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Stop Stigma Sacramento: Mental Illness is Not What you Always Think

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Stop Stigma Sacramento: Mental Illness is Not What you Always Think

Stop Stigma Sacramento: Mental Illness is Not What you Always Think

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  • 1. For Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/ (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:30:52 AM]● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get InvolvedJoin
  • 2. Home - Stop Stigma SacramentoLanguagesEspañolViệtрусскийHmoobhttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/ (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:30:52 AM]Mental illness is treatable, and recovery is possible when education,family, peer and community supports are available and used. However,many never seek help or treatment because of the stigma, discriminationor shame they experience. The result is unnecessary pain and sadnessfor the person with the mental illness, their family, friends and thecommunity as a whole.The Mental Illness:Its not alwayswhat you think project wasinitiated by Sacramento County Department of Health and HumanServices/ Division of Behavioral Health Services (DHHS/DBHS) to:We want to change minds, attitudes and outcomes. As you read on, youmay find that mental illness is not always what you think.Mental illness affects every ethnic, racial, economic, religious and agegroup. Roughly one in every four adults will experience a diagnosablemental disorder during their lifetime. Nearly one out of every five childrenwill experience emotional or behavioral difficulty. In Sacramento County,it is estimated that nearly 355,000 residents are living with a mentalillness.● Reduce stigma and discrimination● Promote mental health and wellness● Inspire hope for people and families living with mental illness
  • 3. Home - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/ (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:30:52 AM]Personal Stories In the NewsRead More >Read More >
  • 4. The Truth about Mental Illness - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > The TruthAbout Mental IllnessDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/the-truth/ (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:00 AM]A mental illness causes mild to severe disturbances in thinking,perception, mood and/or behavior. These disturbances can affect apersons ability to cope with lifes demands and routines. However, witheducation, support and treatment, people can—and do—recover and livefulfilling lives. Studies indicate that the earlier a mental illness is identifiedand treated, the better the chances are for full recovery.Common mental illnesses include:● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● Share Your Story● Adjustment disorders● Panic disorder● Obsessive-compulsive disorder● Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)● Depressive disorder● Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)Join
  • 5. The Truth about Mental Illness - Stop Stigma SacramentoNews broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/the-truth/ (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:00 AM]The Real Threat: Stigma and DiscriminationStigma is the rejection, avoidance or fear people direct toward those theyperceive as being "different." Stigma becomes discrimination when itdeprives people of their civil rights, access to fair housing, employmentopportunities, education and full participation in life. According to alandmark 1999 United States Surgeon General report, stigma is "the most● Eating disorders● Bipolar disorder● SchizophreniaFACT: Like heart disease or diabetes, research shows that mental illnessis often a medical condition that calls for proper treatment, support andeducation.FACT: Two-thirds of people with a diagnosable mental illness never seekprofessional help. Many do not know where to go, dont realize theircondition is treatable or fear discrimination.FACT: Self-stigma prevents up to 60% of those with mental illness fromseeking treatment. According to the Centers for Disease Control andPrevention, people who suffer from chronic, untreated depression maydie up to 25 years earlier than someone in the general population.FACT: Roughly 50% of those with severe mental illness are also affectedby substance abuse. Living with both disorders significantly increasesstigma and discrimination often resulting in social isolation.FACT: People often associate mental illness with danger or violence. Thefact is that someone with a mental illness is no more likely to be violentthan someone in the general population and is actually three times morelikely to become a victim of violence.
  • 6. The Truth about Mental Illness - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/the-truth/ (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:00 AM]formidable obstacle to future progress in the arena of mental illness andhealth."Stigma comes from other people, from institutions and even from self-imposed shame. Individually, each source of stigma represents a majorbarrier. Collectively, they can be profoundly damaging and difficult toovercome. Stigma can shatter hopes of recovery and social inclusion,leaving the person feeling devastated and isolated.Nearly half of the adults in a national survey said they were unwilling tosocialize with, work with, or live near someone with a mental illness.People living with mental illness often say the stigma and discriminationassociated with their illness can be worse than the mental illness itself.The truth is, numerous people living with mental illness go about theireveryday lives and successfully fulfill their roles at work, home and intheir community. Unless self-disclosed, no one would know that aneighbor, co-worker, supervisor or chief executive officer has adiagnosable mental illness.
  • 7. Stop Stigma - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Stop StigmaDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.News broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/ (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:07 AM]Mental illness does not discriminate. But sometimes people do.Stigma and discrimination against those living with mental illness iswidespread and reaches into schools and institutions of learning,employment, housing, health care and media. It causes shame, prejudiceand hopelessness and inhibits over half of those living with mental illnessfrom seeking treatment. This creates serious personal and societalconsequences. When shame is removed from the equation, people withmental illness will more readily seek treatment, achieve recovery andengage in meaningful activities.Stigma is the largest obstacle to recovery, treatment and societalacceptance for people living with mental illness. Stigma anddiscrimination was a major theme during Sacramento Countys MentalHealth Services Act (MHSA) community planning process from 2005-● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● PartnersJoin
  • 8. Stop Stigma - Stop Stigma Sacramentohave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/ (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:07 AM]2011. Continuing the efforts of the MHSA initiative, the SacramentoCounty Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) initiated amultimedia, mental health promotion and stigma and discriminationreduction project. The goal is to fundamentally change negative attitudesand perceptions about mental illness and demonstrate that people livingwith mental illness are everyday people leading meaningful lives.The anti-stigma and discrimination project ultimately seeks to eliminatethe barriers to achieving full inclusion in society and increase access tomental health resources to support individuals and families. All of us canmake a difference by making a commitment to end stigma anddiscrimination.8 Things you can do to stop stigma and discrimination1. Make a pledge. Refuse to perpetuate or tolerate stigma and committo changing your language and attitude about people living withmental illness. Using words like "crazy" or "insane" to describesomeone living with mental illness is hurtful. Commit to removing thistype of language and other labels from your life.2. Take a stand. Ask others to stop promoting stigma and using hurtfullanguage. Keep in mind the best way to stop others from promotingstigma is to educate them about mental health and to let them knowhow their words and actions hurt others.3. Educate yourself. Learn about mental health issues and thedevastating effects of stigma. Ask someone who has openly sharedabout their mental health issues what their experience is like.Knowledge is a powerful tool for dispelling myths and stereotypes.Share your knowledge.4. Be an ally. Think of a friend or family member you have beenconcerned about. Call them to see how they are feeling. If someone
  • 9. Stop Stigma - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/ (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:07 AM]you know exhibits sudden changes in behavior or is experiencingsuicidal thoughts, reach out to them and make every effort to ensurethat they get help.5. Know your rights. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) makesit illegal to discriminate against people with physical or psychiatricdisabilities in employment, transportation, communication, orrecreation. The Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discriminationbecause of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, ordisability.6. Be fearless. Begin a discussion with friends or family about a mentalhealth topic, even if it doesnt apply to you. "What causes someone tofeel suicidal?" or "What do you think children feel when their parentsdivorce?" are examples.7. End the silence. If you have been feeling down, stressed, oranxious, call or meet with a trusted friend or family member and tellthem how you are feeling. Remember that when you speak about yourexperience with mental illness, you give others permission to sharetheir experiences. Click here to read inspiring personal stories fromlocal residents, or submit your own personal story.8. Use your voice. Join a speakers bureau or support group. Beingopen about mental illness can reduce stigma and raise awareness.
  • 10. Personal Stories - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Personal StoriesDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.News broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/personal-stories/ (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:13 AM]There are countless stories of hope and recovery to be told abouteveryday people living with mental illness.Thousands of people live successfully with mental illness every day — ateacher who is a busy mom with three kids and living with bipolardisorder or the veteran who is a son and brother who is living withposttraumatic stress disorder.To view a collection of stories from people in our community who areliving with mental illness, please see the stories below, or visit ourYouTube page here. We invite you to read and watch their stories ofhope, recovery and resiliency.If you would like to share your story please visit the "Share Your Story"section of the website.● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get InvolvedJoin
  • 11. Personal Stories - Stop Stigma Sacramentohave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/personal-stories/ (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:13 AM]New — LishiaRahman-JacksonNew — Jennifer BuchananNew — JudithGrayNew — Kamila BakerAndrea CrookMy journey with mental illness began when I was 24and living in Los Angeles as a hair and makeup artist.Read MoreStacy GannonI was diagnosed Hopeless in 2005. At least thats how Iheard “Bipolar I with psychotic features.” Read MoreClick here to watch a video of Lishias personal story.Click here to watch a video of Jennifers personal story.Click here to watch a video of Judiths personal story.Click here to watch a video of Kamilas personal story.
  • 12. Personal Stories - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/personal-stories/ (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:13 AM]Patrick MaMy life was a mess. I suffered through depression and was indenial for a long time. Read More
  • 13. Resources - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > ResourcesLocal ResourcesSacramento CountyDivision of BehavioralHealthDepression and BipolarSupport AllianceSacramentoNational Alliance onMental Illness SacramentoConsumers Self Help● 2-1-1 Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/ (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:18 AM]Sacramento County Division of Behavioral Health Services providesmental health services for adults and children at facilities throughout thecounty. Services vary according to age and individual needs, and mayinclude:● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● Program Materials|● Media Coverage2-1-1 Sacramento is a free information and referral service for thecommunity. Just call 2-1-1 (or 916-498-1000) or TTY 916-446-1434. AnInfoLine referral specialist will take your call and choose from over 2,400nonprofit and public programs to recommend ones best suited to help.Calls are always confidential.● Assisted access to underserved populations, including outreach● Evaluation and assessment● Brief therapy and counseling for individuals, family and groups● Peer and family member supportJoin
  • 14. Resources - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossiblehttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/ (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:18 AM]To learn more about mental health information and resources, visit thefollowing websites:National ResourcesConsumer ResourcesEthnic / Cultural ResourcesOnline Prevention Resources● Crisis residential● Case management● Medication evaluation and support● Hospitalization● National Institute of Mental Health● National Alliance on Mental Illness● Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration● Wellness Recovery Action Plan● National Empowerment Center● Sacramento County Health and Human Services● Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration/Consumer/Survivor● National Center for Cultural Competence: Georgetown UniversityCenter for Child and Human Development● Mental Health: Culture, Race and Ethnicity | A Supplement toMental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General● National Network to Eliminate Disparities in Behavioral Health● California Mental Health Services Act Prevention and EarlyIntervention Clearinghouse: Culture Matters● How to Report Suicidal Users on Facebook
  • 15. Resources - Stop Stigma Sacramentoby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/ (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:18 AM]
  • 16. PSA Contest - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Get Involved >PSA Contesthttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/psa-contest.php (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:24 AM]● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● PSA Contest |● Champions |● Speakers Bureau |● EventsJoin
