %) EU countries Belgium Bulgaria Czech Republic Denmark Germany Estonia Ireland Greece Spain France Italy Cyprus Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg Hungary Malta Austria Holland Poland Portugal Romania Slovenia Slovakia Finland Sweden United Kingdom Eu27 Croatia Macedonia Iceland Serbia Turkey Israel Internet 62 28 41 68 53 33 73 40 56 50 50 60 43 30 49 34 57 54 75 40 45 30 35 36 66 67 70 53 21 15 62 17 22 55 Travel agency 28 11 16 9 26 15 16 11 25 13 18 17 12 10 36 10 29 32 18 10 22 13 24 16 14 14 22 19 10 22 7 26 10 25 On the spot 21 12 14 4 10 8 4 13 11 13 9 4 16 29 18 5 4 12 11 9 15 15 13 12 11 14 10 11 5 30 11 19 8 12 Transport company 8 3 3 3 3 8 3 5 6 8 4 2 20 5 19 6 6 4 1 6 7 2 2 6 15 7 10 6 8 5 5 6 15 7 8
  • 8. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT Norway 80 12 7 3 Source: Eurobarometer, 2013 Another modality for organizing vacations, with a lower percentage (6%) is through transport companies. In Latvia and Luxembourg it is done by one citizen out of ten, while it is practically insignificant in Holland, where only 1% uses it. An important figure nevertheless, since this typology of workers is in no way informed on this issue, as it has emerged in previous editions of the Observatory. The figures of Eurobarometer indicate an increase in the number of travels, between January 2012 and January 2013, done bu EU citizens towards extra EU destinations. The average is 26%. States where most of the residents travel to far away countries (35% and above) are Germany, Denmark and Englad (in addition to Norway and Serbia, non EU). Even without assuming a direct relation between travel distance and sex tourism with children, for the aims of this report and to describe the phenomenon, the data of all “enlarged” European Union countries has been put on a Cartesian axis, crossing percentages related to travel organization through internet and travels towards long range destinations (extra EU). Countries such as Sweden, Denmark, Holland and Norway are among those with a bigger inclination towards organizing their travels on the internet and most of all travel towards extra EU countries. The general indication is for all States included in this quadrant (top right) it would be beneficial to strengthen awareness raising initiatives on the issue of child exploitation on the web. 9
  • 9. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT Travel planning on the Internet/Extra EU destinations Source: SL&A elaboration based on Eurobarometer data, 2013 Also citizens of the United Kingdom, Spain, France and Italy frequently use internet to organize their travels, but travel less towards far away destinations (and potentially more at risk). The use of the web, on issues such as travel and vacations, has an even greater value than that described insofar. Tripbarometer 3 in fact indicates that online platforms are the main source of information for travels: 92% of travelers declared to have consulted online sources during planning and booking phases of the last trip. Sites which publish travel reviews are the most used source of information (69%), followed by online travel agencies (57%) and web 3 TripAdvisor survey 2012/2013 10
  • 10. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT sites of tour operators (56%). Less than one fifth (18%) declares they went to a traditional travel agency to plan their most recent trip. Information sources Source: TripAdvisor, 2012 Data corresponds perfectly to those published by Eurobarometer, confirming that the value of the web and of tourism disintermediation is a consolidated phenomenon, and one of great importance too. The survey highlights in addition that online information sources are not the most used during travel planning, but are also considered the most useful and reliable. Traditional travel agencies obtained inferior results, being considered a more important source of information by 4% of customers and more reliable by 7%. 2. Analysis of European Online Travel Agencies operating in EU countries 11
  • 11. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT To better analyze the phenomenon, a database of all Online Travel Agencies operating in the 27 member States of the EU has been created: but we may not base ourselves on official lists, because no country in the world has, until now, created a law defining a list/register. The only known referral seems to be ETTSA, the “European Technology & Travel Services Association”, a mediation and European Global Distribution Services (GDO) association. The job was therefore conducted by crossing different sources, or by simply searching on the net. The web in fact allows access to all services in the world in any country. Sixty-two Online Travel Agencies have been surveyed in this way. More than 82% (4 out of 5) are part of 6 international groups, which together represent substantially all the online tourism market. Among these in particular we find TripAdvisor Inc, which includes 19 OTAs, 31% of the total. Online Travel Agency Grouping Source: SL&A direct survey for EBNT Observatory, 2013 Often they are portals similar to one another, rich in content, which allow customers to acquire information on destinations, share the contents themselves on the web, and naturally, purchase tourism services. Around 57% of Online Travel Agencies analyzed allows to purchase all tourism services, both individually (hotels, flights, cars, various activities) and in the form of all inclusive trips (Dynamic Package or else). Of portals, 11% offers various tourism services in single form, which in some case may also be combined in a trip package. Around 32% focuses on the sale of a single tourism product, in the majority of cases hotels, but sometimes also cruises. 12
