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Efc pp Efc pp Presentation Transcript

  • Understanding Church & Faith Trends Christian Leaders Connection 2009 Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Nexus of Influence Where does time, place, culture, opportunity, event, and relationship come together in such a way that our witness will have the greatest influence? Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • What percent of the Canadian population is Evangelical? 20% Catholic Protestant 15% 7% Evangelical Alignment is determined by 10% 19% responses to the Christian Evangelical Scale, 12% 8 questions about 11% personal belief 5% and practice. 4% 5% See “Counting 0% Canadian Attendance Membership Religious Evangelially Evangelicals” in 2001 2001 Affiliation 2001 Aligned 2003 Church & Faith Trends Population Measure Sources: Attendance and Membership from tables supplied by Bruce Guenther and Outreach Canada. Religious Affiliation data from the 2001 Canadian census with evangelical denominations coded by Lorne Hunter of Outreach Canada. Evangelically Aligned data from the 2003 Ipsos Reid Evangelical Beliefs and Practices Survey using the Christian Evangelical Scale. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Age Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Religious affiliation population distribution by age, percentages, 2006 Canadian Christian populations are aging 60% faster than the non-Christian population. Non-Christian 50% 48% 45% 43% 40% 39% 40% 38% Evangelical 30% 28% 29%29% 26% 22% Roman Catholic 20% 13% 10% Main. Prot. 0% 18 to 34 35 to 54 55+ Source: Ipsos Reid Internet Exit Poll, 2006. N=36,000 Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Religious affiliation population distribution by age, percentages, 2001 35% Bibby says that in 2008 16% of youth aged 15-19 indicated a religious affiliation with a Muslim 30% non-Christian faith. 25% Sikh 20% Hindu 15% 10% 5% 0% < 15 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65 + Source: Statistics Canada, “Religion (13) and Age Groups (8) for Population, for Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas 1 and Census Agglomerations, 2001 Census - 20% Sample Data” http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/themes/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2001&PID=68339&APATH=3&GID=431515&METH=1&PTYPE=55430&T HEME=56&FOCUS=0&AID=0&PLACENAME=0&PROVINCE=0&SEARCH=0&GC=0&GK=0&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=&FL=0&RL=0&FREE=0 accessed August 27, 2009 Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canadian teens age 15-19 who identify with a religious tradition, 1984-2008, percentages 60% 13% of teens say religious involvement is “very important” compared to 85% for both Roman friendship and freedom. Catholic 50% 50% 40% 41% 39% Protestant 35% 32% 30% 28% 25% Other 21% 22% Faiths 20% 16% 14% 12% 13% 10% 10% No Faith At All 3% 0% 1984 1992 2000 2008 Source: Reginald Bibby, Project Teen Canada. Teens age 15-19. Reginald Bibby, The Emerging Millenials: How Canada’s Newest Generation is Responding to Change & Choice, (Project Canada Books, 2009): 179. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Total fertility rate by religious affiliation, Canada, 2000-2001 Only Canadian Muslims are having enough children to replace their population. Canadian fertility rate rose to 1.66 in 2007 up from 1.57 picture here. Source: Alain Belanger,editor-in-Chief, “Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada 2003-2004,” Statistics Canada (June 2006): 86. Figure 3. http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/91-209-XIE/91-209-XIE2003000.pdf (accessed July 25, 2008. Data from the 2001 census. Canadian fertility rate = 1.57. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Proportion of population aged 15-29 who practice their religion at least once a month, by religious affiliation, Canada, 2002 Evangelicals are likely included in this category Bibby puts Conservative Protestant youth (15-19) monthly attendance at religious services at 91% in 2008 up from 78% in 2000. Source: Alain Belanger,editor-in-Chief, “Report on the Demographic Situation in Canada 2003-2004,” Statistics Canada (June 2006): 86. Figure 4. http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/91-209-XIE/91-209-XIE2003000.pdf (accessed July 25, 2008. Data from the 2001 census. Data source the 2002 Ethnic Diversity Survey. Only includes non-aboriginal population. Bibby, The Emerging Millenials, 179. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canada’s Aboriginals Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canada’s Aboriginals, Religious Affiliation, 2001 100% 0.2% No Religion 90% 17.0% 80% Other 4.1% 0.6% 1.6% 2.8% 70% 2.7% Aboriginal 60% Spirituality 50% 41.0% 42.1% 42.1% Other 48.2% 43.4% Christian 59.9% 40% 73% Catholic 30% Mainline 20% 20.3% 15.1% 19.6% 20.6% Protestant 15.3% 10% Evangelical 15.4% 9.2% 9.3% 10.7% 10.1% 9.5% 0% N.A. Indian Métis single Inuit single Mult. Aborig. Total single resp. resp. resp. Aborig. resp. n.i.e Aborig. resps. Ident. Pop. Source: 2001 Census of Population, custom extraction. Access to custom tables courtesy of the Vancouver Sun. Evangelical are those affiliated with uniformly evangelical denominations + Christian, n.i.e. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canada’s Aboriginals populations, 1996, 2001 and 2017 1,600 1,400 1996 1,200 1,000 Thousands 800 2001 600 400 2017 200 0 North American Métis Inuit Total Aboriginal Indian Source: Statistics Canada, “Aboriginal population by group, Canada, 1996, 2001, 2017” http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-547-x/2005001/4072109- eng.htm accessed Sept 24, 2009. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Immigration and Visible Minorities Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Percentage who are Canadian and foreign born by religious affiliation, 2001 100% 10.7% 13.7% 90% 16.6% 18.4% 27.1% 80% Foreign-Born 70% 63.2% 60% 71.7% 71.9% 72.5% 50% 40% 30% 20% Canadian- Born 10% 0% Catholic Buddhist Hindu Sikh Population Christian, Muslim Roman Canadian Protestant Evangelical Mainline n.i.e. Source: 2001 Census. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/highlight/Religion/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo=PR&View=1b&Code=01&Table=2&StartRec=1&S ort=2&B1=01&B2=Distribution (accessed April 2, 2009). Evangelical includes Baptist, Pentecostal, Mennonite, Salvation Army, Christian Reformed, Evangelical Missionary, CMA, Adventist, Methodist and Brethren in Christ. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Immigrant counts by region of origin and the percent of these counts that are evangelical affiliates, 2001 2,500,000 25% 22.5% 2,000,000 20% Immigrant Pop. 1,500,000 15% 11.5% 1,000,000 10.2% 10% 500,000 5.4% 4.9% 5% 3.9% 3.0% % Evangelical 0 0% Source: 2001 Census. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/highlight/Religion/Page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo=PR&View=1b&Code=01&Table=2&StartRec=1&S ort=2&B1=01&B2=Distribution (accessed April 2, 2009). Evangelical includes Baptist, Pentecostal, Mennonite, Salvation Army, Christian Reformed, Evangelical Missionary, CMA, Adventist, Methodist and Brethren in Christ. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canadian immigration by region of origin 45% 42% These regions are the most 40% important sources for new immigrants. 35% Up to 2001 30% 25% 19% 20% 20% 16% 15% 13% 11% 10% 9%9% 9% 10% 8% 6% 5% 5% 5% 4%3% 3% 2001 to 2006 5% 1%1% 0% West Central Asia and the Europe Africa United States South-East Asia Southern Asia Oceania and other Eastern Asia Caribbean and Bermuda Central and South America Middle East Sources: 2001 Census. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/themes/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2001&PID=67771&APATH=3&GID=517770&METH=1&PTYPE=55496&THEME=56&FOCUS=0&AID=0&PLACENAME=0&PROVI NCE=0&SEARCH=0&GC=0&GK=0&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=&FL=0&RL=0&FREE=0 (accessed August 27, 2009). 