  • 17. PSA Contest - Stop Stigma SacramentoDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.News broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseball playersDontrelle Willis and Zack Greinkeand former football greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walker andGreg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how you canhelp.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/psa-contest.php (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:24 AM]Congratulations!Congratulations to students from Mr. Rowlands class at Arden MiddleSchool for winning the "Mental Illness: Its not always what you think"Youth PSA Contest!Thank you to everyone who participated and helped to reduce stigmaand discrimination in our community!The winning video will run on Sacramento broadcast stations as anadvertisement in May, including during these shows on the below dates:The video will also run at various times in May during these shows:View the winning PSA here!● May 2: Glee (9 p.m. – 10 p.m.) on FOX● May 6: Rihanna 777 ( 8 p.m. – 9 p.m.) on FOX● May 16: Bang Theory (7 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.) on CBS● May 21: Dancing with the Stars ( 8p.m. – 10 p.m.) on ABC● May 27: The Bachelorette (8 p.m. – 10 p.m.) on ABC● Dr. Oz (NBC)● Dr. Phil & Entertainment Tonight (CBS)● TMZ (FOX)● Ellen, Jimmy Kimmel (ABC)
  • 18. PSA Contest - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmade possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/psa-contest.php (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:24 AM]
  • 19. For Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)LanguagesEnglishViệtрусскийHmoobHome - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/espanol.php (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:30 AM]Las enfermedades mentales afectan a todos los grupos étnicos, raciales, económicos yreligiosos, y a personas de todas las edades. Aproximadamente uno de cada cuatroadultos será diagnosticado con una enfermedad mental durante su vida.Aproximadamente uno de cinco niños experimentará problemas emocionales o deconducta. Se calcula que en el Condado de Sacramento unas 355,000 personas vivencon una enfermedad mental.Las enfermedades mentales son tratables y la recuperación es posible cuando laeducación, el apoyo de la familia, los compañeros y los apoyos comunitarios disponiblesson usados. Sin embargo debido al estigma, la discriminación o la vergüenza queenfrentan muchas personas no buscan ayuda o tratamiento. Como resultado de ello, lapersona con la enfermedad mental sufre, siente dolor y tristeza innecesariamente, asicomo sus familiares, amigos y la comunidad en general.El proyecto Enfermedades Mentales: No siempre es lo que usted piensa, fue iniciado porel Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos/ División de Servicios de Salud● El proyecto Enfermedades MentalesJoin
  • 20. Home - Stop Stigma SacramentoEsteProyectohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/espanol.php (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:30 AM]Conductual del Condado de Sacramento (DHHS/DBHS) para:El proyecto se propone terminar con el estigma. Queremos cambiar mentalidades,actitudes y resultados. Al leer estos materiales comprobará que la enfermedad mental nosiempre es lo que usted piensa.Los residentes del Condado de Sacramento pueden llamar al (211 o 916-498-1000, o alTYY 916-446-1434), el cuál es un servicio de información y canalización gratuito yconfidencial a la comunidad. Un especialista en canalizaciones del InfoLine contestará sullamada y elegirá de entre 2,400 programas sin fines de lucro y públicos para referirlo alos programas que crea le puedan ayudar mejor a cada individuo. Las llamadas siempreson confidenciales y hay intérpretes disponibles.El proyecto contra el estigma y la discriminación ha producido materiales en diferentesidiomas y los ha exhibido en todo el Condado para motivar a las personas a hablaracerca de la senfermedades mentales, para promover historias positivas y exitosas ypara educar a la gente acerca de la verdad sobre las enfermedades mentales.Lo invitamos a que hagan un "clic" en los siguientes ejemplos que aparecen acontinuación para que copie la información y la comparta con otros.● Reducir el estigma y la discriminación● Promover la salud mental y el bienestar● Dar esperanza a personas y familias que viven con enfermedades mentales● Comercial de TelevisiónStop The Stigma TV PSA● Folleto● Tarjeta de Consejos● Poster● Comercial de Radio
  • 21. Home - Stop Stigma Sacramentohasidoposibledebido a la aprobación de los votantes para la Proposición 63, del Acta de Servicios de Salud Mental.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/espanol.php (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:30 AM]
  • 22. For Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)LanguagesEnglishEspañolрусскийHmoobHome - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/viet.php (1 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:31:35 AM]Bệnh tâm thần ảnh hưởng tới mọi nhóm chủng tộc, sắc dân, kinh tế, tôn giáo và tuổitác. Trong mỗi bốn người lớn, có khoảng một người sẽ trải qua chứng bệnh tâm thầncó thể chẩn đoán được trong đời họ. Trong mỗi năm đứa trẻ, có gần một em sẽ trảiqua tình trạng khó khăn về cảm xúc hoặc ứng xử. Tại Sacramento County, ước tính cógần 355,000 cư dân sống với bệnh tâm thần.Bệnh tâm thần có thể chữa trị được, và có thể bình phục khi nào có sẵn và sử dụngđược các yểm trợ từ giáo dục, gia đình, bạn đồng cảnh ngộ và cộng đồng. Tuy nhiên,nhiều người chưa bao giờ tìm kiếm sự giúp đỡ hoặc chữa trị, bởi vì họ bị trải qua tìnhtrạng khinh rẻ, kỳ thị hoặc xấu hổ. Hậu quả là sự đau đớn và buồn phiền không cầnthiết xảy ra cho người mắc bệnh tâm thần, gia đình họ, bạn bè và cộng đồng nói chung.Dự án Bệnh Tâm Thần: Không luôn như quý vị nghĩ (Mental Illness: its not always whatyou think) được khởi xướng bởi Sở Y Tế và Dịch Vụ Nhân Sinh /Ngành Dịch Vụ SứcKhoẻ Tâm Thần (Department of Health and Human Services /Division of BehavioralHealth Services, DHHS/DBHS) thuộc Sacramento County, nhằm:● SỰ THẬT VỀ BỆNH TÂM THẦNMJoin
  • 23. Home - Stop Stigma SacramentoDựánnàycó được là nhờ Dự Luật 63, Đạo Luật Dịch Vụ Sức Khoẻ Tâm Thần do cử tri bỏ phiếu chấp thuận.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/viet.php (2 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:31:35 AM]Dự án này nhằm chận đứng sự khinh rẻ. Chúng tôi muốn thay đổi những suy nghĩ, tháiđộ và hậu quả. Trong lúc đọc, quý vị có thể thấy bệnh tâm thần không luôn như mìnhnghĩ.Cư dân nên cảm thấy thoải mái gọi điện thoại số 211 Sacramento (211 hoặc 916-498-1000, hoặc TTY 916-446-1434), là một dịch vụ thông tin và giới thiệu kín đáo và miễnphí cho cộng đồng. Một chuyên viên giới thiệu (referral) trên đường dây InfoLine sẽnhận cú điện thoại, và giúp lựa chọn từ hơn 2,400 chương trình cộng đồng và vô vụ lợi,nhằm đề nghị những chương trình nào có thể giúp đỡ tốt nhất cho cá nhân này. Các cúđiện thoại luôn được giữ kín và có sẵn thông dịch viên.Dự án chống sự khinh rẻ và kỳ thị đã cung cấp các tài liệu đa ngôn ngữ, được đăng tảikhắp nơi tại quận hạt này, để khuyến khích mọi người trò chuyện về bệnh tâm thần,thúc đẩy những câu chuyện thành công và tích cực, và giáo dục cho mọi người biết sựthật về bệnh tâm thần. Chúng tôi mời gọi quý vị bấm vào các mẫu tin dưới đây, để xemxét, tải xuống và chia xẻ với những người khác.● Giảm thiểu sự khinh rẻ và kỳ thị● Khuyến khích sức khoẻ tâm thần và sự lành mạnh● Gây cảm hứng hy vọng cho những ai và gia đình nào sống với bệnh tâm thần● TV Thương MạiStop The Stigma TV PSA● Tập Tập Sách Thông Tin● Thiệp Tóm Lược● Bích Chương● Radio Thương Mại
  • 24. For Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)LanguagesEnglishEspañolViệtрусскийHmoobHome - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/chinese.php (1 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:31:44 AM]精神病會影響每一個族裔、種族、經濟、宗教和年齡層。大約每四個成人中 就有一人會在一生中得到精神病診斷。每五個兒童中將近一人會發生情緒或 行為困難。在沙加緬度縣,估計有將近 355,000 名居民具有一種精神病。精神病可以治療,而且如果有教育、家庭、同儕和社區的支持可供使用,是 有可能康復的。然而,很多人因為遭受污名、 視或恥辱,從未尋求幫助或 治療。結果是具有精神病的人和他們的家人、朋友及社區承受了不必要的痛 苦和傷心。本專案的目標是停止污名。我們希望改變觀念、態度和結果。當 往下閱● 關於精神病的真相「精神病:並不總是如 所想」專案是由沙加緬度縣衛生和民 服務部/行 為健康服務科 (DHHS/DBHS) 發起,目的是:● 減少污名和 視● 提倡精神健康與安適● 使具有精神病的人和家庭燃起望Join
  • 25. Home - Stop Stigma Sacramento本專案由選民核准的提案63「精神健康服務法案」資助。http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/chinese.php (2 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:31:44 AM]讀 時,可能會發現精神病不總是和 所想的一樣。居民請撥 2-1-1 Sacramento(2-1-1 或 916-498-1000 或,或 TTY (916) 446-1434) ,它是社區中的免費資訊和轉介服務。一位InfoLine轉介專員會接聽電話,並 協助從 2,400 多個非營利公共計劃中選出最適合個人的計劃。來電總是會保密 ,而且備有口譯員服務。這項反污名與 視的專案製作了多種語言的資料,並在全縣刊登發布,鼓勵 民 討論精神病,提倡正面的成功經歷,並且教育民 有關精神病的真相。我們邀請 點選以下樣品進行檢閱、下載並和別人分享。● 電視廣告Stop The Stigma TV PSA● 小冊● 提示卡● 海報
  • 26. For Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)LanguagesEnglishEspañolViệtHmoobHome - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/russian.php (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:49 AM]Психические заболевания могут случиться у человека любой этнической, расовой,экономической, религиозной или возрастной группы. Приблизительно у каждогочетвертого взрослого человека на протяжении жизни произойдет психическоезаболевание с официальным диагнозом. Приблизительно каждый пятый ребенокиспытает эмоциональные или поведенческие отклонения. Считается, что в округеСакраменто проживает около 355 тысяч человек с психическими заболеваниями.Психическое заболевание может лечиться, и излечение вполне возможно, еслилюди будут образовываться в этих вопросах, а также воспользуются имеющейсясемейной и общественной поддержкой. В то же время, многие люди даже необращаются за помощью или лечением, поскольку их угнетает стыд идискриминация. Результатом этого является ненужная боль и страдание психическинездорового человека, его семьи, друзей, да и всей общины в целом.Проект «Психическое заболевание: это не всегда то, что выдумаете» реализуется отделом психического здоровья департамента● ПРАВДА О ПСИХИЧЕСКОМ ЗАБОЛЕВАНИИJoin
  • 27. Home - Stop Stigma SacramentoПроектосуществляетсяблагодаряhttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/russian.php (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:49 AM]здравоохранения правительства округа Сакраменто с целью: Уменьшитьстигматизацию и дискриминацию Поддержать психическое здоровье ипрофилактику Дать надежду людям и семьям, живущим с психическимизаболеваниямиПроект намерен остановить стигматизацию и стыд. Мы хотим внести изменения вумы, отношения и результаты. Дальше вы сможете прочитать, что психическиезаболевания не всегда являются тем, что вы думаете.По телефонам 2-1-1 или 916-498-1000 (для людей с нарушением слуха – 916-446-1434) жителям округа может быть предложена бесплатная и конфиденциальнаяпомощь в информации или направлении на обслуживание. Оператор телефоннойлинии InfoLine ответит на ваш звонок и поможет выбрать из 2400 общественных игосударственных программ именно те, которые наилучшим образом помогутчеловеку. Все звонки обязательно конфиденциальны. У нас есть переводчики.Проект борьбы со стигмой и дискриминацией изготовил материалы на многихязыках и разместил их по всему округу, чтобы помочь людям говорить опсихических заболеваниях, распространять положительные успешные истории ирассказывать людям правду о психических заболеваниях.Предлагаем вам ознакомиться с образцами, выгрузить их и поделиться с другими(щелкните мышкой)● Теле-реклама● Брошюра● Информационная карточка● Плакат● Радио-реклама 1● Радио-реклама 2
  • 28. Home - Stop Stigma Sacramento«Закону о Психиатрическом обслуживании» (Законопроект 63), принятом на референдуме штата Калифорния.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/russian.php (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:49 AM]
  • 29. For Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)LanguagesEnglishEspañolViệtрусскийHome - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/hmong.php (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:55 AM]Tus Mob Puas Hlwb no raug txhua pab neeg, txhua haiv neeg, txhua yam haujlwm, txhuatxoj kev ntseeg thiab tsis hais muaj pes tsawg xyoo li. Yuav luag muaj li ib tug ntawmplaub leeg uas tau txais tus mob puas hlwb uas kuaj tshawbtau nyob rau hauv lub neejno. Ntawm tsib tug menyuam mas ib tug muaj kev nyuaj siab thiab coj tus cwj pwm tsiszoo. Hauv lub zej zog Sacramento, kwv yees hais tias muaj li ntawm 355,000 tus pejxeem uas muaj tus mob puas hlwb no.Tus Mob Puas Hlwb no yeej muaj kev kho tau, thiab yeej yuav cawm tau yog hais tiasmuaj kev kawm txog, muaj tsev neeg, muaj phooj ywg, thiab muaj yus lub zej zog thiabkev txhawb uas siv cov kev pab ntawvd. Tiam sis, feem coob tsis mus nrhiav kev pab losyog kho vim txoj kev ntxub ntxaug, kev saib tsis taus, lossis txoj kev txaj muag uas muajrau yav tag los. Kev muaj mob thiab kev tu siab uas twb tsis tsim nyog rau tus neeg muajmob ntawd, nws tsev neeg, nws cov phooj ywg, thiab tag nrho hauv nws lub zej zog.● QHOV TSEEB TXOG TUS MOB PUASHLWBKEV Puas Hlwb: Tsis zoo xws li koj xav qhov kev pab no tsim muaj losntawmSacramento County Department of Health and Human Services/Division ofJoin
  • 30. Home - Stop Stigma SacramentoTeshttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/hmong.php (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:55 AM]Lub hom phiaj ntawm txoj haujlwm no yog txwv txoj kev ntxub ntxaug. Peb xav hloov txojkev xav, cov cwj pwm, thiab kev kho. Thaum koj nyeem mus ntxiv, koj yuav pom tau haistias kevmob puag hlwb tsis zoo xws li koj xav.Cov neeg nyob hauv no hu tso siab lug tau rau tus xov tooj hu dawb 211 Sacramento(211 lossis 916-498-1000, lossis TTY 916-446-1434), pab dawb thiab txwv tsis pub lwmtus neeg paub thiab pab nrhiav lwm txoj kev pab nyob hauv lub zej zog no. Peb Muajneeg txais xov tooj thiab pab koj xaiv ntawm 2,400 lub koom haum uas pab dawb thiabcov kev pab rau txhua tus pej xeem uas muaj peev xwm pab tau tus neeg ntawv kom zooli zoo tau. Kev sib txuas lus no yeej txwv tsis pub lwm tus neeg paub thiab kuj muaj neegpab txhais lus thiab.Txoj kev txwv kev ntxub ntxaug thiab saib tsis taus lwm tus tsim muaj ntau hom lusthiab muab lo thoob plaws lub zej zog no kom muaj kev sib tham txog tus kab mob puashlwb, muaj kev txhawb kom piav txog nwg li kee kwm uas muaj kev xaus rau qhov zoo,thiab qhia cov peej xeem qhov tseeb txog tus kab mob hlwb no.Peb thov caw koj nias cov nyob hauv qab no kom pom, nqus coj los siv, thiab pab qhiarau lwm tus neeg.Behavioral Health Services(DHHS/DBHS) kom:● Txo txoj kev ntxub ntxaug thiab saib tsis taus● Txhawb kev kho puas hlwb thiab kev noj qab nyob zoo● Tsim kom muaj kev cia siab rau tib neeg thiab tsev neeg uas nyob nrog kev nyuaj siab puas hlwb● Tshaj Twm Hauv TVStop The Stigma TV PSA● Ntawv Qhia Txog● Npav Qhia Txog● Cov Duab Loj Qhia Txog● Tshaj Twm Hauv Xov Tooj Cua
  • 31. Home - Stop Stigma Sacramentohaujlwmnoyogua los ntawm pej xeem kev xaiv pom zoo rau Txoj Cai 63, uas yog Txoj Cai Pab Cuam Kev Mob Puas Hlwb.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/hmong.php (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:31:55 AM]
  • 32. Personal Stories - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > The TruthAbout Mental Illness > Personal StoriesDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/the-truth/personal-stories.php (1 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:32:00 AM]There are countless stories of hope and recovery to be told abouteveryday people living with mental illness.Thousands of people live successfully with mental illness every day — ateacher who is a busy mom with three kids and living with bipolardisorder or the veteran who is a son and brother who is living withposttraumatic stress disorder.To view a collection of stories from people in our community who areliving with mental illness, please see the stories below, or visit ourYouTube page here. We invite you to read and watch their stories ofhope, recovery and resiliency.If you would like to share your story please visit the "Share Your● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● Share Your StoryJoin
  • 33. Personal Stories - Stop Stigma SacramentoNews broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.Projectmade possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/the-truth/personal-stories.php (2 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:32:00 AM]Thoughts" section of the website.Andrea CrookMy journey with mental illness began when I was 24and living in Los Angeles as a hair and makeup artist.Read MoreStacy GannonI was diagnosed Hopeless in 2005. At least that’s how Iheard “Bipolar I with psychotic features.” Read MorePatrick MaMy life was a mess. I suffered through depression and was indenial for a long time. Read More
