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Empowerment Magazine

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Promoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency for the Greater Sacramento

Promoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency for the Greater Sacramento

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  • 1. EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Welcome to the Empowerment Magazine Website!Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to promoting of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by sacpros.org,a leading mentalhealth website dedicating to strengthening and empowering individuals and families with reliable and easilyaccessible information about available services in the community.Winter 2011 Issue Fall 2011 Issue Summer 2011 Issuehttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/default.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:22 AM]
  • 2. EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEWinter 2011 Issue Fall 2011 Issue Summer 2011 IssueIf you find this magazine useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/default.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:22 AM]
  • 3. Current IssueEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSummer 2012 Cover Draft >We are excited to present to you the pd version of our Fall2011 Issue.P 2 TABLE OF CONTENTP 4Living in the Present by Terry Zick, MAP 6Exclusive Interview withRon Risley, MDP 8Special Interview with Lynn Keune, LMFT (LaFamilia Counceling Center Inc)P 10The Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain, LosAngeles by Deonna Wilemme, PhD (KIDSCORNER)P12Medication or Meditation? By Thomas Hushen,Service Coordinator-HRCP 14Hope as Resiliency Factor byTammy Dyer, MSWP 16Sam’s Club Offers Simple Steps to a HealthyBody and Mind byDr. Andrew MyersP 18People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket ToWork by Rosario Ramirez, Social Security PublicAffairs Specialist for the Northern AreaP 20Exclusive Interview withRon Risley, MDP 3Welcome message by Amede Kyubwa, MA,MPA,Acknowledgement, Copyright &DisclaimerP 5Living in the Present byTerry Zick, MANot Alone by David KieszP 7Exclusive Interview withRon Risley, MDP 9Special Interview with Lynn Keune, LMFT (LaFamilia Counceling Center Inc)P 11New School Year Brings an Increase inAnxiety for Children byCindy Thygeson,M.DP 13 Being Loved by Melanie MartinezP 15Sam’s Club Offers Simple Steps to a HealthyBody and Mind by Dr. Andrew MyersP 17A Risk Worth Taking for Change by JanetSegallP 19 Phommasone’s Kitchen Mushroom TacosP 21 Wellness Toolkit by Terry Zick, MAP 23Resources. (Addional Resources on page 3,9, 16, 18, 19, 21 & 22)Advertisements on page 13, 17 & 22http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/CurrentIssue.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:30 AM]
  • 4. Current IssueP22New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxietyfor Children /Cindy Thygeson,M.DBack cover page You can order your FREE copy by simply calling us at 916 222-7541 or sending an e-mail to contact@empowermentmagazine.org or click here for a list of local locations where you can pick up yourFREE copy of the magazineAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/CurrentIssue.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:30 AM]
  • 5. Magazine SectionsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Sections of Empowerment MagazineInspirational > Happiness > Resiliency > Advocacy > KiSECTIONS. Inspiring stories of recovery and empowerment. The Pursuit of Contentment and Happiness. Resiliency Factory. Advocacy Corner. Kids Corner. Art Corner. Thinking Fresh and Eating Clean. Did You know That?. Recipe. Poetry Section. Holistic Holistic Approaches To Healing. Geriatrics Issues. Toolkits. Other ColumnsResiliency > Advocacy > Kids > Art > Thinking Fresh > Did You know That? > Recipe > Poetry > Holistic > Geriatrics > Toolkits> Other Columns >All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Sections.aspx [4/21/2013 10:54:32 AM]
  • 6. InterviewsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInterviewsExclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D.Dr. Risley is the first graduate of the combined residency program in family medicine and psychiatry at UC Davis. He is a formerassistant clinical professor and physician diplomat at UCD. In addition to practicing psychiatry at TCORE, he integrates familymedicine and psychiatry at Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc (www.sacmedoasis.com). He lived for seven years on Sherman Way,just across the boulevard from UCDMC. Click here to read avut the ntroduction to the interview by Gail Erlandson, M.A.Ron Risley, M.D.Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T, Director of LaFamilia Counseling Center.Clinical director and acts as the liaisonto Sacramento County DHHS when working with the County, she is on the cultural Competence Committee at the County, andSystem Wide Committee promoting cultural competence. She is the Clinical Supervisor and Program Manager for the outpatientmental health clinic. She has been with La Familia for almost eleven years. She has a master’s degree in Art Therapy and FamilyTherapy from Notre Dame de Namurs, Ca., and a bachelor’s degree from the famous California College of the Arts in Oakland. Sheis licensed as a marriage and family therapist (MFT) and art therapist (ATR). Bilingual in Spanish and English, she spends most of herdays taking calls. At home, she is an artist and spends her time painting and doing art with her children and grandchildren.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Interviews.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:35 AM]
  • 7. InterviewsSpecial interview with Doctor Hazem Hashem on the important triangle between the physician, the patient and theirpsychiatric medications. Dr. Hashem is the medical director of Visions Unlimited and Wellness and Recovery Center North. He isalso Chief Psychiatrist/Chief of mental health at Solano State Prison, and Board Certified in general psychiatry and ForensicPsychiatrist. Click to readhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Interviews.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:35 AM]
  • 8. InterviewsmoreHazem Hashem, M.D.If you find this magazine useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Interviews.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:35 AM]
  • 9. Advertising and Sponsorship OpportunitiesEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsAdvertising and Sponsorship OpportunitiesWe print and distribute 25,000 copies every quarter. That means you have the power to reach over50,000 homes & businesses throughout the Greater Sacramento Region when you advertise in just one issueof the Empowerment Magazine. Your ad will also be listed on www.sacpros.org, a leading MentalHealth Resource Guide strengthening individuals, families and community with easily accessibleinformation about available services in Greater Sacramento area.Empowerment Magazine is distributed to a variety of agencies, health care providers,mentalhealth agencies and other local businesses. Please click to the link below to view some ofthe locations: Magazine DistributionAdvertising1 time 2 times 3 timesBack CoverPage (FullColor)$750 $690 $650Full Page (inFull Color)$500 $475 $4251/2 Page (inFull Color)$275 $250 $2151/4 Page (inFull Color)$125 $115 $90Sponsorships at Three LevelsPLATINUM SPONSOR GOLD SPONSOR SILVER SPONSOR$500Your logo and a link to your website1 full-page adSponsor’s link in 4 Issues$275Your logo and a link to your website1/2 full-page adSponsor’s link in 4 Issues$125Your logo and a link to your website1/4 full-page adSponsor’s link in 4 IssuesYour generous sponsorship would be also highlighted on our websites.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Advertise.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:38 AM]
  • 10. Advertising and Sponsorship OpportunitiesWe thank you for your interest and look forward to working with you. We will do our best to get you in thenext publication. Our advertising rates are very affordable. We recommend that you select a size that youcan easily afford to run for 4 issues or 1 full year. For more information, please call us at (916) 222- 7541 or e-mail us at contact@empowermentmagazine.org or please complete the form below:* First name (required):* Last name (required):* E-mail address (required):Phone number:* Message (required):If you find this page useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Advertise.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:38 AM]Submit
  • 11. DistributionsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsDistributionsEmpowerment Magazine is distributed to a variety of agencies, health care providers andlocal businesses. Here are just a few of the locations:● Visions Unlimited - Franklin Blvd● TELECARE - Fulton Blvd● Sutter Counseling Center, Howe Avenue● Fair Oaks Psychiatric Associates - Fulton Avenue● Dr Elvert F. Nelson Office - Coyle AvenueMolina Medical Center - Marysville BlvdEast West European Food Groceries - ManzanitaTurning Point Community Programs - Viking DriveNAMI - Viking DriveEskaton Care Center - Manzanita Avenue●River Oak Center for Children -El Camino Avenue, Carmichael●TLCS Admnistration - Fair Oaks Blvd●T-CORE - Fite Circle● Family Dentistry - 47th Avenue● ISA - 47th Avenue●● Med7 Urgent Care - ManzanitaWellness Recovery Center/NorthWellness Recovery Center/SouthSacramento Mental Health Treatment CenterCrestwood (American Behavioral Center) on Engle Road(Carmichael)Crestwood Hospital on Stockton BoulevardHeritage Oaks HospitalSierra Vista HospitalSutter Psychiatric HospitalTurning Point Crisis ResidentialTurning Point NGP/RSTEl Hogar RSTThe Effort on J StreetThe Effort (Oak Park)Sacramento Medical Oasis, IncTurning Point PathwaysTLCS – PalmerTLCS – Carols PlaceCasa Willow (Kaisers contracted Crisis Residential Home)● Disability Action Group - Howe Avenue● ALLMED Medical Center - Howe Avenue● Sacramento County Bowling Green Center - Bowling Drive● Sacramento Public Libray Arcade - Marconi Avenue● Quest Diagnostics Incorporated-Jameson Court Carmichael● Family Discount Pharmacy-Jameson Court Carmichael,● Bio-Data Medical Laboratories Corp - Jameson Ct, Carmichael● The Efforts North Highlands Multi-Service Center-NorthHighlands area● North Highlands Community Center - North Highlands● Sacramento Family Medical Center - North Highlands● Western Dental Centers - Elkhorn Blvd● All Medical Center - Elkhorn Blvd● County of Sacramento Department of Neighororhood Services(North County)● The Sacramento County Department of Human Assistance -North Highlands● Relax Pharmacy - North Highlands● Sacramento Regional Public Safety Training Center - McClellanhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Distributions.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:41 AM]
  • 12. DistributionsDr. Abraham Tekolas Office - Windmill WayHRC/RST - Watt AvenueUC Davis Clinic - O streetWalgreens Pharmacy - Stockton BlvdAll About Wellness - 19th Street● Sacramento County Human AssistanceDepartment. - Fulton Ave● KAISERs CHEMICAL DEPENDENCYRECOVERY PROGRAM.(C.D.R.P.) - Watt Ave.● Sacramento Family Medical Clinic - 47th Avenue● EMQ FamiliesFirst - Folsom Boulevard● Pediatric Medical Associates - University Ave● Behavioral Services - University Ave● Briarwood Health Care - Lemon Hill Avenue● Sacramento Family Medical Clinic - Eastern AvenueMedical Center - Eastern AvenueYMCA - Eastern AvenueMercy Laboratories - Coyle AvenueRadiology Associates of SacramentoMedicalGroup - Coyle AvenueCapitol Nephrology Medical Group - Coyle Avenue●Volunteers Of America (Shelter)Salvation Army (Dawn town)Sacramento Children Receiving HomeSacramento Family Shelter (SAEHC)Womens Refugee (SAEHC)Praise Boarding Care HomeGreen Pasture Boarding Care HomeDe Anza Auto Center (Marconi Ave)Laundromat (Manzanita /CypressLaundromat (Manzanita /Marconi Avenue)Laundromat (Marconi/Eastern or Mission)Laundromat (Marconi/Walnut)After Care – Stockton BoulevardSacramento Community Clinic - Del Paso BlvdManzanita Medical Clinic - James CourtCarmichael Pediatrician - James CourtCamellia Women Health Center - James CourtDr Richard Taggart OfficeMed Center on Madison AvenueDarzell Hearing SystemsDoctor Sebastian Conti OfficeVisions in Education on Manzanita AvenueDr Pau R Gregory, Jr OfficeCare Medical Clinic● Fresh Produce - Madison Ave.● SmileCare - Madison Avenue● Martins Achievement Place, Inc. - North Highlands● Coins Laundry - North Highlands● Guest House - A St● Folsom Psychiatry Associates● Planned Parenthood- North Highlands● West Coast Pharmacy - North Highlands● Imani Clinic – Oak park● Laundry Heaven - Elkhorn Blvd● Beauty Saloon - Elkhorn Blvd● Kaiser Hospital South● California Network of mental Health● James M. Ecerhart D.D.S Inc.● TELECARE -West Sacramento● Michael M. Bronshag, MD. Inc.● Spring Medical Clinic● Wstern Psychiatric Associates● Center For Community Health and Well-Being, Inc.● Lush Hair Salon● Finger Nails Salon● YMCA /W. St)● Dennys Restaurant -Watt Avenue● Sacramento County Primary Care Center● Mental Health America of Northern Californiahttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Distributions.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:41 AM]
  • 13. Distributions● SACRAMENTO WORKS CAREER CENTER - LEMON HILLIf you find this magazine useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Distributions.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:41 AM]
  • 14. Contributors - Empowerment MagazineEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsEmpowerment Magazine ContributorsHisham Soliman M.D M.P.HTerry Zick, M.A Pat Hubbert Gail Erlandson, M.A Anne AdamsMelanie Martinez Eric Zuniga Cynthia Wakefield Dr. Andrew Myers Laree Washingtonhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ListofContributors.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:45 AM]
  • 15. Contributors - Empowerment MagazineHazem Hashem, M.D. Tammy Dyer, M.S.W. Kim Navarez, M.F.T.I Phommasone Griffith Ron Risley, M.D.Marilyn WashingtonJanet SegallRosario M. Ramirez Cindy Thygeson, M.D David KieszLaura HawkinsDianne Ross, RNBarbara N. Dawson Deonna Wilemme, PhD Lynn Keune, L.M.F.TChrista Harmon Reginald Washington Jr.Thomas HushenRavenSong Frisella Jennifer Markmanhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ListofContributors.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:45 AM]
  • 16. Contributors - Empowerment MagazineWe would also like to thank the Wellness and Recovery Center North (WRC) for allowing us to use the tacilityQuestions? Contact us at contact@empowermentmagazine.org or call (916) 222·7541If you find this magazine useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ListofContributors.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:45 AM]
  • 17. CalendarEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsCalendarEmpowerment Magazine is published quarterly online and in a print.Issue Dates Distribution Months Advertising Deadline Articles Submission DeadlinSpring Issue Mar/Apr/May/June Deadline – Feb 20th Deadline – Feb 20thSummer Issue Jun/Jul/Aug/September Deadline – May 20th Deadline – May 20thFall Issue Sept/Oct/Nov/December Deadline – Aug 20th Deadline – Aug 20thWinter Issue Dec/Jan/Feb/March Deadline – Nov 15th Deadline – Nov 15thAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Calendar.aspx [4/21/2013 10:54:47 AM]
  • 18. VideosEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsVideoshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Videos.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:48 AM]
  • 19. VideosAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Videos.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:48 AM]
  • 20. AnnouncementsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Announcements.Pres Release 06.30.11.Press Release 03.21.11.Other Updates from Empowerment Magazine.Follow Us On Facebook.Follow Us On Twitter.Follow Us On YouTube.Follow Us On LinkedinAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Announcements.aspx [4/21/2013 10:54:50 AM]
  • 21. PhotosEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPhotosIf you find this page useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Photos.aspx [4/21/2013 10:54:51 AM]
  • 22. Contact UsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSite Map >Member Login >PrivacyPolicy >Forms >ContactingPlease fill out the following form or call us at 222 - 7541 or send us an e-mail at contact@empowermentmagazine.org* First name (required):* Last name (required):* E-mail address (required):Phone number:* Message (required):http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/contactus.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:54 AM]Submit
  • 23. Contact UsAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/contactus.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:54 AM]
  • 24. Winter 2011 IssueEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Winter 2011 IssuePage1Page3Page5Page7Page9Page2Page4Page6Page8Page10http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/WINTER2011IISSUE.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:57 AM]
  • 25. Winter 2011 IssuePage11Page13Page15Page17Page19Page21Page23Page12Page14Page16Page18Page20Page22Page24http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/WINTER2011IISSUE.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:57 AM]
  • 26. Winter 2011 IssueAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/WINTER2011IISSUE.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:54:57 AM]
  • 27. Fall 2011 IssueEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >FALL 2011 ISSUE. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D. Click here to read this interview!. Living in the Present by Terry Zick, M.A Click here to read this article. New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxiety for Children by Cindy Thygeson, M.D. Director of Medical Affairs at Sutter Center for Psychiatry. Clickhere to read this article. Being Loved by Melanie Martinez. Click here to read this article. Sam’s Club Offers Simple Steps to a Healthy Body and Mind by Dr. Andrew Myers, naturopathic physician and an expert in nutrition and preventativehealth. Click to read this article. Medication or Meditation? By Thomas Hushen, Service Coordinator - HRC Read this article >>. People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket To Work by Rosario M. Ramirez, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist for the Northern Area. Click here toread this article. Hope as Resiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer,MSW. Clickto read this article. Not Alone by David Kiesz, Click here to read this poeme. Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T, Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling Center. Click here to read this interview!. Phommasones Kitchen, Recipe for Mushroom Tacos. find out more. The Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain by Deonna Wilemme, PhD. Click to read this article. Wellness Toolkit by Terry Zick, M.A. Click here to read this article. A Risk Worth Taking for Change by Janet Segall. Click here to read thishttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/FALL2011.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:59 AM]
  • 28. Fall 2011 IssueAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/FALL2011.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:54:59 AM]
  • 29. Summer 2011 IssueEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Summer 2011: Inaugural Issue of Empowerment MagazineWelcome to the first issue of The EmpowermentMagazine by Amede Kyubwa, MA, MPAThe Pursuit of Contentment and Happinesss by TerryZick M.A.Q & A with Dr Hazem HashemCan someone please color me?Working with your Psychiatrist by Gail Erlandson, M.A.LivinResiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer, MSW(continued)Did you know That?Eating clean ave by RavenSong Frisella by LareeWashingtonQ & A with Dr Hazem HashemResource PageActivities That Will Help You Feel Good AboutYourselfThe Pursuit of Contentment and Happinesss byTerry Zick M.A.Q & A with Dr Hazem HashemResiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer, MSWMy Life with a Mental Illness by Janet L FuriaKids Corner "No Monkey Business" by DeonnaWilemme, PhDYou Are the Only One You Have by RavenSongFrisellaEating clean ave by RavenSong Frisella by LareeWashingtonEverything you Need to Know About Mental HealthServicesQuina Lasagna RecipeResource PageBack Cover page (Advertisement)http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Summer2011Issue.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:02 AM]
  • 30. Summer 2011 IssueYou can order your FREE copy by simply calling us at 916 222-7541 or sending an e-mailto contact@empowermentmagazine.org or click here for a list of local locations where you can pick upyour FREE copy of the magazineAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Summer2011Issue.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:02 AM]
  • 31. Latest IssueEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Fall 2011 IssueP 2 TABLE OF CONTENTP 4 Living in the Present by Terry Zick, MAP 6Exclusive Interview withRon Risley, MDP 8Special Interview with Lynn Keune, LMFT (LaFamilia Counceling Center Inc)P 10The Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain, LosAngeles by Deonna Wilemme, PhD (KIDSCORNER)P12Medication or Meditation? By Thomas Hushen,Service Coordinator-HRCP 14Hope as Resiliency Factor byTammy Dyer, MSWP 16Sam’s Club Offers Simple Steps to a HealthyBody and Mind byDr. Andrew Myers gP 18People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket ToWork by Rosario Ramirez, Social Security PublicAffairs Specialist for the Northern AreaP 20Exclusive Interview withRon Risley, MDYou can order your FREE copy by simply calling us at 916 222-7541or sending an e-mail toP 3Welcome message by Amede Kyubwa, MA,MPA,Acknowledgement, Copyright &DisclaimerP 5Living in the Present byTerry Zick, MANot Alone by David KieszP 7Exclusive Interview withRon Risley, MDP 9Special Interview with Lynn Keune, LMFT (LaFamilia Counceling Center Inc)P 11New School Year Brings an Increase inAnxiety for Children byCindy Thygeson,M.DP 13 Being Loved by Melanie MartinezP 15Sam’s Club Offers Simple Steps to a HealthyBody and Mind by Dr. Andrew MyersP 17A Risk Worth Taking for Change by JanetSegallP 19 Phommasone’s Kitchen Mushroom TacosP 21 Wellness Toolkit by Terry Zick, MAhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LatestIssue.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:15 AM]
  • 32. Latest IssueP22New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxietyfor Children /Cindy Thygeson,M.DBack cover pagecontact@empowermentmagazine.org orclick here for a list of local locations where you can pick upyour FREE copy of the Empowerment MagazineP 23Resources. (Addional Resources on page 3,9, 16, 18, 19, 21 & 22)Advertisements on page 13, 17 & 22All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LatestIssue.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:15 AM]
  • 33. Coming in the Next IssueEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Coming In The Next IssueAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ComingintheNextIssue.aspx [4/21/2013 10:55:17 AM]
  • 34. Note to ContributorsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Contributorshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Contributors.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:36 AM]
  • 35. Note to ContributorsWe are thrilled to bring you this exciting first issue of the Empowerment Magazine.We have launched quarterly magazine to provide a forum for voicesthat promote overall wellness and mental health resiliency for greatE Sacramento. We hope that you enjoy this issue, which includes a special interviewwith Dr. Hashem and a variety of spiring and empowering stories along with powerful tools and techniques that will help you discover your own greatnEWe believe that you will find much of this information of interest. Please let us know if you have sug gestions, or ideas about what you want to see infuture issues.The Empowerment Magazine is a publication of SACPROS.ORG, a Sacramento Mental Health Website Resource Guide strengtheningindividuals, families and community with easily accessible information about available se vices in Greater Sacramento area. Mailing Address: P.O.BOX 214864, Sacramento, CA 95821. Phone: (916) 222 7541 E-mail: contact@empowermentmagazine.corg Website: mwww.empowermentmagazine.corgWe look forward to reading your articles, and hearing your comments, suggestions, and ideas. Please write t at contact@empowermentmagazine.corgAmede Kyubwa, M.A, M.P.A.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Contributors.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:36 AM]
  • 36. Submit an ArticleEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Submit an ArticleThank you for your interest in submitting an article/photo to Empowerment Magazine. You may also want visit www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Submissions.aspx for more information on the kind of articles we are looking for.Submission TimelineYou may submit at any time. Deadline for submission is one month prior to the quarterly publication. (December, March, June & September). Onlyapproved articles will be published in the printed version of the Magazine . We accept articles/stories in the600-1200 range.Please follow the following guidelines when sending you article.1. Email your article to: contact@empowermentmagazine.com2. In the subject line of your email, type "THE TITLE OF YOUR ARTICLE"3. Include your article in the body of the email, and as WORD document attached to your email.4. Include the information on top of your email:First Name & Last NameAddressPhoneYour Email address5. Brief bio (110 words or less)6. You may submit an article with your photos.Submission Terms and ConditionsWe also reserve the right to share/publish the article/photo in any manner we choose in any our online and print edition magazine issues. We also reservethe right to edit manuscripts for style, length, clarity, content and philosophical considerations.By sending us your article/photo, you are certifying that you are the author or sole owner of the material that you are submitting to EmpowermentMagazine.You agree to indemnify Empowerment Magazine for all damages and expenses that may be incurred in connection with the material.The Empowerment reserves the right to use the articles in any of its online and print edition magazine issues. It also reserves the right to edit manuscriptsfor style, length, clarity, content and philosophical considerations.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/SubmitanArticle.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:38 AM]
  • 37. Submit an ArticleClick to the link to Download Submission AgreementFall 2011- Submission Agreement - PDFFall 2011- Submission Agreement- Microsoft Word DocThank you for your interest in Empowerment Magazine! We look forward to working with you! If you have further questions, please call us at (916) 222-7541 or send us e-mail atcontact@empowermentmagazine.comAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/SubmitanArticle.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:55:38 AM]
  • 38. Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoAt sacpros.org you will be able to find whaterver mental health resources you need quickly and easily in Greater Sacramento regionHome Magazine SUPPORT GROUPS PROFESSIONALS EMERGENCY HOSPITALS Mental Health Agencies AOD CLINICS JOBS HOUSING OTHER RESOURCESSACRAMENTO HOUSING AUTHORITY ADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIESAdvertising Contract EMERGENCYFind a California Court-Certified Interpreter or Translator For All Mental Health Workers & Friends Who Helped Me Get My Life BackHaving Mortgage Problems JOBSList Volunteer Opportunities Magazine Seeking SponsorsMeet and Greet! on November 6, 2010 at Holliday In Northgate Point/RST Pharmacy ListPower of Know Youth Conference Sacramento County MHA-INNOVATION$4 Prescriptions and other Discount Drug Programs In Sacramento 07/01/2008 - 06/30/2009 PROVIDERS10x10 Wellness Campaign 2009 - 2010 FISCAL YEAR2012 Voice Award 24-HOUR CRISIS TELEPHONE LINES51/50 (Involuntary psychiatric hold) Involuntarily Detained 5150 DESIGNATED PSYCHIATRIC HEALTH FACILITIESA Mental and Emotional Tool Kit for Life A Patients Bill of RightsA REVIEW OF TECHNIQUES IN MANAGING DEPRESSION About Empowerment MagazineAbout SACPROS Acceptable Sample Resume ObjectivesAccepting CMISP (Sacramento County Insurance) ACCEPTING MEDI-CAL INSURANCEAccepting New Patients ACTION WORDSACUTE PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY SERVICES Adult Day Care Centers in Sacramento CountyAdult Education & GED Advocacy AgenciesAging-Related Websites AL-ANON AND ALATEEN MEETINGSALCOHOL & OTHER DRUG TREATMENT and RECOVERY PROGRAMS for WOMEN with CHILDREN Alcohol and Drug Rehabilitation Compiled by CSUSALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE WILL NOT TAKE AWAY YOUR FEARS ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS GROUPS IN SACRAMENTOAll Health Topics ALTA CALIFORNIA REGIONAL CENTERAmericans with Disabilities Act (ADA) AODAOD Programs Licensed Residential Facilities AOD Treatment Programs and Other ProgramsApply for Disability Insurance Apply for Medi-Cal in Sacramento CountyApply for Medi-Cal, CMSP, Food Stamps & CalWORKs Online Apprenticeship ProgramsApprenticeships ARRAY OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICESAskThe Doctor Awareness and Safe Messaging ResourcesBehavioral Health Services Helpful Links Behavioral Health Services-Sacramento CountyBEHAVIORAL THERAPY Being Grateful for a Diagnosis - Being Grateful for a DiagnosisBest Senior Dating Sites Black Infant Health Coordinator Directoryhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResourceGuide.aspx (1 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:55:47 AM]
  • 39. Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoBoard & Care Homes Board Approves Spending Plan for Fiscal Year 2012/13Brunch Up for Mental Health June 3rd From 10 A.M – 1 P.M C.N.A. TRAININGC.O.R.E. Medical Clinic, Inc. California Accredited Schools of Social WorkCalifornia Advocacy Groups California Coverage and Health Initiatives (CCHI)CALIFORNIA MENTAL HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS California State AgenciesCalifornia Top Mental Health Websites Career/Technical TrainingCareers in Environmental Consulting Resource Caregiver Resource GuideCASA WILLOW -ER Diversion Program located in Citrus Heights for individuals with Kaiser insurance th CASE MANAGERSCheck Out Available Support Groups in Your Area and Enjoy! Check the License of the Mental Heath Professional You Choose Before Your First Visit.Child Care Glossary Childcare Resource and Referral, Childcare Subsidies, Recruitment and Training of Child Care ProfessCHILDREN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICE PROVIDERS Choosing Your Birth Control MethodCitizenship, ESL & Literacy in Sacramento City Of Sacramento DirectoryClient-Run Groups Clinicalpsychology.netCLINICS COMMISSION 22% - 25%Commission-based Magazine Advertising Sales Commonly used clinical abbreviationsCommunity College Certificate Programs Community Counseling ServicesCommunity Resources Compiled by Cosumnes River College CRC Community Resources Compiled by Sac StateCommunity Resources Compiled by Turning Point Community Programs ConservatorshipConsumer Leadership Training Consumer Scholarships Offered for National Mental Health America’s 2011 Annual ConferenceConsumer Speaks Conference Contact UsControlling The Interview Counseling Agencies Compiled by CSUSCounseling Agencies Compiled by CSUS Counseling ServicesCounty of Sacramento, PIO Press Releases COURT APPROVED COUNSELING SERVICES FOR BATTERERSCPS MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES CRESTWOOD BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCRISIS LINES AND HELP LINES CSUS Directory of Library Building and ServicesCultural Competence Resource DAY TREATMENT AND DAY REHABILITATION SERVICESDear Colleagues and Friends Department of Human Assistance (CalWorks)Depression Resources Compiled by Network of Care DirectoryDirectory of Consumer-Driven Services (CDS) Disability Awareness Day April 19, 2012DISABILITY INSURANCE BENEFITS DISCOVERING YOUR ADAPTIVE SKILLSDISTRIBUTION DMV NEARBY OFFICESDOMESTIC VIOLENCE RESOURCE Domestic Violence Resources In Sacramento CountyDreamcatchers Empowerment Network Drug Safety ResourcesDSM IV Dual Recovery Anonymous D.R.AEARLY CHILDHOOD MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES Educational Resources for Adults in Sacramento CountyeHealth Acronyms: The world of healthcare IT involves lots of important acronyms. El Hogar Community Services, Inc.ELIGIBILITY FOR SACRAMENTO COUNTY MEDICALLY INDIGENT SERVICES PROGRAM (CMISP) EM 2012Emergencies & Disasters EMERGENCY FOOD SERVICESEmergency Hotlines Emergency Medical Services LinksEMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS Emergency Shelters for Homeless Families in Sacramento CountyEMOTIONAL SUPPORT Empowerment MagazineEnding appointment/ession/visit with Client Error 404 PagesESKATON COMMUNITY SERVICES EskatonTransportation PlusFall 2011 Issue Fall 2011 Issue is Out Nowhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResourceGuide.aspx (2 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:55:47 AM]
  • 40. Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoFALL 2011 OF EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINE Fathers Resource CenterFederal Agencies & Federal Programs Federal Government FormsFind a Congregate Living Health Facility (CLHF) Find a Doctor from Sutter Center for PsychiatryFind a Pediatric Day Health and Respite Care Facility (PDHRCF) Find a Vision Care Provider in Sacramento CountyFind a Western Dental Office in Sacramento Area Find an Intermediate Care Facility (ICF) in Sacramento CountyFIND DENTISTS IN SACRAMENTO COUNTY Find Local Colleges in Sacramento CountyFind Nearest Career Center by ZIP Code Find One-Stop Career CentersFind School Age Child Care Centers in Sacramento County Find Skilled Nursing Facilities(SNF)Find Your Nearest Pharmacy! Find Your Polling LocationFINDING A PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR (PCP) FINDING CHIROPRACTORS IN SACRAMENTO COUNTYFINDING JOB LEADS Finding Osteopathic Physicians in Sacramento CountyFinding Thrift Stores in Sacramento Finding Your RepresentativesFiscal Year 2012 – 2013 - MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ACT Folsom Psychiatry AssociatesForward this E-mail to Friends, colleagues and Family! Help spread the word! Foster Family Agencies in Sacramento CountyFostering Healthy Self-Esteem in Your Teen Free Courses from Top Universities to EveryoneFREE HOT MEALS! Free medical care clinics planned in Sacramento, OaklandFREE OR LOW-COST TYPING TESTS FREE THANKSGIVING MEALSFreelance Volunteer contributors and Photographers From Sacramento County Employment and Business ServicesFundamentals of Recovery GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS GROUPS IN SACRAMENTOGeneral Acute Care Hospital (GACH) GENERAL MEDICAL PRACTICE PHYSICIANSGet Mentioned in Upcoming Issue of Empowerment Magazine. GLOSSARY OF SUICIDE PREVENTION TERMSGOVERNMENT JOBS Grand Slam StatementsGroup Homes in Sacramento County Guiding Wisdoms to Promoting HappinessHealth & Wellness Resources Health Info LinesHealth insurance plans Healthy FamiliesHealthy Outcomes for Personal Enrichment Counseling Center HELP IMPROVE SACPROSHelp with Intake Interview Questions HELPFUL ADJECTIVESHelpful Skills to Being a Good Advocate Helping the HelpersHelping Your Teen Transition to College HERITAGE OAKS HOSPITALHOMELESS & HOUSING SERVICES HOSPITALSHotlines and Emergency Services compiled by Sacramento City College - CSS Housing ResourcesHow do I get Medi-Cal? How to Access Mental Health Services in Sacramento CountyHow to Apply For Food Stamps in Sacramento County How to Contact SACPROSHow to contact Sacramento County Health and Human Services (HHS) How to find EKG LAB Locations in SacramentoHow to Get The Sleep You Need How to Recognize Signs of Elder Abuse and Elder Suicide Warning SignsHuman Rights I Need Help with My Utility BillImani Clinic provides Free Services Information Resources that May be of Interest to Victims of CrimeIntermediate Care Facility – Developmentally Disabled Habilitative (ICF-DDH) & (ICF-DDN) INTERNAL MEDICINE PHYSICIANSIQ Categories for Adults Job Fairs and WorkshopsJob Lines Job Search SitesJob Search Tools JOB SEEKER RESOURCESJOB TALK JOBS VIA INTERNET SITESJOIN OUR JULY 2011 COMMUNITY OUTREACH EFFORTS Join the Editorial TeamJUVENILE JUSTICE COLLABORATIVES AND SERVICES Kaiser Permanente Medical Center and Offices Sacramentohttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResourceGuide.aspx (3 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:55:47 AM]
  • 41. Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoKAISER PSYCHIATRISTS Keeping Your Life EmpoweredLABOR MARKET QUIZ LANGUAGE & CULTURAL SERVICESLANTERMAN ACT Leadership SkillsLeading mental health resource directory for the Greater Sacramento devoted to breaking down the bar Learn More about NAMI Sacramentos In Our Own Voice Program!Licensed Vocational Nurse Links Compiled By Crossroads Diversified Services, Inc.,LINKS TO OTHER RESOURCES IN SACRAMENTO List Your Business on our WebsiteLiving My Life with a Mental Illness local_549437.xmlLocating Legal Services in Sacramento Looking for a Church in Sacramento?Looking for a Printing Company in Sacramento Looking for Counseling Services in and around Sacramento?LOW COST DENTAL CARE IN SACRAMENTO COUNTY Low Cost Healtn Care ResourcesMagazine Sponsorship Opportunities MANAGING THE FEAR AND ANXIETY OF THE UNKNOWNManaging Your Persistent Fears, Anxieties, And Stresses Marriage/FamilyTherapistMaster of Public Health Information Guide Medi-Cal ContactsMedi-Cal Dental Managed Care Comparison Chart Medi-Cal Doctors in CarmichaelMedical Practice Models MEDI-CAL PROVIDERS >>> Primary Care Physicians (PCP)Medicare Facilities in Sacramento Area Medication Assisted Treatment TherapiesMedMark Treatment Centers, Inc Mending Your Teen’s Broken HeartMENTAL HEALTH AGENCIES MENTAL HEALTH CAREMENTAL HEALTH CONSUMERS MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELORSMental Health Disorders Mental Health GlossaryMENTAL HEALTH JOURNALS MENTAL HEALTH MAGAZINES AND OTHERSMental Health meetings & conferences Mental Health Resourse GuideMental Health Sacramento Mental Health Support Groups Compiled by CSUSMental Heath Professionals Mental Status Examination (MSE)MHA Housing & Vacancy List MHSA Steering Committee MeetingsMORE MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS Most Recent Posts on Our BlogMoving Assistance Music TherapyMY SUICIDE SAFETY PLAN NAMI Peer-to-Peer-Ten-Week CourseNARCOTICS ANONYMOUS MEETINGS IN SACRAMENTO National Childrens Mental Health Awareness Day Is May 9, 2012National Organizations Needs Help to Keep Your Relationship and Family Together!NEVER LOSE HOPE IN DEALING WITH YOUR FEARS AND ANXIETIES New Scholarship Announcement (Application window is April 1st-June 1st)New U.S Immigrants NO to Mental Health CutsNON-COUNTY COMMUNITY HEALTH CLINICS Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Services in SacramentoNoting Client/Member Strengths Nursing Homes in Sacramento CountyObesity, Weight Control, and Physical Activity Resources One Last Reminder: The Day After Tomorrow is a May 20thOnline Continuing Education Resources from Online Job Search EnginesOptions for Financial Assistance in Sacramento County Other Clinical ResourcesOther General Information Other Helpful LinksOther Helpful Organizations & Services around the Sacramento areas Other Housing ResourcesOTHER IMPORTANT RESOURCES Other Job LinesOTHER JOB RESSOURCES Other Professional OrganizationsOutpatient Mental Health Services Parent/Student ResourcesParks and Recreation in Sacramento County Past Advertisers - Empowerment MagazinePEDIATRICS PEER SUPPORT/SOCIALIZATIONhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResourceGuide.aspx (4 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:55:47 AM]
