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Usability Engineering Process Flow Model - Sivaprasath Selvaraj
 

Usability Engineering Process Flow Model - Sivaprasath Selvaraj

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    Usability Engineering Process Flow Model - Sivaprasath Selvaraj Usability Engineering Process Flow Model - Sivaprasath Selvaraj Presentation Transcript

    • Usability Engineering Process flow Model
      Presented by: Sivaprasath Selvaraj
    • Agenda
      What is Usability Engineering?
      What is Usability?
      What makes Usability into Design?
      Flow Diagram of Usability Engineering in SDLC
      How to fit Usability Engineering in SDLC? Step 1 – Pursuit
      • Benefits of Usability
      • Business case for Usability
      • Lack of Usability
      • ROI Measures
      • Approach to Design
      • Interface Design Occurs Late in Engineering
      • Less User-Centered Design – More Hidden Costs
      • More User-Centered Design – Less Hidden Costs
    • Agenda
      Step 2 – Planning
      Step 3 – Execution
      Step 4 – Monitoring & Control
      • Value of a Design Strategy
      • Real Example: Design Strategy
      • Basic Parameters of User Profiles
      • User Profile Example
      • Task Profile Example
      • Task Prioritization
      • Environmental Profile
      • Task Analysis – Before & After
      • The Purpose of Task Analysis
      • Navigation Structure
      • Information Architecture
      • Wireframes
      • Prototypes
      • Peer Review
      • Expert Review
      • Heuristic Evaluation
    • What is Usability Engineering?
      Usability engineering is a field that is concerned generally with human-computer interaction and specifically with making human-computer interfaces that have high usability or user friendly. In effect, a user-friendly interface is one that allows users to effectively and efficiently accomplish the tasks for which it was designed.
      The term usability engineering (in contrast to interaction design and user experience design) implies more of a focus on assessing and making recommendations to improve usability than it does on design, though Usability Engineers may still engage in design to some extent, particularly design of wire-frames or other prototypes.
    • What is Usability?
      Several formal and informal definitions of usability exist. The most widely recognized is probably the ISO definition:
      The usability of an interface is a measure of the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction with which specified users can achieve specified goals in a particular environment with that interface.
      Usability is the ease of use and learnability of a human-made object.
    • Benefits of Usability
      User Effectiveness
      Development Costs
      Revenue
      • Increase success rate and reduce users errors
      • Improve ease of use and ease of learning
      • Increase user productivity and user satisfaction
      • Increase user trust in the system
      • Reduce support costs and training costs
      • Reduce development costs and time
      • Reduce maintenance costs
      • Increase product sales, revenue and market share
      • Increase site traffic and transactions/purchases
      • Attract and retain more customers
    • Business case for Usability
      Increase user satisfaction
      Increase user loyalty
      Increase user adoption
      Reduce development costs
      Reduce support costs
      Reduce documentation times
      Reduce maintenance costs
    • Lack of Usability
      Although the definition of usability may be the subject of some discussion, lack of usability is readily recognizable. Systems that lack usability are characterized by:
      Existence of workarounds - because the interface is difficult or does not match workflow in the real world, users develop workarounds to compensate for the inadequacies of the system
      Low usage levels - Users use the system as little as possible.
      Dissatisfaction - Users, and particularly novices, will find the system difficult or frustrating to use
      Rework or double-handling - Inefficient design often means that the same data may need to be entered or read more often than is necessary.
      Because incorporating usability is a quality activity, it often occurs that systems with poor usability are also deficient in other areas. For example, they are likely to be crash-prone, poorly documented and difficult to maintain.
    • ROI Measures
    • Approach to Design
      Technology driven
      Component focus
      System driven (Use Cases)
      Product defect view of quality
      Focus on system robustness
      User Centered Design driven
      • Solutions focus
      • (Real-world) Scenario driven
      • Task success view of quality
      • Focus on User Interface robustness
    • Interface Design Occurs Late in Engineering
    • Less User-Centered Design – More Hidden Costs
    • More User-Centered Design – Less Hidden Costs
    • Flow Diagram of Usability Engineering in SDLC
      Design Strategy
      Personas & Profiles
      Scenarios
      Requirement Gathering
      Task flow Analysis
      NavigationStructure
      Information Architecture
      Wireframes
      Final Product OrApplication
      Prototypes(Low-Fidelity & Hi-Fidelity)
      Usability Testing on Hi-Fidelity prototypes
    • Usability Engineering in SDLC
      Step 1 - Pursuit
      People
      Process
      Technology
      Monitoring &Control
      Planning
      Initiating
      Execution
      Closure
      Pursuit
      • Design Strategy
      In Pursuit stage, POC (Proof of Concept) is created with overflow of Design Strategy.
    • Usability Engineering in SDLC
      Step 2 - Planning
      People
      Process
      Technology
      Monitoring &Control
      Planning
      Initiating
      Execution
      Closure
      Pursuit
      • Refined Design Strategy
      1. Business Goals
      2. Target Users
      3. General Tasks
      4. Technological Constraints
      5. Marketing / Branding Goals
      6. Critical Success Factors
      • Personas & Profiles
      1. User Groups
      2. User Profiles
      3. Environmental Profiles
      4. Task Profiles
      • Scenarios
      • Requirement Gathering
      1. Interviews
      2. Survey
      3. Contextuel Observation
      4. Focus Groups
      5. JAD Sessions
      In Planning stage, documents are created in detail, 1. Refined Design Strategy, 2. Personas & Profiles, 3. scenarios and 4. Requirement gathering.
    • Value of a Design Strategy
    • Real Example: Design Strategy
    • Usability Engineering in SDLC
      Step 3 - Execution
      People
      Process
      Technology
      Monitoring &Control
      Initiating
      Planning
      Closure
      Execution
      Closure
      • Task flow Analysis
      • Navigation Structure
      • Information Architecture
      • Wireframes
      • Low Fidelity Prototypes
      • High Fidelity Prototypes
      Once Design Strategy is completed, Execution stage take place with following methods, 1. Task flow Analysis
      2. Navigation Structure
      3. Information Architecture
      4. Wireframes and
      5. Low Fidelity & High Fidelity Prototypes
    • The Purpose of Task Analysis
    • Task Analysis – Before & After
    • Navigation Structure
    • Information Architecture
    • Wireframes
    • Prototypes
    • Usability Engineering in SDLC
      Step 4 - Monitoring & Control
      People
      Process
      Technology
      Monitoring &Control
      Initiating
      Planning
      Closure
      Execution
      Closure
      • Peer Review
      • Expert Review
      • Heuristic Evaluation
    • Peer Review
    • Expert Review (Subject Matter Experts)
    • Heuristic Evaluation
      Heuristic evaluation is the most popular of the usability inspection methods. Heuristic evaluation is done as a systematic inspection of a user interface design for usability. The goal of heuristic evaluation is to find the usability problems in the design so that they can be attended to as part of an iterative design process. Heuristic evaluation involves having a small set of evaluators examine the interface and judge its compliance with recognized usability principles (the "heuristics").
      By Jakob Nielsen
      1. Visibility of system status
       
      2. Match between system and the real world
       
      3. User control and freedom
       
      4. Consistency and standards 5. Error prevention .
      6. Recognition rather than recall
      7. Flexibility and efficiency of use
       
      8. Aesthetic and minimalist design
       
      9. Help users recognize, diagnose, and recover from errors
       
      10. Help and documentation
    • Thank you
      Presented by: Sivaprasath Selvaraj