  • 34. News - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > News RoomIn The Newshttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/news/ (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:32:06 AM]Media Coverage● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Carter Honored as Mental Health Champion by Sacramento County(UC Davis Health Systems — 9/13/12)● County to Honor Local Mental Health Champions During MentalHealth Board Meeting(Sacramento Examiner — 9/5/12)● Mental Health Champion Makes A Difference(Sacramento State News — 9/5/12)● Sacramento Countys "Mental Illness: Its not always what youthink" art display(Sacramento Examiner – 6/5/12)● Second Saturday Art Display Inspires Hope, Dispels Myths ForThose Living With Mental Illness(Girls on the Grid – 5/11/12)● The Importance of Family in Recovery! “God Only Knows” what weall would do without support!Join
  • 35. News - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/news/ (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:32:06 AM]Español(Free Your Mind Project – 5/5/12)● County Aims to Stop Mental Health Stigma(HealthyCal.org - 4/17/12)● National Everyday Matters Day – stopping the mental health stigma(Examiner – 4/16/12)● Common Ground: Ending Mental Illness Stigma(KCRA – 3/20/12)● Erasing the Stigma of Mental Illness: Jane Ann LeBlanc/Sac CountyHealth Dept.(Fox 40 News – 1/25/12)● Combating the stigma of mental illness(Sacramento News & Review – 2/2/12)● Sacramento County Starts Mental Health Campaign(California Healthline – 1/24/12)● Curbing Stigma of Mental Illness(Capital Public Radio – 1/23/12)● New Mental Health Program(KCRA 3 – 1/21/12)● New Campaign Hopes to Help Mentally Ill Get Treatment(Capital Public Radio – 1/20/12)● Reducing stigma and discrimination associated with mental healthin Sacramento(Examiner – 1/19/12)● Univision Interview with Silvina Martinez(Univision – 5/11/12)● El Condado de Sacramento(DPrimera Mano – January 2012)● Servicios de salud mental gratuitos en Sacramento(Univision – 01/19/12)● Entendiendo las enfermedades mentales(Univision – 02/29/12)● Entendiendo las enfermedades mentales - Parte 2(Univision – 02/29/12)
  • 36. News - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/news/ (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:32:06 AM]Việt● Mental health project aims to stop stigma(Nguoi Viet 2 – 1/20/12)
  • 37. Share Your Story - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > The TruthAbout Mental Illness > Share Your StoryDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/the-truth/share-your-story.php (1 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:32:16 AM]Help stop stigma and discrimination toward people and families livingwith mental illness. Inspire and encourage others, by sharing your storyof hope and recovery. Telling your story may encourage others to sharetheir experiences and may end the silence that contributes to isolationand shame.Submit your story for our "Personal Story" section by completing theinformation below. We can accept a video-taped message up to twominutes or a written message up to 1,500 characters (about 300 words).Only your first name will appear with your story.Stories will be reviewed and posted within 48-72 hours of submission.● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● Share Your StoryJoin
  • 38. Share Your Story - Stop Stigma SacramentoNews broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.Projectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/the-truth/share-your-story.php (2 of 2) [5/26/2013 10:32:16 AM]Personal InformationWhats the best way to contact you?Submit Your StoryEnter a written submission below.Please type a written submission of no more than 1500 characters.Please email us at info@stopsigmasacramento.org to attach a video.I agree to the Terms & Conditions.* required informationFirst Name *Last Name *City *State *PhoneEmailOtherSubmit
  • 39. Partners - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Stop Stigma> PartnersDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/partners.php (1 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:29 AM]A broad coalition of people have signed on to share anti-stigma programinformation with their communities and share stories that promotepositive attitudes, dispel stereotypes and model hope, wellness andrecovery. This includes individuals living in recovery, family members,advocates, healthcare providers, business leaders, educators, ethnicgroups, and community and faith-based organizations. The list ofpartners continues to grow and wed like to recognize them here.● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● Partners● AARP● African American Mental Health Providers● American River College Health Center● Another Choice, Another Chance● Antioch Progressive Church● Arthur A. Benjamin Health Professions High SchoolJoin
  • 40. Partners - Stop Stigma SacramentoNews broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/partners.php (2 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:29 AM]● Asian Community Center● Asian Pacific Community Counseling● Asian Resources, Inc.● Assemblymember Roger Dickinson● Big Brothers Big Sisters● Bread of Life Center● Breaking Barriers● California Association of Black Social Workers - Sacramento Chapter● California Rural Indian Health Board, Inc.● Capitol Community Health Network● CARES (Center for AIDS Research, Education, & Services)● Catholic Social Service of Sacramento● Chinese Community Church● Childrens Receiving Home of Sacramento● City of Rancho Cordova● City of Sacramento● Consumers Self Help Center● Cosumnes River College● Councilmember Bonnie Pannell (City of Sacramento, District 8)● Councilmember Rob Fong (City of Sacramento, District 4)● Crestwood Behavioral Health● Cross Creek Counseling● Crossroads● El Hogar● Elk Grove City Council Member Gary Davis● Elk Grove Unified School District● EMQ FamiliesFirst● First 5 Sacramento● Gender Health Center● G.O.A.L.S for Women● Golden Rule Services
  • 41. Partners - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/partners.php (3 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:29 AM]● Health Education Council - Latino Campaign● Health For All● Hispanic Chamber of Commerce● House of Hope Resource Center● Human Resources Consultants, Inc.● Inter-Tribal Council of California● La Familia Counseling Center● Language Academy of Sacramento● LGBTQ Youth Collaborative (Mental Health America of Northern California )● Loaves and Fishes - Genesis Mental Health● MAAP, Inc.● Mental Health America of Northern California● Mental Health Association in California● Mexican Consulate (Health Education Council/Ventanilla de Salud Program)● MKS Consulting● My Sisters House● NAMI California● NAMI Sacramento● Sacramento County Office of the Public Defender● Office of Statewide Health Planning & Development: Health WorkforceDevelopment Division● Opening Doors● Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church● Outword Magazine● Paradise Oaks Youth Services● P.E.E.C.E Keepers, Inc.● River Oak Center for Children● Sacramento Childrens Home● Sacramento City College● Sacramento City Unified School District● Sacramento County - Supervisor Phil Serna
  • 42. Partners - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/partners.php (4 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:29 AM]● Sacramento County - Supervisor Susan Peters● Sacramento County - Supervisor Don Nottoli● Sacramento County Office of Education● Sacramento Japanese United Methodist Church● Sacramento Latino Medical Association● Sacramento Native American Health Center● Sacramento Police Department● Sacramento State University - Professor Lee● Sacramento State - Student Health and Counseling Services● Sacramento Steps Forward● San Juan Unified School District● Senior Gleaners Inc● Senator Darrell Steinberg● Sacramento Employment and Training Agency (SETA)● Sierra Forever Families● Sierra Health Foundation● Sierra Vista Hospital● Slavic Assistance Center● Southeast Asian Assistance Center● Stanford Youth Solutions● Sutter Center for Psychiatry● Telecare - SOAR● Terkensha Associates● Terra Nova Counseling● The California Medical Association Foundations NEPO Project● The Effort● The Links, Inc.● The Sacramento Observer● The Salvation Army● Transitional Living & Community Support (TLCS)● Turning Point Community Programs
  • 43. Partners - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/stop-stigma/partners.php (5 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:29 AM]● UC Davis CAARE Center● UC Davis Health System Center for Reducing Health Disparities● United Advocates for Children and Families● WEAVE● Women, Infants and Children Program (WIC)● Yav Pem Suab Academy
  • 44. Speakers Bureau - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Stop Stigmahttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/speakers-bureau.php (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:32:34 AM]● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● PSA Contest |● Champions |● Speakers Bureau |● EventsJoin
  • 45. Speakers Bureau - Stop Stigma SacramentoDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.News broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseball playersDontrelle Willis and Zack Greinkeand former football greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walker andGreg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how you canhelp.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/speakers-bureau.php (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:32:34 AM]Stopping Stigma in our community will take the voices of many. If youare living with a mental illness, have a friend or loved one living with amental illness, or want to support our efforts, join the Stop StigmaSacramento Speakers Bureau and:Public speaking experience is not necessary. An orientation and trainingwill be provided for all new Speakers Bureau participants.Request a Speaker● Share your personal story about living with mental illness● Promote positive attitudes about living with mental illness● Share messages of wellness, hope and recoveryClick here for the Speakers Bureau application form and follow thesubmission directions on the bottom of the application. New speakerorientation and training sessions are held 2-3 times yearly. A member ofthe Stop Stigma Sacramento team will contact you with more informationafter your application is received.Click here if you would like to have a member of our Speakers Bureauspeak at an upcoming event. Please complete the request form andfollow the submission directions at the bottom of the application.
  • 46. Speakers Bureau - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmade possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/speakers-bureau.php (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:32:34 AM]
  • 47. Andrea Crook’s Personal StoryMy journey with mental illness began when I was 24 and living in Los Angeles as a hair and makeupartist. Before that, everything was great – I had a beautiful place to live, many friends and a terrific job.Suddenly, I started feeling paranoid and began having audio hallucinations.When I revealed my delusions to my mom she came straight to L.A. to bring me home. As we drove toSacramento, I tried to jump out of the car. Thankfully my brother was there to restrain me until my momcould get help. I was hospitalized with bi-polar disorder and refused medication. Then my grandfathercalled to tell me that after WWII he was hospitalized for over a year with schizophrenia.My grandfather got his PhD in chemistry and taught college for 30 years. His success story gave me hopethat if he could do it so could I. My road to recovery wasn’t easy. I lost my job, my home and manyfriends. I slept nearly all day for almost two years.Through family support and an amazing doctor, I began to recover. I discovered the WRAP program(Wellness Recovery Action Plan) which helps keep you in control and healthy. I also started volunteeringin mental health. Today, my bipolar disorder is in remission, I serve as a consumer advocate liaison forMental Health America of Northern California, I am married and just had a baby.I want people to know that recovery is possible and that they are not alone. There are resources outthere and help is just a phone call away.
  • 48. Stacy Gannon’s Personal StoryI was diagnosed Hopeless in 2005. At least that’s how I heard “Bipolar I with psychotic features.” Inother words: you are crazy and will never live a normal life again. I was one quarter scheduled awayfrom graduating from UC Davis with a degree in Sociology, an emphasis in social services and a minor inFrench. I had been on the Dean’s List every quarter. My Sociology Department Honors certificate hadalready been printed. “What was that all worth?” I thought. “Maybe I’d only imagined I was smart.”And for the next few years my existence was hopeless indeed—minor and major suicide attempts, drugand alcohol abuse and countless mutually-vindictive relationships. Every moment felt like an eternalhell. A case manager finally penetrated my anger one day when she said: “Either the drugs or thisabusive boyfriend is going to kill you. I’m sure your dad would pay for a month of rehab in southernCalifornia. You should go.” I suddenly realized that what she said was true: I was going to die like this.And without much more consideration, I was in my little Toyota Yaris the next day with my fewremaining belongings stuffed in the trunk. I ended up staying in that program for 90 days and wasintroduced to sobriety.With that battle having only just begun, I knew I had another progressive illness to address as well. Eventhough there are some people whose mental illness diminishes with complete surrender to theiralcoholism, my symptoms of Bipolar disorder remain just as severe. My determined self-awareness herewas a beneficial recovery tool. Once I had made up my mind to live again by making decisions to care formyself, the process has been slow but profound. My recovery has been a journey of personaldiscoveries, which does not mean without struggle. But I did finally find some hope along the way. Infact, it was in 2009 just after the birth of my first son that I was taking a course at Long Beach StateUniversity in an attempt to finish my Bachelor’s degree. The class was called “Sociology of MentalHealth.” I felt as though I no longer fit in the classroom setting and that my personal experience faroutweighed the information outlined on my course syllabus. I shared these sentiments with theprofessor who was also a patient’s rights advocate. She offered me some information about theemergence of the peer recovery movement and the employment of consumers in California’s mentalhealth system. “You mean other people are aware that they can recover from a mental illness?” Iwondered. It was unimaginable to me. Only months prior, I had gotten a job interview at an inpatientlocked facility to be a psychiatric technician and secretly hid my disability in hopes of inspiringconsumers once I had “gotten access.” I never got that job.With a newfound drive after having learned of the peer recovery model, I was selected for a PeerAdvocate Certificate Training by Mental Health America of Los Angeles out of 450 applicants. This wasthe beginning of my eventual employment as a Peer Partner for Mental Health America of NorthernCalifornia. And there is no way I could have planned it so perfectly: to be supporting people in similar lifeevents as my own, in the very places that I was hospitalized when my life was seemingly in ruins. I havecome full circle. It’s through the tragic circumstances of my past that now bring my life meaning and aharmonious inner peace.