  • 42. Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoPlaces for Community Legal Aid in Sacramento Region Places for Mental Health Services in Sacramento, CAPLACES TO VISIT IN SACRAMENTO COUNTY Placing an ADPossible Components of Treatment Plan for Crisis Interventions Possible Components of Treatment Plan for Crisis InterventionsPost Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Resource PRESS RELEASE 3.21.11Pressure Ulcer Resource Guide Pre-Telemarketing ChecklistPrimary Care Physicians Privacy StatementPROBATION DEPARTMENT Professional AssociationsProfessional Licenses PROFESSIONALSProject Implicit Mental Health (PIMH) PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY SERVICESPsychiatric Medications PSYCHIATRIC NURSESPsychiatric Technicians PSYCHIATRISTSPsychiatrists in Folsom Psychological Defense MechanismsPSYCHOLOGISTS PSYCHOTHERAPISTSPSYCHOTHERAPY PUBLIC DEFENDERPUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Rainbow Awards 2012 NominationRancho Cordova Directory of Business, Government & Social Services References Upon RequestRegional Transit (RT) Passes Fares & Tickets REHABILITATION SERVICESRelease Dates REPRESENTATIVE PAYEE AGENCIES IN SACRAMENTO COUNTYResearch and Bill Tracking Resiliency FactorResources cimpiled by Sacramento County Public Law Library serves Resources for People with DisabilitiesSACPROS is Leading Mental Health Resource Directory in Greater Sacramento Region sacpros.org linksSACRAMENT COUNTY ACCESS TO SERVICES Sacramento Acute Psychiatric Hospitals (APH)SACRAMENTO AOD TREATMENT FACILITIES Sacramento Area Job SitesSacramento City College to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act Sacramento Community Family ResourcesSACRAMENTO COUNTY FORENSIC SERVICES SACRAMENTO COUNTY ACCEPTABLE STANDARDIZED ABBREVIATIONSSACRAMENTO COUNTY ACCESS & ASSISTED ACCESS SERVICES SACRAMENTO COUNTY ACT CONTRACT PROVIDERSSACRAMENTO COUNTY BEHAVIORAL HEALTH SERVICES PARTNER WITH THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITY-BASEDORGANIZATIONSacramento County Facility LocationsSacramento County Family Resource Centers Sacramento County Formular 2012Sacramento County Health and Human Services Sacramento County Human ServicesSACRAMENTO COUNTY IN-HOME SUPPORTIVE SERVICES SACRAMENTO COUNTY JOB TALK-SCHEDULESacramento County Launches New Social Media Channels for Mental Health Promotion and Stigma Reductio SACRAMENTO COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH BOARDSACRAMENTO COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENT CENTER (SCMHTC)SACRAMENTO COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENT TREATMENT CENTER TREATMENT TREATMENT CENTERRESOURCE REFFSacramento County News - RSS Sacramento County ObservesSacramento County Online Services Sacramento County Over The Counter DruggsSacramento County provides numerous job opportunities to residents Sacramento County Public Library LocationsSACRAMENTO COUNTY TYPING CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS SACRAMENTO EMERGENCY SHELTERSSACRAMENTO HOSPITAL LISTINGS Sacramento Jobs from other Job SitesSacramento Jobs Resources Sacramento License Familly TherapistsSACRAMENTO LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKERS (LCSW) SACRAMENTO LICENSED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGISTSSacramento Medi-Cal Clinics Sacramento Medical Oasis, IncSACRAMENTO NONPROFIT JOB OPPORTUNITIES SACRAMENTO PSYCHIATRISTSSACRAMENTO PSYCHOLOGISTS SACRAMENTO REHAB CENTERShttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResourceGuide.aspx (5 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:55:47 AM]
  • 43. Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoSACRAMENTO ROOM & BOARD HOMES Sacramento Staffing AgenciesSACRAMENTO THERAPISTS Sacramento Valley Faith-Based Community Resource GuideSACRAMENTO WORKS CAREER CENTERS Sacramento Works One-Stop Career CentersSACRAMENTO YOUTH DRUG AND ALCOHOL SERVICES SACRAMENTO YOUTH SUPPORT GROUPS/SERVICESSacramento’s First Mental Health Magazine (Empowerment) has Launched SAMHSA Mental Health Services LocatorSAMHSAs Living Document Sample Treatment Plan Components for Clients with Substance AbuseSarnat International Prize in Mental Health: Call for nominations Screening and Assessment ResourcesSEARCH FOR YOUR UNCLAIMED PROPERTY Senior and Adult ResourcesSENIOR CENTERS/PROGRAMS Seniors’ HealthSHERIFFS DEPARTMENT SIERRA VISTA HOSPITALSite Map sitemapnewSites Linking to Sacpros.org SMARTSmoking Cessation Resources Social Security Disability Benefits HelpSOCIAL WORKERS Some of the common prescription abbreviations:Special Interview with Dr.Hashem St. Anton ProjectsStaffing Job Search Links State Government JobsSubmissions for the Summer 2012 Issue SUBMIT ARTICLESSubmitted Articles for Summer 2012 Issue Subsidized ApartmentsSubstance Abuse Treatment Facilities Suicide Survivor ResourcesSUMMER 2011 ISSUE SUMMER 2011 ISSUE FILESSummer 2012 Cover Draft Summer Tips for Parents of TeensSupport SACPROS SUTTER CENTER FOR PSYCHIATRYTake Charge of Your Health The Future of Psychiatry Looks LikeThe Pursuit of Contentment and Happiness The Rosalynn Carter FellowshipsThe Ruin THE SACRAMENTO VALLEY PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION - SVPATHE SUCCESSFUL 24 TOUGH QUESTIONS Therapeutic InterchangeTHINK TWICE BEFORE QUITTING YOUR JOB Thinking Fresh & Eating CleanTLCS’ HOPE Line ToolBox for Community Mental Health Workers in Greater SacramentoTop Mental Health Sites Top Mental Health Websites in Sacramento AreaTOP REASONS FOR GETTING FIRED Top Skills That Employers WantTowns and Cities of Sacramento County TRADITIONAL INTERVIEW VS. BEHAVIORIAL INTERVIEWTransferable Skills TRANSITIONAL HOUSING PROGRAMSTRANSITIONAL LIVING & COMMUNITY SUPPORT (TLCS) Try Telling your Employer youve been Diagnosed With a Mental IllnessTurn On the Radio and Listen to Your Favorite Program On Air. TURNING POINT COMMUNITY PROGRAMSTWO WORD PHRASES TYPES OF PSYCHOTHERAPYTYPING CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS U.S. Department of LaborUC DAVIS CLINICAL TRAINING SITES UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCEUrgent Services Compiled by CSUS Urgent Services Compiled by CSUSUSA Properties Fund USA.gov for NonprofitsVA NORTHERN CALIFORNIA Veteran Resourcesvision of Empowerment Magazine VISIONS UNLIMITED INC.Volunteer Opportunities in the Sacramento Region VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA GREATER SACRAMENTOWAGE CONVERSION CHART Watch TelevisionWays to Receive your SSDI or SSI Benefits Quickly Websites for Scholarshipshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResourceGuide.aspx (6 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:55:47 AM]
  • 44. Resource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide for SacramentoWellness & Lifestyle WELLNESS AND RECOVERY CENTERS - NORTH AND SOUTHWellness Resources What is a Resume Objective?What’s “Growing” On In Your Mind Garden? WHEN SOMEONE YOU KNOW STRUGGLES WITH FEAR, ANXIETY AND STRESSWhen You are Ready to quit Smoking Where to get answers if you have Questions about Medi-CalWHO - Health Topics Who Makes the Empowerment Magazine?Winter 2011 Issue of Empowerment Magazine Women, Infant, and Children (WIC)Working With People Skills Working with Your PsychiatristWRC NORTH AND SOUTH You can pick up copies of The Empowerment Magazine at the following locationsYOUTH BEREAVEMENT COUNSELING YOUTH CRISIS LINESYOUTH EATING DISORDERS COUNSELINGIf you find this resource page useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResourceGuide.aspx (7 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:55:47 AM]
  • 45. WINTER 2011EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Issue >Fall 2011 Issue >Summer 2011 Issue >Latest Issue >In the Next Issue >Note Contributors >Submit an Article >Resource >WINTER 2011 >Empowerment Magazine Winter 2011 IssueDraft Subject to Change. SUBMISSIONCONTRACT FOR 2011 WINTER ISSUE.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/WINTER2011.aspx (1 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:55:50 AM]
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  • 49. WINTER 2011Empowerment Magazine Winter 2011 IssueDraft Subject to Change. Your feedback is welcomed and encouraged. Please send your feedback and commentsto info@sacpros.org or to contact@empowermentmagazine.orgAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/WINTER2011.aspx (5 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:55:50 AM]
  • 50. Summer 2012 Cover DraftEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSummer 2012 Cover Draft >Please Help us Pick the Cover for Our Summer2012 IssueSpecial thanks to photographer Barbara Natalino Dawsonhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Summer2012CoverDraft.aspx (1 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:56:00 AM]
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  • 56. Summer 2012 Cover DraftAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Summer2012CoverDraft.aspx (7 of 7) [4/21/2013 10:56:00 AM]
  • 57. Welcome to the Fall 2011 issue of Empowerment Magazine 3Not Alone 5Living in the Present 4, 5A Risk Worth Taking for Change 17Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D. 6, 7, 20Special Interview with Lynn Keune, LMFT (LaFamilia Inc) 8 , 9The Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain 10Wellness Toolkit 21Medication or Meditation? 12Being Loved by Melanie 13Hope as Resiliency Factor 14Sam’s Club Offers Simple Steps to a Healthy Body & Mind 15,16Did You Know that? 3, 9, 16, 18, 22People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket To Work 18Recipe for Mushroom Tacos 19New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxiety for Children 11, 22Resources 23EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency for the Greater SacramentoTABLE OF CONTENT
  • 58. How can we increase our level of happiness? There is a rich ban-quet of strategies and tools to help us get there. As I read in onebook, unhappiness is easy—easy, because we continue to thinkand feel the way we always have, which is the easy way. How-ever, the ability to feel happier can become the easy way. Whatwould happen if we committed to the tools that change ourthoughts and feelings toward happiness? Simply put—we wouldbe happier.In the last issue, we learned that if we think we will only be hap-pier in the future when something changes, we have missed anopportunity to be happy NOW. Oh, maybe I will have a moment ortwo of happiness when I get what I wanted finally (“Yeah,joy!!!”) . . . until I focus on the next thing that I think I want or needthat I think will make me happy. When I continue to focus on whatis missing, I don’t feel that joy anymore.When the mind and thought stop yearning for what I want andstop complaining about what I don’t have, in my experience, whathappens? Then I experience a more peaceful mind and well-being. That potential for joy exists all the time, whether or not Ihave what I yearn for.Our genetic makeup affirms that we can be happier (some studiessay only 50% of our happiness potential is genetic). This meansthat no matter our past, our genes support a potential for in-creased happiness. When we realize that we have CHOICE whenit comes to our thoughts and our activities, then we empower ourlife in happier ways.As we apply new strategies and develop a habit of healthierthoughts, it becomes easier to experience happiness. It becomeseasier because our amazing brain will help us out, and has thepotential to “rewire” itself. The new science of neuroplasticity in-forms us that the brain and nervous system have the ability tochange as a result of new input. The most widely recognizedforms of plasticity are improvements in learning, memory, andrecovery from brain damage—to name a few. This wonderful abil-ity to rewire begins with changing our thoughts and feelings.Keep in mind that it is the tools and strategies which hold thepower to transform our life. Empowered commitment to changeour thoughts and behavior will translate into increased content-ment. In the last issue, we reinforced that we can increase ourhappiness quotient by the following strategies:1. Develop an attitude of gratitude.2. Pay attention to our thoughts and choose moreoptimistic or happiness-producing thoughts.3. Seize the moment to be happy rather than wait-ing for life to change to be happy.Two more perspectives are:Live in the present moment more often.Why will being in the present moment increase my happiness?Consider what often happens when we live in the past or in thefuture.things had gone better (often triggering a victim stance, or lack ofpower and lack of control feelings).As we look at the future while focusing on possible future prob-lems, we might mentally envision a possible unhappy life thatisn’t real. We are just creating worst-case scenarios that haven’thappened yet (often triggering fear, worry, anxiety, lack of powerthoughts, lack of control thoughts, and pessimistic thinking).The present moment, without nonproductive thoughts and feel-ings about the past and future, offers increased peace of mind.The present moment offers wisdom, better problem-solving, clar-ity, and transformation. When our attention is in the here andnow, we are less distracted, more focused, and more content.And, to add to the list of benefits—being in the present offersrelaxation, effective problem-solving, and compassion for selfand others. Much has been written on numerous strategies forliving in the present, mindfulness living, and the power of now.The benefits are well documented.Experience life from your heart.Studies show that we change our brain and physiology when wefeel a moment in our heart. The heart has its own wisdom, itsown “brain” or its own intelligence. Research tells us that ourheart has its own complex nervous system.We already live, to some degree, from the heart. Think of thephrases we commonly say that connect us to our heart’s wisdomor compassion such as “bless your heart,” “I did it from theheart,” “my heartfelt appreciation,” “follow your heart,” or “ittouched my heart.” Studies show we can reduce stress, anxiety,fear, anger, and depression by practicing heart-based strategies.Through connecting with the heart, our mind will follow our heartand transform our experience. In addition, when we engage withour heart, we prompt our heartbeat, blood pressure and respira-tion to return to balance. Also, our heart becomes in sync withour brain, resulting in more empowered and healthier benefits.We can transform the present moment when we live from theheart. The heart creates a shift by its ability to heal, forgive, andrenew. The heart gives wise counsel. The heart brings us hometo our truest self. The heart allows the mind to listen to the si-lence. The heart connects us spiritually. Here are a few of thecountless heart-centering strategies:1. Put your hand over your heart and connect with your heartbeat(seemingly hear it or feel it beating).2. Choose a thought of gratitude, and feel the gratitude deeply inthe heart.3. Look for things to be in awe and wonder over (allow yourself tosay “ahhhhhhhh,” “mmmmmmmmm,” and “wow!”).As we revisit the past, we may replay un-pleasant memories or traumas (often trig-gering anger, fear, sadness, anxiety) orwe may wish we could have done it better(often triggering regret) or we may wonderhow great a life we would have had ifLiving in the Present Brings Increased Happiness and ContentmentLiving in the Present by Terry Zick, MAContinued to page 5
  • 59. I visited Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc. to interview Dr . Ron Risley on a hot afternoon in late July. The Oasis is aptly named. Thereare bright greens and blues in the comfortably furnished waiting room. The sound of the water from the fountains relaxes you as youwait. Art surrounds you. Sensitive touches also include books for children. The Oasis is the dream of Dr. Risley and several othersinterested in making a big step toward improving mental health services. Ron Risley is the first graduate of UC Davis’ acclaimedcombined residency training program in family medicine and psychiatry. There are many accolades for Ron, but perhaps the mostsignificant are those I’ve heard from his patients.Laura: “Dr. Risley has made psychiatric care available to me. I had been stable with the County and that was why I waseliminated. I went cold turkey off of 250 mg. of Effexor. I could have died. I became hard-core depressed. I get what I needfrom Dr. Risley.”Robert: “Dr. Risley has been a lifesaver to me. I haven’t had any medical insurance for about 7 years. In 2001, when I wasworking, 160 lbs came down on my head from a distance of 20 feet. I suffer from chronic pain and multiple injuries.Dr. Risley is the first doctor that actually listened to me and examined me thoroughly. He is helping me with the problems Ihave. He is awesome.”Nora: “Dr. Risley is a special doctor that listens to my concerns and helps me develop a plan of treatment that we mutuallyagree on. I feel empowered working with him. He is very understanding because he has lived experience.”Carlo: “He’s a doctor I can trust.”Gail: Who are the people who significantly influenced you in your life?Risley: The first person that comes to mind is my godfather. He was an inventor and was really interested in science andtechnology. When I was barely old enough to read, he bought me a subscription to Scientific American magazine. I would lookat the pictures and I would kind of read what it said without really understanding much. It set the stage for some of my in-terests. He had a garage just full of junk which I always called Joyland. Then growing up I lived across the street from a guyby the name of Bob Herman who designed the first commercial minicomputer. He would give me computer parts and I wouldfiddle with them. Eventually I became an engineer. I did a lot of computer design stuff.Gail: That’s incredible, and now you are a medical doctor, how did you transition?Risley: I really loved the computer stuff, but I got more into the esoteric stuff like cryptography. It is not a field where youcan spend a lot of time talking with other people. So it is kind of a closed world. I ran a consulting firm and spent a lot of timewith machines. I started feeling like I wanted to work more with people. I really wanted to directly affect people’s lives. Ithought that I could be a farmer or a doctor and the farming sounded like a lot of hard, dangerous work.The really interesting part is that I was sitting in a pizza parlor with a girlfriend and she said, “You know you really seem likeyou want to make a change.” I said , “Well, what I would like to do is go to medical school, but I can’t do that!” and, as I saidit, even before she said, “Why not?”, I said, “Why not?” So I did my whole undergraduate program over again. I went to SanDiego City College. Then I transferred to UCSD and got a degree in literature and writing. I read all the stuff that saidonce you get into medical school all you will be doing is science. I found that in doctoring my communication training is morevaluable than organic chemistry. Knowing how to communicate with patients and other doctors has served me well.I had this vision of medicine as sitting down with someone and talking about what was bothering them, and then coming up witha plan for dealing with it. Instead, I found medical school was a world where you are constantly pressured to see people and tofocus on what medicine you are going to give them. The only people who were actually sitting down talking to their patientswere psychiatrists. I really had my focus on primary care medicine. It was what I wanted to do, but I saw that psychiatry wasmuch closer to my vision.Gail: How did the Sacramento Medical Oasis come into being?Risley: This place came into being about this time last year when we all thought we would be out of work. We were wonderingwhere patients were going to go. We thought it would be nice if people on disability income could afford care. We looked intowhether we could accept Medi-Cal, could we get insurance money, could we get grants, was there a way to fund this new con-cept? What we found was that the minute you buy into that insurance system, the costs pretty much triple. There is billing,collections, and a whole bunch of regulatory agencies you have to keep happy. You don’t have to deal with all of that if youdon’t take insurance money. What we came up with, after a lot of number crunching, was that we could see people for $79.00conducted by Gail Erlandson, MA.Continued on page 7
  • 60. Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T,Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling CenterInterviewer: Your mission statement states that youwork in collaborative partnerships. Please explainwhat type of collaborative specific to mental health?Response: Recently our collaborators have been very fo-cused along with the mental health services in trying to reachout to diverse cultures in the community. They asked us toconduct a focus group for Latinos (speaking Spanish only) toask them what were their needs concerning suicide preven-tion, and so we hoped to do that focus group for them, andthen we gave that information to them because as you knowpeople that don’t speak the language are fearful to go to largergroups. And so we approached them. As we said, the reasonthey are not [going is] because they resist large groups. Wehave had a program in the past, and the program was to learnabout what works. And we found out that if we have littlegroups in the gym they will come. And it isn’t because theydon’t know, they know and they want to participate becausethey have information, but they are fearful to go to big groups,thinking they won’t understand. So we have had groups withthe Spanish-speaking, with Hmong-speaking. Those are thetwo main ones but certainly when we had the Oasis Programwe had seven different capabilities of identifying these differentgroups that we could work with. African American was one,LGBT was one. [There were] many different ones we couldreally focus [on] and find out from them what were their needs.Interviewer: That sounds great. How do you helppeople access their strengths and build on posi-tives?Response: We believe in the same philosophy as the MentalHealth Department or Behavior Health Services in providingfamily-driven services, and family-driven services really meanthat we need to hear the voice of the family and what is it thatthey need. What is it from their perspective, not from us asexperts; they are the experts in their family. They know whathas worked in the past and we need to help them use those[methods], and maybe they have lost it somewhere; we canhelp find it again because the whole purpose is for us to getfired. We are not there to step in and run their lives, so wewant to hear from them and find out what has worked. Maybeif there are some community services that they haven’t beenable to utilize, to maybe bring them in to help them to voicewhat it is they need.Interviewer: What are some of the groups that youhave for non-English speaking people that you havenot already mentioned?Response: The mental health department itself. I am an arttherapist myself, one of the many hats that I wear. As an arttherapist I know that I can work with many different languagesbecause art therapy is a universal language, and you can goright past that expressive language of the verbal into the ex-pressive language of the heart, so we have groups in Spanishhere or Hmong, I mean they come in whenever they need it. Ijust did a grievement group, and there was a Spanish-speaking dad and he never received grievement service inSacramento because there was nothing available. Eventhough my group is for kids, I invited him. Dad was just kind ofstanding around, and I asked, “Would you like to stay?” And hesaid he didn’t think his son would want him to, so I asked theson, “What would you think if Dad stayed?”Son said, “I don’t care”; and Dad stayed. He became honest, he hadto cry, it became real. He said, “There has never been anyone to helpus.” It was pretty awesome to be able to [do] that; even if I only hadthat one person it was great. And in conjunction with my mentalhealth groups we work with the Family Resource Center here. Theyoffer parenting groups, in Spanish and in Hmong, and different coregroups under BFRC offer a variety of services. The center is not justexclusive to mental health; we refer our mental health [clients] to ourwhole program. We actually have a group of parents that contributeto all the various different programs. They meet as an advisory com-mittee, and they meet monthly.Interviewer: In what ways do you reduce isolation andhopelessness?Response: I’ll tell you what, for 39, 40 years, however long we’vebeen in business, the original philosophy did not fit all cases. Wefound out that we need to find out from the families what they needand, most of all, go into the communities. If I take you on a tour hereyou’re not going to see an office with a couch. We do in-home, schoolsupport services; we reach out to them rather than making themcome to us. That is what we have done the entire time we have hadLa Familia. We like to become allies with that family, and we providecase management services to help them to connect with the commu-nity resources. There may be a special group within the communitythat can help them so that it will get them out of that isolation.Interviewer: How do you empower individuals?Response: Sometimes it is hard because they sometimes have hitthe end of their rope and they don’t know what to do. We always liketo start from their strengths, and so we identify what strengths theyhave had in the past and then we start to build on those. We find thatlittle by little as we build on those strengths we can help them recog-nize them. That is what really works the very best.Interviewer: I read something interesting about individu-als having an opportunity to become stakeholders. Howdoes this work?Response: The stakeholders are actually the public. They’re theones who will come to our work groups when we are doing focusgroups to identify what it is in the community that is needed. Some-times it is providing outreach to many different diverse areas here.Parents are stakeholders as well because we invite them to be in-volved with the parents’ advisory committee and any families involvedin mental health programs here are encouraged to participate in thatgroup.Interviewer: Do you have an employment center here? How doyou motivate people with mental health challenges to transitioninto wanting to have gainful employment?Response: We do have a One-Stop Career Center here at our fam-ily resource center. We do have families that come through here, firstof all looking for a job, and we find that many of them do have chal-lenges that they are dealing with, and one of them may be a mentalhealth issue. If we really get a sense that that is something that af-fects their ability to find employment, then we work with them to beable to at least help evaluate that this is the case and that there areadditional resources that can help them. We really encourage them toconnect with some community resources to address those chal-lenges. Many times they are not going to accept that, so it may takeseveral times of them coming back. I think they kind of get a sensethat once they are looking for a job and they go forContinued on page 9
  • 61. The Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain, Los Angeles by Deonna Wilemme, PhDDr. Wilemme is a product of the Stockton and Sacramento School Districts. She worked in the mental health field in the beginning ofher career. She was employed by Turning Point Community Programs and then later went into education. She is currently employedby Memphis City Schools. She was a classroom teacher for many years. She now works as an administrator.PUZZLE WORLDMy Birthday TripHave you ever been to Six Flags? Have you ever seen Tweety Bird and Bugs Bunny? I have! My birthday was on June 9th. My familyand I were on our way to Six Flags. I was so excited about the trip. It was my first time going to Six Flags Magic Mountain. I was 10years old, and I had never been to Six Flags. It was also my first time riding on an airplane.The Plane TripWhile on the plane, I played around with my iPod. I was listening to a popular song that had a nice beat. It was my favorite song. Mymom was sitting next to me because I was scared of the plane ride. My brother, Ted, told me to turn the volume down on my iPod be-cause it was too loud. I told him that the music was loud because I didn’t want to hear the roar of the engine. I just wanted to get to SixFlags as soon as possible. I was happy that Los Angeles was close to Sacramento.Arriving in Los AngelesThe flight attendant asked, “Did you know that this airplane is the Six Flags Airplane?” I replied, “No!” A few minutes later, I asked, “Isthat why Tweety Bird is painted on the wing?” “Soon we will be in Los Angeles!” Mom yelled. We had family members waiting for us atthe airport. After we left the airport, my Aunt Rita drove us to Six Flags. We had to drive 2 miles to get to there. On the way, wedropped our bags off at Uncle Neal’s house.Meeting Bugs BunnyAs soon as we arrived at Six Flags, we went swimming. After swimming, I saw Bugs Bunny. He looked exactly like I imagined. He said,“What’s up, doc?” I replied, “Take a picture with me, Bugs!” Bugs said, “Yeah, doc!” I quickly ran to the door to pay, but Bugs said, “Youcan have a picture with me for free.”Adventures at Six FlagsFinally, we rode on a ride called Batman. Then we rode the Superman. After the rides, I went with my mom to the souvenir shop andbought T-shirts, cups, and a glass picture of Bugs Bunny and Tweety Bird. It was getting late; therefore, we went to the concessionstand and bought popcorn, funnel cakes, and cotton candy. After taking a picture with Bugs Bunny, riding the best rides, and eatinguntil we were sick, we headed for the hills. That was the best birthday trip I ever had. My next trip is to Disney World in Orlando, Flor-ida.Author’s Bio
  • 62. Medication or Meditation? by Thomas Hushen, Service Coordinator-HRCThe answer is BOTH! While prescriptiondrugs continue to be the most commonform of relieving mental health“symptoms,” they do not actually con-tribute to the healing of the “cause” ofthese symptoms. Finding the right com-bination of medication to manage ourmental health symptoms can be a chal-lenge, one that I am sure we all haveexperienced. Every day we are facedwith external life stressors. Sometimes itseems that these stressors all happenat once, only to leave us with racingthoughts, anxiety and increased depres-sion, and most of all a feeling of beingoverwhelmed!Those of us who are mental health con-sumers tend to easily get overwhelmeddue to the nature of our human condi-tion and mental illness. On top of ourown life stressors, there is alwayssomething negative being broadcast onradio, TV, newspapers, magazines, andthe Internet. All this negativity createsand feeds ANTS (Automatic NegativeThoughts).The good news is that there are copingskills that help us manage daily stress,depression, and anxiety. One great cop-ing tool for “life” is meditation! Pleaseunderstand that I believe that medica-tion is a gift from the universe, and inmany instances, it allows us to have abetter quality of life.Preventative medicine is progressing,and medical doctors and psychiatristseverywhere are embracing alternativepractices as a way of healing the bodyand preventing disease. Many of thesepractices help us to manage our“persistent” mental health symptoms.I do take prescription medications forconditions that require it, but it alonesometimes is just not enough to helpme deal with life and the challenges itbrings. Meditation is a valuable practicethat helps create a balance of body andmind and brings harmony to one’s entire“being.”Here is what meditation WILL do for youwithout ANY adverse side effects!The Benefits of MeditationAs a mental health consumer myself,and working with clients at Human Re-source Consultants (HRC), I have seenfirsthand the results of this powerfulpractice.There are many great benefits of medita-tion. Meditation is a time of silence, a timeto clear the mind from all of our problems.It does not make the problems go away; itsimply allows us to be better equipped todeal with them. To get significant benefitsfrom meditation, one should meditate for15-20 minutes at the same time. Meditat-ing two times a day—morning and eve-ning—is the best way to begin. I havelisted below some of the surprising bene-fits of this practice that you may not knowabout!1. Reduced Heart Rate: Normali-zation of High Blood PressureHeart rates and high blood pressures havebeen found to fall during meditation. Theeffect tends to persist even when not medi-tating (in those who have been practicingmeditation daily).2. Perfect Rest: Physical Rest andRelaxationThe state of consciousness attained duringmeditation is considered to be the deepestpossible rest and relaxation there is for bothbody and mind. Experiments have shownthat the overall average breathing reductionrate shows a deeper state of rest and peaceof mind during meditation. The meditator isable to maintain this perfect physical rest/relaxation even in activities after meditation.You become calmer and more relaxed, andcan experience the activities you participatein with more clarity and focus.3. Reduced StressStress, as we all know, is a psychologicallyagitated state which is the opposite of restand relaxation. Cortisol (a hormone pro-duced by the body) is released in responseto stress. Cortisol levels are high when aperson is highly anxious or under stress.Physiologists have found that during andafter meditation there are lower levels ofcortisol produced by the body, which meansless anxiety!4. Increased CreativityAs you practice daily meditation, you will findyour level of creativity is enhanced. Oncethere is balance of our mind and body, wehave replaced negative perceptions withpositive ones and are now ready to experi-ence an increase in creativity. Creativity initself is another great coping skill!5. Reduced Need to Self-MedicateSome people resort to using alcohol anddrugs more when they experience depres-sion and anxiety, trying to escape the trou-bles and symptoms they have by self-medicating. When we get overloaded, it’stime to look withinrather than without for peace and com-fort. Meditation tends to reduce the needfor us to self-medicate, and allows us tosee the world differently with a clearmind.6. Relief from InsomniaDeep-rooted stress and anxiety can beone reason for chronic insomnia. As ha-bitual meditation and breath work in-creases, it dissolves deep-seatedstresses and the sleeping cycle naturallyimproves.I encourage you to take a class to learnthe basics of meditation and breath work.I facilitate Sacramento PsychoSocialOptions for Rehabilitation Training(SacPort) groups at HRC and incorpo-rate this practice in every group.Many group members are “amazed” atthe level of deep peace they are able tofeel after meditation. They report thatthey are able to absorb the material andsupport from others more easily as aresult! In conjunction with meditation,breathing exercises will help to regulateyour breathing by simply inhaling throughyour nose and exhaling through yourmouth.Breathe in calmness and peace, andexhale the negative thoughts that areracing through your mind! Is it really thatsimple? Yes! You will find that even afteryour first experience in meditation anddeep breathing exercises, you will truly“feel” the difference!Thomas Hushen is aService Coordinator andSacPort Instructor at HumanResource Consultants (HRC)www.hrcrst.org
