Creative commons licenses

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Presentation at OER Workshop (15-17 Feb 2014)
BOU Campus, Gazipur
Bangladesh

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Creative commons licenses

  1. 1. Introduction to Creative Commons
  2. 2. Let's begin with the obvious
  3. 3. Potential of digital technologies and the Internet
  4. 4. Potential to: share teaching resources
  5. 5. Potential to: collaborate
  6. 6. Potential to: save time
  7. 7. Potential to: save money
  8. 8. Potential to: make better resources
  9. 9. Potential to: stop reinventing various wheels
  10. 10. Potential to: share, remix and reuse
  11. 11. Potential to: learn
  12. 12. However: Two problems
  13. 13. 1. Copyright
  14. 14. 2. Teachers don't hold copyright to their resources
  15. 15. Two solutions, but first....
  16. 16. What is copyright?
  17. 17. Bundle of rights
  18. 18. Automatic (no © required)
  19. 19. Limits users ability to copy, distribute, perform, adapt
  20. 20. What Is the Purpose of Copyright?
  21. 21. To Expand the Commons
  22. 22. Statute of Anne, 1710: “For the encouragement of learning”
  23. 23. USA Constitution: “To promote the progress of science and useful arts.”
  24. 24. Copyright was a pragmatic solution
  25. 25. Copyright was a balance between
  26. 26. Printers
  27. 27. Printers Authors
  28. 28. Printers Public Authors
  29. 29. The commons is a public good
  30. 30. The commons is a public good + People need an incentive to create
  31. 31. The commons is a public good + People need an incentive to create = Limited monopoly, i.e. copyright
  32. 32. The commons is a public good + People need an incentive to create = Limited monopoly, i.e. copyright = A more vibrant culture
  33. 33. So what?
  34. 34. Much of our cultural heritage cannot be legally reused, which means that...
  35. 35. Many online practices infringe copyright
  36. 36. Many online practices infringe copyright Online copyright infringement is easier to find
  37. 37. Many online practices infringe copyright Online copyright infringement is easier to find Copyright restricts the enormous potential of digital technologies
  38. 38. What if you want to allow sharing, remix and reuse?
  39. 39. What if you want to allow sharing, remix and reuse? What if you want to grow the commons?
  40. 40. Solution #1
  41. 41. “Realizing the full potential of the Internet”
  42. 42. Pragmatic solution
  43. 43. Pragmatic solution Creators retain copyright
  44. 44. Pragmatic solution Creators retain copyright Give permission in advance
  45. 45. Public Domain Few Restrictions
  46. 46. All Rights Reserved Few Freedoms
  47. 47. Some Rights Reserved Range of Licence Options
  48. 48. Four Licence Elements
  49. 49. Attribution
  50. 50. Non Commercial
  51. 51. No Derivatives
  52. 52. Share Alike
  53. 53. Six Licences
  54. 54. More free More restrictive
  55. 55. More free More restrictive
  56. 56. More free More restrictive
  57. 57. More free More restrictive
  58. 58. More free More restrictive
  59. 59. More free More restrictive
  60. 60. More free More restrictive
  61. 61. More free More restrictive
  62. 62. Go to creativecommons.org/choose
  63. 63. Layers
  64. 64. Layers Lawyer readable Human readable Licence symbol
  65. 65. Machine Readable Behind the licence button sits html code which makes it searchable online Public Domain Image <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/3.0/"<<img alt="Creative Commons License" style="borderwidth:0”src="http://i.creativecomm ons.org/l/by/3.0/88x31.png" /<</a<<br /<This work is licensed under a <a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/3.0/"<Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License</a<
  66. 66. However, problem #2
  67. 67. You can't apply a CC licence if you don't hold copyright
  68. 68. Teachers don't hold copyright to their teaching resources
  69. 69. Solution #2 Creative Commons policy
  70. 70. All teaching materials are licensed Creative Commons Attribution
  71. 71. 1. No need to ask permission
  72. 72. 1. No need to ask permission 2. Keep resources when you leave
  73. 73. 1. No need to ask permission 2. Keep resources when you leave 3. Teachers receive credit when their work is reused
  74. 74. 4. "Realizing the full potential of the Internet”
  75. 75. What if you want to find Creative Commons material?
  76. 76. search.creativecommons.org digitalnz.org commons.wikimedia.org photopin.org
  77. 77. Creative Commons is a great way to teach students about copyright
  78. 78. It's an integral part of good digital citizenship
  79. 79. Thank you very much

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