  • 49. Patrick Ma’s Personal StoryMy life was a mess. I suffered through depression and was in denial for a long time. It all startedwith my mom abandoning me when I was one month old. This led to me being raised by mydrunken dad who hit me almost every day. Do I suffer PTSD, too, you ask? Just wait for thewhole story to be revealed, and then you can tell me.My dad never took care of me. All he did was abuse me. I endured his abuse until I was 13. Theysay sudden changes can affect one’s psychological health. And it happened to me, many times.After 15 years apart, my mom showed up. And even better, she offered to take me to Americafor a better future. So I left everything I was familiar with and moved to a strange country withstrange people who speak a strange language. Culture shock- that’s what my teacher used toexplain my feelings to me. The language barrier and the obstacles that I faced daily made mefeel frustrated, powerless and I just wanted to scream from the top of my lungs. Things gotbetter for me after a couple months living in the United States. I learned to adapt. Then mymom kicked me out. I was a perfectly good boy, as good as any 17 year old kid who doesn’t doany drugs, nor drinks, nor has unprotected sex and maintains a 4.0 in school can be. But I amgay, and that erases everything else that is good about me to my mom.I attempted suicide. It was not the first time I tried since I did once when I was still in Viet Namwith my alcoholic dad. But this time I had completely given up. I didn’t even feel the slightestchance of hope. I survived, but those suicidal thoughts kept coming back, haunting me. And Imet my first partner. He helped me get on my feet, keep going to school and strive to get amore decent job. I was happy, until he stopped trying to be Prince Charming and cheated on me.I was going to school full time, majoring in Nursing and working part time. I was taking care oftwo puppies because my partner traveled for work. All the new pressure combined with oldwounds spiraled and made my head want to explode. I couldn’t breathe. I felt like I was going todie, or wanting to die, again. The only difference was this time I didn’t just suppress everythingand pretend to be fine. I couldn’t do it anymore.Lucky for me, I have a good support system. My professors love me and I have an excellentadopted mom. They convinced me to get help. The emotions I feel, but can’t control, can beremedied. I fought with them to not do it. I didn’t want to be weak. I thought that mental healthservices and drugs were for crazy people, for anybody, but me. I thought that if I took Zoloft, Iwould become one of them, those who can’t handle stress in their life. I was wrong. The drugonly helped me to stabilize my brain chemicals; I had to do the rest on my own. With supportfrom my adopted mom, I learned how to handle my stress better and I have a safety plan forcrisis, instead of turning to suicidal thoughts whenever life gets tough.I am now going to school full time to become a Physician Assistant while working part time as aYouth Advocate. I learned to use my past struggles to relate to those in need. I learned how tobe strong and accept me for who I am.
  • 50. Anti-stigma Program Materials - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Resources> Program MaterialsLanguagesEspañolViệtрусскийHmoobhttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/program-materials.php (1 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:55 AM]The anti-stigma and discrimination project has produced materials inmultiple languages and posted them throughout the county to encouragepeople to talk about mental illness, promote positive success stories, andeducate people about the truth of mental illness.To request any of the materials listed below, please complete and followthe return instructions on a project materials request form.Jump to: English | Español | Việt | | Hmoob | русскийEnglish - Tip Cards● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● Program Materials|● Media Coverage● African American Female● Caucasian Male● Chinese FemaleJoin
  • 51. Anti-stigma Program Materials - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/program-materials.php (2 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:55 AM]English - BrochuresEnglish - Gas ToppersEnglish - Posters● Hmong Male● Former Soviet Male● Latino● Native American Female● Native American Male● Vietnamese Female● Chinese● English● Hmong● Native American● Former Soviet● Latino● Vietnamese● African American Male● Caucasian Female● Chinese Male● Former Soviet Male● Hmong Male● Latina● Native American Male● Youth Male● Vietnamese Female● African American Female● Caucasian Female● Chinese Male● Former Soviet Male
  • 52. Anti-stigma Program Materials - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/program-materials.php (3 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:55 AM]English - Billboard AdsEnglish - Radio AdsEnglish - Television AdsEspañol - Print MaterialsEspañol - Radio Ads● Hmong Female● Latina● Native American Female● Native American Male● Vietnamese Female● African American Male● Caucasian Male● Chinese Female● Former Soviet Male● Hmong Male● Latino● Native American Female● Youth Male● Vietnamese Male● Ad Version 1● Ad Version 2● Ad Version 3● Ad Version 4●Stop The Stigma TV PSA● Tarjeta de Consejos● Folleto● Poster● Comercial de Radio
  • 53. Anti-stigma Program Materials - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/program-materials.php (4 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:55 AM]Español - Comercial de TelevisiónViệt - Print MaterialsViệt - Radio Thương MạiViệt - TV Thương MạiChinese - Print MaterialsChinese - 電視廣告Hmoob - Print MaterialsHmoob - Tshaj Twm Hauv Xov Tooj CuaHmoob - Tshaj Twm Hauv TV●Stop The Stigma TV PSA● Thiệp Tóm Lược● Tập Tập Sách Thông Tin● Bích Chương● Radio Thương Mại●Stop The Stigma TV PSA● 提示卡● 小冊● 海報●Stop The Stigma TV PSA● Ntawv Qhia Txog● Ntawv Qhia Txog● Cov Duab Loj Qhia Txog● Tshaj Twm Hauv Xov Tooj Cua●Stop The Stigma TV PSA
  • 54. Anti-stigma Program Materials - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/program-materials.php (5 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:32:55 AM]русский - Print Materialsрусский - Радио-реклама● Информационная карточка● Брошюра● Плакат● Радио-реклама 1● Радио-реклама 2
  • 55. News - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Resources >Media CoverageIn The Newshttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/media-coverage.php (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:33:00 AM]● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● Overview|● Program Materials|● Media Coverage● Carter Honored as Mental Health Champion by Sacramento County(UC Davis Health Systems — 9/13/12)● County to Honor Local Mental Health Champions During MentalHealth Board Meeting(Sacramento Examiner — 9/5/12)● Mental Health Champion Makes A Difference(Sacramento State News — 9/5/12)● Sacramento Countys "Mental Illness: Its not always what youthink" art display(Sacramento Examiner – 6/5/12)● Second Saturday Art Display Inspires Hope, Dispels Myths ForThose Living With Mental Illness(Girls on the Grid – 5/11/12)● The Importance of Family in Recovery! “God Only Knows” what weall would do without support!Join
  • 56. News - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/media-coverage.php (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:33:00 AM]Español(Free Your Mind Project – 5/5/12)● County Aims to Stop Mental Health Stigma(HealthyCal.org - 4/17/12)● National Everyday Matters Day – stopping the mental health stigma(Examiner – 4/16/12)● Common Ground: Ending Mental Illness Stigma(KCRA – 3/20/12)● Erasing the Stigma of Mental Illness: Jane Ann LeBlanc/Sac CountyHealth Dept.(Fox 40 News – 1/25/12)● Combating the stigma of mental illness(Sacramento News & Review – 2/2/12)● Sacramento County Starts Mental Health Campaign(California Healthline – 1/24/12)● Curbing Stigma of Mental Illness(Capital Public Radio – 1/23/12)● New Mental Health Program(KCRA 3 – 1/21/12)● New Campaign Hopes to Help Mentally Ill Get Treatment(Capital Public Radio – 1/20/12)● Reducing stigma and discrimination associated with mental healthin Sacramento(Examiner – 1/19/12)● Univision Interview with Silvina Martinez(Univision – 5/11/12)● El Condado de Sacramento(DPrimera Mano – January 2012)● Servicios de salud mental gratuitos en Sacramento(Univision – 01/19/12)● Entendiendo las enfermedades mentales(Univision – 02/29/12)● Entendiendo las enfermedades mentales - Parte 2(Univision – 02/29/12)
  • 57. News - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/media-coverage.php (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:33:00 AM]Việt● Mental health project aims to stop stigma(Nguoi Viet 2 – 1/20/12)
  • 58. Champions - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Stop StigmaDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.News broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/champions.php (1 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:33:06 AM]Do you know someone who’s dedicated to promoting hope and fightingstigma around mental health in Sacramento County? Nominate thisperson to be a Mental Health Champion now!This recognition honors individuals and organizations in SacramentoCounty who have made a significant contribution in reducing the stigmaexperienced by people with mental illness, providing support or treatmentto people with mental illnesses, advocacy for issues related to mentalhealth and/or advancing knowledge in the area of mental illness/healthresearch. Selected nominees will be featured in “Mental Illness: It’s notalways what you think” project materials and activities, and on theproject website.Complete and return the Mental Health Champion Nomination formattached below.● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● PSA Contest |● Champions |● Speakers Bureau |● EventsJoin
  • 59. Champions - Stop Stigma Sacramentohave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/champions.php (2 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:33:06 AM]If you have any questions, please feel free to send an email toinfo@stopstigmasacramento.org.”Mental Illness: It’s not always what you think”Mental Health Champions Hall of FameMay 2012:July 2012:September 2012:Mental Health Champions Nomination form● Marilyn Hillerman● Frances Freitas● Kamila Baker● Albert G. Titman, Sr.● Susan Jim● Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, M.D., Ph.D.● La Familia Counseling Center● Hank Lee● Reba Vinson● Andrea Crook● Hendry Ton, M.D., M.S.● The Effort● Consumers Self Help Center● Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg● Cameron Carter, M.D.● Doris Jones, LCSW● Susan Taylor, Ph.D.● Transitional Living & Community Support, Inc.● Arthur A. Benjamin Health Professions High School
  • 60. Champions - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/champions.php (3 of 3) [5/26/2013 10:33:06 AM]Above: Mental Health Champions at the Sacramento County Board ofSupervisors meeting on July 24, 2012.