  • 63. Hope as Resiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer, MSWAuthoring this section for the Empowerment Magazine has quicklyturned into a huge blessing for me. I am delighted to know thereare so many of us dedicated to infusing ourselves and our com-munity with strength and well-being.However, due to a series of sad events that have transpired sincethe last publishing, I find I am struggling to find the right words tosay. While my vision for this segment is to be positive and uplift-ing, I am also keenly aware that life is hard and sometimes verypainful. So I find myself digging deeper in my quest to bring us alla little closer to realizing our own resilient potential.Wikipedia reports Psychological Resilience as the positive capac-ity of people to cope with stress and adversity. So what preciselyis this “positive capacity” that gives us the strength to try one moretime when really all we want to do is give up? In my last article Imentioned a number of factors that contribute to resiliency suchas spirituality, adequate support, and the ability to see one‟s prob-lems as solvable. And I also talked about hope. Hope is the sparkthat ignites the process of change.In my life, hope came when I saw others overcoming the sameobstacles I had been struggling with for so long. I recall the storyof a woman who was my dear friend some years back. She car-ried with her an energy that just naturally attracted those whowere seeking spiritual strength. She radiated love and compas-sion, and her eyes always twinkled. To know her was to love her.To know her well was to understand her miracle. You see, yearsbefore she had pushed a shopping cart around downtown Sacra-mento, wearing every piece of clothing she owned, and talking tothings that only she could see.Once she overcame her difficulties she carried with her a powerfulgift that cannot be learned through formal education, professionalexperience, or therapeutic intervention. She had the power of ex-ample and with that the gift of hope. The hope is this: “If she cando it, so can I” and “if I can do it, so can you.” Every scary shame-ful place I had been, she had been; but more importantly, shewasn‟t there anymore.This past month has not been an easy one for the people in mylife that I care about. We have all been reminded of the paincaused by the loss of hope. We attended the funerals of two peo-ple, both of whom took their own lives. Although I was not espe-cially close to either of them, I was there to support those they leftbehind.I have spent the days since then trying to better understand thedepth of pain that comes from the loss of hope because I knowthat someone reading this article will be standing on the edge ofthe cliff trying to decide if it is worth it to even try anymore. If thatis you, please keep reading this article.I have another dear friend who made a very serious suicide at-tempt some years back after the death of her adult son. She talksabout the hopelessness of that moment and about being thor-oughly convinced that her family and friends would be better offwithout her. She was very close to the edge but then somethinghappened that changed her mind. Let me have her tell you in herown words: “I thought I heard the voice of my son, who had diedabout ten years before, pleading with me not to take my life.Whether I actually „heard‟ his voice I cannot say, but I felt hopeOne of the brightest lights in my life is my grandson, who wasborn after the death of his father.I have a close, loving relationship with him today that I would havecompletely missed. I have come to a place of recovery throughhope and faith, and no longer feel the overwhelming depressionthat had haunted me throughout my life until that moment of com-plete despair. I no longer live in the pain of the past, but in thehope of the future. I realize just how terribly my death by suicidewould have affected the people I most love, especially my grand-son who is now 24 years old and who has been able to see hisfather through my eyes. I know today that when emotional paincomes calling that I can have faith that it will pass. I know the onlyway to get through it is to go through it rather than over, under, oraround it. Then it is behind me and I don‟t have to meet it againaround the corner.Life is challenging, but there is so much good in living each day asit comes, understanding through faith and hope that each chal-lenge is worth meeting in order to get to the next happiness, whichmay be only a moment away. To come from such despair towhere I am now, embracing the realities of life and knowing noth-ing is worth dying prematurely for, I can only describe as „truefreedom.‟”As our conversation came to an end, I asked my friend if she wasable to turn her life around all by herself. She replied “Absolutelynot. I had to reach out for help and then be willing to accept thehelp that was offered to me. I had reached out for help before buthad not been willing to accept what was offered. This time I reallylistened and took the suggestions offered and things got better.”To anyone reading this article, I want to remind you that“hopeless” is just a feeling and feelings are not facts. Feelingspass if given time. Please do not give up before your miracle ar-rives. Your moment of “true freedom” may be closer that youthink. If you are hurting today, please tell someone. As humanbeings, we are not meant to carry our burdens alone. No matterwhat the voice in your head says, you do matter, life can get bet-ter, and help is available.Tammy received her MSW from CSUS in 2007. She specializes inMental Health and is committed to the Consumer Movement. Shebelieves strongly in the Recovery Model and is committed to help-ing our community overcome misconceptions that lead to the stig-matization of persons with mental health issues. She is currentlyemployed by Consumers Self Help as their Clinical Director whereshe enjoys teaching therapeutic classes. She is proud mother oftwo adult sons. Her passion is photographing blossoms.flooding through my despair. Insteadof dying, I learned how to live withhope as my guiding light. Whenthings get tough, as they do for all ofus, I am able to look at the life I havelived since that day and know thatwhatever I need to walk through, it isworth it. By living instead of dying Iget to experience so much joy that Iwould have completely missed.Author’s Bio
  • 64. Further steps you can take to prevent diabetes include maintaining a healthy weight,exercising and modifying your diet to include select supplements. Sam’s Club hasmany of the products you need to maintain a healthy lifestyle including fitness equipment, a fresh selection of nutritious foods anddietary supplements. With diabetes, it is important to also include magnesium. Dietary sources of magnesium include green,leafy vegetables, meats, starches, grains and nuts and milk, all of which can be found at your local Sam’s Club. Several dietary sur-veys show that a large portion of adults do not meet the recommended daily allowance for magnesium which is 320 mg per day forwomen and 420 mg per day for men.Continued from page 15In a study published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism researchers reportmagnesium supplementation improves sensitivity to insulin in overweight individuals.Supplements of magnesium for six months improved two out of three measures of insu-lin sensitivity, compared with placebo. Blood sugar levels, as measured by fasting lev-els of glucose in the blood, improved by about 7 percent.Problem: Cardiovascular disease is a major concern.As the leading cause of death in our country, nearly everyone knows someone who hasbeen impacted by heart disease. This year, about 1.2 million Americans will suffer aheart attack, and about 452,000 of them will die as a result.Solution: Maintain a healthy lifestyle with products and services available atSam’s Club.A central objective in any heart healthy program must be to achieve a healthy weightand maintain it. Even a small amount of weight loss can lower blood pressure and im-prove blood sugar levels. Another way to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease is toincorporate a regular, moderate exercise program. It is not necessary to run marathons,you just need to make sure that each day you make a commitment to moving your bodythrough an exercise program you can stick with over the long-term.Changing your diet can help as well. Our standard American diet is contributing greatlyto our national obesity and reduced heart health. I recommend a Mediterranean-stylediet, rich in fresh fish, fresh vegetables and fruit and healthy oils like olive oil. All theingredients you need to attain this diet can be found at Sam’s Club, where fresh pro-duce and heart-healthy fish are staples. Building your daily dietary habits around plant-rich food sources will enhance your energy and can add years to your life. Additionally, Irecommend that you support healthy blood pressure and vascular integrity. IncreaseNitric Oxide levels through exercise and antioxidant consumption to help maintain bloodpressure in the normal range.ConclusionWhile Americans face many potential risks to both mental and physical health, a holisticapproach to health can effectively manage overlapping health concerns as describedhere. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle through simple steps can help prevent health prob-lems in children and adults, as well as contribute to a healthy body and mind.Dr. Andrew Myers is a naturopathic physi-cian and an expert in nutrition and preven-tative health. He is author of the booksSimple Health Value and Health is Wealth.Learn more about Dr. Myers and read hisadvice on skin health, weight managementand other health concerns by visitingsamsclub.com/healthyliving.DID YOU KNOW THAT?Wellness and Recovery Centers on Marconi Avenueand Franklin Boulevard provide on-going support groups thatare free and open to all Sacramento County residents 18+years of age. Both Centers also offer medication support ser-vices referred to them by Sacramento County Adult Access.The centers are a supportive place that honor diversity andencourage individuals to reach their highest potential.For more information contact:3815 Marconi Ave Ste # 1 Sacramento, CA 95821PH: 916-485-4175 Fax: 916-485-2673 or7000 Franklin Blvd Ste 110 Sacramento, CA 95823.PH: 916-394-9195 Fax: 916-392-2827Cindy Tuttle provides spiritual retreats for family members ofadults with mental illness and consumers. These non-denominational retreats provide a time and space to reflect onour purpose in life, our holiness, and how love is with us eachday. You can contact Cindy at cindytuttle08@comcast.net orvisit her website www.cindytuttletheauthor.com“”My hope is to offer a peacefuland fun environment where peo-ple can experience their ownsacredness and share theirchallenges and how they haveovercome them. My vision is toprovide a place where peoplewill walk away with a sense ofhope and realize how preciousand holy they are and havesome practical spiritual tools totake home with them to createtheir own spiritual “www.cindytuttletheauthor.com> Wellness and Recovery Center /North:> Wellness and Recovery Center /North:
  • 65. People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket ToWork by Rosario M. Ramirez, Social SecurityPublic Affairs Specialist for the Northern AreaEd Bairos, a farmer and mechanic, went back to the work he loved with the help of the Ticket program. He began receivingSocial Security disability benefits after suffering from severe arthritis, complicated by a knee injury that would require 20surgeries. He was concerned about losing the cash payments and health care he needed to survive and worried that employersmight not want to hire him.Then Bairos learned about the Ticket to Work program when he received a notice in the mail from Social Security. The noticewas a “ticket” that Bairos could use with an employment network of his choosing. Employment networks are organizations thatoffer specialized services such as career counseling, job search assistance, vocational rehabilitation and training. Bairos de-cided to use his ticket with an employment network and returned to work. He continued to receive health care and cash bene-fits because of work incentives, which are special considerations that make it easier for beneficiaries to explore whether go-ing back to work is right for them.Pleased with Bairos’ industry knowledge and skills as a farm manager, his employer gave him a promotion and a raise. Now he isself-sufficient, working for another division within the company. Bairos earns more money than he would have by relying solelyon disability benefits. By using his Ticket, Bairos’ medical reviews were put on hold and he is eligible to receive Medicare cov-erage for up to eight and a half years after discontinuing his disability payments.“Returning to work has made me whole again, especially being able to work in the area that I love. My self-esteem was at itslowest when I wasn’t working and on disability. Returning to work not only improved my self-worth but also my financial wealth.The Ticket to Work program and the ability to keep my Medicare was the reason I was able to return to work,” he said.If you receive Social Security or SSI benefits due to disability, are between 18 and 64 years old and want to work, gettingstarted is easy. Visit www.socialsecurity.gov/work for more information on the Ticket to Work program and work incentives.You also may call (866) 968- 7842 (TDD (866) 833-2967) to learn how going back to work may affect your benefits.Millions of Americans receive disability benefits from Social Security and there could be good newsfor many of those who want to work. A free and voluntary program called Ticket to Work gives indi-viduals who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security disability benefits accessto meaningful employment while maintaining control over benefit choices.Answer:Answer:Questions and AnswersRosario M. Ramirez is a Social Security Public Affairs Specialist for the Northern AreaThe Center for Counseling and Diagnostic Services located on the campus of California StateUniversity, Sacramento provides quality career and Rehabilitation Counseling with a friendly staff and en-vironment. There are approximately 12-14 counseling sessions (50 minutes each) and THERE IS NO FEETHIS FALL SEMESTER!! FREE.Individuals with disabilities and others can receive vocation testing, career counseling and personal counsel-ing as needed. For appointment and information, please 916 278– 6252 or visit their website http://edweb.csus.edu/ccds/
  • 66. When I went to look for a doctor, here I was on the inside, about as inside as you could get, and I felt the same anxiety. Youend up making a lot of calls. There is a shortage of psychiatrists. It is hard to find someone who is taking new patients. Here Iwas on the inside and it was an intimidating, expensive, scary system. Imagine what it must be for someone who has no con-nections? My co-conspirator, Sonny Cline, and I have similar backgrounds. We are both trained in primary care as well as psy-chiatry. At the Oasis, we believe strongly that we have something to offer people and people have something to offer us.That is what it is all about. We have a relationship with the patient, we don’t have a relationship with the insurance companies.At the Oasis patients are invested in their own care. We try to keep our rates as low as possible, but it is still a significantamount of money. They are buying it, they are the customer. They have certain rights to expect that people with privateinsurance or the county system don’t feel that they have. A consumer will go to the doctor and say “well I really want this,”and the doctor says, “well, the insurance company isn’t going to pay me for that, so you are not going to get it.” I often say itis like having an insurance executive there in the room with you when you are getting an exam. We have people who come tothe Oasis with insurance because they like the one on one, people without insurance come here because they don’t have a lot ofoptions. I have a couple people who have followed me from the County and say it’s worth $79 bucks a month to not have todeal with the appointment system and not to have to worry about getting a different doctor every time. Some people think Iam really critical of the county system, and actually I am not. I have worked in that system since 1997, and I think it is re-markable what they do with the resources they have, but there is a huge bureaucratic overhead. We are different from thecounty system, but we can never be a substitute. We just provide an alternative for some.Gail: What do you think the future of psychiatry looks like?Risley: There will be a lot more accessibility to Mental Health Services and our knowledge of the brain will greatly increase.We know so much more about the brain than we did 15 or 20 years ago, and it is still nothing. It is a growing field. We used tosay that when people got sick, that they have “fever.” Now we look at fever as a symptom of a larger problem of differentillnesses. So I think the day will come when we look at depression or anxiety or psychosis as symptoms of a broad spectrum ofillnesses instead of taking one treatment modality.Gail: What brings you the greatest joy in practicing medicine?Risley: What brings me the greatest joy is seeing people who have resigned themselves to being sick, turn a corner and ex-perience a sense of empowerment. To see them make a positive change is never just about their medication. It is never justabout getting a therapist, it is never just about finding a resource like the Wellness Center. But it is a combination of usingmany opportunities and resources. Then one day they wake up and say, “I am a human being, I am a productive person, and Ican bring joy to others.” They come here and they tell me that. Then I realize that I have been a part of that transforma-tion. What can you do in life that brings more joy than that?(continued from page 7)Dr. Risley is the first graduate of the combined residency program in family medicine and psychiatry at UC Davis. He isa former assistant clinical professor and physician diplomat at UCD. In addition to practicing psychiatry at TCORE, heintegrates family medicine and psychiatry at Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc (www.sacmedoasis.com).Interview conducted by Gail Erlandson, MA.Gail has a Master of Arts Degree in Pastoral Ministry from the University of San Francisco and a Bachelor of Arts Degree fromthe University of Portland in Interdisciplinary Studies. Gail taught at Loretto High School for eleven years and has served onstaff at Loaves and Fishes. Gail is a mentor at the Wellness and Recovery Center North.
  • 67. Welcome to the fall issue of the Empowerment Magazine, a quarterly online and print publica-tion dedicated to promoting overall wellness and mental health resiliency for the Greater Sacra-mento region.Just a couple of months ago, we launched our inaugural issue and I am very pleased to sharethat Empowerment Magazine is going strong! We remain committed to our mission of creating a newand positive image for people with lived experience of mental health challenges while helping toeliminate some of the prevailing stereotypes about mental illness.If you have an empowering/inspiring story to share, ideas for Empowerment Magazine, orwould like to send comments or feedback about the magazine, we would love to hear from you.To contact us, send an email to contact@empowermentmagazine.org or call us at 916 222-7541.Sincerely,Amede Kyubwa, MA, MPAMarilyn WashingtonTerry Zick, M.A.Cindy Thygeson, M.D (Sutter Center for Psychiatry)Melanie MartinezDr. Andrew Myers (Sam’s Club)Anne AdamsPhommasone GriffithDeonna Wilemme, PhD.Janet SegallThomas HushenKunde KyubwaThe Infinite Life ProjectHisham Soliman, MD, MPHGail Erlandson, MARosario M. Ramirez, (Social Security Administration)Tammy Dyer. M.S.W.Ron Risley, M.D.Lynn Keune, LMFT (LaFamilia Counseling Center)David KieszEric Zuniga (Inside front cover picture)Pat HubbertChrista HarmonBarbara Dawson (Front and back cover pictures)Cynthia WakefieldSpecial thanks to:A big thank you to Wellness and Recovery Center-North (WRC)for continuing to allow us to use the facility.Empowerment Magazine does not necessarily endorse the views, services or products advertised inthis magazine. The opinions expressed in the articles are solely of the author (s). We are not responsi-ble for omissions or errors. Reproduction in whole or in part for reasons other than personal use, isstrictly prohibited without prior written permission from the author or publisherIf you are looking for some help for yourself or someone you know, you can call 24hours a day, seven days aweek and be connected to many social services. Assistance is also available in other languages. Cant dialCall or Email:
  • 68. 4. Bring the empowering five senses into your heart. Focus on the pleasant smells such as fragrant rain or popcorn. Look at theshapes, colors, and details of flower petals. Listen to the sound of the wind in the trees and the laughter of children. Touch a velvetyrose petal and the texture of tree bark. Truly taste the creamy, smooth, coolness of ice cream or the crunchy texture of an apple.5. Stop to really feel heart connections in special moments with your cat or dog, with the beautiful eyes of an infant, with the wonderand beauty of nature, with emotional aspects of music, and similar moments.6. Focus the inhale and exhale of the breath in your heart.When we become more self-aware of our thoughts and feelings, we begin to see that so often our thoughts were the problem (alongwith the emotions that thoughts bring up). With attention to the present, we feel liberated from non-productive thought and we find away out of our unhappiness. As we become more focused in our present moment with our thoughts and incorporate the feelings of ourheart, we have a powerful approach to increasing happiness. It is a strategy that works through practicing the techniques. Commit tothe practice and you will reap the rewards. I believe in you wholeheartedly. If you want to know more about the magnificence of theheart and what it can do, do a Google search for heart intelligence or explore www.heartmath.org.Terry has a master of arts degree in counseling from University of Colorado–Denver. She has 30 years experience working withadults, children, and family preservation. She has worked in settings such as nonprofits, schools, alcohol/drug programs, and the jus-tice system. Her role as counselor, consultant, and trainer maintains a focus on spirituality, health, and wellness. Terry currently facili-tates groups and supports individualized mentoring at the Wellness and Recovery Center North.Author’s BioWhen I think of where I’ve been, the good times and the badOn a scale of 1 to 10, either way, I’m glad’Cause I’m not alone as I’m reaching for the phoneYou really care, your voice is there, my comfort zone.Sometimes when I’m lost, crushed beneath the painThough I can’t afford the cost, I just smile and play the gameBut there’s a healing place where I cannot pretendYour smiling face, your heart’s embrace heals me againSo even when the storm is strong and I’m deaf to my own cryI faintly hear a distant song and I simply can’t denyThat I’m not alone, even when I’m on my ownYour gentle touch is much too much to let me roam.After losing his American dream and his health to religiousfanaticism, he started over with a can do attitude and sur-rounded himself with like-minded friends. With the help ofMental Health America of Northern California, he landed a jobtraveling California as an analyst of mental health services. Healso helps shoot a TV show which airs every other Saturdaynight on (Comcast) Access Channel 17 at 7 p.m. His passionis the use of music, poetry, and comedy as forms of therapyfor others and himself. He co-facilitates a PerformingArts/Sing-Along group at the Wellness and Recovery Center(WRC). The first love song he wrote is actually a ‘thank you’ toall who encouraged him on his new journey.For all the mental health workers and friends who helped me get my life backAbout David Kiesz
  • 69. a month and treat their psychiatric illness and their general medical illness. We don’t make a distinction. You don’t make a“psych” appointment , or a “ medical” appointment. Instead, we treat the whole person.Gail: If you had to say what your philosophy of medicine is, how would you sum it up?Risley: To borrow from a colleague friend of mine , “We meet over the patient’s suffering,” that is really what it is all about.People don’t need doctors unless they are suffering, and our job is to address that suffering. Whether the job is to treattheir physical pain, or their psychic pain, or to help them integrate into society better, or to help them heal their bones. It isabout caring for their suffering.Gail: I learned from one of your patients, who highly recommends you, that you manage your own bipolar disorder.How would you say the bipolar challenge affects your ability to be a psychiatrist?Risley: I don’t think my illness has ever really impacted my ability to provide patient care. I think it is important that theworld recognize that psychiatric illness can be managed well. I got my diagnosis in medical school. A lot of people I know withbipolar disorder are self-employed so they can have flexibility in their schedule. A lot of it is about perspective. When you gofrom a state, say, of being profoundly depressed, to being really up and being hypo-manic, you begin to realize that the samesituation can be perceived on one day as being bone crushingly depressing and on a different day as being an exhilarating chal-lenge. To recognize that has been a real gift. To be able to have some perspective and not to just go through life feeling thatI am the pawn of forces greater than I am is a true gift.Gail: What do you think about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on the way medicine is practiced?Risley: The pharmaceutical industry currently is the whipping boy because they are the ones making the most money. When alot of money is involved, you have to be really careful with the amount of influence it has. Many doctors I have talked to say,“Oh well, I know they are big, but that doesn’t influence my prescribing at all.” I think that’s dangerous. They do providesome education, but they also have a lot of money and influence and I try to be aware of that.Gail: In your writing you mention the importance of an Interdisciplinary approach to medicine. What does that look like?Risley: An interdisciplinary approach to medicine is one of those things that is a great concept, but really hard to execute.Medications don’t make the world a better place. I can give you all the Prozac that’s made and it is not going to improve yourworld. What is going to improve your world is how you approach it and how you think about it. The medication has a real role ifyou are overcome with symptoms and you can’t do those things you need to make your world a better place. Medication, ifproperly used, controls the symptoms well enough so you can do the work you need to get better. The work might be some-thing internal you do, it might be just having the energy for paying your bills, or it might be getting to a cognitive behavioraltherapy group. It takes all forms, but the medication is a small portion of the care. What we have is a health care deliverysystem that says, “Well you are a doctor, you make way too much money, and the only thing we are going to pay you for is writ-ing those prescriptions.” Healing takes a lot of effort.Gail: What do you think are some of the important things we need to do as a mental health community to achieve bet-ter quality of care and life for our members?Risley: The number one thing is that we have to get rid of the stigma around mental health. One of the things that I amamused and really heartened by is that we providers have people who walk in the door and say, “ I am having this muscle ache,”and then we start talking, and the real reason they are here is something else. We have been able to break down that barrierat the Oasis. Generally speaking, Mental Health services are very separate from the rest of medicine and people in need don’tknow how to access the mental health system. The doctors doing the work don’t have access to the tools they need to make iteasy to make that happen. So people are stuck, and they are stuck really only because we refuse to acknowledge that psychi-atric illness is cardiac illness, it is cancer, it is foot pain, and everything overlaps. I used to think there were clear cut ill-nesses. But if somebody has a broken bone, how did they get that broken bone? What kind of behavior were they engagingin? It may be an insignificant piece of it, or it may be really significant. But until you ask, you do not know.Gail: Your patients have told me that the Oasis has made psychiatric care very accessible to them. What else do yousee unique about the Oasis?Risley: What isn’t unique about it? It is a big experiment in a lot of ways. It first struck me when I was at Massage Envygetting a massage. They have a way of reducing the anxiety about getting a massage. I found a lot of parallels with what peo-ple experience in accessing psychiatric care to the anxiety that might be provoked around getting massage. I was presidentof the Psychiatric Society for about two years.Continued on page 20
  • 70. Interview was conducted by Ann Adams for the Empowerment Magazine.Anne is currently working part time as a volunteer receptionist at the Wellness and Recover Centeron Marconi Avenue. She has served as a board member and residential leader for the SacramentoMutual Housing Association. She has worked for 15 years for law enforcement agencies at thestate and county levels and she also has 4 years of working with children with learning disabilities.She is currently pursuing her education in Human Services from ARC with goal of transferring toBethany University.Interviewer: Your mental health department islike a hidden nugget. How are people referred toyour services?Response: They usually call here and we have peoplehere all day long taking those referrals and then sendingoff to Access[, an Assisted Access program which part-ners with the county]. They need to be medically eligiblechildren from zero to twenty-one years old. We work withthe whole family but the child has to be zero to twenty-one, and they qualify for services through Access if theyhave straight medical.Interviewer: And the last question: is there is astrong emphasis on working with the whole fam-ily? How many families do you serve?Response: We serve about 500 families a year, and thatis just in mental health. We would like the community toknow that La Familia works with diverse cultures—manythink it’s only Spanish—many diverse cultures here, andthat we take pride in standing beside all of them in a part-nership for success.Lynn is clinical Director of LaFamilia CounselingCenter and acts as the liaison to SacramentoCounty DHHS when working with the County. She ison the cultural Competence Committee at theCounty and System Wide Committee promoting cul-tural competence. She has a master’s degree in ArtTherapy and Family Therapy from Notre Dame deNamurs, CA., and a bachelor’s degree from the fa-mous California College of the Arts in Oakland. Sheis licensed as a marriage and family therapist (MFT)and art therapist (ATR). Bilingual in Spanish andEnglish.views and [their problems] affect their ability to conduct a decentinterview—they may be rejected over and over again but theykeep coming and coming—and that way we are able to build arelationship with them. Hopefully we are able to encourage theirconfidence and [get them to] accept some of the services. Encour-agement is the biggest thing, and also helping them to realize thatmental health is not an illness; basically it’s something that canhelp them to become a better person and to be able to gain em-ployment. Take away the stigma of mental health; we use a differ-ent format. The cultures that are involved, the ones that are repre-sented— they are not expert mental health therapists or profes-sionals; basically they will direct individuals to the resources andjust getting them to that point can be a challenge. And sometimesit is getting the referral to mental health so they can go forward.Mission of La Familia Counseling Center, Inc.:To improve the quality of life for at-risk youth and families of diverse backgrounds by offering multi-cultural counseling,support and outreach services and programs to help families to overcome adversity, to become empowered, and to suc-ceed in their lives. Address: 5523 34th Street Sacramento, CA 95820 Tel (916) 452-3601 Web: www.lafcc.orgLynn Keune, LMFTAbout one in five adults (ages 18 and older) has a diagnosablemental disorder. (National Institute of Mental Health)www.samhsa.govDID YOU KNOW THAT?
  • 71. New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxietyfor Children by Cindy Thygeson, M.D. Director ofMedical Affairs at Sutter Center for PsychiatryAs summer comes to an end and children head back to school forthe fall, anxiety levels are on the rise. At Sutter Center for Psy-chiatry, we see a dramatic increase in cases exacerbated by anxi-ety and stress as school returns to session.Transitional times like these tend to be very difficult for children asthey face new fears and stress. All of a sudden children havepressures to perform academically and adjust to social, parentaland teacher expectations that are not necessarily present duringthe summer months.To help ease the shock of these pressures, consider these practi-cal strategies to make the most of the transition period with thestart of the new school year. Anticipating and planning is the bestway to address anxiety to the benefit of both parents and children.Recognize and use cues that school is around the corner – in-cluding back-to-school shopping and an increased focus on aca-demic activities such as reading to help prepare your child for theupcoming change.Like anything else, there are varying degrees of the effects ofanxiety. Newer epidemiological research indicates that more than80 percent of depressed adolescents have a history of childhoodanxiety. Unlike adults, children display anxiety symptoms differ-ently. Rather than verbalizing these feelings, children express itbehaviorally, physically and cognitively.Feeling anxious can interfere with their mood, concentration anddecision-making abilities, which can be misinterpreted as prob-lems with attention or learning. Some children seem overly tense,seek constant reassurance and may be eager to please, whileother children act out.More obvious behaviors include clinginess, separation difficulties,excessive shyness and oppositional behaviors. Anxiety expressedas physical symptoms are very common, difficult to recognize, butalso very important to recognize in kids. Ongoing unexplained,physical complaints – such as difficulty breathing, dizziness, stom-ach aches, problems sleeping, or feeling like they have a lump intheir throat – can be a psychological issue rather than a physio-logical one.Anxiety disorders – the most common mental health issue – arefrequently overlooked or misjudged. When they go untreated, chil-dren struggle with self-esteem and are unable to develop age-appropriate coping skills, and this contributes to problems at homeand at school. The typical pattern of these children becoming un-engaged in the classroom results in poor achievement relative totheir potential. The negative self-image that ensues contributes topoor motivation to study and participate in class and causes moresocial and academic difficulties, continuing as a negative perpet-ual cycle. Besides the more immediate implications, research indi-cates that about half of adults with anxiety disorders report havingleft education early, and half of those report later in life that un-treated anxiety was the primary reason.If you have concerns about a child,the first step is to speak with themabout what their concerns are andwhat they are experiencing. This is-sue is not necessarily based on“what” a child is worrying about, but rather that the worry takes ona life of its own and impacts the child in day-to-day life. Don’t un-derestimate the power of understanding and reassuring a child byletting him or her know that things will be OK; this really makes adifference.At school, it can be helpful to identify a “safe place” where yourchildren may go when feeling upset. This may save them fromresorting to maladaptive ways of coping. If the very commonschool-refusal pattern starts, it is important to address the issueimmediately and have them return to school as soon as possible.In the end, the longer kids are out of school, the more anxiety isfed and unwanted behaviors are reinforced.If your child’s anxieties start to interfere with daily activities inschool, socially and his or her overall well-being, this is a sign toseek professional intervention. Talk with the child’s teacher orschool guidance counselor. You want to discuss this with yourpediatrician or a mental health professional. Write down examplesabout the concerns that you have to take to your visit. With betterunderstanding of what your child is experiencing, you are betterable be of support to your child.It is not uncommon to have difficulty navigating the mental healthsystem. Sutter Center for Psychiatry is available to help determineand provide the best setting for a comprehensive assessment andoffer guidance through the next steps. Sutter Center for Psychiatryis the only hospital in Northern California that treats children underthe age of 12, throughout the spectrum of inpatient and outpatientprograms it offers.We believe in the importance of individualizing care for each per-son to provide the most effective care. Treatment with a profes-sional who believes in recovery, keeps a global view and givesyou options as a partner in treatment is what I believe sets usapart at Sutter Center for Psychiatry. It is not about treating(Continued on page 22)
  • 72. THE INFINITE LIFE PROJECT LLCProvides culturally diverse and culturally relevantpsychotherapy for adolescents, adults, individuals,couples and groups (Breast cancer support) dealingwith depression, stress, domestic violence, trauma,and grief and loss.As an effort to educate the community about the everchanging behaviors of the adolescent, The Infinite LifeProject travels throughout California and other statespresenting educational workshops. Our workshops arebeneficial to families, students and especially schoolfaculties. The workshops will provide families andschool faculty with valuable information and ways tocommunicate and resolve adolescent issues before theyhave escalated.For companies we offer cultural diversity workshops forpeople of different backgrounds in the workplace whowill participate in open and direct conversation. Partici-pants will learn the importance of being conscious ofthose different from them versus being ‘color-blind.’This workshop is for anyone in the workforce and othersocial settings. We also offer alcohol, tobacco andother drugs workshop for companies as well.As a Continuing Education Provider-PCE #4980 we offer thefollowing workshops:* Cultural Diversity* Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drugs* School Community and Crisis* Managing Oppositional Defiance* The Pathways Training Program (Enhanced thinking anddecision-making for young men of color)* Adolescent Development in the 21st CenturyFor additional information or to schedule an appointment contactCarmen Crenshaw at (916) 544-0502 or you can fax your re-quest to (916) 688-8603. Office hours by appointment only.Email: theinfinitelifeproject@yahoo.comWebsite:Mailing address: P.O. Box 2758 Elk Grove Blvd, Elk Grove CA 95759. Physical address: 9008 Elk Grove Blvd #23 Elk Grove CA 95624Being Loved by Melanie MartinezMelanie is an advocate for peoplewith disabilities and homeless. Sheholds an AA degree in Human Ser-vices; she is currently a volunteerat the Wellness and Recovery Cen-ter facilitating an art expressiongroup and an assistant co-facilitatorin the Nutrition support group. Sheenjoys creating nutritional meals forfriends and family.My ups, downs, and flaws are a part of my life. It’s like walking in a park that is covered inleaves that are big and brown. Each leaf represents a barrier, a problem, or a learning op-portunity. I grow from each leaf and flourish from the issue that leads me closer to mypurpose. I understand that mistakes are opportunities to learn and grow.Learning new things helps with the new path ways formed by my neurotransmitters! It alsohelps me expand my self- confidence and self-esteem. Strengthening and developing newpaths, clears the walkway and helps the park with less leaves leaf control. Less Fewerleaves helps clarity because so I can walk down a clear path. But when the wind blows thosedarn leaves back on the path, then I know that there are more opportunities of growththat is are yet to be learned. Each obstacle I encounter during my life must happen for areason.I have had a hard life but I have learned a lot. Now I have to learn to be kind to myself. Ino longer want to hurt myself. I want to live life to the fullest. Living requires me to look atmyself and see what I want in life which is positive. There is much hope if I keep my focuson my healing path!My family, those whom I call my family, is my spiritual family. Not blood- related, but myfamily, who loves me for me even though I’m not perfect. They like me for me, so I don’thave to change according to others’ expectations. I’m unique and I can be loved by othersas long as I am open to vulnerability. Learning new patterns of communication can let othersin my life. I yearn for love and being loved; for I didn’t get it when I was growing up. Nowthat I’m older I love others and like receiving love from others. This is a very healingaspect for me: being loved.