  • 12. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT OTAs are all multilingual, often translated in more than ten languages; in rare cases the translation was done only in two/three languages, English being always present. Legal and operative headquarters of the 62 Online Travel Agencies are in 69% of cases in the USA, while 31% refer to European nations. Six portals have their operative HQ in Italy, five of these display, as provided by the law, a travel agency license. The analysis of 62 websites, in relation the the object of the present Observatory, highlight a discomforting scenario: no specific action emerges (adhesion to campaigns, initiatives, logos, or else) on behalf of OTAs on the issue of sexual exploitation of children. The only referral found on this issue, on 3 of the 6 portals with HQ in Italy, is the compulsory indication provided by law 269/98 in the “general travel conditions” section. “Mandatory communication under article 16 law 269/98 – Italian law punishes with imprisonment all crimes related to prostitution and child pornography, even if committed abroad”. The three agencies are Expedia, Edreams and Logitravel, amounting to 5% of total OTAs surveyed. It is important to highlight that such indication displayed on the websites is present only in the Italian version, confirming that it is done only to respect a law, and not because of a determined will to perform actions to raise awareness regarding this issue. Presence on the website of referrals to the struggle agaisnt sexual exploitation of children in the tourism sector Source: SL&A elaboration, 2013 The figure, compared to the analysis results of tour operators websites in Italy and Europe which deal with outgoing travels, highlights how in the scenario of Online Travel Agencies the percentage of referrals inherent to the issue of sexual exploitation of children in tourism is clearly inferior. 13
  • 13. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 78% of Italian tour operators highlights on their websites, or on commercial downloadable catalogues, the referral to Law 269/98 and/or the adhesion to awareness raising projects on this issue. The percentage of online European tour operators which demonstrate an awareness of this issue is 22%, highlighting the subscription to the Code of Conduct or the adhesion/link to ECPAT. The in depth analysis of the 62 websites of Online Travel Agencies showed that 9 of these (amounting to 15%), European and non European, invite tourists to visit institutional sites containing information and safety measures for the trip (such as the Italian “viaggiare sicuri” website), which by the way report in a detailed manner the issues tied to sexual exploitation of children and laws to fight against this phenomenon for each destination. During the survey phase, it was decided to focus the research on three main Global Distribution Systems present on the international market: Galileo, Amadeus and Sabre. The Global Distribution System (GDS) is an electronic distribution system for the management and booking of hotels, cars, rentals etc. A system used mainly by traditional travel agencies for the booking of tourism services. All three surveyed operators have subscribed the Code of Conduct, committing to perform awareness raising actions towards their suppliers and customers using their services. In addition Sabre, which is part of a group together with other 4 important online travel agencies (Travelprice, Travelocity, Lastminute.com and Zuji), has created in 2012 a “Passport to Freedom”, an international initiative which has the aim of uniting the forces of all the tourism sector to fight against the problem of human trafficking. “Passport to Freedom” increases awareness regarding trafficking and human exploiting, and tries to give a solution. Various leaders of government institutions, non profit organizations and travel industry took part to its creation, to support the implementation of laws which punish those committing this sort of crimes. Among partners we find Ecpat, TheCode.org, Polaris Project, etc. 14
  • 14. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT Sabre Holding has developed a Code of Conduct for suppliers, in which it invites suppliers themselves to support and apply actions useful for putting an end to trafficking of human beings and child exploitation. Navigating the Sabre website, in the Corporate Responsibility section, we may see that the issue is not considered secondary, but it's highlighted, indicating all the positive elements of the struggle against human exploitation, and underlining how it may become an interesting marketing tool. The six biggest groups, aggregating 82% of online portals for the purchase of travels and tourism services, constitute an ideal filter to reach the majority of tourists around the world, and at least the European demand. In addition to subscribing the Code of Conduct, as it has been done by the main global tour operators, it would be beneficial to develop specific awareness raising initiatives/campaigns with these subjects. 3. The phenomenon examined through sector associations surveys Data on sex tourism, involving abused children, is such that one would ask himself how and through which channels it is organized. Based on what has been already observed regarding the structure of the tourism market, this Observatory has dedicated a much space to the phenomenon of Online Travel Agencies, that is the use of internet for the organization of travels and other things. Anyway, the observation of tourism companies, being traditional travel agencies or tour operators, which still perform traditional mediation activities, represents a significant part of the generated traffic. 15