  • 61. Events - Stop Stigma SacramentoFor Information Call 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Home > Get Involved> EventsDid You Know?Abraham Lincoln lived withsevere depression andWinston Churchill lived withbipolar disorder.Countless successful actors,writers, musicians and artistshave lived with mentalillness, including: CatherineZeta Jones, Carrie Fisher,Margot Kidder and Ludwigvan Beethoven.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/events.php (1 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:33:12 AM]Below is a calendar of upcoming events and activities in SacramentoCounty where you can find out more about the “Mental Illness: It’s notalways what you think” project. Project materials will be distributed byproject partners at these events. At events marked with an asterisk (*),look for our booth to talk directly with project staff. The calendar alsoincludes partner events in the community where you can find additionalmental health resources.● The Truth AboutMental Illness ● Stop Stigma● PersonalStories● Resources &News Room● Get Involved● PSA Contest |● Champions |● Speakers Bureau |● EventsUpcoming Events3/16/13 —3/23/13 —2013 School Readiness Fair*Wii Celebrate Healthy Families*Join
  • 62. Events - Stop Stigma SacramentoNews broadcasters JanePauley and Mike Wallacehave publicly documentedtheir bipolar disorder andclinical depression.Olympian gold medalistMichael Phelps frequentlydiscusses his AttentionDeficit / HyperactivityDisorder. Other famousathletes with mental illnessinclude Golden Glove winnerJimmy Piersall, baseballplayers Dontrelle Willis andZack Greinke and formerfootball greats LionelAldridge, Herschel Walkerand Greg Montgomery.Read on to find out whatsbeing done — and how youcan help.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/events.php (2 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:33:12 AM]Sacramento City Unified School District Serna Center5735 47th Avenue, Sacramento, CA 95823Saturday, March 16, 2013 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: Sacramento City Unified School DistrictNorth Highlands Community Center6040 Watt Avenue, North Highlands, CA 95660Saturday, March 23, 2013 from 1-3 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: Sacramento County Dept. of Health & HumanServices, Public Health Division4/4/13 —5/4/13 —5/5/13 —5/11/13 —5/18/13 —5/19/13 —5/23/13 —2013 School Readiness Fair*Wii Celebrate Healthy Families*Out of Darkness Walk*OCA Dragon Boat FestivalHmong Health Alliance Health Fair*Slavic Health Safety and Job FairYarmarka Russian FestivalPacific Rim Street Fest*Consumer Speaks Conference*
  • 63. Events - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/events.php (3 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:33:12 AM]Sacramento StateThursday, April 4, 2013 from 6 – 8 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention &Active MindsDoubletree Hotel2001 Point West, Sacramento, CA 95815Saturday, May 4, 2013 from 5 - 10 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: OCA SacramentoProject materials available at the Crossings TV boothSacramento StateSunday, May 5, 2013 from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: Hmong Health AllianceCarmichael ParkSaturday, May 11, 2013Out of Darkness Walk*OCA Dragon Boat FestivalHmong Health Alliance Health Fair*Slavic Health Safety and Job Fair
  • 64. Events - Stop Stigma Sacramentohttp://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/events.php (4 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:33:12 AM]Hosted by Slavic Assistance CenterSouth Side Park2115 6th Street near U Street, Downtown SacramentoSaturday, May 18, 2013 from 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: Afisha Russian MediaProject materials available at the Crossings TV boothOld Sac & Westfield DowntownSunday, May 19, 2013 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: Asian Pacific Rim FoundationHoliday Inn Sacramento-Capitol Plaza300 J Street, Sacramento, CA 95814Thursday, May 23, 2013 from 9:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: Mental Health America of Northern California &Sacramento County, Department of Health and Human Services, Divisionof Behavioral Health ServicesYarmarka Russian FestivalPacific Rim Street Fest*Consumer Speaks Conference*
  • 65. Events - Stop Stigma SacramentoProjectmadepossibleby voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.http://www.stopstigmasacramento.org/get-involved/events.php (5 of 5) [5/26/2013 10:33:12 AM]William Land Park, Amphitheater AreaSaturday, May 26, 2013 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.Supported/Hosted by: Russian American MediaProject materials available at the Crossings TV boothInternational Kids Festival
  • 66. Para obtener mayor información sobreel proyecto Enfermedades Mentales: Nosiempre es lo que usted piensa, o paracompartir sus ideas sobre las enferme-dades mentales, visítenos en el:StopStigmaSacramento.orgLlame al 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Las llamadas siempre son confidenciales. Hay intérpretes disponibles.basta de estigma y discriminaciónEl estigma es el rechazo, el evitar a la gente osentir miedo por creer que es percibido como unapersona “diferente”.Frecuentemente la gente con enfermedadesmentales no busca tratamiento a causa de laverguenza y el estigma. El estigma se convierte endiscriminación cuando le roba a las personas susderechos civiles, derecho a una vivienda digna,oportunidades de empleo, educación y plena par-ticipación en la vida. Cuando se elimina el miedo ala discriminación o el estigma, las personas vivien-do con enfermedades mentales se pueden sentirmás cómodas para buscar tratamiento, y por lotanto tienen más posibilidades de recuperarse yvivir una vida plena.El proyecto Enfermedades Mentales: No siemprees lo que usted piensa lo inicio la División deServicios de Salud Conductual del Condado deSacramento para:• Reducir el estigma y la discriminación• Promover la salud mental y el bienestar• Dar esperanza a personas y familias que viven con enfermedades mentalesTome nota: En su informe de1999, el Cirujano General delos Estados Unidos identificóel estigma como “El principalobstáculo para progresar en elfuturo en el campo de la saludmental y la salud en general”.Salud Mental: Informe del CirujanoGeneral, 1999January 2012Las EnfermedadesMentales nodiscriminan.Pero algunas vecesla gente sí.Enfermedades Mentales:No siempre es lo que usted piensa.Este Proyecto ha sido posible debido a la aprobación delos votantes para la Proposición 63, del Acta de Serviciosde Salud Mental.
  • 67. la verdad sobre lasenfermedades mentalesLas enfermedades mentales afectan a cada grupoétnico, racial, económico, religioso, y a personasde todas las edades. Aproximadamente 1 de cada4 adultos tendrá una enfermedad mental diagnos-ticable durante su vida. Aproximadamente 1 decada 5 niños experimentará problemas emociona-les o de conducta. Se estima que en el Condadode Sacramento 355,000 residentes viven con unaenfermedad mental.VERDAD: Al igual que las enfermedades del corazóno la diabetes, estudios indican que las enfermedadesmentales por lo general son una condición médica querequiere de tratamiento apropiado, apoyo y educación.VERDAD: Dos tercios de las personas que viven conuna enfermedad mental nunca buscan ayuda profe-sional. Muchos no saben a dónde ir, no saben que suenfermedad es tratable o temen ser discriminados.VERDAD: Hasta un 60% de las personas con enfer-medades mentales no busca tratamiento debido aproblemas del autoestima.VERDAD: Aproximadamente 50% de las personas conenfermedades mentales severas también son afecta-dos por el abuso de sustancias químicas. Vivir conambas enfermedades aumenta significativamente elestigma, la discriminación y el aislamiento social.Enfermedades Mentales:No siempre es lo que usted piensa.8 cosas que ustedpuede hacer paraeliminar el estigmay la discriminación152637CONOZCA SUS DERECHOS. El Acta deEstadounidenses con Incapacidades (ADA)considera ilegal que se discrimine encontra de personas con incapacidades físi-cas o psiquiátricas en los lugares de trabajo,transporte, comunicación, o recreación. ElActa de Vivienda prohíbe discriminación enla vivienda debido a la raza, color, naciona-lidad de origen, religión, sexo, estadofamiliar, o incapacidad.NO TENGA MIEDO. No tenga miedo dehablar sobre las enfermedades mentales.Inicie conversaciones sobre el tema con ami-gos y familiares. Compartir su historia conhonestidad puede cambiar lo que la gentepiensa sobre las enfermedades mentales.TERMINE CON EL SILENCIO. Si se sientemal, estresado o ansioso, llame o reúnasecon un amigo o un familiar en el cual confia.No deje que el miedo y la vergüenza leimpidan recibir apoyo.HAGA ESCUCHAR SU VOZ. Ser abiertorespecto a las enfermedades mentalespuede reducir el estigma y aumentar laconcientización. Hágase miembro de ungrupo para hacer presentaciones públicas,o únase a un grupo de apoyo.haga una promesa. No permita perpetuar otolerar el estigma y comprométase a cambiarel lenguaje y la actitud sobre la gente que vivecon enfermedades mentales. Usar palabrascomo “loco” o “demente” para describir aalguien que tiene una enfermedad mental eshiriente. Elimine de su vida este tipo delenguaje y otras calificativos.asuma una posiciÓn. Pídales a los demásque dejen de promover el estigma y de usarpalabras hirientes. La mejor manera de hacerque otros dejen de promover el estigma eseducarlos sobre las enfermedades mentales.Hágales saber cómo sus palabras y susacciones hieren a los demás.EDÚQUESE A SI MISMO. El conocimiento esuna herramienta poderosa para combatir mitosy estereotipos. Informese acerca de las enfer-medades mentales y los efectos perjudicialesdel estigma. Pregúntele a alguien que vive conuna enfermedad mental acerca de su experien-cia. Comparta con otros lo que aprenda.SEA UN ALIADO. Piense en un amigo o familiardel cuál usted está preocupado. Llámelos paraver cómo están. Si alguien que usted conocemuestra cambios repentinos de conducta otiene pensamientos de suicidio, acérquesea ellos y haga todo el esfuerzo posible paraasegúrese de que reciban ayuda.48Para mayor información y recursos, visite al:StopStigmaSacramento.orgLlame al 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Las llamadas siempre son confidenciales. Hayintérpretes disponibles.
  • 68. EsposoPadre decuatro hijosMúltiplestrabajosEntrenador de fútbolVive con depresiónEnfermedades Mentales:No siempre es lo que usted piensa.
  • 69. 2313 cosas que usted puede hacer para eliminar elestigma y la discriminaciónHagase una promesa. No se permita perpetuar o tolerar el estigma ycomprométase a cambiar el lenguaje y la actitud sobre la gente que vive conenfermedades mentales. Usar palabras como “loco” o “demente” paradescribir a alguien que tiene una enfermedad mental es hiriente. Elimine desu vida este tipo de lenguaje y otros calificativos.CONOZCA SUS DERECHOS. El Acta de Estadounidenses con Incapacidadades(ADA) considera ilegal que se discrimine en contra de personas conincapacidades físicas o psiquiátricas en los lugares de trabajo, transporte,comunicación, o recreación. El Acta de la Vivienda prohíbe discriminación enla adquisición de vivienda debido a raza, color, nacionalidad de origen,religión, sexo, estado familiar, o cualquier tipo de incapacidad.HAGA ESCUCHAR SU VOZ. Ser abierto respecto a las enfermedades mentalespuede reducir el estigma y aumentar la concientización. Hágase miembro deun grupo para hacer presentaciones públicas o únase a un grupo de apoyo.Para mayor información y recursos, visite al:StopStigmaSacramento.orgLlame al 2-1-1 (or TTY (916) 446-1434)Las llamadas siempre son confidenciales. Hayintérpretes disponibles.basta de estigma y discriminaciónEl estigma es el rechazo, el sentimiento de exclusión y eltemor que la gente siente hacia aquellos que percibe como“distintos”.Cuando se elimina el miedo a la discriminación o el estigma,las personas que viven con enfermedades mentales sepueden sentir más cómodas para buscar tratamiento, y porlo tanto tienen más posibilidades de recuperarse y vivir unavida plena.El proyecto Enfermedades Mentales: No Siempre es lo queusted piensa fue iniciado por la División de ServiciosConductuales del Condado de Sacramento para:• Reducir el estigma y la discriminación• Promover la salud mental y el bienestar• Dar esperanza a personas y familias que viven con enfermedades mentalesEnfermedades Mentales:No siempre es lo que usted piensa.Este Proyecto ha sido posible debido a la aprobación de los votantes para la Proposición 63, del Acta de Servicios de Salud Mental.
  • 70. 精神病一視同仁。可是有時候人們會歧視。停止污名和歧視污名是一種人們對於他們認為「不同」的人所產生的排斥、避免或是恐懼。污名和羞恥常使具有精神病的人不願意尋求治療。當污名剝奪了一個人的公民權利、獲取公平住房、就業機會、教育和充分參與生活的機會,就會變成歧視。消除了羞恥或污名的恐懼之後,具有精神病的人就能更自在地尋求治療,因此能夠恢復好轉,更積極地投入生活。「精神病:並不總是如您所想」專案是由沙加緬度縣行為健康服務科發起,目的是:• 減少污名和歧視• 提倡精神健康與安適• 使具有精神病的人和家庭燃起希望在1999年的報告中,美國衛生局局長將污名視為「精神病和健康領域未來進展的最大障礙。」精神健康:美國衛生局局長報告,1999年精神病:並不總是如您所想。StopStigmaSacramento.org致電 2-1-1 (或TTY 916-446-1434)來電總是會保密。我們備有口譯員服務。要洽詢「精神病:並不總是如您所想」專案的詳情,或是分享您對精神病的看法,請與我們聯絡:本專案由選民核准的提案63「精神健康服務法案」資助。
  • 71. 15263748關於精神病的真相精神病會影響每一個族裔、種族、經濟、宗教和年齡層。每四個成人中大約有一人會在一生中發生可診斷的精神病。每五個兒童中將近一人會發生情緒或行為困難。在沙加緬度縣,估計有355,000名居民具有一種精神病。事實:就像心臟病或糖尿病一樣,研究顯示,精神病通常是一種醫學狀況,需要適當的治療、支持和教育。事實:三分之二具有精神病的人從來沒有尋求專業協助。很多人不知道要去哪裡求助,也不知道他們的狀況可以治療,或是害怕污名或歧視。事實:自加的污名使最多百分之60具有精神健康問題的人沒有尋求治療。事實:將近半數具有嚴重精神病的人也會受到物質濫用的影響。同時有這兩種疾病會顯著增加污名和歧視,經常導致社會孤立。您可以終止污名或歧視的八種做法做出承諾。拒絕延續或容忍污名,並且承諾改變您對於具有精神病者的措辭和態度。使用「瘋狂」或是「不正常」之類的字眼來描述具有精神病的人是很傷人的。從您的生活中消除這樣的措辭和其他標籤。採取立場。請別人停止提倡污名以及使用傷人的措辭。讓別人停止提倡污名的最好做法就是讓他們認識精神健康。讓他們知道自己的言行舉止會對別人造成怎樣的傷害。自我教育。知識是破除迷思和刻板印象的強大工具。認識有關精神健康的議題以及污名的破壞性影響。向某個有精神病的人詢問他們的經驗。和別人請分享您的知識。擔任同盟。想想您曾經擔心的親朋好友。打電話給他們,看看他們過得好不好。如果您認識的人突然出現行為變化或是有自殺念頭,請跟他們聯繫,並盡力確保他們獲得幫助。清楚權益。《美國殘障人士法案》(Americans with Disabilities Act,ADA)規定,在就業、交通、通訊或休閒方面歧視身心殘障者是違法行為。《公平住房法案》(FairHousing Act)禁止因為種族、膚色、原國籍、宗教信仰、性別、家庭狀態或殘障進行住房歧視。毫不畏懼。不要害怕討論精神病。先與您的家人或朋友做討論。誠實分享您的經歷可以改變別人對精神病的看法。打破沉默。如果您曾經感覺消沉、有壓力或是焦慮,打電話給一個信任的朋友或家人或和他們見面。不要讓恐懼或羞恥使您無法接受支援。抒發心聲。參加一個演講協會或是支援團體。公開談論精神病能夠減少精神病的污名並且增進認識。洽詢額外的諮詢和資源,請瀏覽:StopStigmaSacramento.org致電 2-1-1 (或TTY 916-446-1434)來電總是會保密。我們備有口譯員服務。精神病:並不總是如您所想。
  • 72. 女兒大學生網球選手朋友具有強迫症精神病:並不總是如您所想。
  • 73. 231您可以終止污名或歧視的三種做法:做出承諾。拒絕延續或容忍污名,並且承諾改變您對於具有精神病者的措辭和態度。使用「瘋狂」或是「不正常」之類的字眼來描述具有精神病的人是很傷人的。承諾從您的生活中消除這樣的措辭和其他標籤。清楚權益。《美國殘障人士法案》(Americans with DisabilitiesAct, ADA)規定,在就業、交通、通訊或休閒方面歧視身心殘障者是違法行為。《公平住房法案》(Fair Housing Act)禁止因為種族、膚色、原國籍、宗教信仰、性別、家庭狀態或殘障進行住房歧視。抒發心聲。參加一個演講協會或是支援團體。公開談論精神病能夠減少精神病的污名並且增進認識。洽詢額外的諮詢和資源,請瀏覽:StopStigmaSacramento.org致電 2-1-1 (或 TTY (916) 446-1434)來電總是會保密。我們備有口譯員服務。精神病:並不總是如您所想。本專案由選民核准的提案63「精神健康服務法案」資助。停止污名和歧視污名是一種人們對於他們認為「不同」的人所產生的排斥、避免或是恐懼。消除了歧視或污名的恐懼後,具有精神病的人就能更自在地尋求治療,因此能夠恢復好轉以及更充分地投入生活。「精神病:並不總是如您所想」專案由沙加緬度縣行為健康服務科發起,旨在:• 減少污名與歧視• 促進健康與安適• 使具有精神病的人和家庭產生希望
  • 74. Психическиезаболевания не знаютдискриминации.Но иногда этойдискриминациейзанимаются люди.ОСТАНОВИТЬ СТИГМУ ИДИСКРИМИНАЦИЮСтигма – это отвержение, неприятие,избегание или страх людей по отношению ктем, которых они считают «другими».Стигма и стыд часто мешают людям,страдающим от психических заболеваний,обращаться за лечением. Стигма можеттакже переходить в дискриминацию, когдалюдей лишают гражданских прав, справед-ливого доступа к жилью, возможностейтрудоустройства, образования, а такжеведения полноценной жизни.При устранении страха дискриминации илиосуждения людям с психическими заболе-ваниями легче обращаться за лечением и,следовательно, идти по пути выздоровленияи более наполненной жизни.Проект «Психические заболевания — это невсегда то, что вы думаете» был разработанотделом психического здоровья округаСакраменто, чтобы:• Уменьшить стигму и дискриминацию• Поддержать психическое здоровье и про-филактику• Дать надежду людям и семьям, живущимс психическими заболеваниямиЦитата: В отчете за 1999 год министрздравоохранения США определилстигму как «самое грозное препят-ствие на пути будущего прогрессав области психического здоровья иболезней».Журнал «Психическое здоровье»,Отчет министра здравоохранения, 1999Чтобы больше узнать о проекте«Психические заболевания — этоне всегда то, что вы думаете» и длясвоих комментариев по вопросампсихических заболеваний посетитенаш веб-сайт«Психические заболевания —это не всегда то, что вы думаете»StopStigmaSacramento.orgЗвоните по телефону 2-1-1(или 916-446-1434 для людей с нарушением слуха).Звонки всегда и обязательно являются конфиденциаль-ными. У нас есть переводчики.Проект осуществляется благодаря «Закону о Психиатри-ческом обслуживании» (Законопроект 63), принятом нареферендуме штата Калифорния.