  • 73. We are learning more and more that the conditions that affect thebody and mind are inter-related. Some diseases, while they canbe managed successfully individually, can wreak havoc whencombined.One example is depression and diabetes. A recent study pub-lished by the Archives of General Psychiatry suggests that womensuffering from both diabetes and depression have a two-fold in-creased risk of death, especially from cardiovascular disease.While statistics like these can be harrowing, there are simplesteps you can take to reduce your risk for depression, diabetes,heart disease and more.In our new book, Health is Wealth, Nobel Laureate Dr. Louis Ig-narro and I outline simple methods to help our readers improvevitality, live healthier lives, and enjoy peak functioning of bothbody and mind. Additionally, I have partnered with Sam’s Club tohelp educate and inform members on preventative healthy livingpractices while bringing access to quality medical supplies andnutritional supplements I’ve outlined some of the risks associatedwith various health problems as well as the simple solutions thatcan help you lead a healthier life.Problem: Poor nutrition habits can damage overall health.Overall health can be negatively affected by what I’ve identified asa Nutritional Deficiency Syndrome (NDS). With NDS it is possibleto see several disease states or dysfunctions overlapping to cre-ate increased risks of both complications and even death.Solution: Maintain nutritional balance with quality foods andsupplements available at Sam’s Club.Sam’s Club offers a great selection of quality foods to keep yourfamily on track in preventing diseases through good nutrition. Tryadding fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains to your menu toensure your daily intake of vitamins and nutrients. A simplesalmon filet for dinner can add a dose of healthy Omega-3 oils,while adding fresh berries to your breakfast cereal can boost anti-oxidant intake.In addition to a healthy diet, the introduction of dietary supple-ments can enhance your body’s performance, and Sam’s Cluboffers a wide variety of vitamins and supplements to meet yournutritional needs at a value you can appreciate. Here are my topfive nutritional recommendations that can make a big difference inyour health:1. Prevent Vitamin D Deficiency. Research has linked VitaminD3 to heart health, cancer prevention, bone health and meta-bolic function. Studies indicate that three-quarters of U.S.teens and adults are deficient in vitamin D. Experts say lowvitamin D levels also may increase a childs risk of developingheart disease later in life. Recommendation: Adults: 2,000IU per day of a vitamin D supplement Such as Member’sMark Vitamin D softgels. For children: 400 to 1,000 IU de-pending on age.2. Focus on your intake of healthy Omega-3 oils. Omega-3 oils(EPA and DHA) play an important role as antioxidants andhelp maintain our overall heart health. Recommendation:900 mg of EPA and DHA per day from 1,400 mg of Fish Oil,such as Member’s Mark Natural Enteric Fish Oil.Statin drugs deplete the body of CoQ10 and this deficiencycan lead to impaired function and activity of heart muscle.Recommendation: 100 to 400 mg of CoQ10 each day,such as Member’s Mark Co Q10 softgels.4. Fight free radicals. Every day our bodies are exposed to tox-ins from our environment, which can lead to the formation offree radicals. Free radicals are reactive molecules that dam-age our cells and lead to premature aging. Nutrients likeVitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, Resveratrol and green teaare antioxidants and can help defend our bodies from thedamaging effects of free radicals. Recommendation: 500to 1,000 mg of Vitamin C daily from supplements such asSuper C Energy and Member’s Mark Chewable Vitamin C.5. Build a foundation for your health. Research has shownthat a multivitamin can actually make a difference in ourhealth, and a study conducted by researchers at the Na-tional Institutes of Health has provided the first epidemi-ologic evidence that the use of multivitamins by women isassociated with longer telomeres. Telomeres are the protec-tive caps at the ends of chromosomes (DNA) that shortenwith the aging of a cell. As we look to extend the quality ofour lives and support the optimal function of our cells andDNA, a multivitamin is a great place to start.Recommendation: Daily age and gender specific multivita-min such as One A Day Men’s or Women’s Health CompleteMultivitamins and Member’s Mark Mature Multi.Problem: The diabetes epidemic.Diabetes affects an estimated 24 million Americans, equal to 8percent of the population. The total costs are thought to be asmuch as $174 billion, with $116 billion being direct costs frommedication, according to 2005-2007 American Diabetes Associa-tion figures.Solution: Take part a free diabetes health screening atSam’s Club and diminish your diabetes risk through ahealthy diet and supplements.Sam’s Club is offering a free diabetes health screening for itsmembers on September 10. The free screenings are one part ofSam’s Club’s efforts to help members take charge of their healththrough preventative measures. Additional screenings forwomen’s health, digestive health and heart health will also beoffered in the coming months. For more information, and to con-firm the times and locations of Sams Club screenings, checkyour local listings at SamsClub.com/healthyliving.3. Support your heart health.In addition to a diet centered onfruit, vegetables and wholegrains, nutrients like CoQ10 arealso important to overall hearthealth and function and canbecome deficient especially forthe 33.5 million Americans whoare currently taking a statin drugto lower their cholesterol.Continued on page 16
  • 74. important was walking out the door. It was a totally successful experience. I knew that I would be better from that time on.Even after several years of being diagnosed with a life-threatening, very painful illness and being on very serious drug therapy, I de-cided to take another risk and I started a foundation for my disease almost single-handedly. I never believed I would be that person.Sometimes I still don’t believe that I’m that person. But I went from being house-bound to flying by myself around the United Statesand across the Atlantic. When the foundation and I parted ways, I decided I still needed to work. It took a lot of time and many rejec-tions, but then the Wellness & Recovery Center took a chance on me.My life has been a rollercoaster of emotions. But I’ve learned a lot of lessons through my life and travels. I learned that it is so impor-tant to listen. I learned that not just saying the words, but working toward positive change is a risk worth taking. You may not alwayssucceed, but you can say you tried your best and know that sometimes that’s enough. I learned that you can’t control another person.I learned that words and deeds can hurt, but how you process and react to words and deeds is in your control. I learned that forgivingyourself and others for just being a human being that makes mistakes and owning it can make you free. Before he died, my partnerused to say that we’re all just passing through so what does it matter. But I say, let’s make a dent in the timeline of life and becomethe best people we can be. I believe we are all connected and how we live our lives and help others lives in the universe forever.A Risk Worth Taking for Change by Janet SegallSometimes, when the negative things in your life outweigh the positive, it is often hard to imagine that any-thing could be good. But it is not uncommon for good, positive things and personal triumphs to come out oftragedy and uncertainty. I moved around a lot, looking for answers—in and out of relationships that neverworked, sometimes predicated with violence and emotional pain, not realizing until later that I was alwayslooking for someone to love me and lift me up. I was looking for answers outside myself. I was looking forothers to fix me.After suffering from agoraphobia for several years—getting better, getting worse again—I made a choice andtook a risk. I left my house and my safety and drove across the country. I was not alone, but what wasAuthor’s BioJanet is a graduate of the State University of New York system. She is the Founder, and was the Director of the Interna-tional Pemphigus Pemphigoid Foundation, an organization dedicated to helping people living with the rare, autoimmunediseases pemphigus and pemphigoid. She is also a certified Health Coach, and Hypnotherapist. She is very grateful tobe working at the Consumers Self Help Wellness & Recover Center North.
  • 75. emotional, socially, physically or spiritually. The older I got and the more I learned, the more I wished I could go back intime and give to my little child self all those great strategies and wisdom. My, oh my, how my life would have changed!A toolkit would have definitely reduced my suffering and empowered my journey. Realistically, I can’t change the pastand so I am not going to dwell on “what could have been”. However, in the now, I search out and give those toolkit tipsto myself and allow my adult self to transform my life with that wise knowledge.Here’s just a few of the many tools to add to your personal toolkit.Do deep belly breathing: bring inhale down into the belly and allow the calming effect of the breath to relax.Focus on facts, not assumptions.Take personal responsibility for improving your life, eliminate a victim stance.Create choices, because the more choices, the more empowered you will feel. So look for choices you have not considered.Surrender to the circumstances you cannot change; surrender the outcome of what you can change.Use the spirituality of prayer, meditation, mindfulness, yoga, and/or contemplation to enhance other strategies.Develop a plan for healing, health and wellness & commit to change. Take baby steps if needed but commit to transform your life.Be solution oriented rather than problem oriented—shift the focus, shift the circumstance.List intentions or purposeful directions for what you want to create in your life. Visualize and feel those positive intentions.Choose optimistic thoughts which encourage thinking the best about a situation, and sustain hope or faith for a good andmanageable outcome.Pick and Choose your thoughts because a thought will cause a particular feeling which will cause a particular behavior. Youfeel the way you feel because you think the way you think.Recognize that you have gifts, talents, skills and inner resources within that you may not be aware of. And, if you becomeaware and utilize them, it could change your experience.Likewise, recognize that you may have options for support outside of yourself that you may not be aware of. So, search the com-munity, the internet, ask people for resources, etc.Push through fear to develop courage and bravery. You will be surprised at what you can do, learn, become.Again, focus on the breath-- when you are at a stop light, in line at the grocery, cooking food, lying in bed ready for sleep,anytime, anywhere. Wherever you go, you bring the potential of the healing, relaxing breath.Everyone can benefit from owning a handy toolkit of strategies and skills for health and wellness. Themore tools we stock in our toolkit, the more we have to draw from to support life’s challenges andboost enjoyment. One tool such as calling a friend to talk, might be just the helpful ticket on one par-ticular day. On another day, a different tool like making a gratitude list might be the most helpful toease our mind, heart and spirit. As we were growing up, most of us (if not all of us) were not given aTerry has a Master of Arts Degree in Counseling from University of Colorado-Denver. She has 30 years experience working withadults, children and family preservation. She has worked in settings such as: non-profits, schools, justice system, alcohol/drug pro-grams. Her role as counselor, consultant and trainer maintains a focus on spirituality, health and wellness. Terry currently facilitatesgroups and supports individualized mentoring at the Wellness and Recovery Center North .Author’s Biowell-being toolkit. Also, it’s possible no one modeled for us how to create a healthier life-mentally,Sacramento County Mental Health Public Awareness Campaign seeking to fundamentally alter nega-tive attitudes and perceptions about mental illness with culturally competent messaging and activi-ties, persuading County residents to feel the same compassion for and acceptance of a person with amental illness as a person with a physical illness or disability. The campaign is part of the County’sMental Health Services Act (MHSA) initiative which provides funding to help transform county mentalhealth services for children, transition age youth, adults, older adults and families.
  • 76. If you, or someone you know,experiencing disrupting symp-toms of mental health, please callAdult Access Team:at (916) 875-1055 or ChildrensAccess Team at (916)8759980Sacramento Suicide PreventionCrisis Line: (916) 368 -3111Sacramento Mental Health Crisis24-hour Line: (916) 732-3637Poison Control:(800) 876 - 4766National Suicide Prevention Life-line 1(800) 273-TALK (8255)WEAVE Crisis Line 916 920 2952Youth Crisis Line 1(800)339-7177REPORT ADULT/CHILDABUSESACRAMENTO EMERGENCY SHELTERSMary House Women/Children(Day Shelter) 1321 North C St. Tel (916)446-4961St Johns (Women/Children)4410 Power Inn Tel (916) 453-1482Family Shelter (SAEHC)4516 Parker Ave. 60 Day Stay-Family /Children Tel (916) 455-2160Union Gospel Mission400 Bannon St. Bed Sign Ups 6:30 P.M. (Men) 7Day Max. W/ 2 Meals A Day Tel (916) 447-3268Voa "A" Shelter(Men Only) Moon. A St. Building BTel (916) 448-5507Womens Refuge (SAEHC)(Single Women) Parker Ave Tel (916) 455-0415SACRAMENTO EMERGENCY ROOM SERVICESMercy General Hospital4001 J Street. Sacramento, CA 95819Tel. (916) 453-4545Mercy Hospital Of Folsom1650 Creekside Dr . Folsom, CA 95630Tel. (916) 983-7400Mercy San Juan Hospital6501 Coyle Avenue . Carmichael, CA95608 Tel. (916) 537-5000Methodist Hospital Sacramento7500 Hospital Drive. Sacramento, CA95823 Tel. (916) 423-3000Sutter Memorial Hospital52nd St And F Street. Sacramento, CA 95819Tel. (916) 454-3333UD Davis Medical Center2315 Stockton Blvd. Sacramento, CA 95817 Tel.(916) 734-3252 / 734-2011Kaiser Permanente Hospital South6600 Bruceville Road Sacramento, CA 95823Tel. (916) 688-2000Kaiser Permanente Hospital Morse2025 Morse Avenue. Sacramento, CA 95825Tel. (916) 973-5000Find Out if you qualify for Medi-Cal InsuranceContact Sacramento County Department of Human AssistanceMedi-Cal District Offices . Downtown Sac . (916)874-2256. East Sacramento (916) 874-3800. South Sacramento (916) 875-8100 . Del Paso (916) 648-0894. Rancho Cordova (916) 875-8600Visit WWW.SACPROS.ORGfor everything you need to know about mentalhealth services in Sacramento County8581 Folsom Bld Ste ASacramento,CA 95826 (800) 772-12132444 Marconi AvenueSacramento, CA 95821 (916) 979-2019910 Cirby WayROSEVILLE, CA 95661 (800) 772-1213Social SecurityAdministration OfficesRESOURCES 24-HOUR CRISIS LINESSuicide Prevention Crisis LinePhone Number: (916) 368—3111PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALSSacramento County Mental HealthTreatment Center (SCMHTC)2150 Stockton Boulevard Sacramento,Tel (916) 875.1000Heritage Oaks Hospital4250 Auburn Blvd. Sact. Tel (916) 489-3336Crestwood Center 2600 Stockton Blvd .Sacto, Tel (916) 452-1431Sutter Center for Psychiatry7700 Folsom Blvd. SacramentoTel (916)386 -3000Sierra Vista Hospital8001 Bruceville Rd., Sacramento,Tel (916) 423-2000Crestwood Carmichael ARBHC4741 Engle Road, CarmichaelTel (916) 483-8424PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCYFor psychiatric emergency, pleasecall 911 as soon as possible or go tonearest emergency roomChild Abuse 24-hour Hotline:(916) 875-KIDS/ (916) 875-5437Report Senior or DependentAdult Abuse: (916) 874-9377Safely Surrendered Baby 24-HourInformation Line: (916) 679-3604or (866) 856-BABYNeed to Apply ForFood Stamps?SACRAMENTO (916) 874-2072SOUTH SACRAMENTO(916) 875-8100 (916)875-9980GALT (209) 745-3484The Volunteer Center Of Sacramentois dedicated to strengthening our com-munities by connecting volunteers withopportunities to service. For more info,please call (916) 567-3100 or visitVOLUNTEER
  • 77. • Having difficulty separating from people or being unnaturally clingy• Constantly having thoughts and fears about the safety ofthemselves or others• Having worries about things before they happen• Being overly self-critical and perfectionistic• Being preoccupied with embarrassment or making mistakes• Having low self esteem• Having trouble falling asleep, frequent nightmares, or difficulty sleeping alone• Difficulty learning and trouble sitting stillHere are signs that a child may be experiencing more than just normal anxiety:Author’s BioWhatever you try, the most important thing is to remember in this journey is that what works for one person may not beright for another. If one thing doesn’t seem to work, continue your search and don’t give up. The good news is, with alittle knowledge and appropriate treatment, problems today can easily become yesterday’s news!one aspect of a person’s life – but giving tools and guidance to have that individual im-prove the overall quality of their life and their relationships. That is lasting treatment.(Continued from page 11)Cindy Thygeson, M.D., a board-certified pediatric and adult psychiatrist, serves as theDirector of Medical Affairs for the Sutter Center for Psychiatry, the only not-for-profit psychiatric hospital in the com-munity. Associated with Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, it is also the only psychiatric hospital that is part of anintegrative health care system in the region. Sutter Medical Center and Sutter Center for Psychiatry are part of SutterHealth, Northern California’s largest health-care network. For more on Sutter’s psychiatric services, visitwww.suttermedicalcenter.org/psychiatry , or call (916) 386-3000 or (800) 801-3077.Wheels to Work provides counselorsand Internet enabled computer workstations whichhelp people who don’t normally have access tothe Internet find transportation and related ser-vices aimed at securing employment.Did You Know That? For more info, please callor visit the Paratransit MobilityManagement Center.RideQuest: (916) 429-2009 x 7229
  • 78. Inspirational StoriesEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Inspirational Stories of EmpowermentLiving My Life with a Mental Illness by Janet L. Furia (published in the Summer 2011 issue)Working with Your Psychiatrist by Gail Erlandson, M.A. (published in the Summer 2011 issue)Tough Times by Cynthia WakefieldAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/InspirationalStories.aspx [4/21/2013 10:58:37 AM]
  • 79. The Pursuit of Contentment and HappinessEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >The Pursuit of Contentment and HappinessLiving in the Present by Terry Zick, MA (Fall 2011 Issue)Living in the Present Brings Increased Happiness and ContentmentHow can we increase our level of happiness? There is a rich banquet of strategies and tools to help us get there. As I read in one book, unhappiness is easy—easy, because we continue to think and feel the way we always have, which is the easy way. However, the ability to feel happier can become the easyway. What would happen if we committed to the tools that change our thoughts and feelings toward happiness? Simply put—we would be happier.In the last issue, we learned that if we think we will only be happier in the future when something changes, we have missed an opportunity to be happyNOW. Oh, maybe I will have a moment or two of happiness when I get what I wanted finally (“Yeah, joy!!!”) . . . until I focus on the next thing that I think Iwant or need that I think will make me happy. When I continue to focus on what is missing, I don’t feel that joy anymore.When the mind and thought stop yearning for what I want and stop complaining about what I don’t have, in my experience, what happens? Then Iexperience a more peaceful mind and well-being. That potential for joy exists all the time, whether or not I have what I yearn for. Our genetic makeupaffirms that we can be happier (some studies say only 50% of our happiness potential is genetic). This means that no matter our past, our genes supporta potential for increased happiness. When we realize that we have CHOICE when it comes to our thoughts and our activities, then we empower our lifein happier ways.As we apply new strategies and develop a habit of healthier thoughts, it becomes easier to experience happiness. It becomes easier because ouramazing brain will help us out, and has the potential to “rewire” itself. The new science of neuroplasticity informs us that the brain and nervous systemhave the ability to change as a result of new input. The most widely recognized forms of plasticity are improvements in learning, memory, and recoveryfrom brain damage—to name a few. This wonderful ability to rewire begins with changing our thoughts and feelings.Keep in mind that it is the tools and strategies which hold the power to transform our life. Empowered commitment to change our thoughts and behaviorwill translate into increased contentment. In the last issue, we reinforced that we can increase our happiness quotient by the following strategies:1. Develop an attitude of gratitude.2. Pay attention to our thoughts and choose more optimistic or happiness-producing thoughts.3. Seize the moment to be happy rather than waiting for life to change to be happy.Two more perspectives are:Live in the present moment more often. Why will being in the present moment increase my happiness? Consider what often happens when we live in thepast or in the future. As we revisit the past, we may replay unpleasant memories or traumas (often triggering anger, fear, sadness, anxiety) or we may wishwe could have done it better (often triggering regret) or we may wonder how great a life we would have had if things had gone better (often triggering avictim stance, or lack of power and lack of control feelings).As we look at the future while focusing on possible future problems, we might mentally envision a possible unhappy life that isn’t real. We are justhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Happiness.aspx (1 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:58:43 AM]
  • 80. The Pursuit of Contentment and Happinesscreating worst-case scenarios that haven’t happened yet (often triggering fear, worry, anxiety, lack of power thoughts, lack of control thoughts, andpessimistic thinking).The present moment, without nonproductive thoughts and feelings about the past and future, offers increased peace of mind. The present momentoffers wisdom, better problem-solving, clarity, and transformation. When our attention is in the here and now, we are less distracted, more focused, andmore content. And, to add to the list of benefits—being in the present offers relaxation, effective problem-solving, and compassion for self and others.Much has been written on numerous strategies for living in the present, mindfulness living, and the power of now. The benefits are well documented.Experience life from your heart.Studies show that we change our brain and physiology when we feel a moment in our heart. The heart has its own wisdom, its own “brain” or itsown intelligence. Research tells us that our heart has its own complex nervous system. We already live, to some degree, from the heart. Think of thephrases we commonly say that connect us to our heart’s wisdom or compassion such as “bless your heart,” “I did it from the heart,” “myheartfelt appreciation,” “follow your heart,” or “it touched my heart.” Studies show we can reduce stress, anxiety, fear, anger, and depression bypracticing heart-based strategies.Through connecting with the heart, our mind will follow our heart and transform our experience. In addition, when we engage with our heart, we promptour heartbeat, blood pressure and respiration to return to balance. Also, our heart becomes in sync with our brain, resulting in more empowered andhealthier benefits.We can transform the present moment when we live from the heart. The heart creates a shift by its ability to heal, forgive, and renew. The heart giveswise counsel. The heart brings us home to our truest self. The heart allows the mind to listen to the silence. The heart connects us spiritually. Here are afew of the countless heart-centering strategies:1. Put your hand over your heart and connect with your heartbeat (seemingly hear it or feel it beating).2. Choose a thought of gratitude, and feel the gratitude deeply in the heart.3. Look for things to be in awe and wonder over (allow yourself to say “ahhhhhhhh,” “mmmmmmmmm,” and “wow!”).4. Bring the empowering five senses into your heart. Focus on the pleasant smells such as fragrant rain or popcorn. Look at the shapes, colors, anddetails of flower petals. Listen to the sound of the wind in the trees and the laughter of children. Touch a velvety rose petal and the texture of tree bark.Truly taste the creamy, smooth, coolness of ice cream or the crunchy texture of an apple.5. Stop to really feel heart connections in special moments with your cat or dog, with the beautiful eyes of an infant, with the wonder and beauty ofnature, with emotional aspects of music, and similar moments.6. Focus the inhale and exhale of the breath in your heart.When we become more self-aware of our thoughts and feelings, we begin to see that so often our thoughts were the problem (along with the emotionsthat thoughts bring up). With attention to the present, we feel liberated from non-productive thought and we find a way out of our unhappiness. As webecome more focused in our present moment with our thoughts and incorporate the feelings of our heart, we have a powerful approach toincreasing happiness. It is a strategy that works through practicing the techniques. Commit to the practice and you will reap the rewards. I believe inyou wholeheartedly. If you want to know more about the magnificence of the heart and what it can do, do a Google search for heart intelligence orexplore www.heartmath.org.The Pursuit of Contentment and Happiness by Terry Zick, M.A.(published in the Summer 2011 issue)http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Happiness.aspx (2 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:58:43 AM]
  • 81. The Pursuit of Contentment and HappinessAm I in control of my contentment and my happiness? I am happy to say that research, mental health professionals andmany individuals who study human nature say — absolutely yes! So many books have been written on the topic of happiness— all empowering me to know that there are lots of strategies and viewpoints to help me to be more contented.Studies show that people who have wealth are not necessarily happier, and if they become happy, don’t always stay happy— money itself doesn’t make us happy. Likewise, people with the most education are not necessarily happier. Students whomake high grades aren’t happier than those with low grades. No matter what aspect of life we face, what makes us happy isthe type of thoughts we have. What contributes to happiness is the choice we make with our thoughts. Optimistic people(those with positive outlooks) are happier than pessimists (those with negative outlooks).Many people describe happiness as contentment. Contented people tend to accept things as they are, and have a sense ofmental or emotional satisfaction. Some might call happiness and contentment simply peace of mind. Are we born geneticallywired to be happy or unhappy? To some degree we are born with a predisposition or a possible set point toward happiness orunhappiness. According to some studies, our happiness level depends 50% on our genetics, 10% on circumstances, and40% on our intentional activities. Intentional activities are 1) the intention of how I am going to choose to think and patterns ofthought (cognitive), and 2) how I am going to choose to respond, or act, or spend time “being” (behavioral). These thoughtpatterns for happiness come from a variety of feeling-good strategies including social, spiritual, and physical — in addition tothe cognitive and behavioral.We can change our thoughts and, therefore, our feelings, emotions, and moods. We do this with focused intention, purposeand motivation. The power of intention to direct the course of our thoughts will support us to sit firmly in the driver’s seat ofour life and reap the happiness rewards that we seek.What happens if I get those unhappiness genes? Here’s some good news! I can still be happy! If both my parents were unhappy people and I inheritedgenes toward unhappiness, I can learn new strategies that pump up that 40% of intentional activities. Genes do not rule my happiness quotient because Ican empower my happiness by my choices.I have learned that if I am anxious, sad, angry, scared, or depressed, I can still learn how to be a happier person. The thing about unhappiness is that it foolsus into thinking that we don’t have a choice to feel peace or joy. We always have choices. The transformation toward increased happiness happens becausethe strategies, tools, and skills I can learn will influence my moods. My journey started when I claimed an intention that I will learn how to be happier, and Igathered a lot of the “how to be happier” wisdom...and applied it.So what can you do? Right now. Today. Here’s just three of the many, many tips I would like to share with you:1. I developed an attitude of gratitude. There is always something to be grateful for. It might be gratitude to just get out of bed, or have money for the bus orrent. (For years I have written “Thank you” on every check I write.) It might be appreciation for the smell of roses, or a stranger’s kind word or smile. It mightbe gratitude for a person or event in my life. When I think of all the people who are suffering more, or who have less, I feel so deeply grateful.2. I pay attention to what is happening in my mind and thoughts. This is often called developing self-awareness. When I notice a negative thought thatundoubtedly will affect my mood, I use a strategy to shift or reframe that thought. Police your thoughts so you can get out of the prison that your ownthoughts create. Change your attitude, your perspective, look for the good. The science of neuroplasticity tells us that the brain is pliable, able to change, togrow new cells. Our brain can change its hard wiring for unhappy thoughts and “stinkin’ thinkin’.” Our brain has a kind of default because it just repeats thehttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Happiness.aspx (3 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:58:43 AM]
  • 82. The Pursuit of Contentment and Happinesssame automatic pattern of thinking — until we introduce a different thought and repeat the happy-producing thought. How do we rewire our brain and createnew habits of thinking? Consider a commitment to changing the thoughts, practice meditation or mindfulness, or focus on the breath. When we change ourthoughts, our brain rewires itself, and now we have happier patterns of thinking. Remember the saying, “garbage in, garbage out”? Our brains will help usachieve happier thoughts IF we deliberately feed it thoughts of love, joy, compassion, gratitude, altruism, optimism, etc.3. I seize the moment to be happy. In other words, I don’t wait to get a different something or wait for someone to change, or for life to show up differently inorder to be happy. Happiness is available to you right now. Happiness exists when we develop an awareness that we are OK in our mind, heart, and spirit.We feel happier as we learn to make peace with who we are and where we are. If we keep waiting to be happy for when better days come (better health,better finances, better friends, better home, etc.), we have missed the beauty of the precious moment of available contentment. When we wake up to theidea that we have an always and forever internal resource for happiness, we can feel more peace and joy. Footnote: These strategies are not about denial.These strategies combine acceptance of “what is” with purposeful intention to move in productive, beneficial, and more contented directions.Too many people think they can’t possibly change. Not true. It does take effort, lots of purposeful effort to move from the familiar road of unhappiness to takea side route to a road of happiness (and let it grow to become your new Main Street). Focus and take the steps. Even if they are baby steps, make a change.Do something different that will increase the moments of joy and peace. Develop a strategy of “I can do this.” Tell yourself, “I can be more grateful today. Ican eliminate my typical negative phrases and repeat new empowering phrases. I can seize more moments to connect with my happiness within whethercircumstances change — or not. My brain will help me out and in time it will become easier to feel differently.” I discovered that I always had Main Streetavailable within. I made the changes I talk about. You can too. I believe in you wholeheartedly.Terry has a Master of Arts Degree in Counseling from the University of Colorado-Denver. She has 30 years experience workingwith adults, children and family preservation. She has worked in settings such as: nonprofit, schools, justice system, alcohol/drug problems. Her role as counselor, consultant and trainer maintains a focus on spirituality, health and wellness. Terrycurrently facilitates groups and support individualized mentoring at the Wellness and Recovery Center NorthIf you find this article useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Happiness.aspx (4 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:58:43 AM]
  • 83. Resiliency FactorEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Resiliency FactorHope as Resiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer, MSW(published in the Fall 11 issue)Authoring this section for the Empowerment Magazine has quickly turned into a huge blessing for me. I am delighted to know there are so many ofus dedicated to infusing ourselves and our community with strength and well-being. However, due to a series of sad events that have transpiredsince the last publishing, I find I am struggling to find the right words to say. While my vision for this segment is to be positive and uplifting, I amalso keenly aware that life is hard and sometimes very painful. So I find myself digging deeper in my quest to bring us all a little closer to realizingour own resilient potential.Wikipedia reports Psychological Resilience as the positive capacity of people to cope with stress and adversity. So what precisely is this“positive capacity” that gives us the strength to try one more time when really all we want to do is give up? In my last article I mentioned a numberof factors that contribute to resiliency such as spirituality, adequate support, and the ability to see one’s problems as solvable. And I also talkedabout hope. Hope is the spark that ignites the process of change.In my life, hope came when I saw others overcoming the same obstacles I had been struggling with for so long. I recall the story of a woman who wasmy dear friend some years back. She carried with her an energy that just naturally attracted those who were seeking spiritual strength. She radiatedlove and compassion, and her eyes always twinkled. To know her was to love her. To know her well was to understand her miracle. You see,years before she had pushed a shopping cart around downtown Sacramento, wearing every piece of clothing she owned, and talking to things thatonly she could see.Once she overcame her difficulties she carried with her a powerful gift that cannot be learned through formal education, professional experience,or therapeutic intervention. She had the power of example and with that the gift of hope. The hope is this: “If she can do it, so can I” and “if I can do it,so can you.” Every scary shameful place I had been, she had been; but more importantly, she wasn’t there anymore.This past month has not been an easy one for the people in my life that I care about. We have all been reminded of the pain caused by the loss ofhope. We attended the funerals of two people, both of whom took their own lives. Although I was not especially close to either of them, I was thereto support those they left behind.I have spent the days since then trying to better understand the depth of pain that comes from the loss of hopebecause I know that someone reading this article will be standing on the edge of the cliff trying to decide if it is worth it to even try anymore. If that isyou, please keep reading this article.I have another dear friend who made a very serious suicide attempt some years back after the death of her adult son. She talks about thehopelessness of that moment and about being thoroughly convinced that her family and friends would be better off without her. She was very close tothe edge but then something happened that changed her mind. Let me have her tell you in her own words: “I thought I heard the voice of my son,who had died about ten years before, pleading with me not to take my life. Whether I actually ‘heard’ his voice I cannot say, but I felt hopeflooding through my despair. Instead of dying, I learned how to live with hope as my guiding light. When things get tough, as they do for all of us, Iam able to look at the life I have lived since that day and know that whatever I need to walk through, it is worth it. By living instead of dying I getto experience so much joy that I would have completely missed.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResiliencyFactor.aspx (1 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:58:49 AM]
  • 84. Resiliency FactorI have a close, loving relationship with him today that I would have completely missed. I have come to a place of recovery through hope and faith, andno longer feel the overwhelming depression that had haunted me throughout my life until that moment of complete despair. I no longer live in the painof the past, but in the hope of the future. I realize just how terribly my death by suicide would have affected the people I most love, especiallymy grandson who is now 24 years old and who has been able to see his father through my eyes. I know today that when emotional pain comescalling that I can have faith that it will pass. I know the only way to get through it is to go through it rather than over, under, or around it. Then it isbehind me and I don’t have to meet it again around the corner.Life is challenging, but there is so much good in living each day as it comes, understanding through faith and hope that each challenge is worthmeeting in order to get to the next happiness, which may be only a moment away. To come from such despair to where I am now, embracing therealities of life and knowing nothing is worth dying prematurely for, I can only describe as ‘true freedom.’”As our conversation came to an end, I asked my friend if she was able to turn her life around all by herself. She replied “Absolutely not. I had to reachout for help and then be willing to accept the help that was offered to me. I had reached out for help before but had not been willing to accept whatwas offered. This time I really listened and took the suggestions offered and things got better.”To anyone reading this article, I want to remind you that “hopeless” is just a feeling and feelings are not facts. Feelings pass if given time. Please donot give up before your miracle arrives. Your moment of “true freedom” may be closer that you think. If you are hurting today, please tell someone.As human beings, we are not meant to carry our burdens alone. No matter what the voice in your head says, you do matter, life can get better, andhelp is available."No matter what the voice in your head says, “You do matter, life can get better, and helpis available"■Visit The Samaritans at http://www.metanoia.org/suicide/samaritans.htm & send them an anonymous e-mail■Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (TTY:1-800-799-4TTY)■Teenagers, call Covenant House NineLine, 1-800-999-9999■Look in the front of your phone book for a crisis line■Check www.sacpros.org for more resources such as finding a therapist or other mental heath services■Join a support group or get individual mentor services at the Wellness and Recovery Center - See the “Did You Know Section” of the Fall 2011 issuefor more details (see page 16)Resiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer, M.S.W. (published in the Summer 2011 issue)http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResiliencyFactor.aspx (2 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:58:49 AM]
  • 85. Resiliency FactorTammy Dyer, M.S.W.My life has not ended up where I thought it would...thankfully. I was one of those children who receivedmessages, both verbal and non-verbal, that she was not going to be worth much. And I bought it, for awhile. And then the course of my life changed, and then it changed again, and again. Until I reached aplace where I was able to break free from the lies and fully embrace the realization that I am deservingand able to create a healthy, happy life for myself. This article is written to illuminate one of the mostpowerful principles I have discovered in my wellness process.The universe has brought me a number of amazingly special people as I have navigated down my life’spath. Interestingly enough, these folks have always showed up at just the right time to help me overcomewhatever was blocking my ability to be healthy and whole at that point in my life. One lady in particular,Mrs. V., came along at just one of these times. Mrs. V. was a very spunky, animated, fun-loving 75-year-old Vietnamese woman who came to the United States in 1955 as the bride of an American serviceman.To say she had a fascinating story would be an understatement.I believe the gift I received from her was the infusion of the concept of “resiliency” into my way of thinking.Since early childhood, I have had a place inside of me that has always felt lost. It is the place where mysadness lives. Sometimes that place feels big enough to swallow me whole and sometimes it becomesso small I forget it is there. It is always a place desperate for hope. In Mrs. V I found a woman who wasoverflowing with hopefulness. She seemed to have enough for the both of us and I found myself beingdrawn more and more to her spiritual presence. No matter what came her way, she would declare it to bea cause for celebration. To her, obstacles were seen not as hardship but rather as opportunities forgrowth and spiritual strengthening. That concept was new to me. I mean, I would have a meltdown justtrying to choose a type of breakfast cereal at the grocery store.In May of 2006 Mrs. V allowed me to interview her for one of my Social Work classes.At the end of the interview she shared with me some of her memories from the war. People around her were sick and dying. Families struggled to findenough food to eat. Husbands, sons, and brothers were lost to the war.Her community underwent a complete cultural upheaval as hundreds of thousands of women found themselves suddenly head of their household, needingto find some way to provide for their families. I was amazed at the manner in which she relayed her stories. There was never even a hint of defeat. I did atone point try to move the conversation toward the idea of adversity. Mrs. V simply translated my statement into another example of resilience and continuedto tell her story. Her story was not a story of victimization, but rather of determination. By the end of the interview I was hooked. I wanted what she had.I altered my direction academically and personally to incorporate the concept of resilience into my journey.What I found is that resiliency factors can be divided into several distinctive categories:Personality: Resilience is attributed to certain characteristics aperson carries within their self that contribute to positive healthy outcomes in spite of external chaos. A number of personality characteristics havebeen identified as contributing to resilience, including humor, empathy, and an easy temperament. These personality traits lend themselves to the likeabilityhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResiliencyFactor.aspx (3 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:58:49 AM]