2006 Census http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/topics/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?TPL=RETR&ALEVEL=3&APATH=3&CATNO=&DETAIL=0&DIM=&DS=99&FL=0&FREE=0&GAL=0&GC=99&GK=NA&GRP=1&IPS=&METH=0&ORDE R=1&PID=89424&PTYPE=88971,97154&RL=0&S=1&ShowAll=No&StartRow=1&SUB=723&Temporal=2006&Theme=72&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canadian immigration for select religious affiliations, by immigration period, percentages 100% Other 90% No religion 80% Sikh 70% Buddhist 60% Hindu 50% Muslim 40% Jewish 30% Christ. n.i.e. 20% Orthodox 10% Protestant Rom. Cath. 0% Before 1961 1961-1970 1971-1980 1981-1990 1991-2001 Sources: Statistics Canada, “Religions in Canada, http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/analytic/companion/rel/pdf/96F0030XIE2001015.pdf accessed Oct 2, 2009. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Visible minority populations, 2001 and 2017, and percent affiliated with evangelical denominations in 2001 2,000,000 25% Pop. In 2001 1,800,000 Evangelical representation among 21.6% the fastest growing populations is 1,600,000 very low. 20% 1,400,000 1,200,000 15% Projected Pop. In 2017 1,000,000 800,000 10% 600,000 7.4% 7.7% 5.8% % affil.with 400,000 5% Evang. 4.3% Denoms. in 200,000 3.1% 2001 1.7% 1.1% 0.6% 0.4% 0 0% Sources: 2001 Census. http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/themes/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?Temporal=2001&PID=67771&APATH=3&GID=517770&METH=1&PTYPE=55496&THEME=56&FOCUS=0&AID=0&PLACENAME=0&PROVINCE=0&SE ARCH=0&GC=0&GK=0&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=&FL=0&RL=0&FREE=0 (accessed April 2, 2009). Evangelical includes Baptist, Pentecostal, Mennonite, Salvation Army, Christian Reformed, Evangelical Missionary, CMA, Adventist, Methodist and Brethren in Christ and 2006 Census http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census06/data/topics/RetrieveProductTable.cfm?ALEVEL=3&APATH=3&CATNO=&DETAIL=0&DIM=&DS=99&FL=0&FREE=0&GAL=0&GC=99&GID=837928&GK=NA&GRP=1&IPS=&METH=0&ORDER=1&PID =92334&PTYPE=88971&RL=0&S=1&SUB=0&ShowAll=No&StartRow=1&Temporal=2006&Theme=80&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF= accessed August 27, 2009, and Source:Alain Belanger and Eric Caron Malenfant, “Ethnoculural diversity in Canada: Prospects for 2017,” Statistics Canada (March 2005): 3. Catalogue no. 91-541-XIE Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Projected percent of population comprising visible minority groups in 2001 and projected population for 2017, selected cities 60% 51% 50% 49% 2001 40% 30% 28% 24% 21% 2017 20% 19% 18% 15% 16% 10% 0% Winnipeg Calgary Gatineau Montreal Edmonton Hamilton Canada Toronto Vancouver Ottawa - Source:Alain Belanger and Eric Caron Malenfant, “Ethnoculural diversity in Canada: Prospects for 2017,” Statistics Canada (March 2005): 4. Catalogue no. 91-541-XIE Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Percentage who moved in the last 5 years by religious affiliation, 2001 70% Moved from outside of Canada 60% Moved between 31.2% municipalities in Canada 50% 13.5% 19.0% Moved within the same city 11.7% 40% 2.8% 11.4% 11.0% 10.7% 30% 17.4% 10.8% Who is connecting with 20% newcomers during the first 28.4% 27.0% 21.9% 25.8% 26.6% 3 months? 10% 0% Evangelical Muslim Sikh Hindu Buddhist Source: Canadian Census 2001. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Work and Family Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Families where the husband or wife were single-earners, percentages, 1976 and 2008 60% 53% 50% Most families are dual-earner families % Families with Single-earner Husband 40% 30% 21% 20% % Familes with Single-earner 10% Wife 10% 4% 0% 1976 2008 Source: Katherine Marshall, “The Family Work Week”, Perspectives (April 2009): 6. and 7. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001- x/2009104/pdf/10837-eng.pdf Accessed April 24, 2009. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Families with children in the home that are dual-earner, by age of children, percentages, 1976 and 2008 90% 80% 77% 1976 2008 70% 67% 60% 50% 45% Dual income 40% families are the 31% norm for families 30% with children – even very young 20% children. This 10% creates time stress for families. 0% Youngest Child under 6 Youngest Child 6 to 15 Source: Katherine Marshall, “The Family Work Week”, Perspectives (April 2009): 7 & 8. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001- x/2009104/pdf/10837-eng.pdf Accessed April 24, 2009. Wives contribution to total family employment hours rose from 43.8% in 1997 to 45.3% in 2008. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Families with children in the home that are dual-earner, hours worked, wives and husbands, 1997 and 2008, percentages 100% 11% 10% 90% Over 40 hours 27% 32% 80% 30 to 40 hours 70% Under 30 hours 60% 63% 68% 50% The work load for husbands is 40% 68% getting lighter 64% while the work 30% load for wives is 20% getting heavier. 26% 10% 21% 4% 5% 0% 1997 2008 1997 2008 Wives Husbands Source: Katherine Marshall, “The Family Work Week”, Perspectives (April 2009): 7 & 8. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001- x/2009104/pdf/10837-eng.pdf Accessed April 24, 2009. Wives contribution to total family employment hours rose from 43.8% in 1997 to 45.3% in 2008. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Statistics Canada’s Time Stress Scale 1. I plan to slow down in the coming year; 2. I consider myself a workaholic; 3. When I need more time, I tend to cut back on my sleep; 4. At the end of the day, I often feel that I have not accomplished what I had set out to do; 5. I worry that I don’t spend enough time with my family or friends; 6. I worry that I am constantly under stress trying to accomplish more than I can handle; 7. I feel trapped by routine; 8. I feel that I just don’t have time for fun any more; 9. I often feel under stress when I don’t have enough time; and 10. I would like to spend more time alone. A person’s Time Stress score is determined by the number of positive responses to these 10 statements. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Time Stress Among Dual-earner Couples Employed Full Time, 2005. 100% Time Stress 90% 19% 18% Score of 7 to 24% 27% 34% 10 80% 38% Time Stress 70% Score of 4 to 6 32% 60% 42% Time Stress 36% 34% Score of 0 to 3 50% 40% 40% 41% Women in dual income 30% 50% families 20% 39% 39% 39% experience 27% more time 10% 22% stress than 0% men. Yongest Youngest No children Yongest Youngest No children Child Child 6 to under 16 Child Child 6 to under 16 Under 6 15 Under 6 15 Men Women Source: Katherine Marshall, “The Family Work Week”, Perspectives (April 2009): 6. 11 http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-001- x/2009104/pdf/10837-eng.pdf Accessed April 24, 2009. See page 6 for definition of time stress. Time stress is measured on a scale from 0 to 10 where 0 is the lowest amount of reported stress and 10 is the highest. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Family factors and high religious involvement for those employed full-time, 1975, 1990 and 2005 50% 45% 44% 42% 40% 39% 39% 35% 33% 34% 33% 31% 30% 30% 28% 29% 25% 20% 18% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1975 1990 2005 1975 1990 2005 1975 1990 2005 1975 1990 2005 Men Women Men Women No Children Has Children Source: Desjarlais deKlerk, Kristen Ann, “The Impact on Religious Involvement of Women in the Paid Labour Force, 1975-2005,” MA theiss, University of Lethbridge, 2009. Tables 2 and 3. High religious involvement means monthly or greater. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Giving and Volunteering Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Average charitable donations for Canadians as reported on tax filings and percentage reporting charitable donations, 1998-2006 $1,600 26.0% $1,483 All 25.8% 25.8% Canadian $1,400 tax filers $1,197 25.6% $1,200 $1,059 25.4% $986 $1,000 25.2% All donors $860 $800 25.0% 24.8% $600 24.6% 24.6% $400 $365 Percent of $305 taxfilers $252 $266 24.4% $222 reporting $200 chartiable 24.2% donations $0 24.0% 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 Source: Statistics Canada Table 111-0001 – Summary of charitable donors, annual. CANSIM. http://cansim2.statcan.ca/cgi- win/cnsmcgi.exe?Lang=E&amp;CANSIMFile=CIICII_1_E.htm&amp;RootDir=CII/ (accessed: July 25, 2008) Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Average charitable donations and donation rates by frequency of attendance at religious services, 1997, 2000, 2004 and 2007 $1,250 94% 100% 93% 90% 90% 90% Not Weekly $1,038 Attnd. $1,000 84% 80% 82% $887 75% 77% 70% Weekly Attnd. $750 60% $577 50% $551 $500 40% Weekly Attnd. Donation Rate 30% $284 $295 $250 20% $148 $176 Not Weekly Attnd. 10% Donation Rate $0 0% 1997 2000 2004 2007 Source: Rick Hiemstra, “Evangelical Giving and Volunteering,” Church & Faith Trends 2:2 (January 2009): 3 and Michael Hall, David Lasby, Stephen Ayer, William David Gibbons, “Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating,” (Statistics Canada, 2009): 9 and 23. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Average annual hours volunteered by attendance at religious services, 1997, 2000, 2004 and 2007 250 229 232 202 197 200 Not Weekly 149 147 150 136 142 Hours 100 Attend Weekly 50 0 1997 2000 2004 2007 Source: Rick Hiemstra, “Evangelical Giving and Volunteering,” Church & Faith Trends 2:2 (January 2009): 3, and Michael Hall, David Lasby, Stephen Ayer, William David Gibbons, “Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating,” (Statistics Canada, 2009): 43. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Average annual volunteer hours and volunteer rate by presence of children in household, 2004 and 2007 People with children volunteer more 250 often but for a smaller number of hours 70% 2004 ave. vol. hours 62% 60% 200 54% 191 50% 2007 ave. 184 vol. hours 150 41% 39% 153 40% Hours 141 147 142 125 30% 2004 100 110 volunteer rate 20% 50 2007 10% volunteer rate 0 0% No children Pre-school aged Both pre-school School aged children only and school aged children only children Source: Michael Hall, David Lasby, Stephen Ayer, William David Gibbons, “Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating,” (Statistics Canada, 2009): 40. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Average annual volunteer hours and volunteer rates for Canadians, 2004 and 2007, by age 300 70% 2004 ave. volunteer 245 60% hours 250 218 202 205 50% 2007 ave. 200 177 volunteer Volunteer rate 170 hours 40% 152 158 Hours 150 139 138 137 133 30% 2004 volunteer rate 100 20% 50 2007 10% volunteer rate 0 0% 15 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65 + Source: Michael Hall, David Lasby, Stephen Ayer, William David Gibbons, “Caring Canadians, Involved Canadians: Highlights from the 2007 Canada Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating,” (Statistics Canada, 2009): 40. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Evangelism, Church and Belief Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • “I feel it is very important to encourage non-Christians to become Christian?” by Religious Affiliation, 2007 100% Strongly 22% disagree 36% 80% 40% 46% 50% Moderately 18% disagree 60% Moderately 28% 36% agree 24% 40% 23% Strongly 59% agree 20% 18% 15% 19% 31% Don't know / 11% 8% 11% refused 0% Evangelical Mainline Roman Catholic Canada Protestant Protestant Source: Ipsos Reid CHEC EFC 2007. N=1000. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • “My private beliefs about Christianity are more important than what is taught by any church?” 100% Strongly disagree 10% 6% 8% 10% 12% Moderately disagree 16% 80% 18% 16% Moderately agree 33% Strongly agree 21% 27% 60% 28% Don't know / refused 40% 77% 71% 48% 44% 45% 43% 20% 0% 1996 2003 1996 2003 Evangelical (Affil.) Canada Sources: All Ipsos Reid Surveys. 