  • 75. ПРАВДА О ПСИХИЧЕСКОМ ЗАБОЛЕВАНИИПсихическое заболевание может случиться учеловека любого этнического или расовогопроисхождения, любого вероисповедания,любого экономического статуса и возраста.Приблизительно у каждого четвертогочеловека на протяжении жизни произойдетпсихическое заболевание с официальнымдиагнозом. Приблизительно у каждого пятогоребенка наблюдаются эмоциональныеили поведенческие отклонения. Согласноофициальной статистике, в округе Сакраментопроживает около 355 тысяч человек спсихическими заболеваниями.ФАКТ: Исследования показывают, что, подобноболезням сердца или диабету, психическоезаболевание зачастую является таким же заболе-ванием, требующем лечения, поддержки иобразования.ФАКТ: Две третьих людей с диагностируемымипсихическими заболеваниями никогда необращаются за профессиональной помощью.Многие не знают, куда обращаться, не имеютпредставления о своем состоянии или боятсядискриминации.ФАКТ: Около 60% людей, страдающих психиче-скими заболеваниями, осуждают сами себя,чтомешает им обращаться за лечением.ФАКТ: Около половины людей, имеющих тяжелыеформы психических заболеваний, злоупотре-бляют алкоголем и наркотиками. Комбинацияэтих двух психических нарушений существенноповышает стигму (социальное осуждение) идискриминацию, что во многих случаях приводитк социальной изоляции.8 ШАГОВ, КОТОРЫЕМОЖНО ПРЕДПРИНЯТЬДЛЯ УСТРАНЕНИЯ СТИГМЫИ ДИСКРИМИНАЦИИВОЗЬМИТЕ НА СЕБЯ ОБЯЗАТЕЛЬСТВО.Откажитесь поддерживать или терпетьстигму и обяжитесь изменить свой язык иотношение к людям, страдающим психиче-скими болезнями. Употребление в речи такихслов как «безумный» или «сумасшедший»по отношению к человеку с психическимзаболеванием является оскорбительным.Искорените такие слова из своей речи ииные виды навешивания ярлыков.ЗАЙМИТЕ АКТИВНУЮ ПОЗИЦИЮ.Просите других людей прекратить поддер-живать стигму и пользоваться оскорби-тельными словесными оборотами. Самыйлучший способ прекращения поддержкистигмы это образование людей по вопросампсихических заболеваний и разъяснениевреда, который наносится их оскорби-тельными словами и действиями.ЗАЙМИТЕСЬ САМООБРАЗОВАНИЕМ.Знания являются мощным инструментом дляразвеивания мифов и стереотипов. Спроситеу людей, имеющих психические заболе-вания, об их жизненном опыте. Поделитесьполученной информацией с другими людьми.БУДЬТЕ СОЮЗНИКАМИ. Подумайтео друге или родственнике, состояниездоровья которого вас беспокоит.Позвоните им и узнайте, как их дела. Есликто-либо из ваших знакомых проявляетвнезапные перемены в поведении илидумает о самоубийстве, протяните имруку и помогите им найти помощь.ЗНАЙТЕ ВАШИ ПРАВА. Согласно Закона обамериканцах-инвалидах (The Americans withDisabilities Act - ADA), дискриминация людейс физической или психиатрической инвалид-ностью в вопросах трудоустройства, транс-портного обеспечения, общения или отдыхаявляется незаконной. Закон о справедливомжилищном обеспечении (The Fair HousingAct) запрещает дискриминацию при обеспе-чении жилья на основании расы, цвета кожи,национального происхождения, религии,пола, семейного статуса или инвалидности.НЕ БОЙТЕСЬ. Не бойтесь говорить о психи-ческих заболеваниях. Проведите обсуж-дение с друзьями или родственниками. Вашчестный рассказ может изменить то, каклюди думают о психических заболеваниях.НЕ МОЛЧИТЕ. Если вас одолевает плохоенастроение, стресс или тревожность,позвоните или встретьтесь с другом илиродственником. Не позволяйте страху илистыду удерживать вас от поиска помощи.ВЫСКАЗЫВАЙТЕ СВОЕ МНЕНИЕ. Присо-единитесь к группе лекторов или группеподдержки. Открытый разговор о психи-ческих заболеваниях сможет уменьшитьстигму и повысить информированностьлюдей.За получением дополнительной информации обращайтесь:StopStigmaSacramento.orgЗвоните по телефону 2-1-1(или 916-446-1434 для людей с нарушением слуха).Звонки всегда и обязательно являются конфиденциаль-ными. У нас есть переводчики.«Психические заболевания —это не всегда то, что вы думаете»15263748
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  • 77. Yog xav paub txogTus Mob Puas Hlwb;Tsis Zoo Li Koj Xav lossis piav txog koj txojkev xav txog tus mob puas hlwb no, mussaib peb ntawm:StopStigmaSacramento.orgHu tus xov tooj 2-1-1(lossis TTY 916-446-1434)Cov kev sib txuas lus no yeej tsis pub leej twg paub. Muajneeg pab txhais lus thiab.tsum txoj kev saib tsis tausthiab kev cais lwm tusTxoj Kev Saib Tsis Taus yog ib qhov siv tsis tau, tsisxav pom lossis lwm tus neeg ntshai yus vim lawvpom yus “txawv” lwm tus.Txoj Kev Saib Tsis Tau thiab kev txaj muag yog txojkev txwv rau cov neeg muaj tus mob tsis kam musnrhiav kev kho. Kev saib tsis tau nthau ua kev sibcais tsi pub kom lawv muaj kev ua ncaj ncees, kevvaj tse, kev ua haujlwm, kev kawm thiab kev koomtes koom pub ntoob rau neej lub neeg. Txoj kevntshai uas sib cais lossis kev saib tsis taus yuavtsum muab tshem tawm es sub, cov neeg muaj tusmob puas hlwb no yuav mus nrhiav kws kho mobyam tsis muaj kev nyuaj siab, thiab kom lawv zoozuj zus thiab muaj kev koom tes ua lawv luj neejkom kawg.Tus Mob Puas Hlwb: Tsis zoo xws li koj txoj kev xavtas mus li yog ib qhov tsim los ntawm SacramentoCounty Department of health/ Division ofBehaviorial Health Services kom:• Txo txoj kev ntxub ntxaug thiab saib tsis taus.• Txhawb kev kho puas hlwb thiab kev noj qab nyob zoo.• Tsim kom muaj kev cia siab rau tib neeg thiab tsev neeg uas nyob nrog kev nyuaj siab puas hlwb.Qiv Los Siv: Nyob rau xyoo 1999 tautshaj tawm tias, Teb Chaws Meskastug thawj nom phais neeg hais tiaskev saib tsis tau “yog qhov txausntshai tshaj txog kev kho mus rauyav tom ntej txog phab kev mobhlwb thiab neeg lub cev.”Kev Puas Hlwb:Yog tshab xo los ntawm yawg thawjkws phais neeg Surgeon General, xyoo 1999Tus Mob Puas Hlwbyuav mob tsis caisneeg.Tabsis qee zaumneeg kuj muaj kevcais neeg.Tus Mob Puas Hlwb:Tsis zoo li koj xavTes haujlwm no yog ua los ntawm pej xeem kev xaiv pom zoo rauTxoj Cai 63, uas yog Txoj Cai Pab Cuam Kev Mob Puas Hlwb.
