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Ancient Egyptian Artifacts

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Ancient Egyptian artifacts as available at Sadigh Gallery. Information on history of ancient Egypt and artifacts included.

Ancient Egyptian artifacts as available at Sadigh Gallery. Information on history of ancient Egypt and artifacts included.


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  • 1. ♦ ♦New Collection♦ ♦ Available at Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. For more information on Egyptian antiquities, visit Sadigh Gallery’s Ancient Egyptian Art Online Catalog Page: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com
  • 2. People came to live in Egypt probably around 40,000 years ago.Around 3000 BC, Egypt was first unified under one ruler, who was calledthe Pharaoh.From that time until around 525 BC, when Egypt was conquered by thePersians, Egypt’s history is divided into six different periods:Old Kingdom: 2686 – 2160 BCFirst Intermediate Period: 2160 – 2040 BCMiddle Kingdom – 2040 - 1633 BCSecond Intermediate Period: 1786 – 1558 BCNew Kingdom: 1558 – 1085 BCThird Intermediate Period: 1085 – 525 BCPersian Rule: 525 BC – 332 BC© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com :
  • 3. The ancient Egyptians practiced a belief system that was par totemism, partpolytheism, and part ancestor worship.There were numerous Gods, many of them lived invisiblyin the mortal world, acting through sacred sites, animals or evenchosen people.Furthermore, the spirits of the deceased, if remembered and honored, could aid andguide the living from the Afterlife.Egyptian Gods seemed to be made for storytelling. There were tales to educate,tales to entertain, tales with morals, and in those stories, the Gods did not seem sounreachable. It was comforting to learn that the Gods faced many of the samehappiness and problems that the people did, albeit on a grander scale. In learningabout the Gods on such an intimate level, the Egyptians could better relate to theuniverse around them. © Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com :
  • 4. Many artifacts are available at Sadigh Gallery. Popular selling items are:Finely carved Scarabs were used as seals; inscribed Scarabs were issued to commemorate important events or buried with mummies.The earliest were purely amuletic and uninscribed; it was only during the Middle Kingdom (2055-1650 BC) that they were used as seals.During the reign of Amenhotep III (1390-1352 BC), a series of unusually large scarabs were produced to celebrate certain events oraspects of Amenhotep’s reign. There were also a number of funerary types of scarabs such as the large “winged scarab”, and the “heartScarab", usually inscribed with Chapter 30B of the Book of the Dead which was included in burials from at least the13th Dynasty (1795-1650 BC) onward.One of the most interesting and collectable artifacts from ancient Egypt is the ushabti, the magical statue found in tombs. During Egypt’s MiddleKingdom period, small statues began to be placed in the tombs of the deceased. These statues were intended to be servants, which wouldmagically come to life, and do any unpleasant chore the deceased might be called upon to perform in the afterlife. At first, the statues wereinscribed with only the name of the deceased, but soon they were inscribed with magical spells as well to assure that they would really comealive to do their chores. They were usually made of faience, although some were made of terracotta, wood or stone. Faience ushabtis wereproduced in all sizes and in varying shapes. The poorest quality were small, uninscibed and with minimal features. The better quality statueswere usually larger, with inscriptions on the front and back. © Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com :
  • 5. Amulets were Of all the magical objects used by the Egyptians, the amulet was by far the most popular. Judging from the number of them foundin excavations, practically everyone in Egypt must have had them. Those were worn or carried by a person for magical benefit. Some amulets that were purely protective derived their power by evoking the Gods. made of almost every material available to the AncientEgyptian. The finest were carved of stone: lapis lazuli, carnelian, turquoise, feldspar, serpentine and steatite. Metals were used, in addition, goldbeing the most valuable, but copper, bronze and iron also were prized. Wood and bone were sometimes used. Of all materials, however,the greatest number of amulets was made out of faience. Apparently the materials were selected for their supposedmagical properties. By far, the most numerous of all amulets found in excavations is the Eye of Horus.The most numerous of all amulets found in excavations is the Eye of Horus. This was the highly stylized eye of the Falcon-God, Horus.According to myth, Horus fought his evil Uncle Seth to avenge his father’s (Osiris) death. In battle, Horus’ eye was torn to pieces but, fortunately,the eye could be restored. Because of its association with the regeneration of Horus’ eye, it was worn for good health.Beads, worn by both men and woman in Egypt, were believed to bring good luck. The Egyptian word “sha” means luck and sha became theword for bead. A number of semi-precious stones were available from Egypt’s natural resources but in ancient times, the greatest number ofbeads was made from faience, an inexpensive ceramic paste that was developed around 4000 BC in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Faience is theforerunner of glass and although the recipe was a closely guarded secret, the technology spread throughout the Ancient World. © Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com :
  • 6. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. 3 Carved green limestone scarabs with hieroglyphs to the bottom. Holes for wearability. Ptolemaic. 305-30 BC (¾"-1")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 7. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. Carved green soapstone Bes, the Egyptian dwarf God believed to guard against evil spirits and misfortune. Seated on a base. Phallus visible. Hieroglyphs on the back. Ptolemaic. 305-30 BC (3 ½" x 1 ¾")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 8. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. 3 Limestone Amulets: Eye of Horus, 18th Dynasty (1570-1342 BC) ;Scarab with hieroglyphs.26th Dynasty (663-525 BC);Goose. Ptolemaic period (305-30 BC). Each with a hole for stringing. (¾"-1")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 9. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. Carved light green limestone seated cat amulet, the domestic pet and symbol of Bastet (Bast) and Ra. Loop for wearability. Ptolemaic. 305-30 BC(1 ¼")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 10. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. Carved brown limestone crowned falcon sitting on a base. Incised geometric patterns on the surface to indicate feathers. 26 Dynasty. 63 - 525 BC (5" x 2 ¼")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 11. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. Carved light green soapstone amulet of an Egyptian Queen or Goddess in profile. Loop at the top for wearability. Ptolemaic. 305-30 BC (1 ¾")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 12. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. Bronze curved eye inlay. Probably from a figure of the God Osiris or an anthropoid coffin. Light green patina with earthen encrustations. Late Kingdom. 715-332 BC (2 ½")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 13. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Ancient Egyptian. Carved green soapstone Eye of Horus with open work. Hole for wearability. Ptolemaic. 600-300 BC (1")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 14. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Green, black, blue, white and red tubular mummy beads, lotus beads, and clasps redesigned on modern 22kt gold plate collar necklace and earrings settings. 600- 300 BC (Necklace: 18", Earrings: 2")© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 15. ARTIFACT COLOR ENLARGEMENT (800) 426-2007 DESCRIPTION Faience Ushabti amulets. Vivid green with yellow highlights and traces of blue glaze covered with hieroglyphic inscriptions. 663-525 BC (4" - 4 1/2“)© Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com
  • 16. Thank you very much for your attention. For more information on Egyptian ancient artifacts,visit Sadigh Gallery’s Egyptian Art Online Catalog Page: http://sadighgalleryegypt.comSadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. is a licensed ancient art dealer in New York City. Our show room has been opened to the public for over 30 years. © Sadigh Gallery Ancient Art, Inc. ● 303 Fifth Avenue Suite 1603 New York, NY 10016 ● Tel (212) 725-7537 ● http://www.sadighgallery.com Egyptian Online Catalog: http://sadighgalleryegypt.com

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