  • 15. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT In the occasion of the 2013 edition, we deemed unavoidable to involve Sector Associations of tourism companies at a national and European level. In synergy with the Safe host project – supporting European social parts in the struggle against sexual exploitation of children in tourism- we have first of all involved all employer representatives which are partners of the project, thinking that raising awareness as a byproduct of the project itself would produce a positive trend of information gathering and good practices. We have sent to Ectaa (European travel agents and tour operators) and Fiavet (Federazione italiana agenzie di viaggio e turismo), partners of the project, and to other associations we considered relevant to the Observatory, a questionnaire to gather information regarding good practices and action that all participating members possess and adopt regarding the phenomenon in general and towards the struggle against sex exploitation of children in particular. We have noticed that a new consciousness and awareness of the problem was achieved, also thanks to the questionnaire, and this is to be considered as a first step. Associations that answered: ABTO, Belgian tour operator association, declares to be aware of the problem, and adheres to the Ecpat code of conduct and to the awareness raising and dissemination activities. Also participates actively to Ecpat meetings. Has communicated that TUI applies this policy and develops training courses for its employees. ECTAA, European Travel Agents and Tour Operators, represents 21 European countries, and all major national tour operators associations in the countries. Declares to perform a wide array of awareness raising activities for the benefit of its associates. Since 1996, all Ectaa members subscribe a declaration in which they solemnly commit to not promoting in any way sex tourism with children, and activate information activities towards customers, 16
  • 16. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT explaining the consequences of child prostitution in the visited countries; in the declaration there is in addition the commitment to cooperate with competent authorities in the struggle against sexual exploitation of children in tourism, and to help the victims. Since 1997, Ectaa is an observer of the “ World tourism network on child protection” formerly “ task force for the protection of children in tourism”. In 2000/2001 Ectaa participates to a EU funded project managed by Ecpat, for the creation of a specific code of conduct for tour operators, supported by many national sector associations (“The Code”). In 2010 the “Destination and sustainabilty Commitee “ was established, exchanging good practices regarding tourism and the struggle against sexual exploitation of children in tourism. Affiliates policies: Ectaa subscribed The Code, in particular together with: ORV (Austria), SRV (Switzerland), DRV (Germany), FIAVET (Italy), ANAT (Romania), ANRV (United Kingdom) and FEAAV (Spain). Ectaa members which have presented some good practices regarding the topics examined by the Observatory are: Tour operators active in the struggle against sexual exploitation of children in tourism Abto Belgium DFR Denmark SNAV France DVR Germany SRF Sweden Abta United Kingdom Source: Ectaa, 2013 ABTA, during the SAFE HOST project conference which took place in Florence in May 2013, announced its close cooperation with the British police regarding the issue of sexual exploitation of children. The association indicates various priorities, among which: the search for 17
  • 17. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT more members, Adv, TO and the aim to include domestic violence and kidnappings in the scope of their actions. In addition, ABTA suggests to raise the attention level in occasion of “great events” such as the Confederations Cup and the World Cup in Brazil. The resulting framework deriving fro this analysis of sector Associations including European tour operators leaves us without doubts: if subjects are aware of the problem posed by sexual exploitation of children, they adopt a responsible and active attitude. It is clear fro this analysis that also through the commitment of Ectaa, its affiliates have acquired an active role in the struggle against children in tourism through various projects. There are no grey areas: or you are active in the struggle against sexual exploitation of children, or you aren't doing anything about it. Considerations to be done are that countries which seem more active and aware, through their tour operator associations, seem to be those from where the offenders come from. In general, the answer received by Sector Associations was not significant in terms of quantity, so it is objective that in Europe there is still a low attention towards this phenomenon, also on behalf of those Sector Association which should orient and sensitise the policies of their associates. It is evident that Italy, with its law 269, demonstrates an attention, even though due to the norm, which is superior and widespread among professionals of the tourism sector. 4. Interviews and analysis of Interpol and fraud squads of police departments (England and the Netherlands) 18