  • 78. qhov tseeb txog tus mob puashlwbTus Mob Puas Hlwb no raug txhua pawg neeg,txhua haiv neeg, txhua yam haujlwm, txhua txoj kevntseeg thiab tsis hais muaj pes tsawg xyoo li. Yuavluag muaj li 1 tug ntawm 4 leeg uas yuav tau tus kojmob puas hlwb uas kuaj tau nyob rau hauv lub neejno. Ntawm 5 tug menyuam mas 1 tug yuav muajkev nyuaj siab thiab coj tus cwj pwm tsis zoo. Hauvlub zej zog Sacramento, kwv yees hais tias muajli ntawm 355,000 tus pej xeem uas muaj tus mobpuas hlwb no.QHOV TSEEB: Ib yam li mob plawv lossis tshav qabzib, kev tshawb fawb nthuav tawm hais tias tus mobpuas hlwb yeej yog kev mob nkeeg uas tsim nyog cojmus kho, muaj kev txhawb nqa thiab mus kawm kompaub ntxiv.QHOV TSEEB: Ob feem peb ntawm cov neeg muaj tusmob puas hlwb no yeej tsis mus nrhiav kev kho mob.Feem coob tsis paub mus nrhiav kev kho qhov twg,tsis paub hais tias yuav muaj kev kho tau lossis ntshaitsam muaj neeg saib tsis taus lawv.QHOV TSEEB: Kev saib tsis taus yus tus kheej txwv li60% ntawm cov neeg muaj tus mob puas hlwb no txojkev mus nrhiav kev kho.QHOV TSEEB: Yuav luag muaj li 50% ntawm cov neeguas muaj tus mob puas hlwb uas mob nyhav heev vimyog siv yeeb siv tshuaj. Ua neej nyob nrog ob yam noyuav ua rau neeg muaj kev ntxub ntxaug, saib tsis tausyus, thiab tsis muaj kev sib raug zoo nrog rau lwm tus.Tus Mob Puas Hlwb:Tsis zoo li koj xav152637PAUB tias koj muaj CAI. Tsab cai Americanswith Disabilities Act (ADA) tsim hais tias yogib txoj kev yuam cai yog hais tias muaj kevntxub ntxaug rau cov neeg sav cev txog kev uahaujlwm, tsheb thauj neeg, kev sib txuas lus,lossis kev ua si. Tsab cai Fair Housing Act tsispub kom muaj kev si cais vim yog lwm haivneeg,vim txawv nqaij tawv, nyob lub teb chawstwg tuaj, kev ntseeg, poj niam los txiv neej, muajpoj niam los yuav txiv lawm, lossisvim yog neegsav cev.TSIS TXHOB NTSHAI. Tsis txhob ntshai piav txogkoj tus mob. Pib kev sib txuas lus nrog rau covphooj ywg lossis tsev neeg. Qhia ncaj txog kojtus mob yuav ua rau lwm tus neeg hloov txoglawv txoj kev xav txog tus mob puas hlwb no.TSIS TXHOB CIA LI UA TWJ YWM. Yog hais tiaskoj tsis muaj siab ua dab tsi, nyuaj siab lossissiab nyob tsis tus, hus xov tooj lossis mus ntsibkoj tus phooj ywg uas koj ntseeg siab lossis ibtug hauv koj tsev neeg . Tsis txhob cia kev ntshailossis kev txaj muag txwv kom tsis muaj kevtxhawb nqa.SIV KOJ LUB SUAB. Mus koom nrog cov pawgneeg. Qhib siab dawb paug txog tus mob puashlwb yuav txo tau kev ntxub ntxaug thiab haiskom lauv to taub.COG LUS HAIS TIAS. Tsim txhob tsim lossis ub ebtxog txoj kev ntxub ntxaug thiab txiav txim siabhloov koj cov lus thiab koj tus cwj pwm cov tib neegmuaj tus kab mob hlwb. Siv cov lus xws li “vwm”lossis “ hlwb quaj” los piav txog cov neeg muajtus mob puas hlwb yog ib yam kev mob siab. Tsistxhob siv cov lus no thiab lwm txoj kev uas tis npephem mus tag koj lub neej.SAWV CEV. Thov kom lwm tus tsis txhob muaj kevntxub ntxaug thiab siv cov lus mob lwm tus siab.Qhov zoo kev txwv lwm tus neeg kom txhob ntxubntxaug es qhia kom lawv paub txog tus kab mobhlwb. Qhia kom lawv paub tias lawv cov lus thiablawv tus cwj pwm ua tau muaj kev mob siab raulwm tus neeg.QHIA KOJ TUS KHEEJ. Kev paub txog yogi b txojkev yuav ua kom rhuab tshem cov dab neeg thiabxavtias zoo tib yam. Mus kawm txog tus mob puashlwb thiab kev ntxub ntxaug saib kev puam tsuajnpaum li cas. Mus nug cov neeg uas muaj tusbmob puas hlwb no saib lawv kev txawj yog zoo liscas. Tuaj piav qhia txog koj txoj kev kawm kom lwmtus paub thiab.COG PHOOJ YWG. Xav txog ib tus phooj ywg lossisib tug hauv koj tsej neeg uas koj muaj kev txhawjxeeb txog. Hu xov tooj mus xyuas saib lawv nyobli cas. Yog hais tias muaj cov neeg uas koj paubes cia li hloov cwj pwm txawv lossis muaj kev xavtxog yuav txov nws txoj sia, mus cuag lawv thiab uatxhua yam kom lawv nrhiav kev pab.48Yog hais tias xav paub tshaj no ntxiv thiab xav tau kevpab, mus xyuas ntawm:StopStigmaSacramento.orgHu tus xov tooj 2-1-1(lossis TTY 916-446-1434)Cov kev sib txuas lus no yeej tsis pub leej twg paub. Muajneeg pab txhais lus thiab.8 yam uas koj uatau kom txwv txojkev ntxub ntxaugthiab cais lus tus
  • 79. Stop Stigma Sacramento | Terms ConditionsBy agreeing to the Terms Conditions I acknowledge that I am providing a video or written message,name, city and email address through the StopStigmSacramento.org website (Website) for the “MentalIllness: It’s not always what you think” project (Project), a project administered by the County ofSacramento (County).I desire to engage in the Project voluntarily and for my own personal reasons. In consideration ofproviding a video or written message for use by the Project, I hereby expressly assume all risk arising outof my participation. I agree that my image and words will appear on the Website and may be used inother aspects of the Project including but not limited to media, advertising,I agree to not sue, and do release, indemnify and hold harmless, the County of Sacramento, its affiliates,officers, directors, volunteers and employees, and all contractors and agents of such contractors, fromany and all liabilities, claims, demands, and causes of action whatsoever, arising out of my participationin the Project, whether arising from the negligence of any of the above parties or from any other cause.The foregoing release, indemnification, and hold harmless shall be as broad and inclusive as is permittedby the state in which I live.I acknowledge that I assign the right to the County of Sacramento and the Project to gather, process,analyze, and retain the demographic and/or other information that I supply through the Website so thatthe Project may inform its programs and services. I consent to the use of my image and words by theProject of any of this demographic and/or other information. I authorize the Project to email meinformation about the Project and related programs offered by the Project partners and the County.I acknowledge and agree that the County may discontinue the Project without notice to me and that Ishall have no continuing rights in the Project upon such termination.I assert that I am the person about whom the information I am providing relates.If any portion of this agreement is held invalid, the balance shall continue in full force and effect.
  • 80. Speakers BureauSPEAKER APPLICATIONAPPLICANT INFORMATIONNAME: TODAY’S DATE: / /COMPANY / ORGANIZATION / OTHER:ADDRESS:TELEPHONE: ( ) - EMAIL:Please contact me by Telephone EmailHow did you hear about the Speakers Bureau?Where did you access the Speakers Bureau application?APPLICANT EXPERIENCEPlease describe your public speaking experience if any. If you have no public speaking experience,please check the “None” box. Note: prior speaking experience is not required.NoneAPPLICANT INTERESTSI am interested in speaking about (check all that apply):My story of hope and wellness Family stories (challenges, hope, recovery)Overcoming stigma Advocating for changeCultural and ethnic perspectives Navigating the health systemGetting help for a loved one Overcoming challengesServices and supports OtherI am interested in speaking to: Availability (check all that apply)Age group: Business HoursGeographic area: EveningsSpecific Audience: WeekendsNo preference OtherStop Stigma Sacramento
  • 81. ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONPlease tell us a little bit about yourself and your interest in joining the Speakers Bureau:Which languages would you be comfortable using in front of an audience?Are you interested in offering assistance or volunteering time to the Speakers Bureau either in additionto or in place of speaking?Yes No If Yes, please specifyHelping at a future event Helping to recruit speakersHelping promote the Speakers Bureau Other:Optional: Please indicate your experience with mental illness (check all that apply):I am a family member, friend or loved one of someone living with mental illnessI am, or have been, a consumer of mental health servicesI have a message of wellness, hope or recovery I want to shareI am an educator or health professional Other:Would you like assistance preparing your speaking topic or preparing for your speaking event?Yes NoIf Yes, what type of assistance?Any other information you would like us to know:Return Application:By Fax: (916) 875-6001 By Email:Attn: Stop Stigma Sacramento Speakers Bureau Click the above EMAIL box to submit directly, orscan and email to: info@stopstigmasacramento.orgBy Mail: Sacramento CountyStop Stigma Sacramento Speakers Bureau9333 Tech Center Drive, Suite 800Sacramento, CA 95826New speaker training and orientation sessions are held 2-3 times yearly. Someone from Stop Stigma Sacramentowill contact you within 1-2 weeks to discuss orientation and training. For assistance, or for questions about yourapplication, email info@stopstigmasacramento.org or call 916-875-4256EMAILPRINTED COPY
  • 82. Speakers BureauSPEAKER REQUEST FORMThank you for requesting a speaker through the Stop Stigma Sacramento Speakers Bureau. Requestsare filled on a first come, first served basis and by speaker availability. Depending upon speakeravailability, requests for presentations may require additional time to accommodate. However, submittinga request two weeks or more in advance will greatly improve our ability to fill your request.REQUESTOR INFORMATIONNAME: TODAY’S DATE:COMPANY OR ORGANIZATION:ADDRESS:TELEPHONE: ( ) - EMAIL: FAX: ( ) -How did you hear about the Speakers Bureau?EVENT INFORMATIONEvent Date:Speaker Requested: FROM AM PM TO AM PM Presentation Length: MinutesEvent Address: City: Zip:Event Contact Name: Telephone: ( ) -Number of anticipated attendees: NOTE: A minimum of 12 attendees is preferred.Please describe your anticipated event attendees:Community-Based Org. Reps Health Professionals Students: AgesFaith-Based Group Parents Specific cultural group:General Public Seniors OtherSpeakers use a lecture format and may not be appropriate for resource fair settings. Please contact us with questions.Please indicate which subject area(s) you would like the speaker to address (check all that apply):Stories of hope and wellness Family stories (challenges, hope, recovery)Overcoming stigma Advocating for changeCultural and ethnic perspectives Navigating the health systemGetting help for a loved one Overcoming challengesServices and supports OtherIf you need a presentation in a language other than English, please indicate LanguageStop Stigma Sacramento
  • 83. Additional InformationPlease tell us a little bit about the reasons why you are requesting a speaker, what you hope to gain andany special areas you would like the speaker to address:By submitting this application, the host organization or requestor agrees to: Promote the event to the local community (as possible). Include the Stop Stigma Sacramento logo and slogan on materials promoting the event. Make the event free and open to the general public (unless policy, security or confidentialityprohibits). Promptly notify the Stop Stigma Sacramento Speakers Bureau of scheduling or location changes. Confirm all arrangements with your program speaker(s) two weeks before the program.I agree to the aboveSubmit Request:By Fax: (916) 875-6001 By Email:Attn: Stop Stigma Sacramento Speakers Bureau Click the above EMAIL box to submit directly orscan and email to info@stopstigmasacramento.orgBy Mail: Sacramento CountyStop Stigma Sacramento Speakers Bureau9333 Tech Center Drive, Suite 800Sacramento, CA 95826For assistance, or for questions about your request, email info@stopstigmasacramento.org or call916-875-4256.On behalf of Stop Stigma Sacramento and the Sacramento County Division of Behavioral Health Services,thank you for helping stop stigma and discrimination by requesting a speaker for your event.You will receive an email or telephone call within 5-7 business days of receiving your request, confirmingor declining your request. For assistance, or for questions about your request, please contactCrystal Kekai Rowland at 916-875-4256, rowlandc@saccounty.netEMAILPRINTED COPY
  • 84. MENTAL ILLNESS: IT’S NOT ALWAYS WHAT YOU THINK PROJECT MATERIALSMaterials are available while supplies last. Requests for large quantities will be filled as materials are available.To view larger images of materials, please visit www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/program-materials.phpPLEASE CIRCLE THE QUANTITY OF EACH MATERIAL YOU WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE. COMPLETE AND FAX THIS ENTIRE FORM TO (916) 447-8509YES! We would like to receive free informational materials. Complete and fax this form to (916) 447-8509Organization: ________________________________________________ Contact:______________________________ E-mail: _______________________________________Mailing Address: ______________________________________________________ City: ______________________________ Zip: _________ Phone: ____________________ENGLISH MATERIALBROCHURES100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______
  • 85. PLEASE CIRCLE THE QUANTITY OF EACH MATERIAL YOU WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE. COMPLETE AND FAX THIS ENTIRE FORM TO (916) 447-8509TIP CARDS (6.5” x 4.5”)100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______
  • 86. PLEASE CIRCLE THE QUANTITY OF EACH MATERIAL YOU WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE. COMPLETE AND FAX THIS ENTIRE FORM TO (916) 447-8509POSTERS (11” x 17”)100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______
  • 87. PLEASE CIRCLE THE QUANTITY OF EACH MATERIAL YOU WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE. COMPLETE AND FAX THIS ENTIRE FORM TO (916) 447-8509MULTILINGUAL MATERIALSSPANISH CHINESEBROCHURE TIP CARD (6.5” x 4.5”) POSTER (11”x 17”) BROCHURE TIP CARD (6.5” x 4.5”) POSTER (11” x 17”)100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______
  • 88. MENTAL ILLNESS: IT’S NOT ALWAYS WHAT YOU THINK PROJECT MATERIALSMaterials are available while supplies last. Requests for large quantities will be filled as materials are available.To view larger images of materials, please visit www.stopstigmasacramento.org/resources/program-materials.phpPLEASE CIRCLE THE QUANTITY OF EACH MATERIAL YOU WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE. COMPLETE AND FAX THIS ENTIRE FORM TO (916) 447-8509HMONG VIETNAMESEBROCHURE TIP CARD (6.5” x 4.5”) POSTER (11”x 17”) BROCHURE TIP CARD (6.5” x 4.5”) POSTER (11” x 17”)100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______
  • 89. PLEASE CIRCLE THE QUANTITY OF EACH MATERIAL YOU WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE. COMPLETE AND FAX THIS ENTIRE FORM TO (916) 447-8509RUSSIANBROCHURE TIP CARD (6.5” x 4.5”) POSTER (11”x 17”)100250500Other ______100250500Other ______100250500Other ______
  • 90. Oldest daughterEnglish teacherFriendAvid readerLiving with anxietyMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.