  • 86. Resiliency Factorof a person. A person who is likeable will presumably have more friends and therefore more support. This seems to be of particular importance duringthe adolescent years when peer support becomes developmentally vital, but it also holds true into adulthood.Locus of control: Perception of self and the problem. People who see themselves as having control over their lives tend to be healthier, happier, andmore able to overcome difficulties. Likewise, those who see the problem(s) as being outside of their control tend to become more discouraged,depressed, and less able to take corrective action. People who believe they can create changes in their lives will act in ways congruent to that belief, suchas getting an education, seeking services, or calling on their support system for help. A closely related resiliency factor is determination. Someonewho believes they are able to make changes in their life will be more inclined to override the desire to give up when things seem unbearable.Cognitive abilities and education: A person who has the cognitive ability to think through life’s difficulties and then develop and implement a plan of actionis much more likely to avoid becoming stuck and discouraged. Directly connected to cognitive abilities is education. Being educated either formally throughan institution or therapeutically regarding the nature of one’s presenting problem can be beneficial in acquiring resilience. For many people, formaleducation is seen as the key to upward mobility and the overcoming of personal, cultural, and societal barriers. It provides a sense of empowermentand control over one’s future. Psychosocial education can provide the same benefit in regard to a person taking control of some barrier to success, suchas recovering from an addiction or mental illness.Spirituality and religion. While religion and spirituality are related, they are in fact separate, distinct constructs. Religion is an external, ritualized expressionof spirituality. Religion can be an external protective factor which complements internal spiritual resilience. For some, finding a higher purpose has beena necessary component to their health and well-being. The term higher purpose can be defined as the ways and means whereby a person creates meaningin their life. A person with resiliency will find a way to create meaning out of adversity. In essence, spirituality empowers people to cope with stressorsby transforming negative events into opportunities for personal growth.Culture and Family. A sense of belonging and connectedness can result from having strong family support or a positive cultural identity. Besidesproviding support and structure, feeling connected to one’s family or community brings a sense of responsibility. It is common for a person strugglingwith seemingly overwhelming obstacles to find the determination to continue because to give up would bring sorrow to the people they careabout.Communication. It stands to reason the effectiveness of other resiliency factors such as cognitive abilities, social support, and education woulddepend largely on one’s ability to communicate. Someone who can communicate their needs in a constructive manner is more likely to solicit apositive response from the environment.Conclusion: Resiliency can be summed up as an individual’s ability to negotiate with the environment to get their needs met. Those who have healthy,positive negotiating skills are called resilient; those who do not are referred to as self-destructive. The good news is most resilience factors can be learned.It is common for someone, as part of their wellness journey, to return to school, receive cognitive-behavioral counseling, or join a support group orreligious organization. However, I believe the most powerful ally in obtaining resiliency is the introduction of hope. As the consumer movement begins tocome into full bloom in the mental health field, more people, myself included, are finding the strength to openly identify as persons with significantmental health struggles. In so doing we are able to become a living example of hope. We are able to show that we can and do recover and go on tolive amazingly full, satisfying lives. I am continually amazed at just how far a person can go on just the tiniest bit of hope. Resiliency is a dynamic, fluidprocess that changes over time as a person grows and matures. All people, unless severely disabled, engage in this process. As with otherlifelong processes, resiliency is always a work in progress. With individual willingness and appropriate intervention such as education and support,resilience can be acquired at any stage in life.Tammy received her MSW from CSUS in 2007. She specializes in Mental Health and is committed to the ConsumerMovement. She believes strongly in the Recovery Model and is committed to helping our community overcomemisconceptions that lead to the stigmatization of persons with mental health issues. She is currently employed byConsumers Self Help as their Clinical Director where she enjoys teaching therapeutic classes. She is the proud mother oftwo adult sons. Her passion is photographing blossoms.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResiliencyFactor.aspx (4 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:58:49 AM]
  • 87. Resiliency FactorAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ResiliencyFactor.aspx (5 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:58:49 AM]
  • 88. Advocacy CornerEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Advocay CornerReaching Across Stockton by Ron Risley, M.D.Ron Risley, M.D.Take a walk along Stockton Boulevard. Head south from U Street, and on the right youll pass 2250 Stockton Blvd: theSacramento County Mental Health Treatment Center (affectionately known as SCMHTC). Keep heading south, past the CocaCola bottling plant, and youll reach the UC Davis Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science. Its an attractive but low-keybuilding, also on the west side, nestled between a telephone company switching station and a La Bou fast food restaurant.Now look east across Stockton and behold the monument to modern medicine that is the University of California, Davis MedicalCenter. The sprawling campus has it all: lush lawns, a rose garden, hospital towers, clinic buildings, parking structures, waterfountains, the emergency room. Gurneys, elevators, operating rooms, MRIs. Theres radiology, burn management, and surgeryfor everything from your eyes to your toenails. Theres internal medicine and family practice. You can get care for you liver,kidneys, stomach, intestines, colon, skin, lungs, heart, bones, muscles, nervous system, ears, nose, neck, spine, andreproductive organs. Oncology, neurology, nephrology, urology, pathology, cardiology, pulmonology, surgery, dermatology,ophthalmology, gynecology... it seems theres a clinic and hospital beds for every imaginable medical problem... except mentalhealth. For that, you have to cross Stockton.Psychiatrists are fully trained and licensed medical doctors. They go to the same medical schools as other doctors, take the same medical board exams.Yet, somehow, a year or two after graduating from medical school they pack up their MD degrees and cross Stockton to the mental health ghetto.The gulf between mental health and the rest of medicine might not always be as tangible as Stockton Boulevard, but that gulf is there wherever health careis practiced. Insurance companies offer different benefits, limits, and co-payments for mental health. Where the law prohibits that practice, they often farmout the "mental health benefit" to a different company to manage it in a separate (but equal?) fashion. Imagine if your health insurance required you to usean entirely different set of telephone numbers, forms, utilization reviewers, diagnostic codes, and procedures for a lung problem like asthma than for abroken bone... and heaven help you if you get a rib fracture that affects your breathing!If youre a family physician, an internist, a radiologist, or a dermatologist you might practice in a fancy building with your name, credentials, andspecialty emblazoned on a sign over your door. If youre a psychiatrist, youre more likely to be practicing in a nondescript office suite with discreet parkingand minimal signage. People hide their psychiatric medications and fear that, should they have the misfortune of having to go to the ER for amedical emergency, they will get labeled a "psych case" and wont have their symptoms taken seriously. You might be "a schizophrenic" or "a borderline,"http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/AdvocayCorner.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:58:53 AM]
  • 89. Advocacy Cornerbut youll likely never be called "a colon cancer" or "a multiple sclerosis."So whats wrong with Stockton Boulevard? Is it really so bad to separate mental health from "real" medicine? Yes, it is.The combination of stigmatization and separate (but equal?) Jim Crow funding of mental health care makes it all too easy to single out a group whosepublic face is shunned by society. Use Google to search for "cancer care cuts" and you get about two million hits. Perform the same search for "mentalcare cuts" and the figure climbs to over twenty-five million.The Stockton Boulevards of health care also directly affect the quality of care. Patients with psychiatric illness are usually seen many times by primarycare physicians before being referred to a psychiatrist. Their diagnosis is often delayed because primary care physicians -- who have trained andpracticed east of Stockton -- dont always have ready familiarity with the signs and symptoms of psychiatric disease. They might have a low thresholdfor consulting with or referring to the cardiologist or orthopedist they had lunch with last week, but when they have to refer across Stockton they areconfronted with an unfamiliar system of care and doctors whom they have never met. Psychiatrists often prescribe medications with profound sideeffects such as weight gain, diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Yet most psychiatrists cant easily reach across Stockton to ask aprimary care or specialist colleague how to screen for, identify, and treat those side effects. They often arent able to do much more than say "seeyour primary care doctor." Yet the primary care doctor (if the patient has one) might not be aware of the implications of the medication. Wouldthe consequences of stopping the medication be worse than the consequences of high cholesterol? Those kinds of decisions require aninterdisciplinary approach thats hard to maintain across a busy four-lane street.Diabetes is a particularly telling case: psychiatrists often have greater access to patients, more time and experience communicating with them, and a lotof insight into how the patient perceives their chronic illness and their own role in managing it. The psychiatrist might also have a much better understandingof the role that psychotropic medications play in causing or exacerbating diabetes, and what other options might be available. Yet it is left to the primarycare physician to do blood tests, prescribe medications, and educate a patient who might be seen as difficult or even frightening. Beyond diabetes thereare psychiatric aspects of stroke, pain, substance abuse (particularly nicotine), asthma, heart disease, reproductive health, gastrointestinal illness,infectious disease, cancer, migraine... the list is huge.What can be done? Asking patients to cross Stockton Boulevard whenever they have a symptom or disease that affects both the mind and body willsurely result in more than the occasional traffic accident. We need to move mental health out of the ghetto, re-establish good communication betweenmental health providers and the rest of the medical community, abolish insurance systems that isolate and stigmatize mental health care, and integratemind health into medical school and residency programs (and I dont mean the oh-god-I-have-to-do-a-psych-rotation system currently in place). We haveto reject the Cartesian fallacy that says that mind and body are separate: good medical care means treating the whole person. Its time to abandonthe boulevard.Dr. Risley is the first graduate of the combined residency program in family medicine and psychiatry at UC Davis. Heis a former assistant clinical professor and physician diplomat at UCD. In addition to practicing psychiatry at TCORE,he integrates family medicine and psychiatry at Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc (www.sacmedoasis.com ). He livedfor seven years on Sherman Way, just across the boulevard from UCDMC.If you find this article useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/AdvocayCorner.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:58:53 AM]
  • 90. Art SectionEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Art SectionIn almost every age group, from very young children to older adults, artistic expressions can play a positive role in the therapeuticprocess. Some of the benefits include helping to relax the mind, transform the way the brain is functioning and reduce anxiety.Artistic expressions can also play a significant role in recovery process by helping to improve the emotional and mental health of thosewho have suffered experiences of abuses or other life traumas.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ArtSection.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:58:55 AM]
  • 91. Art SectionWe accept artwork submissions on an ongoing basis.If you are interested in submitting artwork for consideration forthe next issue please feel free to contact usatcontact@empowermentmagazine.orgAbout Melanie MartinezMelanie is an advocate for people with disabilities and homelessness. She holds an AA degree inHuman Services. She is currently a volunteer at the Wellness and Recovery Center facilitating an artexpression group and an assistant co-facilitator in the nutrition support group. She enjoys creatingnutritional meals for friends and family.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ArtSection.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:58:55 AM]
  • 92. Kids CornerEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >KIDS CORNERYour opinion is welcomed, as well as any new ideas or suggestions, that you have for the Kids Corner.Contact us at contact@empowermentmagazine.org or by phone at (916) 222-7541TheTrip to Six Flags Magic Mountain, Los Angeles by Deonna Wilemme, PhDMy Birthday TripHave you ever been to Six Flags? Have you ever seen Tweety Bird and Bugs Bunny? I have! My birthday was on June 9th. My family and I were on our way to Six Flags. Iwas so excited about the trip. It was my first time going to Six Flags Magic Mountain. I was 10 years old, and I had never been to Six Flags. It was also my first time riding onan airplane.The Plane TripWhile on the plane, I played around with my iPod. I was listening to a popular song that had a nice beat. It was my favorite song. My mom was sitting next to me because Iwas scared of the plane ride. My brother, Ted, told me to turn the volume down on my iPod because it was too loud. I told him that the music was loud because I didn’t wantto hear the roar of the engine. I just wanted to get to Six Flags as soon as possible. I was happy that Los Angeles was close to Sacramento.Arriving in Los AngelesThe flight attendant asked, “Did you know that this airplane is the Six Flags Airplane?” I replied, “No!” A few minutes later, I asked, “Is that why Tweety Bird is painted onthe wing?” “Soon we will be in Los Angeles!” Mom yelled. We had family members waiting for us at the airport. After we left the airport, my Aunt Rita drove us to Six Flags.We had to drive 2 miles to get to there. On the way, we dropped our bags off at Uncle Neal’s house.Meeting Bugs BunnyAs soon as we arrived at Six Flags, we went swimming. After swimming, I saw Bugs Bunny. He looked exactly like I imagined. He said, “What’s up, doc?” I replied, “Takea picture with me, Bugs!” Bugs said, “Yeah, doc!” I quickly ran to the door to pay, but Bugs said, “You can have a picture with me for free.”Adventures at Six FlagsFinally, we rode on a ride called Batman. Then we rode the Superman. After the rides, I went with my mom to the souvenir shop and bought T-shirts, cups, and a glasspicture of Bugs Bunny and Tweety Bird. It was getting late; therefore, we went to the concession stand and bought popcorn, funnel cakes, and cotton candy. After takinga picture with Bugs Bunny, riding the best rides, and eating until we were sick, we headed for the hills. That was the best birthday trip I ever had. My next trip is to DisneyWorld in Orlando, Florida.PUZZLE WORLDhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/KidsCorner.aspx (1 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:00 AM]
  • 93. Kids CornerNo Monkey Business by Deonna Wilemme, PhD (published in Summer 2011 Issue)One hot day as I was walking home from school when my aunt called me on my cell phone “Hello”? I said, my aunt says “I will pay you two hundred andfifty dollars to baby sit my friend’s baby, Lewis. He is the best baby in the whole wide world”. I thought about all that money and all the candy I could buy,and besides it could be the start of my new business. “I would love to baby sit baby Lewis”. I said. So my aunt brought baby Lewis over right away andyou know what, he was a monkey! That’s right! Lewis was actually a baby monkey! “I thought Lewis was a baby!” I yelled. “He is,” said my aunt “ababy monkey”. Thinking about all that money and all that candy I could buy, I took Lewis in my care.Lewis was calm until my little brother gave him acandy Bar. After eating the candy bar, he went wild!He was acting like he was in the jungle. He climbedon the table and jumped up and down like he wasbananas! “Don’t do that!” I screamed. “Don’t swingfrom the ceiling fan.That is dangerous!” I yelled at the top of my lungs. Iwas worried about how much cash I would lose if hewas hurt. So I had to think of something quick. I gaveLewis three bananas and put him in my little brother’stoy car. I wanted to throw him out of my house, but Ithought about all that cash. How long will he haveenergy? I don’t know how much more I can take.I decided Lewis, my brother, and I would have aparty. We turned on the radio to D.J. Jam, D.J. Jam,http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/KidsCorner.aspx (2 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:00 AM]
  • 94. Kids Cornerplayed the music while we danced. Lewis was happy.I thought about all the money I was going to make, andI began to dance. It was so much fun. D.J. Jamplayed my favorite song and Lewis danced his tail off.He danced all over the place. My brother and Ichanted, “Go, Lewis! Go, Lewis!”Something went terribly wrong when Lewis went in myroom. He was jumping up and down on my bed. Then,he started screaming. I was just about to catch him byhis little tail when something strange happened. Lewisfell fast asleep just like that. I guess it was naptime forboth of us because I fell asleep right next to him. Lewissnored like a loud elephant and he also slept with hiseyes open. It was so scary. RING! RING! The phonewoke me up. I answered.It was my aunt. “I am on my way, and if Lewis had agood time, the money is yours”, she boasted. Now all Icould think about is my new friend. He is differentfrom my other friends, but that doesn’t matter.Do you want a new friend?Dr. Wilemme is a product of the Stockton and Sacramento School Districts. She worked in the mental health field inthe beginning of her career. She was employed by Turning Point Community Programs and then later wentinto education. She is currently employed by Memphis City Schools. She was a classroom teacher for many years.She now works as an administrator.If you find this article useful, please share with a friend!http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/KidsCorner.aspx (3 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:00 AM]
  • 95. Kids CornerAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/KidsCorner.aspx (4 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:00 AM]
  • 96. Thinking FreshEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Thinking Fresh and Eating CleanThinking Fresh and Eating Clean by Laree Washington (published in the Summer2011 issue)People often say to me, “You’re so small! How do you stay that size?” I credit some of it to goodgenes, but I rely on the foods I eat for upkeep and longevity. The program I am introducing hereare things that I have found to work for myself and information that I have gathered from professionals.Think Fresh, Eat Clean is the idea of eating the freshest foods possible and eating them in a way that givesyou the most energy and nutrients and that keeps the pathways of your body cleansed and flowingnaturally. This is done by reducing the amount of food you eat that contains damaging fats and replacing itwith foods that naturally contain water and healthy fatty acids. This is not an overnight lifestyle makeovermarathon; however, you might see yourself making changes along the way. I will show you how to get themost out of your current diet in a way that fits your life, and your budget.The first step to motivating yourself to eating fresher and cleaner is to know the health benefits of foods.When you know how powerful a piece of fruit or a vegetable is, you will want to eat it more. The next step isknowing what is going into your food. The Future of Food is an excellent documentary to watch. There areso many chemicals in our food, especially processed food, but even in foods from the produce section ofour grocery stores. My goal is to know where my food came from and what has been put on it before itenters my mouth. Since that has been my goal, I have become friends with people who have gardens orfruit trees, and I shop at the farmers’ markets more often (whether indoors or outdoors). I’m not encouraginganyone to shop the organics section! What I am saying is find that small market that sells local farm-freshfood. You’ll find that their prices might be considerably lower than the major grocer.Not only is it what you do or don’t eat, but it’s how and when you eat it that makes the difference. The bestway to start off your day is with energy and vitamins. Fruit is the way to go. I will warn you, fruit will not holdyou over until lunch, so you’ll need snacks. I am a believer in snacks! Where most go wrong with snacks iswhen they buy food that puts their health on a decline instead of eating food that propels their energy andnutrient intake forward. Lunch is a good time to eat a big filling meal. Most people are most active at thepeak of the day, which allows you to burn off your lunch and wind down for the evening. For dinner, keep itsavory and light. Be sure to eat your last meal of the day by 7 p.m. but no later than 8 p.m. to give yourbody time to wind down for a good night’s sleep. If you go to bed late, you’ll most likely get hungry. Eat yourfavorite fruit to keep your digestive system relaxed and clean.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ThinkingFresh.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:04 AM]
  • 97. Thinking FreshLaree WashingtonIt is important to eat at the same time every day. Your body will learn what to expect, and this saves you from going off the deep end — forexample, screeching your tires into the McDonald’s drive-through because you didn’t eat breakfast, you forgot your snacks, you’re eating two hours laterthan usual, and now you’re starving.My personal diet is about 10% carbohydrates, 5% (or less) meat, 5% (or less) dairy, 5% junk, and 75% (or more) fruits and vegetables. Water andpure squeezed juice, not from concentrate, is the best way to go for daily liquid intake. I really like Simply Apple and Simply Lemonade. I am a big teadrinker so sometimes I’ll take fresh herbs and make my own hot tea.I recently sat at a restaurant with a friend and explained my program to her. She said, “I eat cheap, it’s too expensive to eat healthy...” No doubt you mightbe saying the same thing, I said it too, but I took a chance and this is what I found: shopping by recipe is more cost-effective than stashing food for whatyou might make in the future. I started buying small recipe books from the checkout stands. Note: I buy one at a time; I’ll make everything I want out ofthe book before I buy another one. I also write out the ingredients to the meals I already ate to see what I really need to buy. I find that some of thesame ingredients can be used in more than one of my recipes. Now, with 4 produce items I have three or four meal options. A chef friend of mine told methat if my recipe calls for more than 10 ingredients, it is neither time- nor cost-effective. Remember, we’re talking about your everyday diet, not your specialor holiday spreads. As you walk through the grocery aisles, think fresh. Which is more cost-effective to buy, packaged dried herbs for $3 to $5 or freshleaf herbs for less than $1? What is even more fresh and clean is to buy that herb as a small potted plant! When your recipe calls for more expensiveluxury items like a special cheese, you don’t have to sacrifice it. Buying cheese by the slice or buying your items in bulk, according to your need, will saveyou money. This way you also avoid having that food go bad in the fridge because you were only buying for one dish.When I was in college and after, eating fresh was a challenge because I was always on the go. I didn’t have time to cook, and carrying around fresh foodwas too messy. My motto when buying was ”Anything that can go in the microwave...” This time around I find that storage and prep time is the key. I couldnot eat the way I do without ziplock bags and lots of storage containers of all sizes. I didn’t go out and buy five sets of Tupperware, but I use what Ihave. Some of my foods come in sturdy plastic containers with snap-on lids, and the takeout restaurants give their sauces in little containers. I save all ofthem and reuse them. When you come home from the market, take a moment to clean and chop your vegetables or fruit and put them in yourcontainers. When I do this, I can throw together one of my recipes in the same amount of time it would take for some frozen foods to cook in themicrowave. This is especially helpful when I’m on the go; I don’t want a fruit that needs to be peeled, that is messy, that has a lot of seeds, or that needs tobe stored a certain way.Are you thinking fresh yet? Now let’s clean up! Let’s go into your kitchen. Make a list of the foods you eat on a weekly basis. Write down your favoritefoods and your guilty foods. How often do you have these? From this point forward you and I are going to work together to get fresh and eat clean.Anywhere Is a Good Place to StartThere was a time when we ate out a lot, fast food, TV dinners, and takeout. Today my mom jokes that she had given Taco Bell so much of her money thatshe could have owned it by then and she knew that had to change. We tried different things in the beginning like buying whole wheat bread (evenEzekiel bread!), shopping at Wild Oats, buying free range chicken and veggie burgers, then shopping at the farmers’ market. My brother and I learned topay attention to content labels on our food, so we evolved over the years; as we learned we changed.Just Say NoIn the beginning I heard a lot of no’s when we planned our meals or when we went shopping. They went something like, “No, you can’t have _______, butyou can have ______ or _______.” Usually, I wanted pizza or Subway, but my mom had guidelines. We had to choose meals that were within theparameters of healthy choices. Every other weekend we could splurge and have what we wanted or a dessert. One of our favorites was my mom’s “saladwith everything in it but the kitchen sink.” Shopping in the grocery store was another discipline. With our new menu we would shop accordingly. My mom hada system of categorizing our meals. We had options for breakfast, lunch, snack (we were allowed about two for school), and dinner. We weren’t allowed toeat our school snack at home or our dinner options for lunch.Even with all of these guidelines we would try our best to manipulate the system and ask for our snacks right before dinner was ready. My mom wouldjust say, “If you’re hungry, eat fruit, but if you really want those chips, you better get full because that will be your dinner.” Though we heard a lot of no’sduring this time, as 12- and 7-year-olds, we felt empowered because we were included, we were given choices and options. Eating clean is aboutreducing the fat in your foods and increasing your water intake. Foods that have water are those that naturally have water in them. Think, if you were toput this food in the food processor, would there be a natural juice that is extracted? On the other hand, if you were to put a food in a food processor, wouldhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ThinkingFresh.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:04 AM]
  • 98. Thinking Freshit turn into a thick, heavy, or paste-like substance? Eat until you’re satisfied, not until you’re stuffed. Don’t worry! The food that you didn’t eat will still bethere when you get hungry again. I feel that my body doesn’t work as hard to digest food when I eat this way. This method also helps to avoid thecrashing sleepy feeling we get after eating so much. Your body is actually using so much energy to digest your food that it wears you out and makesyou sleepy. This was a starting point for us. As time progresses, you’ll become better at making healthy choices, and thinking fresh and eating cleanwill become a part of your everyday life.Laree was raised in Sacramento, CA. She graduated from Calvary Christian School and went on to receive herBachelor of Art Degree in Fashion Design and Marketing from American Intercontinental University in Los Angeles.She currently works as a behavior instructor at Resources in Autism Education in Torrance, CA and enjoysresearching sustainable living and health and wellnessIf you find this article useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ThinkingFresh.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:04 AM]
  • 99. Recipe SectionEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Phommasone’s Kitchen Mushroom TacosThis is one of my favorite dishes. I like to play around in the kitchen making up new dishes that are nutritious and taste good.The recipe:1-2 packages of sliced button mushrooms1 tsp of sea salt1-2 tsp of black pepper2 tsp garlic powder1 tsp cayenne pepper1-2 tbsp olive oil1 cup of cabbage½ cup red onions1 avocado1 cup of your favorite cheeseSalsaPut mushrooms in a bowl. Add olive oil and above spices. Mixthem together. After mixing, spread the mushrooms on a bakingsheet. Make sure to spread the mushrooms out and then bake at350 degrees for 20 minutes. The mushrooms should still be firm.Heat the corn tortillas in a nonstick pan; cook on both sides.After both sides are warm add cheese until it melts. Remove thetaco shell from the pan. Add cabbage, onions, avocado, and topwith salsa. If you don’t like cabbage you can use lettuce. I prefercabbage because I love the crunch and it has more nutritionalvalue.So for all the health conscious people (or not), you will love my version of tacos. Thesecret to affordable eating and getting more for your bucks is using vegetables and fruitsthat are in season. Better yet, have your own garden or access to a neighbor’s garden;just ask them first.Don’t be afraid to use your favorite spices such as curry, cilantro, barbeque sauce, orchipotle to bring out your culture. Tacos can also be turned into fish tacos by addingtilapia, swordfish, salmon, or shrimp. As Emeril Lagasse would say, “Bam!” Bon appétit,my friendshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/RecipeSection.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:07 AM]
  • 100. Recipe SectionAbout Phommasone Griffith Phom. has been working in the mental health field for more than 12 years. She has a bachelor’s in Social Work fromSacramento State University. She has many hobbies but her favorite pastime is cooking and feeding family and friends healthy delicious meals.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/RecipeSection.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:07 AM]
  • 101. Recipe SectionAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/RecipeSection.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:07 AM]
  • 102. Poetry CornerEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Poetry Corner. Forgiveness by Cynthia Wakefield. You are the only one you have by RavenSong Frisella. The Box You Made For Me by Tammy Dyer, M.S.W.. Not Alone by David KieszAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/PoetryCorner.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:08 AM]
  • 103. Holistic Approaches To HealingEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Holistic Approaches To HealingAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Holistic.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:10 AM]
  • 104. Geriatrics IssuesEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Geriatrics IssuesAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Geriatrics.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:11 AM]
  • 105. ToolkitsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >ToolkitsActivities That Will Help You Feel Good About YourselfMake a list of+++> at least five of your strengths, for example, persistence, courage, friendliness, creativity+++> at least five things you admire about yourself, for example the way you have raised your children, your good relationship with your brother, oryour spirituality+++> 10 ways you can "treat" or reward yourself that dont include food and that dont cost anything, such as walkil in woods, window-shopping,watching children playing on a playground, gazing at a babys face or at a beau ful flower, or chatting with a friend+++> the five greatest achievements in your life so far, like recovering from a serious illness, graduating from high school, or learning to use a computer+++> 10 things you can do to make yourself laugh+++> 10 things you could do to help someone else+++> 10 things that you do that make you feel good about yourselfSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services Website: www.samhsa.govAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Toolkits.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:13 AM]
  • 106. Other ColumnsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >Other Columnshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/OtherColumns.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:14 AM]
  • 107. Other ColumnsAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/OtherColumns.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:14 AM]
  • 108. DID YOU KNOW THAT?EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsInspirational >Happiness >Resiliency >Advocacy >Art >Kids >Thinking Fresh >Recipe >Poetry >Holistic >Geriatrics >Toolkits >Other Columns >Did You Know >DID YOU KNOW THAT?Wellness and Recovery Centerson Marconi Avenue and FranklinBoulevard provide on-going support groups that are free and open to all Sacramento Countyresidents 18+ years of age. Both Centers also offer medication support services referred to them bySacramento County Adult Access. The centers are a supportive place that honor diversity andencourage individuals to reach their highest potential. For more information contact:> Wellness and Recovery Center /North:3815 Marconi Ave Ste # 1 Sacramento, CA 95821PH: 916-485-4175 Fax: 916-485-2673 or>Wellness and Recovery Center /South:7000 Franklin Blvd Ste 110 Sacramento, CA 95823.Ph: 916-394-9195 Fax: 916-392-2827Cindy Tuttle provides spiritual retreats for family members of adults with mental illnessand consumers. These non-denominational retreats provide a time and space to reflect on ourpurpose in life, our holiness, and how love is with us each day. You can contact Cindy atcindytuttle08@comcast.net or visit her website www.cindytuttletheauthor.com”My hope is to offer a peaceful and fun environment where people can experiencetheir own sacredness and share their challenges and how they have overcomethem. My vision is to provide a place where people will walk away with a sense ofhope and realize how precious and holy they are and have some practical spiritualtools to take home with them to create their own spiritual“www.cindytuttletheauthor.comIf you are looking for some help for yourself or someone you know, you can call 2-1-1 24hours aday, seven days a week and be connected to many social services. Assistance is also available inother languages. Cant dial2-1-1? Call (916)498-1000 or800)500-4931 Email: info@211sacramento.orgAbout one in five adults (ages 18 and older) has a diagnosable mental disorder. (National Instituteof Mental Health) www.samhsa.govThe Center for Counseling and Diagnostic Serviceslocated on the campus of California State University,Sacramento provides quality career and Rehabilitation Counseling with a friendly staffand environment. There are approximately 12-14 counseling sessions (50 minutes each) andTHERE IS NO FEE THIS FALL SEMESTER!! FREE. ndividuals with disabilitiesand others can receive vocation testing, career counseling and personal counseling as needed. Forappointment and information, please 916 278– 6252 or visit their website http://edweb.csus.edu/ccds/Wheels to Work provides counselors and Internet enabled computer workstationswhich help people who don’t normally have access to the Internet find transportation and relatedservices aimed at securing employment. For more info, please call or visit the Paratransit MobilityManagement Center. RideQuest: (916) 429-2009 x 7229All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DIDYOUKNOWTHAT.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:16 AM]
  • 109. DID YOU KNOW THAT?EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsDID YOU KNOW THAT?Wellness and Recovery Centerson Marconi Avenue and FranklinBoulevard provide on-going support groups that are free and open to all Sacramento Countyresidents 18+ years of age. Both Centers also offer medication support services referred to them bySacramento County Adult Access. The centers are a supportive place that honor diversity andencourage individuals to reach their highest potential. For more information contact:> Wellness and Recovery Center /North:3815 Marconi Ave Ste # 1 Sacramento, CA 95821PH: 916-485-4175 Fax: 916-485-2673 or>Wellness and Recovery Center /South:7000 Franklin Blvd Ste 110 Sacramento, CA 95823.Ph: 916-394-9195 Fax: 916-392-2827Cindy Tuttle provides spiritual retreats for family members of adults with mental illnessand consumers. These non-denominational retreats provide a time and space to reflect on ourpurpose in life, our holiness, and how love is with us each day. You can contact Cindy atcindytuttle08@comcast.net or visit her website www.cindytuttletheauthor.com”My hope is to offer a peaceful and fun environment where people can experiencetheir own sacredness and share their challenges and how they have overcomethem. My vision is to provide a place where people will walk away with a sense ofhope and realize how precious and holy they are and have some practical spiritualtools to take home with them to create their own spiritual“www.cindytuttletheauthor.comIf you are looking for some help for yourself or someone you know, you can call 2-1-1 24hours aday, seven days a week and be connected to many social services. Assistance is also available inother languages. Cant dial2-1-1? Call (916)498-1000 or800)500-4931 Email: info@211sacramento.orgAbout one in five adults (ages 18 and older) has a diagnosable mental disorder. (National Instituteof Mental Health) www.samhsa.govThe Center for Counseling and Diagnostic Serviceslocated on the campus of California State University,Sacramento provides quality career and Rehabilitation Counseling with a friendly staffand environment. There are approximately 12-14 counseling sessions (50 minutes each) andTHERE IS NO FEE THIS FALL SEMESTER!! FREE. ndividuals with disabilitiesand others can receive vocation testing, career counseling and personal counseling as needed. Forappointment and information, please 916 278– 6252 or visit their website http://edweb.csus.edu/ccds/Wheels to Work provides counselors and Internet enabled computer workstationswhich help people who don’t normally have access to the Internet find transportation and relatedservices aimed at securing employment. For more info, please call or visit the Paratransit MobilityManagement Center. RideQuest: (916) 429-2009 x 7229All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DidYouknowThat.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:18 AM]
  • 110. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.DEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsExclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D (In the Fall 2011 issue)Dr. Risley is the first graduate of the combined residency program in family medicine and psychiatry at UC Davis. He is a former assistant clinicalprofessor and physician diplomat at UCD. In addition to practicing psychiatry at TCORE, he integrates family medicine and psychiatry at SacramentoMedical Oasis, Inc (www.sacmedoasis.com).Introduction to the Interview by Gail Erlandson, M.A.I visited Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc. to interview Ron Risley on a hot afternoon in late July. TheOasis is aptly named. There are bright greens and blues in the comfortably furnished waiting room. The sound of the waterfrom the fountains relaxes you as you wait. Art surrounds you. Sensitive touches also include books for children.The Oasis is the dream of Dr. Risley and several others interested in making a big step toward improving mental health services. Ron Risley isthe first graduate of UC Davis’ acclaimed combined residency training program in family medicine and psychiatry. There are many accolades forRon, but perhaps the most significant are those I’ve heard from his patients.Laura: “Dr. Risley has made psychiatric care available to me. I had been stable with the county and that was why I was eliminated. I went coldturkey off of 250 mg. of Effexor. I could have died. I became hard-core depressed. I get what I need from Dr. Risley.”Robert: “Dr. Risley has been a lifesaver to me. I haven’t had any medical insurance for about 7 years. In 2001, when I was working, 160 lbscame down on my head from a distance of 20 feet. I suffer from chronic pain and multiple injuries. Dr. Risley is the first doctor that actuallylistened to me and examined me thoroughly. He is helping me with the problems I have. He is awesome.”Nora: “Dr. Risley is a special doctor that listens to my concerns and helps me develop a plan of treatment that we mutually agree on. I feelempowered working with him. He is very understanding because he has lived experience.”Carlo: “He’s a doctor I can trust.”Gail: Who are the people who significantly influenced you in your life?Risley: The first person that comes to mind is my godfather. He was an inventor and was really interested in science andtechnology. When I was barely old enough to read, he bought me a subscription to Scientific American magazine. I would look atthe pictures and I would kind of read what it said without really understanding much. It set the stage for some of my interests.He had a garage just full of junk which I always called Joyland. Then growing up I lived across the street from a guy by the name ofBob Herman who designed the first commercial minicomputer. He would give me computer parts and I would fiddle withthem. Eventually I became an engineer. I did a lot of computer design stuff.Gail: That‛s incredible, and now you are a medical doctor, how did you transition?Risley: I really loved the computer stuff, but I got more into the esoteric stuff like cryptography. It is not a field where youcan spend a lot of time talking with other people. So it is kind of a closed world. I ran a consulting firm and spent a lot of timewith machines. I started feeling like I wanted to work more with people. I really wanted to directly affect people‛s lives. Ithought that I could be a farmer or a doctor and the farming sounded like a lot of hard, dangerous work.The really interesting part is that I was sitting in a pizza parlor with a girlfriend and she said, “You know you really seem like youwant to make a change.” I said , “Well, what I would like to do is go to medical school, but I can‛t do that!” and, as I said it, evenbefore she said, “Why not?”, I said, “Why not?” So I did my whole undergraduate program over again. I went to San Diegohttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisley.aspx (1 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:24 AM]