  • 18. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT After various editions of the Observatory in the years, we have clearly identified the key role of international police forces or of countries of origin of criminals, also regarding our work. Data and trends, which may escape a flux analysis done from the tourism companies' point of view, may be identified if gathered from police forces, that work on identifying and prosecuting crimes linked to this hideous trafficking. We have identified some countries which have implemented repressive programs against this crime, and others which have implemented good practices. The choice was done considering the will of the police forces to have a “dialogue” with the tourism sector, well aware of the usefulness of this synergy. Following this logic, we chose: • England - Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre • Holland - National Police Services Agency of The Netherlands both of which have developed specific programs, and we tries to involve Europol in this research. We have started performing the survey by sending a letter and a questionnaire (enclosed). We have received an answer from both police forces, no answer was received by Europol. UNITED KINGDOM CEOP, the child exploitation on line protection center, has developed many actions regarding this issue. In the meantime, a specific analysis on the travel and tourism sector was carried out, clearly defining that access to internet, and as a 19
  • 19. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT consequence reduced costs and wider audience are the cause of the increasing rates of this kind of crime. Various aspects have been analyzed, regarding countries that are a destination for sex tourism involving children; for example, it is a paradox that as more tourism infrastructures are developed which are desirable for mass tourism, the gap between the poor and those with low literacy levels increases, and with this there is also an increase in children sex tourism. CST (children sex tourism) increases also due to weak and not adequate local laws. As a consequence, the tourism industry has a huge responsibility: it has the duty to monitor and report all practices which damage children, and regarding this, the EBNT Observatory is positioned in an admirable way. CEOP has also an operative branch (ICPN: International child protection network) working in close cooperation with all organizations which deal with the struggle against sexual exploitation of children worldwide. This cooperation allows to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon all around the world, and produces training and educational projects within the CEOP. One last “good practice” in the United Kingdom was the creation of the “Child protection certificate records” that give information regarding British citizens living in the UK and organizations worldwide that intend to hire a person which will be in contact with children. More than 2000 certificates were requested to this archive since October 2012. This seems to be an efficient tool for preventing the proliferation of “embedded sex offenders”, those criminals which taking advantage of their role, have an easy access to children , of whom they are given custody. HOLLAND 20
  • 20. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT The Ministry of Security and Justice, from which police forces depend, has been looking at the issue of sexual exploitation of children for years. Since 2007, in the Schiphol airport (Amsterdam's airport and one with the most daily transfers in the world) the Royal Netherland Marechausee (Kmar) organizes cooperation activities with frontier police and public persecution service (OM). During these days all passengers of flights coming from countries where children sex tourism is present are controlled to verify the possession of child pornography. Following this example, EUROPOL has coordinated two action days in 2011 and 2012 in the main European airports. In addition to the many apprehensions reported, the most significant result was the cooperation and awareness raising produced by these days among the various authorities involved, cooperation which is key to reach a tangible result. In 2012, the cooperation was extended to non governmental organizations and to the tourism sector companies, for a joint action involving telephonic help lines, inviting tourists to report in anonymous form, through the telephonic lines or website, all anomalous activities they are aware of. This activity has produced 27 reports from the 24 th of October 2012 to the 15th of March 2013. These good practices clearly show that the struggle against sexual exploitation of children is ore efficient if synergies are activated between involved actors. 21
  • 21. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 5. Update on implementation of EU 92/2011 Directive and comparison with previous editions of Observatory L.269 The indication of national implementation measures does not assume completeness of nor compliance with such measures. NATIONAL DISPOSITION COMMUNICATED BY MEMBER STATES RELATIVELY TO: Directive 2011/92/EU of the European Parliament and Council, 13 th December 2011, against the sexual abuse and exploitation of children and child pornography, in substitution of framework decision 2004/68/JHA of the Council. From the last edition of the Observatory to this date, an important deadline is getting closer: the Directive of the European Parliament of December 2011 (regulating the crime of child pornography by aggravating punishment and identifying a wider scenario for this crime, often hidden behind the internet, so to escape controls more efficiently) must be implemented by all Member States of the Union within 18th December 2013. From query sent directly to DG justice, responsible for the Directive: Europe Direct <citizen_reply@edcc.ec.europa.eu> “Now, contrary to regulations applying internally in Member States directly after this came into force, the Directive must be implemented by Member States. This means that to find a concrete implementation of the principles expressed in the Directive in favour of citizens, the national legislator must approve one or more acts which adopt the Directive in the internal laws of the Member State, adapting national legislation to achieve the objectives defined by the Directive”. Ratification entails that the Directive (having the role of advising and guiding each Member State) becomes a national law. Hungary has declared they are close to reaching this objective. The challenge our Observatory has is that of “verifying” if and what countries have accomplished this task. This is a difficult result to obtain, since the ratification happens in a national logic, tied to laws and rules 22