1996 God and Society, N=3000; 2007 CHEC/EFC, N=1000. Colin Lindsay, “Canadians attend weekly religious services less than 20 years ago.” Statistics Canada, 2008. Catalogue no. 89-630-X. Note: The category less frequently includes; at least once a month, a few times a year and at least once a year. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • “I don’t think you need to go to church to be a good Christian?” 100% Strongly 7% 9% disagree 15% 19% 9% Moderately 9% disagree 80% 16% Moderately 15% agree 27% 25% Strongly 60% agree 28% Don't know / 26% refused 40% 77% 66% 55% 57% In 2005 20% 41% 40% 21% of Canadians attended 0% religious 1996 2003 1996 2003 services weekly. Evangelical (Affil.) Canada Sources: All Ipsos Reid Surveys. 1996 God and Society, N=3000; 2007 CHEC/EFC, N=1000. Colin Lindsay, “Canadians attend weekly religious services less than 20 years ago.” Statistics Canada, 2008. Catalogue no. 89-630-X. Note: The category less frequently includes; at least once a month, a few times a year and at least once a year. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • “A mentally competent person, who has been diagnosed as terminally ill, should be allowed to ask someone to assist them in taking their own life?” by religious affiliation, 2007 100% 15% Strongly 24% 20% disagree 80% 40% 17% 13% Moderately 16% disagree 60% 14% Moderately 34% 32% agree 33% 40% 25% Strongly agree 46% 20% 32% 33% Don't know / 25% 21% refused 0% Evangelical Mainline Roman Catholic Canada Protestant Protestant Source: Ipsos Reid CHEC EFC 2007. N=1000. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Face Time Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Average time per day spent at various locations in hours, Canada, by gender, 2005 18 17.2 15.9 About 9 hours spend on sleep 16 and non-social activity per day Male 14 Average hours per day On average Canadians spent 63 minutes a day commuting 12 in 2005 compared to 54 minutes in 1992 10 8 Less time in a place of worship than the grocery store. Female 6 3.8 4 2.6 1.6 1.4 2 1.3 1.2 0.8 0.8 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.1 0.2 0 0.1 0 Source: Statistics Canada, “General Social Survey on Time Use: Overview of the Time use of Canadians, 2005” (July 2006): 39. Catalogue no. 12F0080- XIE. Canadians age 15 and older. Martin Turcotte, “Like Commuting? Worker’s perceptions of their daily commute,” CST, (Winter 2006): 35. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Frequency of Canadians’ attendance at religious services, 1985 to 2005 35% 33% 32% 30% 30% 28% 27% 27% 26% 25% At least once a 25% week 22% 21% 20% 15% Never 10% 5% 0% 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 Source: Colin Lindsay, “Canadians attend weekly religious services less than 20 years ago.” Statistics Canada, 2008. Catalogue no. 89-630-X. Note: The category less frequently includes; at least once a month, a few times a year and at least once a year. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canadians who attend religious services weekly, by age, 1985 to 2005 50% Largest attendance drop among Boomers 42% 40% 39% 1985 37% Attend Weekly 30% 25% 23% 22% 2005 20% Attend 16% 16% Weekly 10% 0% 15 to 24 25 to 44 45 to 64 65 and over Source: Colin Lindsay, “Canadians attend weekly religious services less than 20 years ago.” Statistics Canada, 2008. Catalogue no. 89-630-X. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Who Canadians spend time with, by gender, 2005 The average worker spent The average worker spent 2.9 hours alone 3.4 hours per day in 2005 in 2005 up from 2.2 hours in 1986. engaged in various activities with members of 7 6.5 their family down from 4.2 6.3 hours in 1986. 6 5.7 5.3 5.2 Average hours per day 4.8 4.9 5 4.7 Male 4.3 4.4 4 3 Female 2 1 0 Alone With household With persons With household With persons members outside the members only outside the household household only Sources: Statistics Canada, “General Social Survey on Time Use: Overview of the Time use of Canadians, 2005” (July 2006): 50. Catalogue no. 12F0080- XIE. Canadians age 15 and older. Martin Turcotte, “Time spend with family during a typical workday, 1986 to 2005,” Canadian Social Trends (Summer 2007): 2 and 3. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canadians who live alone by age and gender, percentages, 2001 40% 38% In 1951 only 2.6% of 35% Canadians lived alone Male compared to 12.3% in 2001. 30% 25% 20% 17% Female 16% 15% 14% 13% 12% 11% 11% 10% 9% 7% 5% 4% 3% 0% 15-24 25-44 45-54 55-64 65 + All 15 + Source: Warren Clark, “Time Alone,” Canadian Social Trends (Autumn 2002): 3and 4. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Internet use and selected time uses, minutes per day, 2005 600 Average time alone per day in 2005 Non-user 493 was 5.9 hours. Heavy internet users 500 - more than 1 hour per day - spend 8.2 hours per day alone. 401 400 374 Minutes per day Up to 1 hour 300 per day 205 191 200 176 More than 1 86 hour per day 100 74 58 0 Alone Contact with household Spouse/partner children < 15 years Source: B. Veenhof, “The Internet: Is it changing the way Canadians spend their time?” Statistics Canada (December 2008): 13. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Internet use and time spent at select locations, 2005 1,200 1072 The average Canadian spent 16.5 Non-user 985 1002 1,000 hours per day at home compared to 17.9 for heavy internet users – more than 1 hour per day 800 Minutes per day Up to 1 hour 600 per day 400 More than 1 203 hour per day 200 172 93 52 41 20 3 2 3 0 Home Work Other person's Place of worship house Source: B. Veenhof, “The Internet: Is it changing the way Canadians spend their time?” Statistics Canada (December 2008): 16. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Social Networking Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Canadians who have a social network profile, by age, 2009 100% In 18 months the percentage of Canadians with a 90% 86% social networking profile grew from 39% to 56% 80% 70% 60% 59% 60% 56% 52% 50% 44% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 18-34 35-54 55 + Male Female Canada Source: “What? You don’t have a social network profile? You are now the minority,” Ipsos Reid, June 19, 2009 Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • When Canadians who are aware of Facebook last used it, by age, 2009 Online Canadians now spend one third of their Internet time on social networking sites – this does not include email. 100% Never 13% 90% 21% 23% 6% 28% Longer ago 80% 4% 8% 14% 70% 14% Within the 13% 17% past three 60% 10% 10% months 6% Within the 50% 7% last month 12% 9% 40% 12% Within the 12% 12% 70% last week 30% 13% 51% 10% 10% Yesterday 20% 8% 10% 23% 22% Today 12% 0% Age 18-34 Age 35-54 Age 55 + Canada Source: “What? You don’t have a social network profile? You are now the minority,” Ipsos Reid, June 19, 2009 Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Resources Canadians use to deal with major life change, by age, percentages, 2008 Young people experience the greatest Few Canadians look amount of life change and look to close to religious friends, family and the internet (which often organizations for help means social networking) for help. with major life change 80% 75% Family 70% 68% 68% 64% 65% 61% Close friends 60% 56% 58% 50% 48% 49% 50% 46% Professionals (including 40% 36% 47% doctors) Internet 31% 30% Religious 20% 16% organizations 11% 13% 11% 9% 10% At least one major change 0% 20 to 29 30 to 44 45 to 64 65 + Source: Leslie-Anne Keown, “General Social Survey Report: Social Networks help Canadians deal with change.” Canadian Social Trends (Winter 2009): 4 and 7. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Perceived high importance of various devices for daily life, by age 90% 80% 78% 77% 70% 67% 67% 59% 57% 59% 60% 48% 49% 47% 50% 44% 40% 40% 35% 37% 32% 31% 30% 20% 10% 0% 13-17 18-34 35-54 55 + 13-17 18-34 35-54 55 + 13-17 18-34 35-54 55 + 13-17 18-34 35-54 55 + Computer Internet Cell phone Television Source: Decima Research, “2008 Wireless Attitudes Study,” Sept 12, 2008. http://www.cwta.ca/CWTASite/english/pdf/DecimaStudy_2008.pdf accessed Sept 15, 2009. “High importance” is 7 or more out of 10. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Screen time (TV + Computer), by age, 2005, by age In 2008 44% of Canadians age 55 and older said the internet was very important for their daily lives. T.V. viewing has fallen off from 1986 levels for the younger age groups. Computer time, which 5 does not include, cell or PDA use, has grown. Older media is losing ground to newer media. 4 Computer 0.3 0.6 Hours per day 3 0.7 1.4 0.7 1.0 0.8 2 3.6 3.2 T.V. 2.4 1 2.0 1.7 1.7 1.7 0 20 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65 to 74 75 or older Source: Margot Shields and Mark S. Tremblay, “Screen time among Canadian adults: A profile,” Statistics Canada (June 2008): 32. Catalogue no. 82-003. Data from the 1986 and 2005 General Social Survey. 2007 Data from the Community Health Survey. Veenhor and Timusk, “Online activities of Canadian Boomers and Seniors,” Canadian Social Trends (August 2009): 25 Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Percent of Canadian households reporting having a cellular telephone, by selected income quintile, 2004-2007 100% Lowest 90% 90.9% Middle 80% 76.2% Highest 70% By 2007 71% of Canadian 60% households had a cell phone for personal use up from 59% 50% in 2004. 42.5% 40% In 2007 the average annual house hold expenditure on 30% wireless services was $773, $128 more than they spent on 20% landline service. 10% Canada had 21.6 million wireless subscribers in March 0% 2009. 2004 2005 2006 2007 Source: Canada’s Office of Consumer Affairs, “Cellphone Services – Recent Consumer Trends,” Consumer Trends Update (Fall 2008). http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/oca-bc.nsf/vwapj/FINALCell2008Info-Apr21-eng.pdf/$FILE/FINALCell2008Info-Apr21-eng.pdf accessed September 15, 2009. Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association http://www.cwta.ca/CWTASite/english/index.html accessed Sept 15, 2009. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Source: Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association http://www.cwta.ca/CWTASite/english/industryfacts.html# accessed Sept 15, 2009. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • 87 million Number of text messages Canadians send per day as of March 2009 ½ of all phone connections in Canada are now wireless Source: Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association http://www.cwta.ca/CWTASite/english/industryfacts.html# accessed Sept 15, 2009. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Richness and Touches High Twitter What goes here? Facebook Podcasts Touches Website ? Worship Service E-mail Face-to-face Low Richness Low High Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Direction and Speed Fast Twitter Facebook MMS Podcast Website Texting E-mail Speed Worship Service ? Bulletin Slow Face-to-face Direction One Way Two Way Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • How much Face Time do I currently have with the people I’m trying to reach? Source: Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association http://www.cwta.ca/CWTASite/english/industryfacts.html# accessed Sept 15, 2009. Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Centre for Research on Canadian Evangelicalism (CRCE) www.evangelicalfellowship.ca/crce Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Community Research Guide for Church Leaders Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca
  • Contact Information: Rick Hiemstra Director Centre for Research on Canadian Evangelicalism MIP Box 3745, Markham, ON, L3R 0Y4 905.479.5885 x281 Email: hiemstrar@efc-canada.com Websites:  www.evangelicalfellowship.ca/crce  www.churchandfaithtrends.ca  www.evangelicalfellowship.ca/cebp Rick Hiemstra 905.479.5885 CRCE evangelicalfellowship.ca