  • 91. 2313 things you can doto stop stigma and discriminationmake a pledge. Refuse to perpetuate or tolerate stigma and committo changing your language and attitude about people living withmental illness. Using words like “crazy” or “insane” to describesomeone living with mental illness is hurtful. Commit to removing thistype of language and other labels from your life.KNOW YOUR RIGHTS. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)makes it illegal to discriminate against people with physical orpsychiatric disabilities in employment, transportation, communication,or recreation. The Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discriminationbecause of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status,or disability.use your voice. Join a speakers bureau or support group. Beingopen about mental illness can reduce stigma and raise awareness.For additional information and resources, go to:StopStigmaSacramento.orgCall 2-1-1 (or TTY (916) 446-1434)Calls are always confidential. Interpreters are available.stop stigma and discriminationStigma is the rejection, avoidance or fear people directtoward those they perceive as being “different.”When fear of discrimination or stigma is removed,people living with mental illness may feel morecomfortable seeking treatment, and thus able to recoverand engage more fully in life.The Mental Illness: It’s not always what you thinkproject was initiated by Sacramento County, Division ofBehavioral Health Services to:• Reduce stigma and discrimination• Promote mental health and wellness• Inspire hope for people and families living with mental illnessMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63,the Mental Health Services Act.
  • 92. Father of twoPartnerLittle League coachVeteranLiving withbipolar disorderMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.
  • 93. 2313 things you can doto stop stigma and discriminationmake a pledge. Refuse to perpetuate or tolerate stigma and committo changing your language and attitude about people living withmental illness. Using words like “crazy” or “insane” to describesomeone living with mental illness is hurtful. Commit to removing thistype of language and other labels from your life.KNOW YOUR RIGHTS. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)makes it illegal to discriminate against people with physical orpsychiatric disabilities in employment, transportation, communication,or recreation. The Fair Housing Act prohibits housing discriminationbecause of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status,or disability.use your voice. Join a speakers bureau or support group. Beingopen about mental illness can reduce stigma and raise awareness.For additional information and resources, go to:StopStigmaSacramento.orgCall 2-1-1 (or TTY (916) 446-1434)Calls are always confidential. Interpreters are available.stop stigma and discriminationStigma is the rejection, avoidance or fear people directtoward those they perceive as being “different.”When fear of discrimination or stigma is removed,people living with mental illness may feel morecomfortable seeking treatment, and thus able to recoverand engage more fully in life.The Mental Illness: It’s not always what you thinkproject was initiated by Sacramento County, Division ofBehavioral Health Services to:• Reduce stigma and discrimination• Promote mental health and wellness• Inspire hope for people and families living with mental illnessMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63,the Mental Health Services Act.
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  • 101. In a 1999 report, the UnitedStates Surgeon Generalidentified stigma as “themost formidable obstacle tofuture progress in the arenaof mental illness and health.”Mental Health: A Report of theSurgeon General, 1999
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  • 103. To learn more about the MentalIllness: It’s not always what you thinkproject or to share your thoughts onmental illness, visit us at:StopStigmaSacramento.orgCall 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Calls are always confidential. Interpreters are available.Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.stop stigma and discriminationStigma is the rejection, avoidance or fearpeople direct toward those they perceive as being“different.”Stigma and shame often prevent people livingwith mental illness from seeking treatment.Stigma becomes discrimination when itdeprives people of their civil rights, accessto fair housing, employment opportunities,education and full participation in life. Whenfear of discrimination or stigma is removed,people living with mental illness may feel morecomfortable seeking treatment, and thus ableto recover and engage more fully in life.The Mental Illness: It’s not always what youthink project was initiated by SacramentoCounty Division of Behavioral Health Services to:• Reduce stigma and discrimination• Promote mental health and wellness• Inspire hope for people and families living with mental illnessIn a 1999 report, the UnitedStates Surgeon Generalidentified stigma as “themost formidable obstacle tofuture progress in the arenaof mental illness and health.”Mental Health: A Report of theSurgeon General, 1999Mental Illness doesnot discriminate.But sometimespeople do.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the MentalHealth Services Act.
  • 104. the truth about mental illnessMental illness affects every ethnic, racial,economic, religious and age group. Roughly onein every four adults will experience a diagnosablemental illness during their lifetime. Nearlyone out of every five children will experienceemotional or behavioral difficulty. In SacramentoCounty, it is estimated that nearly 355,000residents are living with a mental illness.FACT: Like heart disease or diabetes, researchshows that mental illness is often a medicalcondition that calls for proper treatment, supportand education.FACT: Two-thirds of people with a diagnosablemental illness never seek professional help.Many do not know where to go, don’t realize theircondition is treatable or fear discrimination.FACT: Self-stigma prevents up to 60% of those withmental illness from seeking treatment. Accordingto the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,people who suffer from chronic, untreateddepression may die up to 25 years earlier thansomeone in the general population.FACT: Roughly 50% of those with severe mentalillness are also affected by substance abuse.Living with both disorders significantly increasesthe stigma and discrimination often resulting insocial isolation. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.8 things youcan do to stopstigma anddiscrimination152637KNOW YOUR RIGHTS. The Americans withDisabilities Act (ADA) makes it illegal todiscriminate against people with physicalor psychiatric disabilities in employment,transportation, communication, orrecreation. The Fair Housing Act prohibitshousing discrimination because of race,color, national origin, religion, sex, familystatus, or disability.be fearless. Begin a discussion withfriends or family about a mental healthtopic, even if it doesn’t apply to you.“What causes someone to feel suicidal?”or “What do you think children feel whentheir parents divorce?” are examples.end the silence. If you have been feelingdown, stressed, or anxious, call or meetwith a trusted friend or family member andtell them how you are feeling. Rememberthat when you speak about your experiencewith mental illness, you give otherspermission to share their experiences.use your voice. Join a speakers bureauor support group. Being open aboutmental illness can reduce stigma andraise awareness.make a pledge. Refuse to perpetuate ortolerate stigma and commit to changing yourlanguage and attitude about people livingwith mental illness. Using words like “crazy”or “insane” to describe someone living withmental illness is hurtful. Commit to removingthis type of language and other labels fromyour life.take a stand. Ask others to stop promotingstigma and using hurtful language. Keepin mind the best way to stop others frompromoting stigma is to educate them aboutmental health and to let them know how theirwords and actions hurt others.educate yourself. Learn about mentalhealth issues and the devastating effects ofstigma. Ask someone who has openly sharedabout their mental health issues what theirexperience is like. Knowledge is a powerfultool for dispelling myths and stereotypes.Share your knowledge.be an ally. Think of a friend or familymember you have been concerned about. Callthem to see how they are feeling. If someoneyou know exhibits sudden changes in behavioror is experiencing suicidal thoughts, reach outto them and make every effort to ensure thatthey get help.48For additional information and resources, go to:StopStigmaSacramento.orgCall 2-1-1 (or TTY 916-446-1434)Calls are always confidential. Interpreters are available.
  • 105. In a 1999 report, the UnitedStates Surgeon Generalidentified stigma as “themost formidable obstacle tofuture progress in the arenaof mental illness and health.”Mental Health: A Report of theSurgeon General, 1999
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  • 107. In a 1999 report, the UnitedStates Surgeon Generalidentified stigma as “themost formidable obstacle tofuture progress in the arenaof mental illness and health.”Mental Health: A Report of theSurgeon General, 1999
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  • 109. In a 1999 report, the UnitedStates Surgeon Generalidentified stigma as “themost formidable obstacle tofuture progress in the arenaof mental illness and health.”Mental Health: A Report of theSurgeon General, 1999
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  • 111. In a 1999 report, the UnitedStates Surgeon Generalidentified stigma as “themost formidable obstacle tofuture progress in the arenaof mental illness and health.”Mental Health: A Report of theSurgeon General, 1999
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  • 113. In a 1999 report, the UnitedStates Surgeon Generalidentified stigma as “themost formidable obstacle tofuture progress in the arenaof mental illness and health.”Mental Health: A Report of theSurgeon General, 1999
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  • 115. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgHusbandVeteranLiving withposttraumaticstress disorder
  • 116. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgHusbandVeteranLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 117. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgHusbandVeteranLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 118. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgPartnerCollegefreshmanLiving withattention deficithyperactivitydisorder
  • 119. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgPartnerCollege freshmanLiving with attention deficithyperactivity disorder
  • 120. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgPartnerCollege freshmanLiving with attentiondeficit hyperactivitydisorder
  • 121. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgHusbandRuns family businessLiving with depression
  • 122. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgHusbandRuns family businessLiving with depression
  • 123. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgHusbandRuns familybusinessLiving withdepression
  • 124. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFatherSmall business ownerLiving with anxiety
  • 125. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFatherSmall business ownerLiving with anxiety
  • 126. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFatherSmallbusinessownerLiving withanxiety
  • 127. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFatherFarmerLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 128. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFatherFarmerLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 129. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFatherFarmerLiving withposttraumaticstress disorder
  • 130. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgBusy momChild care providerLiving with depression
  • 131. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgBusy momChild care providerLiving with depression
  • 132. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgBusy momChild careproviderLiving withdepression
  • 133. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFather of fiveTraditional singerLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 134. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFather of fiveTraditional singerLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 135. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgFather of fiveTraditionalsingerLiving withposttraumaticstress disorder
  • 136. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgSonMath wizLiving with schizophrenia
  • 137. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgSonMath wizLiving with schizophrenia
  • 138. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgSonMath wizLiving withschizophrenia
  • 139. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgAuntBusiness ownerLiving with bi-polar disorder
  • 140. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services ActCall 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgAuntBusiness ownerLiving with bi-polardisorder
  • 141. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgAuntBusinessownerLiving withbi-polar disorder
  • 142. Oldest daughterEnglish teacherFriendAvid readerLiving with anxietyMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.You may think you know what mental illness looks like, but odds are you can’t tell if a personhas a mental illness just by looking at them. Roughly one in four adults will experience a mentalillness during their lifetime, regardless of race, income, faith or age. But shame causes most tonever seek treatment. You can help. Changing attitudes about mental illness will encouragepeople to get the help they need to lead fulfilling lives.For more information about mental illness, local resources or support call2-1-1; TTY 916-446-1434 or visit StopStigmaSacramento.org.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act
  • 143. College freshmanSkateboarderFriendPartnerLiving with attentiondeficit hyperactivitydisorderMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.You may think you know what mental illness looks like, but odds are you can’t tell if a personhas a mental illness just by looking at them. Roughly one in four adults will experience a mentalillness during their lifetime, regardless of race, income, faith or age. But shame causes most tonever seek treatment. You can help. Changing attitudes about mental illness will encouragepeople to get the help they need to lead fulfilling lives.For more information about mental illness, local resources or support call2-1-1; TTY 916-446-1434 or visit StopStigmaSacramento.org.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act
  • 144. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.FatherSmall businessownerCamperCommunityleaderLiving withanxietyYou may think you know what mental illness looks like, but odds are you can’t tell if a personhas a mental illness just by looking at them. Roughly one in four adults will experience a mentalillness during their lifetime, regardless of race, income, faith or age. But shame causes most tonever seek treatment. You can help. Changing attitudes about mental illness will encouragepeople to get the help they need to lead fulfilling lives.For more information about mental illness, local resources or support call2-1-1; TTY 916-446-1434 or visit StopStigmaSacramento.org.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act
  • 145. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.AuntBusinessownerIncredible cookGardenerLiving withbipolar disorderYou may think you know what mental illness looks like, but odds are you can’t tell if a personhas a mental illness just by looking at them. Roughly one in four adults will experience a mentalillness during their lifetime, regardless of race, income, faith or age. But shame causes most tonever seek treatment. You can help. Changing attitudes about mental illness will encouragepeople to get the help they need to lead fulfilling lives.For more information about mental illness, local resources or support call2-1-1; TTY 916-446-1434 or visit StopStigmaSacramento.org.Project made possible by voter approved Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act
  • 146. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Father of threeChurch pastorLiving with depression
  • 147. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.PartnerVeteranLiving withbipolar disorder
  • 148. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.DaughterCollege studentLiving with obsessivecompulsive disorder
  • 149. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.WifeChoir singerLiving withbipolar disorder
  • 150. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.FatherFarmerLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 151. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Father of fourWorking multiple jobsLiving with depression
  • 152. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.SonMath wizLiving withschizophrenia
  • 153. Mental Illness:It’s not always what you think.Call 2-1-1 Visit: StopStigmaSacramento.orgMental Illness:It’s not always what you think.UncleFishermanLiving with posttraumaticstress disorder
  • 154. “Mental Illness: It’s not always what you think”Mental Health Champion AwardNomination FormThe Mental Health Champion Award honors individuals and organizations in Sacramento County who: Have made a significant contribution in reducing the stigma experienced by people with mental illness; Provide outstanding support or treatment to people with mental illness; Advocate for issues related to mental health; and/or Advance knowledge in the area of mental health researchMental Health Champion nominations will be reviewed by a committee of consumers, family members,community stakeholders and Division of Behavioral Health Services staff. Selected nominees will be highlightedin multiple “Mental Illness: It’s not always what you think” project outreach materials and activities.Nominee InformationFirst Name: ____________________________ Last Name: _______________________________________Title: ____________________________________ Organization: ___________________________________Phone Number: _____________________ Email: _______________________________________________Reason for NominationPlease describe the contribution or success of this person to bringing hope and / or awareness tomental health and mental illness in the Sacramento community.__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________If more space is needed, please attach additional sheets.Nominator InformationYour First Name: ________________________ Last Name: _______________________________________Title: ____________________________________ Organization: ___________________________________Phone Number: _____________________ Email: _______________________________________________Please return completed nomination form via mail, email or fax to:Raj Dhanda, Edelman921 11thStreet, Suite 250 - Sacramento, CA 95816raj.dhanda@edelman.comFax: (916) 447-8509Call (916) 288-2210 for more information.