  • 22. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT of the ratifying country, so each country has its own legal procedure for this. Since there is no common procedure, nor an obligation on behalf of the European Parliament to control the effective implementation of ratification, it is very difficult to gather this kind of information. With this in mind, we have proposed a query to the Italian office in the European Parliament (enclosed email) to help us identify a modality for gathering this information. At the moment, there doesn't seem to be an entity, structure or organisation which deals with such issues: each country is responsible for the implementation and ratification of EU Directive 2011, and there are no controls to impose this. If the problems is raised by an organisation or a private citizen however, a control and/or sanctioning action is activated by the EU itself. Belgium: N.A. Bulgaria: N.A. Czech Republic: N.A. Denmark: N.A. Germany: N.A. Estonia: 23
  • 23. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT Deadline for implementation: 18/12/2013 1. Väljasõidukohustuse ja sissesõidukeelu seadus1 Implementation provision: seaduse parandus, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 14; Official publication: Elektrooniline Riigi Teataja, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 14, Effective date:28/04/2013; Referral: (MNE(2013)52910) 2. Välismaalaste seadus1 Implementation provision: seaduse parandus, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 12; Official publication: Elektrooniline Riigi Teataja, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 12, Effective date:28/04/2013; Referral: (MNE(2013)52909) 3. Välismaalasele rahvusvahelise kaitse andmise seadus1 Implementation provision: seaduse parandus, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 11; Pubblicazione ufficiale: Elektrooniline Riigi Teataja, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 11, Effective date e:28/04/2013; Referral: (MNE(2013)52908) 4. Sotsiaalhoolekande seadus Implementation provision: seaduse parandus, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 6; Official publication: Elektrooniline Riigi Teataja, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 6, Effective date:28/04/2013; Referral: (MNE(2013)52907) 5. Riigi õigusabi seadus Implementation provision: seaduse parandus, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 5; Official publication: Elektrooniline Riigi Teataja, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 5, Effective date:28/04/2013; Referral: (MNE(2013)52906) 6. Ohvriabi seadus1 Implementation provision: seaduse parandus, Number : RT I, 18.04.2013, 4; Official publication: Elektrooniline Riigi Teataja, Number: RT I, 18.04.2013, 4, Effective date:28/04/2013; Referral: (MNE(2013)52905) Ireland: N.A. Greece: 24
  • 24. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT N.A. Spain: N.A. France: N.A. Italy: N.A. Cyprus: N.A. Latvia: N.A. Lithuania: N.A. Luxembourg: Deadline for implementation: 18/12/2013 1. Loi du 21 février 2013 relative à la lutte contre les abus sexuels et l’exploitation sexuelle des enfants et portant modification de plusieurs dispositions du Code pénal Implementation provision: Loi; Official publication: Mémorial Luxembourgeois A, Number: 35, Effective date: 01/03/2013, Page: 00536-00537; Referral: (MNE(2013)51654) Hungary: N.A. Malta: N.A. Netherlands: 25
  • 25. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT N.A. Austria: Deadline for implementation: 18/12/2013 1. Gesetz, mit dem die Dienstordnung 1994 (32. Novelle zur Dienstordnung 1994), die Vertragsbedienstetenordnung 1995 (38. Novelle zur Vertragsbedienstetenordnung 1995), die Pensionsordnung 1995 (23. Novelle zur Pensionsordnung 1995), das Wiener Gleichbehandlungsgesetz (13. Novelle zum Wiener Gleichbehandlungsgesetz), das Wiener Bedienstetenschutzgesetz 1998 (6. Novelle zum Wiener Bedienstetenschutzgesetz 1998), das Wiener Antidiskriminierungsgesetz (3. Novelle zum Wiener Antidiskriminierungsgesetz), das Wiener Bezügegesetz 1995 (13. Novelle zum Wiener Bezügegesetz 1995) und das Gesetz über die fachlichen Anstellungserfordernisse für die von der Stadt Wien anzustellenden Kindergartenpädagogen/Kindergartenpädagoginnen und Hortpädagogen/Hortpädagoginnen geändert werden Implementation provision: Landesgesetz, Number: 88/2012; Official publication: Landesgesetzblatt ( LGBl. ), Number: 88/2012, Date of publication 31/12/2012; Referral:(MNE(2013)50578) Poland: N.A. Portugal: N.A. Romania: N.A. Slovenia: Deadline for implementation: 18/12/2013 1. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah zakona o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 111/2001, Date of publication: 29/12/2001, Page: 13091-13094; Referral: (MNE(2003)54170) 26