  • 111. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.DCity College. Then I transferred to UCSD and got a degree in literature and writing. I read all the stuff that said once you getinto medical school all you will be doing is science. I found that in doctoring my communication training is more valuable thanorganic chemistry. Knowing how to communicate with patients and other doctors has served me well.I had this vision of medicine as sitting down with someone and talking about what was bothering them, and then coming up with aplan for dealing with it. Instead, I found medical school was a world where you are constantly pressured to see people and to focuson what medicine you are going to give them. The only people who were actually sitting down talking to their patientswere psychiatrists. I really had my focus on primary care medicine. It was what I wanted to do, but I saw that psychiatry wasmuch closer to my vision.Gail: How did the Sacramento Medical Oasis come into being?Risley: This place came into being about this time last year when we all thought we would be out of work. We were wonderingwhere patients were going to go. We thought it would be nice if people on disability income could afford care. We looked intowhether we could accept Medi-Cal, could we get insurance money, could we get grants, was there a way to fund this newconcept? What we found was that the minute you buy into that insurance system, the costs pretty much triple. There isbilling, collections, and a whole bunch of regulatory agencies you have to keep happy. You don‛t have to deal with all of that if youdon‛t take insurance money. What we came up with, after a lot of number crunching, was that we could see people for $79.00a month and treat their psychiatric illness and their general medical illness. We don‛t make a distinction. You don‛t make a“psych” appointment , or a “ medical” appointment. Instead, we treat the whole person.Gail: If you had to say what your philosophy of medicine is, how would you sum it up?Risley: To borrow from a colleague friend of mine , “We meet over the patient‛s suffering,” that is really what it is all about.People don‛t need doctors unless they are suffering, and our job is to address that suffering. Whether the job is to treattheir physical pain, or their psychic pain, or to help them integrate into society better, or to help them heal their bones. It isabout caring for their suffering.Gail: I learned from one of your patients, who highly recommends you, that you manage your own bipolar disorder. Howwould you say the bipolar challenge affects your ability to be a psychiatrist?Risley: I don‛t think my illness has ever really impacted my ability to provide patient care. I think it is important that theworld recognize that psychiatric illness can be managed well. I got my diagnosis in medical school. A lot of people I knowwith bipolardisorder are self-employed so they can have flexibility in their schedule. A lot of it is about perspective. When yougo from a state, say, of being profoundly depressed, to being really up and being hypo-manic, you begin to realize that thesame situation can be perceived on one day as being bone crushingly depressing and on a different day as being anexhilarating challenge. To recognize that has been a real gift. To be able to have some perspective and not to just go throughlife feeling that I am the pawn of forces greater than I am is a true gift.Gail: What do you think about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on the way medicine is practiced?Risley: The pharmaceutical industry currently is the whipping boy because they are the ones making the most money. When a lotof money is involved, you have to be really careful with the amount of influence it has. Many doctors I have talked to say, “Oh well,I know they are big, but that doesn‛t influence my prescribing at all.” I think that‛s dangerous. They do provide some education,but they also have a lot of money and influence and I try to be aware of that.Gail: In your writing you mention the importance of an Interdisciplinary approach to medicine. What does that look like?Risley: An interdisciplinary approach to medicine is one of those things that is a great concept, but really hard toexecute. Medications don‛t make the world a better place. I can give you all the Prozac that‛s made and it is not going to improveyour world. What is going to improve your world is how you approach it and how you think about it. The medication has a real role ifyou are overcome with symptoms and you can‛t do those things you need to make your world a better place. Medication, ifproperly used, controls the symptoms well enough so you can do the work you need to get better. The work might be somethinginternal you do, it might be just having the energy for paying your bills, or it might be getting to a cognitive behavioral therapygroup. It takes all forms, but the medication is a small portion of the care. What we have is a health care delivery system thatsays, “Well you are a doctor, you make way too much money, and the only thing we are going to pay you for is writingthose prescriptions.” Healing takes a lot of effort.Gail: What do you think are some of the important things we need to do as a mental health community to achievebetter quality of care and life for our members?http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisley.aspx (2 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:24 AM]
  • 112. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.DRisley: The number one thing is that we have to get rid of the stigma around mental health. One of the things that I am amusedand really heartened by is that we providers have people who walk in the door and say, “ I am having this muscle ache,” and thenwe start talking, and the real reason they are here is something else. We have been able to break down that barrier at theOasis. Generally speaking, Mental Health services are very separate from the rest of medicine and people in need don‛t know howto access the mental health system. The doctors doing the work don‛t have access to the tools they need to make it easy to makethat happen. So people are stuck, and they are stuck really only because we refuse to acknowledge that psychiatric illness iscardiac illness, it is cancer, it is foot pain, and everything overlaps. I used to think there were clear cut illnesses. But if somebodyhas a broken bone, how did they get that broken bone? What kind of behavior were they engaging in? It may be an insignificantpiece of it, or it may be really significant. But until you ask, you do not know.Gail: Your patients have told me that the Oasis has made psychiatric care very accessible to them. What else do yousee unique about the Oasis?Risley: What isn‛t unique about it? It is a big experiment in a lot of ways. It first struck me when I was atMassage Envy getting a massage. They have a way of reducing the anxiety about getting a massage. I found a lotof parallels with what people experience in accessing psychiatric care to the anxiety that might be provoked around getting massage.I was president of the Psychiatric Society for about twoyears.When I went to look for a doctor, here I was on the inside, about as inside as you could get, and I felt the same anxiety. You endup making a lot of calls. There is a shortage of psychiatrists. It is hard to find someone who is taking new patients. Here I was onthe inside and it was an intimidating, expensive, scary system. Imagine what it must be for someone who has no connections? Myco-conspirator, Sonny Cline, and I have similar backgrounds. We are both trained in primary care as well as psychiatry. At theOasis, we believe strongly that we have something to offer people and people have something to offer us. That is what it is allabout. We have a relationship with the patient, we don‛t have a relationship with the insurance companies.At the Oasis patients are invested in their own care. We try to keep our rates as low as possible, but it is still a significant amountof money. They are buying it, they are the customer. They have certain rights to expect that people with private insurance orthe county system don‛t feel that they have. A consumer will go to the doctor and say “well I really want this,” and the doctorsays, “well, the insurance company isn‛t going to pay me for that, so you are not going to get it.” I often say it is like havingan insurance executive there in the room with you when you are getting an exam. We have people who come to the Oasis withinsurance because they like the one on one, people without insurance come here because they don‛t have a lot of options. I have acouple people who have followed me from the County and say it‛s worth $79 bucks a month to not have to deal with theappointment system and not to have to worry about getting a different doctor every time. Some people think I am really critical ofthe county system, and actually I am not. I have worked in that system since 1997, and I think it is remarkable what they do withthe resources they have, but there is a huge bureaucratic overhead. We are different from the county system, but we can never bea substitute. We just provide an alternative for some.Gail: What do you think the future of psychiatry looks like?Risley: There will be a lot more accessibility to Mental Health Services and our knowledge of the brain will greatly increase. Weknow so much more about the brain than we did 15 or 20 years ago, and it is still nothing. It is a growing field. We used to saythat when people got sick, that they have “fever.” Now we look at fever as a symptom of a larger problem of different illnesses. SoI think the day will come when we look at depression or anxiety or psychosis as symptoms of a broad spectrum of illnesses insteadof taking one treatment modality.Gail: What brings you the greatest joy in practicing medicine?Risley: What brings me the greatest joy is seeing people who have resigned themselves to being sick, turn a corner and experiencea sense of empowerment. To see them make a positive change is never just about their medication. It is never just about gettinga therapist, it is never just about finding a resource like the Wellness Center. But it is a combination of using many opportunitiesand resources. Then one day they wake up and say, “I am a human being, I am a productive person, and I can bring joy to others.”They come here and they tell me that. Then I realize that I have been a part of that transformation. What can you do in lifethat brings more joy than that?If you find this page useful, please share with a friend!http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisley.aspx (3 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:24 AM]
  • 113. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.DAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisley.aspx (4 of 4) [4/21/2013 10:59:24 AM]
  • 114. Lynn Keune, L.M.F.TEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSpecial Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T,Director of LaFamilia Counseling Center (Fall 2011 Issue)Interviewer: Your mission statement states that you work in collaborative partnerships. Pleaseexplain what type of collaborative specific to mental health?Response:Recently our collaborators have been very focused along with the mental health services in trying to reach out to diverse cultures in the community.They asked us to conduct a focus group for Latinos (speaking Spanish only) to ask them what were their needs concerning suicide prevention, and so we hoped to dothat focus group for them, and then we gave that information to them because as you know people that don’t speak the language are fearful to go to larger groups. And sowe approached them. As we said, the reason they are not [going is] because they resist large groups. We have had a program in the past, and the program was to learnabout what works. And we found out that if we have little groups in the gym they will come. And it isn’t because they don’t know, they know and they want to participatebecause they have information, but they are fearful to go to big groups, thinking they won’t understand. So we have had groups with the Spanish-speaking, withHmong-speaking. Those are the two main ones but certainly when we had the Oasis Program we had seven different capabilities of identifying these different groups thatwe could work with. African American was one, LGBT was one. [There were] many different ones we could really focus [on] and find out from them what were their needs.Interviewer: That sounds great. How doyou help people access their strengthsand build on positives?Response: We believe in the same philosophy as the MentalHealth Department or Behavior Health Services in providing family-driven services, and family-driven services really mean that we needto hear the voice of the family and what is it that they need. What is itfrom their perspective, not from us as experts; they are the experts intheir family. They know what has worked in the past and we need tohelp them use those [methods], and maybe they have lost itsomewhere; we can help find it again because the whole purpose isfor us to get fired. We are not there to step in and run their lives, sowe want to hear from them and find out what has worked. Maybe ifthere are some community services that they haven’t been able toutilize, to maybe bring them in to help them to voice what it is theyneed.Interviewer: What are some of thegroups that you have for non-Englishspeaking people that you have notalready mentioned?Response: The mental health department itself. I am an arttherapist myself, one of the many hats that I wear. As an art therapistI know that I can work with many different languages because arttherapy is a universal language, and you can go right past thatexpressive language of the verbal into the expressive language of theheart, so we have groups in Spanish here or Hmong, I mean theyhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LynnKeuneLMFT.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:29 AM]Submit Query
  • 115. Lynn Keune, L.M.F.Tcome in whenever they need it. I just did a grievement group, andthere was a Spanish-speaking dad and he never received grievementservice in Sacramento because there was nothing available. Eventhough my group is for kids, I invited him. Dad was just kind ofstanding around, and I asked, “Would you like to stay?” And he saidhe didn’t think his son would want him to, so I asked the son, “Whatwould you think if Dad stayed?”Son said, “I don’t care”; and Dad stayed. He became honest, he hadto cry, it became real. He said, “There has never been anyone to helpus.” It was pretty awesome to be able to [do] that; even if I only hadthat one person it was great. And in conjunction with my mentalhealth groups we work with the Family Resource Center here. Theyoffer parenting groups, in Spanish and in Hmong, and different coregroups under BFRC offer a variety of services. The center is not justexclusive to mental health; we refer our mental health [clients] to ourwhole program. We actually have a group of parents that contributeto all the various different programs. They meet as an advisorycommittee, and they meet monthly.Interviewer: In what ways do you reduceisolation and hopelessness?Response: I’ll tell you what, for 39, 40 years, however longwe’ve been in business, the original philosophy did not fit all cases.We found out that we need to find out from the families what theyneed and, most of all, go into the communities. If I take you on a tourhere you’re not going to see an office with a couch. We do in-home,school support services; we reach out to them rather than makingthem come to us. That is what we have done the entire time we havehad La Familia. We like to become allies with that family, and weprovide case management services to help them to connect with thecommunity resources. There may be a special group within thecommunity that can help them so that it will get them out of thatisolation.Interviewer: How do you empowerindividuals?Response: Sometimes it is hard because they sometimes havehit the end of their rope and they don’t know what to do. We alwayslike to start from their strengths, and so we identify what strengthsthey have had in the past and then we start to build on those. We findthat little by little as we build on those strengths we can help themrecognize them. That is what really works the very bestInterviewer: I read something interesting about individuals having an opportunity to becomestakeholders. How does this work?Response: The stakeholders are actually the public. They’re the ones who will come to our workgroups when we are doing focus groups to identify what it is in the community that is needed.Sometimes it is providing outreach to many different diverse areas here. Parents are stakeholders aswell because we invite them to be involved with the parents’ advisory committee and any familiesinvolved in mental health programs here are encouraged to participate in that groupInterviewer: Do you have an employment center here? How do you motivate people with mental healthchallenges to transition into wanting to have gainful employment?Response:We do have a One-Stop Career Center here at our family resource center. We do have families that come through here, first of all lookingfor a job, and we find that many of them do have challenges that they are dealing with, and one of them may be a mental health issue. If we really get asense that that is something that affects their ability to find employment, then we work with them to be able to at least help evaluate that this is the case andthat there are additional resources that can help them. We really encourage them to connect with some community resources to address those challenges.Many times they are not going to accept that, so it may take several times of them coming back. I think they kind of get a sense that once they are looking fora job and they go for views and [their problems] affect their ability to conduct a decent interview—they may be rejected over and over again butthey keep coming and coming—and that way we are able to build a relationship with them. Hopefully we are able to encourage theirconfidence and [get them to] accept some of the services. Encouragement is the biggest thing, and also helping them to realize that mentalhealth is not an illness; basically it’s something that can help them to become a better person and to be able to gain employment. Take awaythe stigma of mental health; we use a different format. The cultures that are involved, the ones that are represented— they are not expertmental health therapists or professionals; basically they will direct individuals to the resources and just getting them to that point can be ahttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LynnKeuneLMFT.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:29 AM]
  • 116. Lynn Keune, L.M.F.Tchallenge. And sometimes it is getting the referral to mental health so they can go forwardInterviewer: Your mental health department is like a hidden nugget. How are people referredto your services?Response: They usually call here and we have people here all day long taking those referrals and then sending off to Access[, an Assisted Accessprogram which partners with the county]. They need to be medically eligible children from zero to twenty-one years old. We work with the whole family butthe child has to be zero to twenty-one, and they qualify for services through Access if they have straight medical.Interviewer: And the last question: is there is a strong emphasis on working with the wholefamily? How many families do you serve?Response: We serve about 500 families a year, and that is just in mental health. We would like the community to know that La Familia works withdiverse cultures—many think it’s only Spanish—many diverse cultures here, and that we take pride in standing beside all of them in a partnership forsuccess.About Lynn Keune, L.M.F.TLynn is clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling Center and acts as the liaison to Sacramento County DHHS when working with the County.She is on the cultural Competence Committee at the County and System Wide Committee promoting cultural competence. She has amaster’s degree in Art Therapy and Family Therapy from Notre Dame de Namurs, CA., and a bachelor’s degree from the famous CaliforniaCollege of the Arts in Oakland. She is licensed as a marriage and family therapist (MFT) and art therapist (ATR). Bilingual in Spanish andEnglish.Interview was conducted by Ann Adams for the Empowerment Magazine.Anne is currently working part time as a volunteer receptionist at the Wellness and Recover Center on Marconi Avenue. She has served as aboard member and residential leader for the Sacramento Mutual Housing Association. She has worked for 15 years for law enforcementagencies at the state and county levels and she also has 4 years of working with children with learning disabilities. She is currently pursuingher education in Human Services from ARC with goal of transferring to Bethany University.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LynnKeuneLMFT.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 10:59:29 AM]
  • 117. Doctor Hazem HashemEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSpecial interview with Doctor Hazem Hashem on the importanttriangle between the physician, the patient and their psychiatricmedications. (published in Summer 2011 Issue)Today we will be speaking with Dr. Hazem Hashem on the important triangle between the physician, the patient and theirpsychiatric medications.INTERVIEWER: Often people give up on theirmedications because they lose patience whilewaiting for results, since most people won’tfeel better right away. How long does it takefor most psychiatric medications to get intothe system and start noticeably helping?DR. HASHEM: This is a very important aspect of treatment.Interestingly, a national study was done by the National Institute ofMental Health, called the CATIE. This study dispelled a commonbelief among mental health staff that patients stop taking theirmedications primarily due to side effects. Actually, the studyshowed the number one reason patients stopped taking theirmedication is because they believe the medication is not working.The time in which a medication begins to become effective variesfrom condition to condition and from person to person. In conditionssuch as depression or schizophrenia, one theory is that receptors inthe brain seem to change in patients afflicted with these conditions.The problem can vary from these receptors malfunctioning, to thepresence of too many receptors or too few. In order to heal thesereceptors, the body takes time to repair them effectively. Themedication itself may affect the neurotransmitters immediately, butthat healing process in the body does take time to complete. This iswhere some individuals may become impatienthttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DoctorHazemHashem.aspx (1 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:59:34 AM]
  • 118. Doctor Hazem HashemINTERVIEWER: So the healing time can also vary from person to person?DR. HASHEM: Yes. Two of the main factors are person to person and from condition to condition. In my clinical observation, we generally tellthe patients it takes about four to six weeks in order to see any noticeable effects. In the cases of some new medication such as serotonergics,which include SSRIs for depression, we observed some who saw improvement in three days, some people improved in a week, some people tooktwo weeks, and some people took four weeks. But in general, the cardinal rule is not to give up on the medicine for at least four to six weeks.Now, another factor is the prescribed dosage of a medication. For example, many people are familiar with taking Tylenol. Commonly, most peopletake two Tylenol tablets for the normal headache. If you were to take just one tablet, your headache might not go away and you would believethe medicine doesn’t work. It’s the same thing with psychiatric medication. You can take one Prozac, and you may not get better. Your proper dosemay be two Prozacs, or three, or four. The dosage normally goes up to 80 mg. So a rule of thumb, that is generally not used when medicationsare given up on, is that you should try a medication up to its maximum dosage for up to six to eight weeks before abandoning it. If after this youcontinue to not see results, then a medication can be deemed ineffective. I believe giving up before this, is a little premature. What will helppeople strengthen their faith in a medicine would be to think of their affliction as a cut on a finger. One day of covering it with a band-aid will notcomplete the healing process. Visualizing it like this helps when a condition is not visual like a cut or scrape. Unfortunately, nerve cells in the brainand the body are the slowest tissues to heal.INTERVIEWER: Why do psychiatrists sometimes order lab tests?DR. HASHEM: Lab tests are useful for certain conditions. Some depression, for example, can be caused by low thyroid function. The thyroid is avery important hormone producing gland located in the lower part of the neck. In this case, anti-depressants may be completely ineffective and leadto much frustration during treatment. Sometimes there are no other symptoms that can be observed to determine if a patient’s depression is causedby thyroid dysfunction. After discovering this, it has become standard to perform a test called TSH to check for this condition so we can begineffective treatment. For other medications, such as lithium or Depakote, it has been found that the effectiveness of the drug is based on how muchis actually being absorbed into your system. You need a certain level of the medicine in your blood in order for the medication to be effective. Abovethat level, it may give cause side effects without additional benefit and below that range is ineffective. In the case of lithium, monitoring the level inthe blood is very important. Lithium is excreted in the kidney. If you have a fast kidney, you will need more lithium than someone who has a slowkidney in order to reach the ideal level in the blood. This is why therapeutic treatment sometimes must also be complimented with lab tests tocomplete the treatment process.INTERVIEWER: So as opposed to a specific doesage, one must look at how the medicationis interacting with the individual’s body?DR. HASHEM: Exactly. There is also another realm of lab work we use in order to tell is a medication is doing harm to a patient’s body or is creatingan adverse reaction when mixed with another medication. For example, Depakote, Tegretol or other seizure medications tend to sometimes harmthe liver at a very slow pace. We periodically check liver function and keep track of a patient’s blood count to make sure these harmful effects arenot occurring. Commonly, with new second-generation antipsychotics like Zyprexa, Seroquel and Abilify, , it was found there was a high percentageof patients who developed diabetes and high cholesterol while on these medications. In those cases we will closely monitor weight, BMI, blood sugarand cholesterol.INTERVIEWER: How do psychiatrists help empower people to accomplish theirtreatment goals?http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DoctorHazemHashem.aspx (2 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:59:34 AM]
  • 119. Doctor Hazem HashemDR. HASHEM: In the last few years, Psychiatrists have actually been cornered into just being medication prescribers. But we also my use the shorttime we have to give “cognitive therapeutic hints.” The most empowered patient is a patient who is knowledgeable about their condition. This isthe foundation of empowerment. This is why I always encourage people to research on internet, look up their symptoms and read about theconditions, read about the medications, and read about the different side effects and things like that. In some cases, the doctor may miss to ask theright questions. This can lead to a physician missing important clues to a patient’s condition, inevitably resulting in misdiagnosis. When a patient says“I read about a particular condition and I feel it fit me perfectly.” I am happy to discuss and match their symptoms with the right treatment. Doctorsshould not feel insulted by that. Much to the contrary, it is very helpful for the person to know exactly what symptoms they’re dealing with. So I alsoask people to put every symptom they have on a scale of one to ten before we start treatment and a number after treatment. Each time we readjustthe dose or change a medicine. This way, you’re actually giving the doctor a good picture of whether the medicine has worked or not. If a patient isnot aware of or doesn’t keep track of their symptoms, the medicine may have worked perfectly, but they deem it ineffective because theythemselves were not aware of the changes taking place. So it is very important for both the doctor and the patient to recognize what has beenachieved and what has yet to be achieved.Knowing a patient’s preference is also helpful in the treatment. In some cases a patient might say,”oh, I heard horrible things about Zyprexa,” orProzac or any drug for that matter. If the doctor continues to insist on giving that medication anyway, the patient may be reluctant to take it.Additionally, the patient will most likely give a negative report on the medications effectiveness since they already have a bad impression ofthe medication anyway. So it is very important for the patient to know what they are taking and to be educated on exactly how they are being treatedINTERVIEWER: Medications help people feel better, but do people disempowerthemselves when they give all the credit to medications during the healing process?DR. HASHEM: Absolutely. That’s a very good point, actually. I don’t feel medication by any means is the only reason people get better or worsein certain cases. As we just mentioned, the perception people have about their condition is also paramount. Placebo is a perfect example. I readan article that said drug companies are having big problems with the impact of placebo because the placebo has such a strong impact in thehealing process that placebo success rates often surpassed the success rates of the actual medication. The pharmaceutical company, Merck, triedto create an antidepressant they thought would be highly successful. Ironically, when confronted with the fact that they would be trying a brandnew highly successful antidepressant, when they gave the control group the placebo they felt better strictly by the perception and the newmedication could not be approved. We still don’t fully understand the effect of placebo or the ability of the mind to heal itself, so I would say perceptionby the patient is just as important as the choice of medication.In a large study early on it was found that the group of depressed patients received only cognitive therapy with no medication improved as much asthe patients on medication alone. I recall when Prozac came out it was found to be very helpful to a lot of people the issue of how long to stayon medication came up. In my experience I found that when depression is improved on medication the person actually change their interaction withtheir environment and people around them. This positive interaction feeds back into them positively. If you can copy that positive interactionand cognitive thinking and behavior and continue to do it without the medication you would be able to get off the medication.So somehow you need to learn that you are feeding into the environment that is causing some of the problems you are experiencing. Your role inthe environment is very important. In my experience, this method applies with disorders like depression and anxiety. Bipolar and schizophrenia onthe other hand, are purely biological conditions. In these situations in particular, the mind over matter approach would not be the preferred methodand would probably have little effectiveness. There is no doubt about it; I always encourage people to take steps in the way of cognitive functionwhich will eventually take place of the antidepressant or anti-anxiety.INTERVIEWER: So reinforcement of other strategies - cognitive behavioral,physical, spiritual, etc. – is very important in the treatment process?DR. HASHEM: Definitely. But in medicine we learnt not to say always or never. So in many of the cases of depression or anxiety, the cognitivehttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DoctorHazemHashem.aspx (3 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:59:34 AM]
  • 120. Doctor Hazem Hashemand behavioral and the spiritual aspects of treatment are as powerful as or more powerful than the medication itself. This also has no sideeffects, obviously, because medication has side effects that you don’t want. Sometimes in the absence of this cognitive approach, no antidepressantcan seem to work.INTERVIEWER: What can people do to take more personal responsibility for their health?DR. HASHEM: Complete awareness of your condition and treatment, in addition, a basic knowledge of what constitutes a healthy person. I actuallylike the spiritual aspect of thinking. The spiritual aspect of life gives us kind of reassurance, some degree of faith that takes away the sense ofthe depression. When you always feel that there is a higher power, you always feel that there is a hope and there is a reason. I think, spirituality also,in all religion and all philosophies, encourages you to be healthy. All the exercises in all the religions are meant to keep you healthy. A healthy bodyhas a healthy mind and so forth. So to take more responsibility for your health is by being educated about health and being aware of whatproduces negative results in your body and your mind.INTERVIEWER: And, last but not least, is psychiatry a science or an art or both?DR. HASHEM: Well, I think psychiatry is primarily a science, and I would say it’s art that uses science. There are a lot of things that take this form,like computer graphics for example. It’s art that’s using the science. The reason is we are not going to use any medication without a scientificexperiment or testing that proves beyond doubt that this medicine is really effective in this group of people. Unfortunately, to do that, they have topick patients who have only mostly pure, single conditions and change the environment so it will be very specific to this condition and use thismedication in that context and prove that his medicine works for this condition. On the other hand, humans are not created based on a textbook. Goddid not open the DSM to put the specific criteria in different people. All patients are a mix of different things. Nothing is exactly the same as thetextbook. Nobody has one pure condition, or two or three, with all the other factors that get involved in that. So I would say that the science is actuallythe proof that each single medicine clearly has a function. The art is mixing all this together; matching medication together with people andconditions. This perfect balance cannot be taught and must be acquired through experience, observations, involvement, notions and feelings. ThatI believe is the definition of art.INTERVIEWER: So it keeps it interesting.DR. HASHEM: Yes, yes.INTERVIEWER: Well, I think that’s it. Thank you, Dr. Hashem.DR. HASHEM: Thank you.Dr. Hazem Hashem is the medical director of Visions Unlimited and Wellness and Recovery Center North.He is also Chief Psychiatrist/Chief of mental health at Solano State Prison, and Board Certified ingeneral psychiatry and Forensic Psychiatrist.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DoctorHazemHashem.aspx (4 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:59:34 AM]
  • 121. Doctor Hazem HashemAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DoctorHazemHashem.aspx (5 of 5) [4/21/2013 10:59:34 AM]
  • 122. Press Release 06.30.11EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Press Release 06.30.11Sacramento’s First Mental Health Magazine (Empowerment) has LaunchedThe first issue of the "the Empowerment Magazine" is now available online and at over 500 locations in the Sacramento Region.The Empowerment Magazine is the first print and online magazine to focus exclusively on promoting overall wellness and mental health resiliency forthe Sacramento region.The first issue features articles on pursuing contentment and happiness, the resiliency factor, working with your psychiatrist, thinking fresh and eatingclean and a kid’s corner. Also, included is a special interview with Doctor Hazem Hashem on the important triangle between the physician, the patientand their psychiatric medications.“We were lacking a publication in Greater Sacramento that promotes uplifting voices in the mental health community and we found this inexcusable,”said Amede Kyubwa, founder of the Empowerment Magazine and sacpros.org. The magazine aims at creating a new and positive image for people withlived experience of mental health challenges, “and also helps to eliminate some of the prevailing stereotypes about mental illness,” added Kyubwa“The magazine empowers individuals with direct or indirect experience of living with or overcoming mental heath issues to talk about theirpositive experiences; something they normally do not get to do in a public way,” said Marilyn Washington, Sacpros Community Network Director.25,000 copies of the Empowerment Magazine are being distributed all over the Sacramento Region in a variety of agencies, venues and retail stores.The magazine can also be read anytime online at http://www.sacpros.org. The free quarterly magazine is published by Sacpros.org. The magazine’snext issue is due in September 2011About Empowerment Magazine:The Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly Mental Health Magazine promoting overall wellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento.It is publishedby SACPROS http://www.sacpros.org, a leading Mental Health Resource Guide strengthening individuals, families and community with easilyaccessible information about available services in Greater Sacramento area.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/PR063011.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:36 AM]
  • 123. Press Release 03.21.11EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Press Release 03.21.11Mental Health Magazine "The Empowerment" to Launch in SacramentoMental Health Magazine aimed at promoting overall wellness and resiliency for the Greater SacramentoSacramento CA. March 21, 2011. SACPROS.ORG is preparing to launch a mental health magazine for the Greater Sacramento called "TheEmpowerment", which will publish information on many topics relating to the mental health community. Articles of interest will include information onsymptom management, alternative strategies, current approaches taught in the greater Sacramento area, health and wellness perspectives and manyother topics.According to SACPROS Network Director, Marilyn Washington "the magazine will create a new and positive image for people with mental healthissues working towards their recovery and hopefully help eliminate some of the prevailing stereotypes about mental illness". It will provide the ability forpeople with mental illnesses to express their opinions on all areas of their wellness and recovery, something they normally do not get to do in a publicway. "SACPROS wants The Empowerment to be an uplifting voice in mental health community", said Ms. Washington."The mental health community is larger than those who are already in the mental health system and who are highly challenged. It also includes alarger population of people who are currently in mainstream society, but who are struggling in their jobs or relationships, dealing with losses, or whoare working through addiction issues. The mental health community might also include our friends, family, neighbors and coworkers who have neversought out support services", said Terry Zick, Wellness Editor of The Empowerment. The official launch is scheduled for June 2011."Were very excited,"she said," about the launch of this magazine".The magazine will have an initial print run of 25,000 copies that will be distributed for FREE every quarter to schools, colleges, bus stops, coffee shops,local hospitals, mental health agencies, grocery stores, room and board homes, boarding care homes and police stations. In 6 to 9 months, SACPROShopes to increase the copies to 54,000.The Empowerment will also enable counselors, therapists, clinical Social workers, clinical Psychologists, mental health prevention specialists,educators, nurses, physicians & psychiatrists, hospitals and treatment centers and other behavioral healthcare professionals to promote their vitalprograms and services to the mental health community. The deadline for placing ads in magazine for the Summer 2011 issue is May 15th, 2011.About Sacproswww.sacpros.org Sacramento Personalized Recovery Oriented Services (SACPROS) is a leading Mental Health Resource Guide strengtheningindividuals, families and community with easily accessible information about available services in Greater Sacramento area. For more informationabout placing adds in magazine or if you have something to shout about, contact Marilyn Washington at (916) 222 - 7541 or send an e-mail atinfo@sacpros.org. website: www.sacpros.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/PR032111.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:38 AM]
  • 124. Press Release 03.21.11All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/PR032111.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:38 AM]
  • 125. Other UpdatesEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Other UpdatesAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/OtherUpdates.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:39 AM]
  • 126. Follow us on FacebookEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Follow us on FacebookAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Facebook.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:40 AM]
  • 127. Follow us on TwitterEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Follow us on TwitterAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Twitter.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:42 AM]
  • 128. Follow us on YouTubeEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Follow us on YouTubeAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/YouTube.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:43 AM]
  • 129. Follow Us On LinkedinEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Follow Us On Linkedinhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/linkedin.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:45 AM]
  • 130. Follow Us On LinkedinAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/linkedin.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:45 AM]
  • 131. Fall 2011 Issue Out NowEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >Empowerment Magazine Fall 2011 Issue is Out NowEmpowerment Magazine second issue is now available online at http://www.empowermentmagazine.org and in print at over 500 locationsin the Sacramento Region.Empowerment Magazine second issue features an exclusive interview with Dr Ron Risley, former assistant clinical professor of UCDavis and founder of Sacramento Medical Oasis and a special interview with Keune, LMFT, Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling Center.It also contains several articles including, Living in the Present by Terry Zick,M.A; New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxiety for Children byCindy Thygeson, M.D. Director of Medical Affairs at Sutter Center forPsychiatry; Being Loved by Melanie Martinez; Sam’s Club Offers SimpleSteps to a Healthy Body and Mind by Dr. Andrew Myers, naturopathicphysician and an expert in nutrition and preventative health; Medication orMeditation by Thomas Hushen, Service Coordinator - HRC; People With ADisability Can Get A Ticket To Work by Rosario M. Ramirez, SocialSecurity Public Affairs Specialist for the Northern Area; Hope as Resiliency Factorby Tammy Dyer, MSW;Not Alone by David Kiesz; Wellness Toolkit byTerry Zick; The Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain by DeonnaWilemme, PhD; and Mushroom Tacos by Phommasone Griffin.According to Amede Kyubwa, the founder of Empowerment Magazine, “the fall issue alsohas a number of useful resources such as 211 Sacramento, CSUS Free CounselingServices phone number, Wheels to Work phone number, local emergency shelters phonenumbers, 24 Hours Crisis Lines, Medi-Cal Information, suicide Prevention crisis lines,psychiatric emergency phone numbers, Sacramento Emergency Room Services phonenumbers; and Reporting Child Abuse/Neglect or Adult Abuse/Neglect”The free quarterly magazine is published by Sacpros.org, a leading Mental HealthResource Guide dedicated to strengthening individuals, families and community witheasily accessible information about available services in Greater Sacramento area.Empowerment Magazine’s next issue is due in December 2011.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Fall2011IssueOutNow.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:48 AM]
  • 132. Fall 2011 Issue Out NowAbout Empowerment MagazineIt is a quarterly free online and print magazine dedicated to promoting overall wellness and mental health resiliency for theGreater Sacramento. Further information about the magazine can easily be obtained by visiting http://www.empowermentmagazine.orgor sending e-mail to contact@empowermentmagazine.org or calling Marilyn Washington at (916) 222-7541If you find this useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Fall2011IssueOutNow.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:48 AM]
  • 133. LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPR 06.30.11 >PR.03.21.11 >Other Updates >On Facebook >On Twitter >On YouTube >On Linkedin >Fall 2011 Issue Out Now >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWE >LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEEmpowerment Magazine invites you to list your event with us, it’s totally free!Events will appear on our websites and in print, blasting your event to 25,000 print magazines and postedto www.sacpros.org;your local leading Mental Health Resource Guidestrengthening individuals, families and community with easily accessible informationabout available services in Greater Sacramento area. Online postings with a website will be givena hotlink to your webpage. Submissions must be received 15 days prior to the issue date of magazine for inclusionin print. To view our current publication calendar, please click here.For additional information or advertising opportunities please contact us at 916 - 222 - 7541or e-mail usat contact@empowermentmagazine.org or please complete the form below:* First name (required):* Last name (required):* E-mail address (required):Phone number:* Message (required):http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LISTYOUREVENT.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:51 AM]Submit
  • 134. LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LISTYOUREVENT.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:51 AM]
  • 135. Site MapEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSite Map >Member Login >PrivacyPolicy >Forms >Site MapThis is a list of all the Web pages on this site.sitemap[1].xmlDistributions Not Alone by David KieszResource Page linked to SACPROS.ORG, a Comprehensive Mental Health Resource Guide forSacramento2011 Winter ContactA Risk Worth Taking for Change by Janet Segall Advertising and Sponsorship OpportunitiesAdvocacy Corner AnnouncementsArt Section Articles Being ReviewedBeing Loved by Melanie Martinez CalendarComing in the Next Issue Contact UsContributors - Empowerment Magazine Current IssueDID YOU KNOW THAT? Doctor Hazem HashemDr. Andrew Myers EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEExclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D.Fall 2011 Issue Fall 2011 Issue Out NowFollow us on Facebook Follow Us On LinkedinFollow us on Twitter Follow us on YouTubeForms Geriatrics IssuesHolistic Approaches To Healing Hope as Resiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer. M.S.W.Immigration Resources Inspirational StoriesInterviews Kids CornerLatest Issue LIST YOUR EVENT IN EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINELiving in the Present by Terry Zick, M.A. Living My Life with a Mental Illness by Janet L. FuriaLynn Keune, L.M.F.T Magazine SectionsMedication or Meditation? by Thomas Hushen, Service Coordinator - HRC New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxiety for Children by Cindy Thygeson, M.D. Director of MediNote to Contributors Other Columnshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/sitemap.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:53 AM]
  • 136. Site MapOther Updates People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket To Work by Rosario M.Phommasones Kitchen, Recipe for Mushroom Tacos PhotosPoetry Corner Press Release 03.21.11Press Release 06.30.11 Privacy PolicyRead the Magazine Online Recipe SectionResiliency Factor Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T, Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling CenterSpiritual Retreats in Mental Health Programs by Cindy Tuttle Submit an ArticleSummer 2011 Issue Summer 2012 Cover DraftThe Box You Made For Me by Tammy Dyer, M.S.W. The Pursuit of Contentment and HappinessThe Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain by Deonna Wilemme, PhD Thinking FreshToolkits Tough Times by Cynthia WakefieldVideos Wellness Toolkit by Terry Zick, M.A.WINTER 2011 Winter 2011 IssueWINTER 2011 SUBMISSION CONTRACT Working with Your Psychiatrist by Gail Erlandson, M.A.You are The Only One You Have Zumba FitnessAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/sitemap.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 10:59:53 AM]
  • 137. Privacy PolicyEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSite Map >Member Login >PrivacyPolicy >Forms >Privacy PolicyEmpowermentMagasine.org is committed to respecting and protecting the privacy of those who use this website . We do not collect data that identifiesyou, as a user of this website.However, EmpowermentMagasine.org works with carefully chosen third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit our Web site.These companies may use information (not including your name, address, email address or telephone number) about your visits to this and other Web sitesin order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you.The DoubleClick DART cookie is used by Google in ads served on this site and other websites displaying AdSense ads. When users visit anAdSense publishers website and either view or click on an ad, a cookie may be dropped on that end users browser. The data gathered from thesecookies will be used to help AdSense publishers better serve and manage the ads on their site(s) and across the web. Users may opt out of the use ofthe DART cookie by visiting the Google ad and content network privacy policy.Some of our pages contain links to other sites that may have information practices different from ours. EmpowermentMagasine.org has no controlover information that is submitted to, or collected by, these third parties. You should consult the privacy notices of any site you choose to visit.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/PrivacyPolicy.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:55 AM]Submit Query
  • 138. FormsEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSite Map >Member Login >PrivacyPolicy >Forms >Download Submission AgreementPlease click to either link below to open the contract as Word document or Adobe Acrobat pdf. Save the document to your local computer and eitherprint the contract or complete the contract using Microsoft Word and email it back as soon as possible an attachmentto contact@empowermentmagazine.org●Fall 2011- Submission Agreement - PDF●Fall 2011- Submission Agreement- Microsoft Word DocFailure to return the form by Monday September 12, 2011 will result in a delay in publication of your article.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Forms.aspx [4/21/2013 10:59:57 AM]
  • 139. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D.EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsExclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D.conducted by Gail Erlandson, MAI visited Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc. to interview Dr . Ron Risley on a hot afternoon in late July. TheOasis is aptly named. There are bright greens and blues inthe comfortably furnished waiting room. The sound of the water from the fountains relaxes you as you wait. Art surrounds you. Sensitive touches also include booksfor children. The Oasis is the dream of Dr. Risley and several others interested in making a big step toward improving mental health services. Ron Risley is the firstgraduate of UC Davis’ acclaimed combined residency training program in family medicine and psychiatry. There are many accolades for Ron, but perhaps the mostsignificant are those I’ve heard from his patients.Ron Risley, M.DLaura: “Dr. Risley has made psychiatric care available to me. I had been stable with the County and that was why I waseliminated. I went cold turkey off of 250 mg. of Effexor. I could have died. I became hard-core depressed. I get what I needfrom Dr. Risley.”Robert: “Dr. Risley has been a lifesaver to me. I haven’t had any medical insurance for about 7 years. In 2001, when I wasworking, 160 lbs came down on my head from a distance of 20 feet. I suffer from chronic pain and multiple injuries. Dr. Risleyis the first doctor that actually listened to me and examined me thoroughly. He is helping me with the problems I have. He isawesome.”Nora: “Dr. Risley is a special doctor that listens to my concerns and helps me develop a plan of treatment that we mutuallyagree on. I feel empowered working with him. He is very understanding because he has lived experience.”Carlo: “He’s a doctor I can trust.”Gail: Who are the people who significantly influenced you in your life?Risley: The first person that comes to mind is my godfather. He was an inventor and was really interested in science andtechnology. When I was barely old enough to read, he bought me a subscription to Scientific American magazine. I would look atthe pictures and I would kind of read what it said without really understanding much. It set the stage for some of my interests.He had a garage just full of junk which I always called Joyland. Then growing up I lived across the street from a guy by the name ofBob Herman who designed the first commercial minicomputer. He would give me computer parts and I would fiddle withthem. Eventually I became an engineer. I did a lot of computer design stuff.Gail: That‛s incredible, and now you are a medical doctor, how did you transition?Risley: I really loved the computer stuff, but I got more into the esoteric stuff like cryptography. It is not a field where youcan spend a lot of time talking with other people. So it is kind of a closed world. I ran a consulting firm and spent a lot of timewith machines. I started feeling like I wanted to work more with people. I really wanted to directly affect people‛s lives. Ithought that I could be a farmer or a doctor and the farming sounded like a lot of hard, dangerous work.The really interesting part is that I was sitting in a pizza parlor with a girlfriend and she said, “You know you really seem like youwant to make a change.” I said , “Well, what I would like to do is go to medical school, but I can‛t do that!” and, as I said it, evenbefore she said, “Why not?”, I said, “Why not?” So I did my whole undergraduate program over again. I went to San DiegoCity College. Then I transferred to UCSD and got a degree in literature and writing. I read all the stuff that said once you getinto medical school all you will be doing is science. I found that in doctoring my communication training is more valuable thanhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisleyFall2011.aspx (1 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:03 AM]
  • 140. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D.organic chemistry. Knowing how to communicate with patients and other doctors has served me well. I had this vision of medicineas sitting down with someone and talking about what was bothering them, and then coming up with a plan for dealing with it. Instead,I found medical school was a world where you are constantly pressured to see people and to focus on what medicine you are going togive them. The only people who were actually sitting down talking to their patients were psychiatrists. I really had my focus onprimary care medicine. It was what I wanted to do, but I saw that psychiatry was much closer to my vision.Gail: How did the Sacramento Medical Oasis come into being?Risley: This place came into being about this time last year when we all thought we would be out of work. We were wonderingwhere patients were going to go. We thought it would be nice if people on disability income could afford care. We looked intowhether we could accept Medi-Cal, could we get insurance money, could we get grants, was there a way to fund this newconcept? What we found was that the minute you buy into that insurance system, the costs pretty much triple. There isbilling, collections, and a whole bunch of regulatory agencies you have to keep happy. You don‛t have to deal with all of that if youdon‛t take insurance money. What we came up with, after a lot of number crunching, was that we could see people for $79.00 amonth and treat their psychiatric illness and their general medical illness. We don‛t make a distinction. You don‛t make a“psych” appointment , or a “ medical” appointment. Instead, we treat the whole person.Gail: If you had to say what your philosophy of medicine is, how would you sum it up?Risley: To borrow from a colleague friend of mine , “We meet over the patient‛s suffering,” that is really what it is all about.People don‛t need doctors unless they are suffering, and our job is to address that suffering. Whether the job is to treattheir physical pain, or their psychic pain, or to help them integrate into society better, or to help them heal their bones. It isabout caring for their suffering.Gail: I learned from one of your patients, who highly recommends you, that you manage your own bipolar disorder. Howwould you say the bipolar challenge affects your ability to be a psychiatrist?Risley: I don‛t think my illness has ever really impacted my ability to provide patient care. I think it is important that theworld recognize that psychiatric illness can be managed well. I got my diagnosis in medical school. A lot of people I knowwith bipolardisorder are self-employed so they can have flexibility in their schedule. A lot of it is about perspective. When yougo from a state, say, of being profoundly depressed, to being really up and being hypo-manic, you begin to realize that thesame situation can be perceived on one day as being bone crushingly depressing and on a different day as being anexhilarating challenge. To recognize that has been a real gift. To be able to have some perspective and not to just go throughlife feeling that I am the pawn of forces greater than I am is a true gift.Gail: What do you think about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on the way medicine is practiced?Risley: The pharmaceutical industry currently is the whipping boy because they are the ones making the most money. When a lotof money is involved, you have to be really careful with the amount of influence it has. Many doctors I have talked to say, “Oh well,I know they are big, but that doesn‛t influence my prescribing at all.” I think that‛s dangerous. They do provide some education,but they also have a lot of money and influence and I try to be aware of that.Gail: In your writing you mention the importance of an Interdisciplinary approach to medicine. What does that look like?Risley: An interdisciplinary approach to medicine is one of those things that is a great concept, but really hard toexecute. Medications don‛t make the world a better place. I can give you all the Prozac that‛s made and it is not going to improveyour world. What is going to improve your world is how you approach it and how you think about it. The medication has a real role ifyou are overcome with symptoms and you can‛t do those things you need to make your world a better place. Medication, ifproperly used, controls the symptoms well enough so you can do the work you need to get better. The work might be somethinginternal you do, it might be just having the energy for paying your bills, or it might be getting to a cognitive behavioral therapygroup. It takes all forms, but the medication is a small portion of the care. What we have is a health care delivery system thatsays, “Well you are a doctor, you make way too much money, and the only thing we are going to pay you for is writingthose prescriptions.” Healing takes a lot of effort.Gail: What do you think are some of the important things we need to do as a mental health community to achievebetter quality of care and life for our members?Risley: The number one thing is that we have to get rid of the stigma around mental health. One of the things that I am amusedand really heartened by is that we providers have people who walk in the door and say, “ I am having this muscle ache,” and thenwe start talking, and the real reason they are here is something else. We have been able to break down that barrier at theOasis. Generally speaking, Mental Health services are very separate from the rest of medicine and people in need don‛t know howto access the mental health system. The doctors doing the work don‛t have access to the tools they need to make it easy to makethat happen. So people are stuck, and they are stuck really only because we refuse to acknowledge that psychiatric illness ishttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisleyFall2011.aspx (2 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:03 AM]
  • 141. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D.cardiac illness, it is cancer, it is foot pain, and everything overlaps. I used to think there were clear cut illnesses. But if somebodyhas a broken bone, how did they get that broken bone? What kind of behavior were they engaging in? It may be an insignificantpiece of it, or it may be really significant. But until you ask, you do not know.Gail: Your patients have told me that the Oasis has made psychiatric care very accessible to them. What else do yousee unique about the Oasis?Risley: What isn‛t unique about it? It is a big experiment in a lot of ways. It first struck me when I was atMassage Envy getting a massage. They have a way of reducing the anxiety about getting a massage. I found a lotof parallels with what people experience in accessing psychiatric care to the anxiety that might be provoked around getting massage.I was president of the Psychiatric Society for about twoyears.When I went to look for a doctor, here I was on the inside, about as inside as you could get, and I felt the same anxiety. You endup making a lot of calls. There is a shortage of psychiatrists. It is hard to find someone who is taking new patients. Here I was onthe inside and it was an intimidating, expensive, scary system. Imagine what it must be for someone who has no connections? Myco-conspirator, Sonny Cline, and I have similar backgrounds. We are both trained in primary care as well as psychiatry. At theOasis, we believe strongly that we have something to offer people and people have something to offer us. That is what it is allabout. We have a relationship with the patient, we don‛t have a relationship with the insurance companies.At the Oasis patients are invested in their own care. We try to keep our rates as low as possible, but it is still a significant amountof money. They are buying it, they are the customer. They have certain rights to expect that people with private insurance orthe county system don‛t feel that they have. A consumer will go to the doctor and say “well I really want this,” and the doctorsays, “well, the insurance company isn‛t going to pay me for that, so you are not going to get it.” I often say it is like havingan insurance executive there in the room with you when you are getting an exam. We have people who come to the Oasis withinsurance because they like the one on one, people without insurance come here because they don‛t have a lot of options. I have acouple people who have followed me from the County and say it‛s worth $79 bucks a month to not have to deal with theappointment system and not to have to worry about getting a different doctor every time. Some people think I am really critical ofthe county system, and actually I am not. I have worked in that system since 1997, and I think it is remarkable what they do withthe resources they have, but there is a huge bureaucratic overhead. We are different from the county system, but we can never bea substitute. We just provide an alternative for some.Gail: What do you think the future of psychiatry looks like?Risley: There will be a lot more accessibility to Mental Health Services and our knowledge of the brain will greatly increase. Weknow so much more about the brain than we did 15 or 20 years ago, and it is still nothing. It is a growing field. We used to saythat when people got sick, that they have “fever.” Now we look at fever as a symptom of a larger problem of different illnesses. SoI think the day will come when we look at depression or anxiety or psychosis as symptoms of a broad spectrum of illnesses insteadof taking one treatment modality.Gail: What brings you the greatest joy in practicing medicine?Risley: What brings me the greatest joy is seeing people who have resigned themselves to being sick, turn a corner and experiencea sense of empowerment. To see them make a positive change is never just about their medication. It is never just about gettinga therapist, it is never just about finding a resource like the Wellness Center. But it is a combination of using many opportunitiesand resources. Then one day they wake up and say, “I am a human being, I am a productive person, and I can bring joy to others.”They come here and they tell me that. Then I realize that I have been a part of that transformation. What can you do in lifethat brings more joy than that?Dr. Risley is the first graduate of the combined residency program in family medicine and psychiatry at UC Davis. He isa former assistant clinical professor and physician diplomat at UCD. In addition to practicing psychiatry at TCORE,he integrates family medicine and psychiatry at Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc (www.sacmedoasis.com).Interview conducted by Gail Erlandson, MA.Gail has a Master of Arts Degree in Pastoral Ministry from the University of San Francisco and a Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Portlandin Interdisciplinary Studies. Gail taught at Loretto High School for eleven years and has served on staff at Loaves and Fishes. Gail is a mentor at theWellness and Recovery Center North.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisleyFall2011.aspx (3 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:03 AM]
  • 142. Exclusive Interview with Ron Risley, M.D.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DrRonRisleyFall2011.aspx (4 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:03 AM]
  • 143. New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxiety for Children by Cindy Thygeson, M.D. Director of MediEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsNew School Year Brings an Increase in Anxietyfor Childrenby Cindy Thygeson, M.D. Director of Medical Affairs at Sutter Center for PsychiatryAs summer comes to an end and children head back to school for the fall, anxiety levels are on the rise. At Sutter Center for Psychiatry, we see adramatic increase in cases exacerbated by anxiety and stress as school returns to session.Transitional times like these tend to be very difficult for children as they face new fears and stress. All of a sudden children have pressures to perform academically andadjust to social, parental and teacher expectations that are not necessarily present during the summer months.To help ease the shock of these pressures, consider these practical strategies to make the most of the transition period with the start of the new school year. Anticipatingand planning is the best way to address anxiety to the benefit of both parents and children. Recognize and use cues that school is around the corner – including back-to-school shopping and an increased focus on academic activities such as reading to help prepare your child for the upcoming change.Like anything else, there are varying degrees of the effects of anxiety. Newer epidemiological research indicates that more than 80 percent of depressed adolescents havea history of childhood anxiety. Unlike adults, children display anxiety symptoms differently. Rather than verbalizing these feelings, children express it behaviorally,physically and cognitively.Feeling anxious can interfere with their mood, concentration and decision-making abilities, which can be misinterpreted as problems with attention or learning. Somechildren seem overly tense, seek constant reassurance and may be eager to please, while other children act out.Cindy Thygeson, M.D.More obvious behaviors include clinginess, separation difficulties, excessive shyness and oppositional behaviors. Anxiety expressed as physicalsymptoms are very common, difficult to recognize, but also very important to recognize in kids. Ongoing unexplained, physical complaints – such asdifficulty breathing, dizziness, stomach aches, problems sleeping, or feeling like they have a lump in their throat – can be a psychological issue rather thana physiological one.Anxiety disorders – the most common mental health issue – are frequently overlooked or misjudged. When they go untreated, children struggle withself-esteem and are unable to develop age-appropriate coping skills, and this contributes to problems at home and at school. The typical pattern ofthese children becoming unengaged in the classroom results in poor achievement relative to their potential. The negative self-image that ensuescontributes to poor motivation to study and participate in class and causes more social and academic difficulties, continuing as a negative perpetualcycle. Besides the more immediate implications, research indicates that about half of adults with anxiety disorders report having left education early, andhalf of those report later in life that untreated anxiety was the primary reason.If you have concerns about a child, the first step is to speak with them about what their concerns are and what they are experiencing. This issue ishttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DRCindyThygesonFall2011.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 11:00:07 AM]
  • 144. New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxiety for Children by Cindy Thygeson, M.D. Director of Medinot necessarily based on “what” a child is worrying about, but rather that the worry takes on a life of its own and impacts the child in day-to-day life.Don’t underestimate the power of understanding and reassuring a child by letting him or her know that things will be OK; this really makes a difference.At school, it can be helpful to identify a “safe place” where your children may go when feeling upset. This may save them from resorting to maladaptiveways of coping. If the very common school-refusal pattern starts, it is important to address the issue immediately and have them return to school as soonas possible. In the end, the longer kids are out of school, the more anxiety is fed and unwanted behaviors are reinforced.If your child’s anxieties start to interfere with daily activities in school, socially and his or her overall well-being, this is a sign to seek professionalintervention. Talk with the child’s teacher or school guidance counselor. You want to discuss this with your pediatrician or a mental health professional.Write down examples about the concerns that you have to take to your visit. With better understanding of what your child is experiencing, you are betterable be of support to your child.It is not uncommon to have difficulty navigating the mental health system. Sutter Center for Psychiatry is available to help determine and provide thebest setting for a comprehensive assessment and offer guidance through the next steps. Sutter Center for Psychiatry is the only hospital in NorthernCalifornia that treats children under the age of 12, throughout the spectrum of inpatient and outpatient programs it offers.We believe in the importance of individualizing care for each person to provide the most effective care. Treatment with a professional who believesin recovery, keeps a global view and gives you options as a partner in treatment is what I believe sets us apart at Sutter Center for Psychiatry. It is notabout treating one aspect of a person’s life – but giving tools and guidance to have that individual improve the overall quality of their life andtheir relationships. That is lasting treatment.Whatever you try, the most important thing is to remember in this journey is that what works for one person may not be right for another. If one thingdoesn’t seem to work, continue your search and don’t give up. The good news is, with a little knowledge and appropriate treatment, problems today caneasily become yesterday’s news!Here are signs that a child may be experiencing more than just normal anxiety:■ Having difficulty separating from people or being unnatu rally clingy■ Constantly having thoughts and fears about the safety of themselves or others■ Having worries about things before they happen■ Being overly self-critical and perfectionistic■ Being preoccupied with embarrassment or making mis takes■ Having low self esteem■ Having trouble falling asleep, frequent nightmares, or diffi culty sleeping alone■ Difficulty learning and trouble sitting stillCindy Thygeson, M.D.,a board-certified pediatric and adult psychiatrist, servesas theDirector of Medical Affairs for the Sutter Center forhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DRCindyThygesonFall2011.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 11:00:07 AM]
  • 145. New School Year Brings an Increase in Anxiety for Children by Cindy Thygeson, M.D. Director of MediPsychiatry, the only not-for-profit psychiatric hospital inthe community.Associated with Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento, it isalso the only psychiatric hospital that is part of anintegrative health care system in the region. SutterMedical Center and Sutter Center for Psychiatry arepart of Sutter Health, Northern California’s largesthealth-care network. For more on Sutter’s psychiatricservices, visit www.suttermedicalcenter.org/psychiatry ,or call (916) 386-3000 or (800) 801-3077.If you find this article useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DRCindyThygesonFall2011.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 11:00:07 AM]
  • 146. Being Loved by Melanie MartinezEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsBeing Loved by Melanie MartinezMy ups, downs, and flaws are a part of my life. It‛s like walking in a park that is covered in leaves that are bigand brown. Each leaf represents a barrier, a problem, or a learning opportunity. I grow from each leaf andflourish from the issue that leads me closer to my purpose. I understand that mistakes are opportunities to learnand grow.Learning new things helps with the new path ways formed by my neurotransmitters! It also helpsme expand my self- confidence and self-esteem. Strengthening and developing new paths, clearsthe walkway and helps the park with less leaves leaf control. Less Fewer leaves helps claritybecause so I can walk down a clear path. But when the wind blows those darn leaves back on thepath, then I know that there are more opportunities of growth that is are yet to be learned. Eachobstacle I encounter during my life must happen for a reason.I have had a hard life but I have learned a lot. Now I have to learn to be kind to myself. I nolonger want to hurt myself. I want to live life to the fullest. Living requires me to look at myselfand see what I want in life which is positive. There is much hope if I keep my focus on myhealing path!My family, those whom I call my family, is my spiritual family. Not blood- related, but my family,who loves me for me even though I’m not perfect. They like me for me, so I don’t have to changeaccording to others’ expectations. I’m unique and I can be loved by others as long as I am opento vulnerability. Learning new patterns of communication can let others in my life. I yearn forlove and being loved; for I didn’t get it when I was growing up. Now that I’m older I love othersand like receiving love from others. This is a very healing aspect for me: being loved.About Melanie MartinezMelanie is an advocate for people with disabilities and homeless. She holds an AA degree inHuman Services; she is currently a volunteer at the Wellness and Recovery Center facilitating anart expression group and an assistant co-facilitator in the Nutrition support group. She enjoyscreating nutritional meals for friends and family.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/MelanieMFall2011.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:09 AM]
  • 147. Being Loved by Melanie MartinezAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/MelanieMFall2011.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:09 AM]
  • 148. Dr. Andrew MyersEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSam’s Club Offers Simple Steps to a Healthy Body and Mindby Dr. Andrew MyersWe are learning more and more that the conditions that affect the body and mind are inter-related. Some diseases, while they can be managed successfully individually,can wreak havoc when combined. One example is depression and diabetes. A recent study published by the Archives of General Psychiatry suggests thatwomen suffering from both diabetes and depression have a two-fold increased risk of death, especially from cardiovascular disease. While statistics like these canbe harrowing, there are simple steps you can take to reduce your risk for depression, diabetes, heart disease and more.In our new book, Health is Wealth, Nobel Laureate Dr. Louis Ignarro and I outline simple methods to help our readers improve vitality, live healthier lives, and enjoypeak functioning of both body and mind. Additionally, I have partnered with Sam’s Club to help educate and inform members on preventative healthy living practices whilebringing access to quality medical supplies and nutritional supplements I’ve outlined some of the risks associated with various health problems as well as the simplesolutions that can help you lead a healthier life.Problem: Poor nutrition habits can damage overall health.Overall health can be negatively affected by what I’ve identified as a Nutritional Deficiency Syndrome (NDS). With NDS it is possible to see several disease states ordysfunctions overlapping to create increased risks of both complications and even death.Solution: Maintain nutritional balance with quality foods and supplements available at Sam’s Club.Sam’s Club offers a great selection of quality foods to keep your family on track in preventing diseases through good nutrition. Try adding fresh fruits, vegetables and wholegrains to your menu to ensure your daily intake of vitamins and nutrients. A simple salmon filet for dinner can add a dose of healthy Omega-3 oils, while adding freshberries to your breakfast cereal can boost antioxidant intake.In addition to a healthy diet, the introduction of dietary supplements can enhance your body’s performance, and Sam’s Club offers a wide variety of vitamins andsupplements to meet your nutritional needs at a value you can appreciate. Here are my top five nutritional recommendations that can make a big difference in your health:http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/AndrewMyers.aspx (1 of 3) [4/21/2013 11:00:42 AM]
  • 149. Dr. Andrew Myers1. Prevent Vitamin D Deficiency. Research has linked Vitamin D3 to heart health, cancer prevention, bone health and metabolic function. Studies indicatethat three-quarters of U.S. teens and adults are deficient in vitamin D. Experts say low vitamin D levels also may increase a childs risk of developing heart disease later inlife. Recommendation: Adults: 2,000 IU per day of a vitamin D supplement Such as Member’s Mark Vitamin D softgels. For children: 400 to 1,000 IU dependingon age.2. Focus on your intake of healthy Omega-3 oils. Omega-3 oils (EPA and DHA) play an important role as antioxidants and help maintain ouroverall heart health. Recommendation: 900 mg of EPA and DHA per day from 1,400 mg of Fish Oil, such as Member’s Mark Natural Enteric Fish Oil.3. Support your heart health. In addition to a diet centered on fruit, vegetables and whole grains, nutrients like CoQ10 are also important to overall hearthealth and function and can become deficient especially for the 33.5 million Americans who are currently taking a statin drug to lower their cholesterol.Statin drugs deplete the body of CoQ10 and this deficiency can lead to impaired function and activity of heart muscle. Recommendation: 100 to 400 mg ofCoQ10 each day, such as Member’s Mark Co Q10 softgels.4. Fight free radicals. Every day our bodies are exposed to toxins from our environment, which can lead to the formation of free radicals. Free radicals arereactive molecules that damage our cells and lead to premature aging. Nutrients like Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium, Resveratrol and green tea are antioxidants and canhelp defend our bodies from the damaging effects of free radicals. Recommendation: 500 to 1,000 mg of Vitamin C daily from supplements such as Super CEnergy and Member’s Mark Chewable Vitamin C.5. Build a foundation for your health. Research has shown that a multivitamin can actually make a difference in our health, and a study conductedby researchers at the National Institutes of Health has provided the first epidemiologic evidence that the use of multivitamins by women is associated with longertelomeres. Telomeres are the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes (DNA) that shorten with the aging of a cell. As we look to extend the quality of our lives andsupport the optimal function of our cells and DNA, a multivitamin is a great place to start.Recommendation: Daily age and gender specific multivitamin such as One A Day Men’s or Women’s Health Complete Multivitamins and Member’s Mark Mature Multi.Problem: The diabetes epidemic.Diabetes affects an estimated 24 million Americans, equal to 8 percent of the population. The total costs are thought to be as much as $174 billion, with $116 billion beingdirect costs from medication, according to 2005-2007 American Diabetes Association figures.Solution: Take part a free diabetes health screening at Sam’s Club and diminish your diabetes risk througha healthy diet and supplements.Sam’s Club is offering a free diabetes health screening for its members on September 10. The free screenings are one part of Sam’s Club’s efforts to help memberstake charge of their health through preventative measures. Additional screenings for women’s health, digestive health and heart health will also be offered in thecoming months. For more information, and to confirm the times and locations of Sams Club screenings, check your local listings at SamsClub.com/healthyliving.Further steps you can take to prevent diabetes include maintaining a healthy weight, exercising and modifying your diet to include select supplements. Sam’s Club hasmany of the products you need to maintain a healthy lifestyle including fitness equipment, a fresh selection of nutritious foods and dietary supplements. With diabetes, itis important to also include magnesium. Dietary sources of magnesium include green, leafy vegetables, meats, starches, grains and nuts and milk, all of which canbe found at your local Sam’s Club. Several dietary surveys show that a large portion of adults do not meet the recommended daily allowance for magnesium which is 320mg per day for women and 420 mg per day for men.In a study published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism researchers report magnesium supplementation improves sensitivity to insulin inoverweight individuals. Supplements of magnesium for six months improved two out of three measures of insulin sensitivity, compared with placebo. Blood sugar levels,as measured by fasting levels of glucose in the blood, improved by about 7 percent.Problem: Cardiovascular disease is a major concern.As the leading cause of death in our country, nearly everyone knows someone who has been impacted by heart disease. This year, about 1.2 million Americans will suffera heart attack, and about 452,000 of them will die as a result.Solution: Maintain a healthy lifestyle with products and services available at Sam’s Club.A central objective in any heart healthy program must be to achieve a healthy weight and maintain it. Even a small amount of weight loss can lower blood pressure andimprove blood sugar levels. Another way to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease is to incorporate a regular, moderate exercise program. It is not necessary torun marathons, you just need to make sure that each day you make a commitment to moving your body through an exercise program you can stick with over the long-term.Changing your diet can help as well. Our standard American diet is contributing greatly to our national obesity and reduced heart health. I recommend a Mediterranean-style diet, rich in fresh fish, fresh vegetables and fruit and healthy oils like olive oil. All the ingredients you need to attain this diet can be found at Sam’s Club, wherefresh produce and heart-healthy fish are staples. Building your daily dietary habits around plant-rich food sources will enhance your energy and can add years to yourhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/AndrewMyers.aspx (2 of 3) [4/21/2013 11:00:42 AM]
  • 150. Dr. Andrew Myerslife. Additionally, I recommend that you support healthy blood pressure and vascular integrity. Increase Nitric Oxide levels through exercise and antioxidant consumption tohelp maintain blood pressure in the normal range.ConclusionWhile Americans face many potential risks to both mental and physical health, a holistic approach to health can effectively manage overlapping health concerns asdescribed here. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle through simple steps can help prevent health problems in children and adults, as well as contribute to a healthy body and mind.Dr. Andrew Myers is a naturopathic physician and an expert in nutrition and preventative health.He is author of the books Simple Health Value and Health is Wealth.Learn more about Dr. Myers and read his advice on skin health, weight management and other health concerns by visiting samsclub.com/healthyliving.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/AndrewMyers.aspx (3 of 3) [4/21/2013 11:00:42 AM]
  • 151. Medication or Meditation? by Thomas Hushen, Service Coordinator - HRCEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsMedication or Meditation? By Thomas Hushen,Service Coordinator - HRCThe answer is BOTH! While prescription drugs continue to be the most common form of relieving mental health “symptoms,” they do not actually contributeto the healing of the “cause” of these symptoms. Finding the right combination of medication to manage our mental health symptoms can be a challenge,one that I am sure we all have experienced.Every day we are faced with external life stressors. Sometimes it seems that these stressors all happen at once, only to leave us with racing thoughts,anxiety and increased depression, and most of all a feeling of being overwhelmed!Those of us who are mental health consumers tend to easily get overwhelmed due to the nature of our human condition and mental illness. On top of ourown life stressors, there is always something negative being broadcast on radio, TV, newspapers, magazines, and the Internet. All this negativity createsand feeds ANTS (Automatic Negative Thoughts)The good news is that there are coping skills that help us manage daily stress, depression, and anxiety. One great coping tool for “life” is meditation!Please understand that I believe that medication is a gift from the universe, and in many instances, it allows us to have a better quality of life.Preventative medicine is progressing, and medical doctors and psychiatrists everywhere are embracing alternative practices as a way of healing the bodyand preventing disease. Many of these practices help us to manage our “persistent” mental health symptoms.Thomas Hushenis a Service Coordinator andSacPort Instructor atHuman Resource Consultants(HRC)www.hrcrst.orgI do take prescription medications for conditions that require it, but it alone sometimes is just not enough to help me deal with life and the challenges itbrings. Meditation is a valuable practice that helps create a balance of body and mind and brings harmony to one’s entire “being.” Here is whatmeditation WILL do for you without ANY adverse side effects!The Benefits of MeditationAs a mental health consumer myself, and working with clients at Human Resource Consultants (HRC), I have seen firsthand the results of thispowerful practice. There are many great benefits of meditation. Meditation is a time of silence, a time to clear the mind from all of our problems. It doesnot make the problems go away; it simply allows us to be better equipped to deal with them. To get significant benefits from meditation, one shouldmeditate for 15-20 minutes at the same time. Meditating two times a day—morning and evening—is the best way to begin. I have listed below some ofthe surprising benefits of this practice that you may not know about!1. Reduced Heart Rate: Normalization of High Blood PressureHeart rates and high blood pressures have been found to fall during meditation. The effect tends to persist even when not meditating (in those who havebeen practicing meditation daily).2. Perfect Rest: Physical Rest and RelaxationThe state of consciousness attained during meditation is considered to be the deepest possible rest and relaxation there is for both body andhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ThomasHFall2011.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:45 AM]Submit Query