  • 26. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 2. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah zakona o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon;Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 56/2003, Date of publication: 13/06/2003, Page: 06521-06527; Referral: (MNE(2003)54171) 3. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Zakona o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon, Number 2005-01-4401; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 101/2005, Date of publication: 11/11/2005, Page: 10624-10628, Effective date: 26/11/2005; Referral: (MNE(2013)51148) 4. Pravilnik o izvrševanju pripora Implementation provision: Pravilnik, Number: 1999-01-1761; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 36/1999, Date of publication: 14/05/1999, Page: 04183-04191, Effective date: 29/05/1999; Referral: (MNE(2013)51766) 5. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Zakona o izvrševanju kazenskih sankcij Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2008-01-3346; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 76/2008, Date of publication: 25/07/2008, Page: 10859-10870, Effective date: 01/11/2008; Referral: (MNE(2013)51767) 6. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Zakona o izvrševanju kazenskih sankcij Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2012-01-4318; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 109/2012, Date of publication: 31/12/2012, Page: 12126-12132, Effective date 15/01/2013; Referral: (MNE(2013)51768) 7. Pravilnik o spremembah in dopolnitvah pravilnika o izvrševanju pripora Implementation provision: Pravilnik, Number: 2002-01-1867; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 39/2002, Date of publication: 06/05/2002, Page: 03827-03830, Effective date: 21/05/2002; Referral: (MNE(2013)51769) 8. Zakon o izvrševanju kazenskih sankcij Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2000-01-0973; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 22/2000, Date of publication: 10/03/2000, Page: 03109-03133, Effective date: 09/04/2000; Referral: (MNE(2013)51770) 9. Zakon o sodelovanju v kazenskih zadevah z državami 27
  • 27. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 10. lanicami Evropske unije Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2007-01-5065; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number 102/2007, Date of publication: 09/11/2007, Page: 13702-13761, Effective date: 24/11/2007; Referral: (MNE(2013)51771) 11. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Zakona o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2008-01-2959; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 68/2008, Date of publication: 08/07/2008, Page: 09238-09245, Effective date: 23/07/2008;Referral: (MNE(2013)51142) 12. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Zakona o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2011-01-3914; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 91/2011, Date of publication: 14/11/2011, Page: 11840-11854, Effective date: 29/11/2011; Referral: (MNE(2013)51143) 13. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah zakona o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 72/1998, Date of publication: 23/10/1998, Page: 05594-05603; Referral: (MNE(2003)54169) 14. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah zakona o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2004-01-1926; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 43/2004, Date of publication: 26/04/2004, Page: 05249-05255, Effective date: 23/05/2004; Referral: (MNE(2013)51145) 15. Zakon o kazenskem postopku Implementation provision: Zakon; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 63/1994, Date of publication: 13/10/1994, Page: 03503-03567; Referral: (MNE(2003)54153) 16. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Zakona o odgovornosti pravnih oseb za kazniva dejanja Implementation provision: Zakon, Numero: 2008-01-2818; Pubblicazione ufficiale: Uradni list RS, Number: 65/2008, Date of publication: 30/06/2008, Page: 08692-08693, Effective date: 01/11/2008; Referral: (MNE(2013)51141) 28
  • 28. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 17. Zakon o odgovornosti pravnih oseb za kazniva dejanja (ZOPOKD) Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 1999-01-2791; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 59/1999, Date of publication: 23/07/1999, Page: 07529-07534, Effective date: 21/10/1999; Referral: (MNE(2011)52302) 18. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Kazenskega zakonika (KZ-1B) Implementation provision: Zakon, Number 2011-01-3913; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 91/2011, Date of publication: 14/11/2011, Page: 11826-11839, Effective date: 14/05/2012;Referral: (MNE(2011)57897) 19. Kazenski zakonik (KZ-1) Implementation provision: Zakon; Official publication : Uradni list RS, Number: 55/2008, Date of publication: 04/06/2008, Page: 05865-05911, Effective date: 01/11/2008; Referral: (MNE(2008)55950) 20. Zakon o spremembah in dopolnitvah Zakona o odgovornosti pravnih oseb za kazniva dejanja Implementation provision: Zakon, Number: 2012-01-2402; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 57/2012, Date of publication: 27/07/2012, Page: 05950-05950, Effective date: 11/08/2012; Referral: (MNE(2013)51763) 21. Pravilnik o spremembah in dopolnitvah Pravilnika o izvrševanju pripora Implementation provision: Pravilnik, Number: 2006-01-5375; Official publication: Uradni list RS, Number: 127/2006, Date of publication: 07/12/2006, Page: 13982-13983, Effective date: 22/12/2006; Referral: (MNE(2013)51762) Slovakia: N.A. Finland: N.A. Sweden: N.A. United Kingdom: 29
  • 29. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT N.A. Source: europa.lex So, based on an official European source, until today (beginning of June 2013) only 4 countries in addition to Italy have adopted the EU Directive. 30
  • 30. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT ANNEX: A CONVERGENT ACTION European Council “Strategy for the Rights of the Child 2012-2015” IMMAGINI DA INCOLLARE 31
  • 31. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT A.1. Database of Online Travel Agencies The creation of a database of all Online Travel Agencies which operate in the tourism sector in the 27 Member States of the UE which are the object of this analysis, may not be base on official lists. No nation in the world has until now has produced laws on this topic, defining a list/register; the only recognized referral to date seems to be ETTSA, the “European Technology & Travel Services Association”, an association of mediators and European Global Distribution Services (GDO). This work was therefore achieved by cross linking different sources, and through the simple search on the internet: the world wide web in fact allows access to all services in the world from any country. Online Travel Agencies List 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 3 Name Trivago Expedia hotels.com Hotwire Car Rentals Egencia Classic Vacations eLong Venere website www.trivago.it www.expedia.com www.hotels.com www.hotwire.com www.carrentals.com www.egencia.it www.classicvacations.com www.elong.net www.venere.com Group EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC EXPEDIA INC Edreams www.edreams.com Odigeo GoVoyages www.govoyages.com Odigeo Opodo www.opodo.com Odigeo Travellink Nome www.travellink.com sito web Odigeo Gruppo 32
  • 32. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 1 4 1 5 1 6 1 7 1 8 1 9 2 0 2 1 2 2 2 3 2 4 2 5 2 6 2 7 2 8 2 9 3 0 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 4 3 5 3 Odigeo www.odigeo.com Odigeo Ebookers.com www.ebookers.com Orbitz Orbitz www.orbitz.com Orbitz Hotel Club www.hotelclub.com Orbitz Rates to go www.ratestogo.com Orbitz Mr Jet www.mrjet.se Orbitz Cheap Ticket www.cheaptickets.com Orbitz Orbitz Business www.orbitzforbusiness.com Orbitz Adventure Travel www.adventurefinder.com Orbitz Lodging www.lodging.com Orbitz Away www.away.com Orbitz Gorp www.gorp.com Orbitz Asia Hotels www.asiahotels.com Orbitz Trip www.trip.com Orbitz Kayak www.kayak.it Priceline Booking www.booking.com Priceline Group Priceline www.priceline.com Priceline Group Agoda www.agoda.com IgoUgo www.igougo.com Lastminute.com www.it.lastminute.com Zuji www.zuji.com Travelprice TripAdvisor www.travelprice.it www.tripadvisor.it Priceline Group Travelocity - Sabre Holding Travelocity - Sabre Holding Travelocity - Sabre Holding Travelocity - Sabre Holding Tripadvisor Inc, 33
  • 33. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 6 3 7 3 8 3 9 4 0 4 1 4 2 4 3 4 4 4 5 4 6 4 7 4 8 4 9 5 0 5 1 5 2 5 3 5 4 5 5 5 6 5 7 5 EXPEDIA INC Air Fare Watch Dog www.airfarewatchdog.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Booking Buddy www.bookingbuddy.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Cruise Critic www.cruisecritic.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Every Trail www.everytrail.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Family Vacation critic www.familyvacationcritic.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Flip key www.flipkey.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Holiday Lettings www.holidaylettings.co.uk TripAdvisor, Inc. Holiday Watch Dog www.holidaywatchdog.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Independent Traveler www.independenttraveler.com TripAdvisor, Inc. One Time www.onetime.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Seat Guru www.seatguru.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Snique Away www.sniqueaway.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Smart Travel www.smartertravel.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Tingo www.tingo.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Travel Library Nome www.travel-library.com sito web TripAdvisor, Inc. Gruppo Travel Pod www.travelpod.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Virtual Tourist www.virtualtourist.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Where ive been www.whereivebeen.com TripAdvisor, Inc. Kuxun www.kuxun.cn TripAdvisor, Inc. Travelport www.travelport.com Amadeus Sabre Holding www.amadeus.com www.sabre-holdings.com Sabre Holding 34
  • 34. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 8 5 9 Logitravel www.logitravel.it 6 0 World Choise Travel www.worldchoicetravel.co.uk 6 1 Book it www.bookit.com 6 2 Traveleurope www.traveleurope.com 6 3 Olta www.olta.it 6 4 Voyages sncf www.tgv-europe.it 6 5 QCUScruise www.crocieraonline.com List of OLTAs (database under development). ----- ----- ----- www.qcnscruise.com 35
  • 35. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT A.2. Questionnaire for survey on Online Travel Agencies All those companies identified as OTAs, present in the previous list, are now involved in a direct survey, aimed at understanding their attitude towards children sex tourism and relative contrast actions, through a survey questionnaire such as the one we present hereunder: Draft National Observatory for the implementation of law 269/98 and Code of Conduct for the Tourism Industry SafeHost Project - Year 2013 OTA ___________ Location__________ Class _____ Control Sheet for Online Travel Agencies Main languages in which the portal is translated ITA UK GER FRA SPA HOL DEN SWE RUS OTHER ________________________________________________________________ Tourism services offered: Hotel Flight Car Activities/Excursions Integrated packages Other activities ____________________________________________________________ Continents in which you plan travels: Europe Africa Asia Oceania North America South America *** The OLTA highlights in their website (various sections) referrals regarding the struggle against child prostitution in tourism NO YES–specify _________________________________________ YES – Code of Conduct specify (logo, text) ____________________________ Notes _____________________________________________________________________ 36
  • 36. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT A.3. Tour Operators and travel agencies database 37
  • 37. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT Member States EU Austria Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Ireland Italy Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Netherlands Poland Portugal United Kingdom Czech Republic Romania Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Hungary Associations of Tour Operators and Travel Agencies European Tour Operator Association ORV (Österreichischer Reisebüroverband / Association of Austrian Travel Agents) WKO (Fachverband der Reisebüros) FIT/FTI (Fédération de l’Industrie du Tourisme / Federatie van de Toeristische Industrie) BATA (Bulgarian Association of Travel Agents) ABTTA (Association of Bulgarian Tour Operators and Travel Agents) ACTA (Association of Cyprus Travel Agents) DRF (The Association of Danish Travel Agents and Tour Operators) ETFL (Estonian Association of Travel Agents) SMAL (Suomen matkatoimistoalan liitto / The Association of Finnish Travel Agents) SNAV (Syndicat National des Agences de Voyages) DRV (Deutscher ReiseVerband) HATTA (Hellenic Association of Travel and Tourist Agencies) ITAA (Irish Travel Agents Association) FIAVET (Federazione Italiana Associazioni Imprese Viaggi e Turismo) ASTOI (Associazione Tour Operator Italiani) ALTA (Association of Latvian Travel Agents) FATTA (Federation of Associations of Travel & Tourism Agents) ANVR (Algemeen Nederlands Verbond van Reisondernemingen) PIT (Polska Izba Turystyki) APAVT (Associação Portuguesa das Agências de Viagens e Turismo) ABTA (The Travel Association) ACCKA (Asociace Ceskych Cestovnich Kancelari a Agentur) ANAT (Asociatia Nationala A Agentiilor De Turism). SACKA (Slovak Association of Travel Agents) ZTAS (Zdruzenje Turisticnih Agencij Slovenije) AEDAVE (Associación Empresarial de Agencias de Viajes Españolas) ACAV (Asociación Catalana de Agencias de Viajes) SRF (Svenska Resebyråföreningen / Association of Swedish Travel Agents) MUISZ (Association of Hungarian Travel Agencies) A.4. Questionnaire for survey on Tour Operators and travel agencies associations 38
  • 38. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT European Tourism Observatory against sexual exploitation of children in tourism sector A. Are you aware of the detrimental practice of sexual exploitation of children in the tourism sector? _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ B. How does your organization and affiliates face the problem? _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ C Is there a specific policy being enforced by your affiliates, regarding the issue of sexual exploitation of children in the tourism sector? _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ This questionnaire may be sent back via email, fax or ordinary mail to the following addresses: SL&A – Via Iside 8 – 00184 Rome – Fax +39 06 47823753 – email: survey.ebnt@gmail.com For further information or to fill in the questionnaire via telephone: +39 06 4741245 39
  • 39. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 40
  • 40. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT A.5. Letter and draft of interview to police forces Dear ……, For years our country has been committed in the struggle against sexual exploitation of children in the tourism sector. In this context, the Ente Bilaterale Nazionale del Turismo has been promoting for years a National Observatory for the implementation of law 269/98 and of the Code of Conduct acknowledged in July 19th 2003 by the National Labor Contract (CCNL) of the tourism sector, which includes all information on what companies and the Institutions have done in compliance with Law 269 and relative Code of Conduct. In occasion of the participation of EBNT, as a partner of the Safe Host project “Supporting European Social Partners in combating Sexual Exploitation of Children in Travel and Tourism”, funded by the EU through the social dialogue budget line, we wish to give our contribution, making available all updated data coming from the Observatory, and widening the research field to include the Police Forces of various European countries, that are currently fighting against sexual exploitation of children. We actually believe that the role played by police forces at national and international level is crucial, and having a comprehensive view of this aspect as well, will help the Observatory to reach better results. With this aim, we have prepared some questions, included in the enclosed form. The interviews will be carried out by SL&A, a company contracted by us, and expert in this specific sector and issues. It will be our concern to keep you updated on the results of the survey, which you will be able to look at yourself here: http://www.ebnt.it/gestione_osservatorio/Documenti/26_20 10_6_14_Report_2009.pdf best regards Vice-president Lucia Anile President Alfredo Zini 41
  • 41. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT A.6. Email di richiesta al Parlamento Europeo Date: 09 April 2013 11:21 Object: observatory on the struggle against sexual exploitation of children in tourism To: roberta.quadrini@europarl.europa.eu Dear Ms. Roberta Quadrini Following our conversation by telephone earlier today, I will summarize what we have told each other. I am taking care together with SL&A -Rome and on behalf of EBNT Ente bilaterale nazionale turismo of monitoring the various aspects of the struggle against sexual exploitation of children in the tourism industry. Within this context, we are monitoring the DIRECTIVE 2011/92/EU OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 13th December 2011 on combating the sexual abuse and sexual exploitation of children and child pornography, and replacing Council Framework Decision 2004/68/JHA. The Directive foresees a ratification by member States. The request is: how may we know which countries have ratified the Directive? Any information you could give me would be extremely useful. Thank you, best regards 42
  • 42. NATIONAL OBSERVATORY ON IMPLEMENTATION OF LAW 269/98 AND OF THE TOURISM INDUSTRY CODE OF CONDUCT 43