  • 152. Medication or Meditation? by Thomas Hushen, Service Coordinator - HRCmind. Experiments have shown that the overall average breathing reduction rate shows a deeper state of rest and peace of mind during meditation.The meditator is able to maintain this perfect physical rest/relaxation even in activities after meditation. You become calmer and more relaxed, andcan experience the activities you participate in with more clarity and focus.3. Reduced StressStress, as we all know, is a psychologically agitated state which is the opposite of rest and relaxation. Cortisol (a hormone produced by the body) isreleased in response to stress. Cortisol levels are high when a person is highly anxious or under stress. Physiologists have found that during andafter meditation there are lower levels of cortisol produced by the body, which means less anxiety!4. Increased CreativityAs you practice daily meditation, you will find your level of creativity is enhanced. Once there is balance of our mind and body, we have replacednegative perceptions with positive ones and are now ready to experience an increase in creativity. Creativity in itself is another great coping skill!5. Reduced Need to Self-MedicateSome people resort to using alcohol and drugs more when they experience depression and anxiety, trying to escape the troubles and symptoms they haveby self-medicating. When we get overloaded, it’s time to look within rather than without for peace and comfort. Meditation tends to reduce the need for usto self-medicate, and allows us to see the world differently with a clear mind.6. Relief from InsomniaDeep-rooted stress and anxiety can be one reason for chronic insomnia. As habitual meditation and breath work increases, it dissolves deep-seatedstresses and the sleeping cycle naturally improves.I encourage you to take a class to learn the basics of meditation and breath work. I facilitate Sacramento PsychoSocial Options for RehabilitationTraining (SacPort) groups at HRC and incorporate this practice in every group. Many group members are “amazed” at the level of deep peace they are ableto feel after meditation. They report that they are able to absorb the material and support from others more easily as a result! In conjunction withmeditation, breathing exercises will help to regulate your breathing by simply inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth.Breathe in calmness and peace, and exhale the negative thoughts that are racing through your mind! Is it really that simple? Yes! You will find that evenafter your first experience in meditation and deep breathing exercises, you will truly “feel” the difference!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ThomasHFall2011.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:45 AM]
  • 153. People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket To Work by Rosario M.EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPeople With A Disability Can Get A Ticket To Workby Rosario M. Ramirez, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist for the Northern AreaMillions of Americans receive disability benefits from Social Security and there could be good news for many of those who wantto work. A free and voluntary program called Ticket to Work gives individuals who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI)or Social Security disability benefits access to meaningful employment while maintaining control over benefit choices.Rosario M. RamirezEd Bairos, a farmer and mechanic, went back to the work he loved with the help of the Ticket program. He began receivingSocial Security disability benefits after suffering from severe arthritis, complicated by a knee injury that would require 20 surgeries.He was concerned about losing the cash payments and health care he needed to survive and worried that employers might not want tohire him.Then Bairos learned about the Ticket to Work program when he received a notice in the mail from Social Security. The notice wasa “ticket” that Bairos could use with an employment network of his choosing. Employment networks are organizations that offerspecialized services such as career counseling, job search assistance, vocational rehabilitation and training. Bairos decided to use histicket with an employment network and returned to work. He continued to receive health care and cash benefits because ofwork incentives, which are special considerations that make it easier for beneficiaries to explore whether going back to work isright for them.Pleased with Bairos‛ industry knowledge and skills as a farm manager, his employer gave him a promotion and a raise. Now he isself-sufficient, working for another division within the company.Bairos earns more money than he would have by relying solely on disability benefits. By using his Ticket, Bairos‛ medical reviews wereput on hold and he is eligible to receive Medicare coverage for up to eight and a half years after discontinuing his disability payments.“Returning to work has made me whole again, especially being able to work in the area that I love. My self-esteem was at its lowestwhen I wasn‛t working and on disability. Returning to work not only improved my self-worth but also my financial wealth. The Ticketto Work program and the ability to keep my Medicare was the reason I was able to return to work,” he said.If you receive Social Security or SSI benefits due to disability, are between 18 and 64 years old and want to work, getting startedis easy. Visit www.socialsecurity.gov/work for more information on the Ticket to Work program and work incentives. You also maycall (866) 968- 7842 (TDD (866) 833-2967) to learn how going back to work may affect your benefits.Questions and AnswersQuestion: I am receiving Social Security disability benefits. Will my benefits be affected if I workand earn money?Answer: It depends. We have special rules called "work incentives" that help you keep your monthly payments and Medicarecoverage while you test your ability to work. For example, you can receive full benefits regardless of how much you earn, as longas you report your work activity and continue to have a disabling impairment during a trial work period. For more informationhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/RosarioRFall2011.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:50 AM]Submit Query
  • 154. People With A Disability Can Get A Ticket To Work by Rosario M.about work incentives, we recommend that you read our publication, Working While Disabled-How We Can Help at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/10095.html.Question: Is there a time limit on how long I can receive Social Security disability benefits?Answer: Your disability benefits will continue as long as your medical condition has not improved and you still cannot work. Wewill review your case at regular intervals to make sure you are still disabled. If you are still disabled when you reach yourfull retirement age, we will convert your disability benefit to a retirement benefit at the same amountRosario M. Ramirez is a Social Security Public Affairs Specialist for theNorthern AreaAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/RosarioRFall2011.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:50 AM]
  • 155. Not Alone by David KieszEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsNot Alone by David Kiesz"For all the mental health workers and friends who helped me get mylife back"When I think of where Ive been, The good times and the badOn a scale of 1 to 10, Either way, Im gladCause Im not alone as Im reaching for the phoneYou really care, your voice is there, my comfort zone.Sometimes when Im lost, crushed beneath the painThough I cant afford the cost, I just smile and play the gameBut theres a healing place where I cannot pretendYour smiling face, your hearts embrace heals me againSo even when the storm is strong and Im deaf to my own cryI faintly hear a distant song and I simply cant denyThat Im not alone, even when Im on my ownYour gentle touch is much to much too let me roam.David KieszAfter losing his American dream and his health to religious fanaticism, he started over with a can do attitude and surrounded himself with like-mindedfriends. With the help of Mental Health America of Northern California, he landed a job traveling California as an analyst of mental health services. Healso helps shoot a TV show which airs every other Saturday night on (Comcast) Access Channel 17 at 7 p.m. His passion is the use of music, poetry,and comedy as forms of therapy for others and himself. He co-facilitates a Performing Arts/Sing-Along group at the Wellness and Recovery Center(WRC). The first love song he wrote is actually a ‘thank you’ to all who encouraged him on his new journey.If you find this poeme useful, please share with a friend!http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/NotAlonebyDavidKiesz.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:53 AM]
  • 156. Not Alone by David KieszAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/NotAlonebyDavidKiesz.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:00:53 AM]
  • 157. Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T, Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling CenterEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSpecial Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T,Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling CenterInterviewer: Your mission statement states that you work in collaborative partnerships. Pleaseexplain what type of collaborative specific to mental health?Response:Recently our collaborators have been very focused along with the mental health services in trying to reach out to diverse cultures in the community.They asked us to conduct a focus group for Latinos (speaking Spanish only) to ask them what were their needs concerning suicide prevention, and so we hoped to dothat focus group for them, and then we gave that information to them because as you know people that don’t speak the language are fearful to go to larger groups. And sowe approached them. As we said, the reason they are not [going is] because they resist large groups. We have had a program in the past, and the program was to learnabout what works. And we found out that if we have little groups in the gym they will come. And it isn’t because they don’t know, they know and they want to participatebecause they have information, but they are fearful to go to big groups, thinking they won’t understand. So we have had groups with the Spanish-speaking, withHmong-speaking. Those are the two main ones but certainly when we had the Oasis Program we had seven different capabilities of identifying these different groups thatwe could work with. African American was one, LGBT was one. [There were] many different ones we could really focus [on] and find out from them what were their needs.Interviewer: That sounds great. How doyou help people access their strengths andbuild on positives?Response: We believe in the same philosophy as the MentalHealth Department or Behavior Health Services in providing family-drivenservices, and family-driven services really mean that we need to hear thevoice of the family and what is it that they need. What is it from theirperspective, not from us as experts; they are the experts in their family.They know what has worked in the past and we need to help them usethose [methods], and maybe they have lost it somewhere; we can helpfind it again because the whole purpose is for us to get fired. We are notthere to step in and run their lives, so we want to hear from them and findout what has worked. Maybe if there are some community services thatthey haven’t been able to utilize, to maybe bring them in to help them tovoice what it is they need.Interviewer: What are some of the groupsthat you have for non-English speakingpeople that you have not alreadymentioned?Response: The mental health department itself. I am an art therapistmyself, one of the many hats that I wear. As an art therapist I know that Ican work with many different languages because art therapy is auniversal language, and you can go right past that expressive languageof the verbal into the expressive language of the heart, so we havegroups in Spanish here or Hmong, I mean they come in whenever theyneed it. I just did a grievement group, and there was a Spanish-speakinghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LynnKFall2011.aspx (1 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:57 AM]Submit Query
  • 158. Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T, Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling Centerdad and he never received grievement service in Sacramento becausethere was nothing available. Even though my group is for kids, I invitedhim. Dad was just kind of standing around, and I asked, “Would you liketo stay?” And he said he didn’t think his son would want him to, so Iasked the son, “What would you think if Dad stayed?”Son said, “I don’t care”; and Dad stayed. He became honest, he had tocry, it became real. He said, “There has never been anyone to help us.” Itwas pretty awesome to be able to [do] that; even if I only had that oneperson it was great. And in conjunction with my mental health groups wework with the Family Resource Center here. They offer parenting groups,in Spanish and in Hmong, and different core groups under BFRC offer avariety of services. The center is not just exclusive to mental health; werefer our mental health [clients] to our whole program. We actually have agroup of parents that contribute to all the various different programs.They meet as an advisory committee, and they meet monthly.Interviewer: In what ways do you reduceisolation and hopelessness?Response: I’ll tell you what, for 39, 40 years, however long we’vebeen in business, the original philosophy did not fit all cases. We foundout that we need to find out from the families what they need and, mostof all, go into the communities. If I take you on a tour here you’re notgoing to see an office with a couch. We do in-home, school supportservices; we reach out to them rather than making them come to us. Thatis what we have done the entire time we have had La Familia. We like tobecome allies with that family, and we provide case managementservices to help them to connect with the community resources. Theremay be a special group within the community that can help them so thatit will get them out of that isolation.Interviewer: How do you empowerindividuals?Response: Sometimes it is hard because they sometimes have hitthe end of their rope and they don’t know what to do. We always like tostart from their strengths, and so we identify what strengths they havehad in the past and then we start to build on those. We find that little bylittle as we build on those strengths we can help them recognize them.That is what really works the very besInterviewer: I read something interesting about individuals having an opportunity tobecome stakeholders. How does this work?Response: The stakeholders are actually the public. They’re the ones who will come to our work groups when we are doing focus groups toidentify what it is in the community that is needed. Sometimes it is providing outreach to many different diverse areas here. Parents are stakeholders aswell because we invite them to be involved with the parents’ advisory committee and any families involved in mental health programs here areencouraged to participate in that groupInterviewer: Do you have an employment center here? How do you motivate people with mentalhealth challenges to transition into wanting to have gainful employment?Response:We do have a One-Stop Career Center here at our family resource center. We do have families that come through here, first of alllooking for a job, and we find that many of them do have challenges that they are dealing with, and one of them may be a mental health issue. If wereally get a sense that that is something that affects their ability to find employment, then we work with them to be able to at least help evaluate that thisis the case and that there are additional resources that can help them. We really encourage them to connect with some community resources toaddress those challenges. Many times they are not going to accept that, so it may take several times of them coming back. I think they kind of get asense that once they are looking for a job and they go for views and [their problems] affect their ability to conduct a decent interview—theymay be rejected over and over again but they keep coming and coming—and that way we are able to build a relationship with them.Hopefully we are able to encourage their confidence and [get them to] accept some of the services. Encouragement is the biggest thing,http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LynnKFall2011.aspx (2 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:57 AM]Submit Query
  • 159. Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T, Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling Centerand also helping them to realize that mental health is not an illness; basically it’s something that can help them to become a betterperson and to be able to gain employment. Take away the stigma of mental health; we use a different format. The cultures that areinvolved, the ones that are represented— they are not expert mental health therapists or professionals; basically they will directindividuals to the resources and just getting them to that point can be a challenge. And sometimes it is getting the referral to mentalhealth so they can go forwardInterviewer: Your mental health department is like a hidden nugget. How are peoplereferred to your services?Response: They usually call here and we have people here all day long taking those referrals and then sending off to Access[, an AssistedAccess program which partners with the county]. They need to be medically eligible children from zero to twenty-one years old. We work with the wholefamily but the child has to be zero to twenty-one, and they qualify for services through Access if they have straight medical.Interviewer: And the last question: is there is a strong emphasis on working with thewhole family? How many families do you serve?Response: We serve about 500 families a year, and that is just in mental health. We would like the community to know that La Familia works withdiverse cultures—many think it’s only Spanish—many diverse cultures here, and that we take pride in standing beside all of them in a partnership forsuccess.About Lynn Keune, L.M.F.TLynn is clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling Center and acts as the liaison to Sacramento County DHHS when working with theCounty. She is on the cultural Competence Committee at the County and System Wide Committee promoting cultural competence. Shehas a master’s degree in Art Therapy and Family Therapy from Notre Dame de Namurs, CA., and a bachelor’s degree from the famousCalifornia College of the Arts in Oakland. She is licensed as a marriage and family therapist (MFT) and art therapist (ATR). Bilingual inSpanish and English.Interview was conducted by Ann Adams for the Empowerment Magazine.Anne is currently working part time as a volunteer receptionist at the Wellness and Recover Center on Marconi Avenue. She has servedas a board member and residential leader for the Sacramento Mutual Housing Association. She has worked for 15 years for lawenforcement agencies at the state and county levels and she also has 4 years of working with children with learning disabilities. She iscurrently pursuing her education in Human Services from ARC with goal of transferring to Bethany University.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LynnKFall2011.aspx (3 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:57 AM]
  • 160. Special Interview with Lynn Keune, L.M.F.T, Clinical Director of LaFamilia Counseling CenterAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LynnKFall2011.aspx (4 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:00:57 AM]
  • 161. Wellness Toolkit by Terry Zick, M.A.EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWellness Toolkit by Terry Zick, M.A. (published in the Fall 2011 issue)Everyone can benefit from owning a handy toolkit of strategies and skills for health and wellness. The more tools we stock in our toolkit, the more we haveto draw from to support life’s challenges and boost enjoyment. One tool such as calling a friend to talk, might be just the helpful ticket on one particularday. On another day, a different tool like making a gratitude list might be the most helpful to ease our mind, heart and spirit.As we were growing up, most of us (if not all of us) were not given a well-being toolkit. Also, it’s possible no one modeled for us how to create a healthierlife-mentally, emotional, socially, physically or spiritually. The older I got and the more I learned, the more I wished I could go back in time and give to mylittle child self all those great strategies and wisdom.My, oh my, how my life would have changed! A toolkit would have definitely reduced my suffering and empowered my journey. Realistically, I can’tchange the past and so I am not going to dwell on “what could have been”. However, in the now, I search out and give those toolkit tips to myself andallow my adult self to transform my life with that wise knowledge.Terry Zick, M.AHere’s just a few of the many tools to add to your personal toolkit.• Do deep belly breathing: bring inhale down into the belly and allow the calming effect of the breath to relax.• Focus on facts, not assumptions.• Take personal responsibility for improving your life, eliminate a victim stance.• Create choices, because the more choices, the more empowered you will feel. So look for choices you have not considered.• Surrender to the circumstances you cannot change; surrender the outcome of what you can change.• Use the spirituality of prayer, meditation, mindfulness, yoga, and/or contemplation to enhance other strategies.• Develop a plan for healing, health and wellness & commit to change. Take baby steps if needed but commit to transform your life.• Be solution oriented rather than problem oriented—shift the focus, shift the circumstance.• List intentions or purposeful directions for what you want to create in your life. Visualize and feel those positive intentions.• Choose optimistic thoughts which encourage thinking the best about a situation, and sustain hope or faith for a good and manageable outcome.• Pick and Choose your thoughts because a thought will cause a particular feeling which will cause a particular behavior. You feel the way you feel because you think theway you think.• Recognize that you have gifts, talents, skills and inner resources within that you may not be aware of. And, if you become aware and utilize them, it could changeyour experience.• Likewise, recognize that you may have options for support outside of yourself that you may not be aware of. So, search the community, theinternet, ask people for resources, etc.• Push through fear to develop courage and bravery. You will be surprised at what you can do, learn, become.Again, focus on the breath-- when you are at a stop light, in line at the grocery, cooking food, lying in bed ready for sleep, anytime, anywhere. Whereveryou go, you bring the potential of the healing, relaxing breath.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/TerryZFall2011b.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:01:01 AM]
  • 162. Wellness Toolkit by Terry Zick, M.A.Terry has a Master of Arts Degree in Counseling from University of Colorado-Denver. She has 30 years experience working with adults, children andfamily preservation. She has worked in settings such as: non-profits, schools, justice system, alcohol/drug programs. Her role as counselor, consultantand trainer maintains a focus on spirituality, health and wellness. Terry currently facilitates groups and supports individualized mentoring at the Wellnessand Recovery Center North .If you find this article useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/TerryZFall2011b.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:01:01 AM]
  • 163. A Risk Worth Taking for Change by Janet SegallEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsA Risk Worth Taking for Change by Janet SegallSometimes, when the negative things in your life outweigh the positive, it is often hard to imagine that anything could be good. But it is not uncommon for good, positivethings and personal triumphs to come out of tragedy and uncertainty. I moved around a lot, looking for answers—in and out of relationships that never worked,sometimes predicated with violence and emotional pain, not realizing until later that I was always looking for someone to love me and lift me up. I was looking foranswers outside myself. I was looking for others to fix me.After suffering from agoraphobia for several years—getting better, getting worse again—I made a choice and took a risk. I left my house and my safety and drove acrossthe country. I was not alone, but what wasimportant was walking out the door.It was a totally successful experience. I knew that I would be better from that time on.Even after several years of being diagnosed with a life-threatening, very painful illness and being on very serious drug therapy, I decided to take another risk and I starteda foundation for my disease almost single-handedly. I never believed I would be that person. Sometimes I still don’t believe that I’m that person. But I went from beinghouse-bound to flying by myself around the United States and across the Atlantic. When the foundation and I parted ways, I decided I still needed to work. It took a lot oftime and many rejections, but then the Wellness & Recovery Center took a chance on me.My life has been a rollercoaster of emotions. But I’ve learned a lot of lessons through my life and travels. I learned that it is so important to listen. I learned that not justsaying the words, but working toward positive change is a risk worth taking. You may not always succeed, but you can say you tried your best and know that sometimesthat’s enough. I learned that you can’t control another person.I learned that words and deeds can hurt, but how you process and react to words and deeds is in your control. I learned that forgiving yourself and others for just being ahuman being that makes mistakes and owning it can make you free. Before he died, my partner used to say that we’re all just passing through so what does it matter. But Isay, let’s make a dent in the timeline of life and become the best people we can be. I believe we are all connected and how we live our lives and help others lives inthe universe forever.About the AuthorJanet is a graduate of the State University of New York system. She is the Founder, and was the Director of the International PemphigusPemphigoid Foundation, an organization dedicated to helping people living with the rare, autoimmune diseases pemphigus and pemphigoid. She is alsoa certified Health Coach, and Hypnotherapist. She is very grateful to be working at the Consumers Self Help Wellness & Recover Center North.If you find this article useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/JanetSFall2011.aspx [4/21/2013 11:01:04 AM]
  • 164. We are thrilled to bring you this exciting first issue of the Empowerment Magazine. We have launched thisquarterly magazine to provide a forum for voices that promote overall wellness and mental health resiliency for greaterSacramento. We hope that you enjoy this issue, which includes a special interview with Dr. Hashem and a variety of in-spiring and empowering stories along with powerful tools and techniques that will help you discover your own greatness.We believe that you will find much of this information of interest. Please let us know if you have special requests, sug-gestions, or ideas about what you want to see in future issues.The Empowerment Magazine is a publication of SACPROS.ORG, a Sacramento Mental Health Website Re-source Guide strengthening individuals, families and community with easily accessible information about available ser-vices in Greater Sacramento area. Mailing Address: P.O. BOX 214864, Sacramento, CA 95821. Phone: (916) 222 -7541 E-mail: info@sacpros.org Website: www.sacpros.orgWe look forward to reading your articles, and hearing your comments, suggestions, and ideas. Please write to usat info@sacpros.orgSpecial thanks to the following individuals for helping to put out this first issue of the magazine.Marilyn Washington, Sacpros Network DirectorTerry Zick, M.A,Gail Erlandson, M.ADr. Hisham SolimanChrista HarmonAnne AdamsReginald Washington Jr.Laura HawkinsWRC Program Coordinator, Eric ZunigaJanet AlyKim Navarez, M.F.TPat HubbertTammy Dyer, MSWDr. Hazem HashemLaree WashingtonMathew MarkieweczJanet L FuriaPhommasone GriffithDr. Deonna WilemmeMelanie MartinezAmede Kyubwa, M.A, M.P.AWe would also like to thank the Wellness and Recovery Center North (WRC) for allowing us to use the facilityThe Empowerment Magazine2011 - 2012 Calendar— Fall 2011:September— Holiday/Winter 2011:Nov— Winter 2012 :January— Spring 2012: March— Summer 2012: JuneWelcome to the First Issue ofThe Empowerment MagazineQuestions? Contact us atinfo@sacpros.org or call(916) 222-7541
  • 165. The Pursuit of Contentmentand HappinessAm I in control of my contentment and my happiness? Iam happy to say that research, mental health profes-sionals and many individuals who study human nature say— absolutely yes! So many books have been written onthe topic of happiness — all empowering me to knowthat there are lots of strategies and viewpoints to helpme to be more contented.Studies show that people who have wealth are not nec-essarily happier, and if they become happy, don’t alwaysstay happy — money itself doesn’t make us happy. Like-wise, people with the most education are not necessarilyhappier. Students who make high grades aren’t happierthan those with low grades. No matter what aspect oflife we face, what makes us happy is the type ofthoughts we have. What contributes to happiness is thechoice we make with our thoughts. Optimistic people(those with positive outlooks) are happier than pessi-mists (those with negative outlooks).Many people describe happiness as contentment. Con-tented people tend to accept things as they are, andhave a sense of mental or emotional satisfaction. Somemight call happiness and contentment simply peace ofmind. Are we born genetically wired to be happy or un-happy? To some degree we are born with a predisposi-tion or a possible set point toward happiness or unhappi-ness. According to some studies, our happiness level de-pends 50% on our genetics, 10% on circumstances, and40% on our intentional activities. Intentional activitiesare 1) the intention of how I am going to choose to thinkand patterns of thought (cognitive), and 2) how I amgoing to choose to respond, or act, or spend time “being”(behavioral). These thought patterns for happinesscome from a variety of feeling-good strategies includingsocial, spiritual, and physical — in addition to the cogni-tive and behavioral.We can change our thoughts and, therefore, our feel-ings, emotions, and moods. We do this with focused in-tention, purpose and motivation. The power of intentionto direct the course of our thoughts will support us tosit firmly in the driver’s seat of our life and reap thehappiness rewards that we seek.What happens if I get those unhappiness genes? Here’ssome good news! I can still be happy! If both my parentswere unhappy people and I inherited genes toward un-happiness, I can learn new strategies that pump up that40% of intentional activities. Genes do not rule my hap-piness quotient because I can empower my happiness bymy choices.I have learned that if I am anxious, sad, angry, scared,or depressed, I can still learn how to be a happier per-son. The thing about unhappiness is that it fools us intothinking that we don’t have a choice to feel peace or joy.We always have choices. The transformation towardincreased happiness happens because the strategies,tools, and skills I can learn will influence my moods. Myjourney started when I claimed an intention that I willlearn how to be happier, and I gathered a lot of the“how to be happier” wisdom...and applied it.So what can you do? Right now. Today. Here’s justthree of the many, many tips I would like to sharewith you:1. I developed an attitude of gratitude. There is al-ways something to be grateful for. It might be grati-tude to just get out of bed, or have money for the busor rent. (For years I have written “Thank you” on everycheck I write.) It might be appreciation for the smell ofroses, or a stranger’s kind word or smile. It might begratitude for a person or event in my life. When I thinkof all the people who are suffering more, or who haveless, I feel so deeply grateful.2. I pay attention to what is happening in my mindand thoughts. This is often called developing self-awareness. When I notice a negative thought that un-doubtedly will affect my mood, I use a strategy to shiftor reframe that thought. Police your thoughts so youcan get out of the prison that your own thoughts create.Change your attitude, your perspective, look for thegood. The science of neuroplasticity tells us that thebrain is pliable, able to change, to grow new cells. Ourbrain can change its hard wiring for unhappy thoughtsand “stinkin’ thinkin’.”
  • 166. Q & A with Dr Hazem HashemToday we will be speaking with Dr. Hazem Hashemon the important triangle between the physician, thepatient and their psychiatric medications.INTERVIEWER: Often people give up on their medi-cations because they lose patience while waiting forresults, since most people won’t feel better rightaway. How long does it take for most psychiatricmedications to get into the system and start noticea-bly helping?DR. HASHEM: This is a very important aspect of treat-ment. Interestingly, a national study was done by the Na-tional Institute of Mental Health, called the CATIE. Thisstudy dispelled a common belief among mental healthstaff that patients stop taking their medications primarilydue to side effects. Actually, the study showed the num-ber one reason patients stopped taking their medication isbecause they believe the medication is not working. Thetime in which a medication begins to become effectivevaries from condition to condition and from person to per-son. In conditions such as depression or schizophrenia, one theory is that receptors in the brain seem to change in pa-tients afflicted with these conditions. The problem can vary from these receptors malfunctioning, to the presence oftoo many receptors or too few. In order to heal these receptors, the body takes time to repair them effectively. Themedication itself may affect the neurotransmitters immediately, but that healing process in the body does take time tocomplete. This is where some individuals may become impatient.INTERVIEWER: So the healing time can also vary from person to person?DR. HASHEM: Yes. Two of the main factors are person to person and from condition to condition. In my clinical obser-vation, we generally tell the patients it takes about four to six weeks in order to see any noticeable effects. In thecases of some new medication such as serotonergics, which include SSRIs for depression, we observed some who sawimprovement in three days, some people improved in a week, some people took two weeks, and some people took fourweeks. But in general, the cardinal rule is not to give up on the medicine for at least four to six weeks. Now, anotherfactor is the prescribed dosage of a medication. For example, many people are familiar with taking Tylenol. Com-monly, most people take two Tylenol tablets for the normal headache. If you were to take just one tablet, yourheadache might not go away and you would believe the medicine doesn’t work. It’s the same thing with psychiatricmedication. You can take one Prozac, and you may not get better. Your proper dose may be two Prozacs, or three,or four. The dosage normally goes up to 80 mg. So a rule of thumb, that is generally not used when medicationsare given up on, is that you should try a medication up to its maximum dosage for up to six to eight weeks beforeabandoning it. If after this you continue to not see results, then a medication can be deemed ineffective. I be-lieve giving up before this, is a little premature. What will help people strengthen their faith in a medicine wouldbe to think of their affliction as a cut on a finger. One day of covering it with a band-aid will not complete thehealing process. Visualizing it like this helps when a condition is not visual like a cut or scrape. Unfortunately,nerve cells in the brain and the body are the slowest tissues to heal.INTERVIEWER: Why do psychiatrists sometimes order lab tests?DR. HASHEM: Lab tests are useful for certain conditions. Some depression, for example, can be caused by low thyroidfunction. The thyroid is a very important hormone producing gland located in the lower part of the neck. In this case,anti-depressants may be completely ineffective and lead to much frustration during treatment.
  • 167. Working with Your Psychiatrist by Gail Erlandson, M.A.EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWorking with Your Psychiatrist by Gail Erlandson, M.A.A seasoned psychiatrist once said to me: “We are justbeginning to scratch the surface in understandingmental health disorders.” This has served me well. As agesture of hope, this same doctor also handed me apaperback with stories of accomplished people inhistory who experienced a broad array of mental healthchallenges. I learned not to identify myself as an illness,and that language is important in making this distinction.To empower myself, I choose to say “I manage bipolar”rather than “I am bipolar.” It is important that weemphasize that we are people, regardlessof ourparticular challenge.There are many components to being healthy: self-responsibility, cognitive support, healthy relationships,regular exercise, good nutrition, sound sleep, creativeoutlets, financial stability, and the setting of goals.Choose to work with a psychiatrist that appreciates aholistic approach to your health. Open communicationwith your psychiatrist is critical to successful outcomes.Self-awareness and communicating any changes inyour health is key.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/WorkingwithYourPsychiatrist.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:01:24 AM]
  • 168. Working with Your Psychiatrist by Gail Erlandson, M.A.It is important to communicate with your psychiatrist so that you can take an active role in your treatment plan. Be assertive and always ask yourpsychiatrist or pharmacist about potential side effects of any recommended medication. Communicating any side effects you are experiencing while takingmedication is very important so your psychiatrist can recommend alterations in your treatment plan. See yourself in the driver’s seat as you work with yourpsychiatrist as your trusted guide. Our choice of language is helpful in working with our doctors. Rather than saying, “My doctor is putting me on amedication,” try saying “I am choosing to go on this medication with the recommendation of my physician.” The more we take charge of our illness, thegreater our wellness. There may be times that we lose insight into ourselves and need to let someone else be in the driver’s seat and take over for a while.If we disagree with our doctor, it is important to consult them before making any changes. Let trusted loved ones know if you have made any medicationchanges, so they can help you watch for “red flags” like changes in behavior, mood, appetite, or sleep.Knowledgeable psychiatrists acknowledge that medications can have side effects and also tell us there is trial and error in their practice. Psychiatry is botha Science and an Art. Doctors greatly rely on honest feedback from their patients. You are the one who lives in your body. I find it beneficial to askquestions and look for options outside of medication. My life has been saved by psychotropic medication, yet it remains my rule of thumb to use as littlemedication as possible to be well. Managing a mental health challenge is an evolving process. It is important to educate your doctor about your symptomsand how the medication affects you. As we make lifestyle changes that positively impact our wellness, we can get better. It is possible that medication thatwas needed at one stage in our recovery journey will no longer be needed.Remember that you have choice in working with your psychiatrist, both in your treatment plan and in selecting your doctor. Choose someone who is ableto communicate well and with compassion. Look for someone who will listen to you and treat you with respect. If you have been given a diagnosis,regardless of what it is, see yourself as a person first. A mental health challenge can be the opportunity for growth and may help further our compassionand understanding.Gail has a Master of Arts Degree in Pastoral Ministry from the University of San Francisco and a Bachelor of ArtsDegree from the University of Portland in Interdisciplinary Studies. Gail taught at Loretto High School for elevenyears and has been on staff at Loaves and Fishes. Gail is a mentor for the Wellness and Recovery Center North. Shewelcomes feedback and can be reached at gerlandson@consumersselfhelp.orgAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/WorkingwithYourPsychiatrist.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:01:24 AM]
  • 169. Sacramento Medical Oasis, Inc. provides both outpatient psychiatric services and primary care services in the sameclinic located at 440 Howe Avenue , Sacramento, CA 95825. Phone: 916.282.0889 Subscription: $79/month, Fam-ily Plan: $99/month www.sacmedoasis.comThe Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Act (SAMSHA) has recently awarded Consumers Self Help(CSH) a grant to fund The Community Collaboration for Continuity of Care project. This program is aimed at provid-ing case management services to promote continuity between inpatient and outpatient services mental health con-sumers receive, as well as facilitating training for Emergency Department nurses from a consumer’s perspective.The grant is a unique collaboration between CSH, University of California Davis Medical Center and CaliforniaState University, Sacramento with the goal of integrating consumer voices into the services provided and to alsoorient Emergency Department nurses to consumer-centered care. www.consumersselfhelp.org• Mental illnesses affect almost every family in America.• People with mental illnesses make important contributions to our families and our communities.• People with mental illnesses recover, often by working with mental health professionals and by using medications,self-help strategies, and community supports.• Stigma and fear of discrimination are key barriers that keep many people from seeking help.• You can make a difference in the way people see mental illnesses and mental health if you:– Learn and share the facts about mental health and about people with mental illnesses, especially if youhear or read something that isn’t true;– Treat people with mental illnesses with respect and dignity;– Support the development of community resources for people with mental illnesses and their friends andfamily; and– Respect the rights of people with mental illnesses and don’t discriminate against them when it comes tohousing, employment, or education.Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services Web site: www.samhsa.govOne in five adults has a diagnosable mental health disorder - Sacramento County Division of Mental Health serveshttp://www.sacdhhs.comDID YOU KNOW THAT?If you have something that you would like to be included in future issues ofThe Empowerment Magazine, please send it to info@sacpros.org or call (916) 222-7541
  • 170. http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Documents/Fall%202011%20Empowement%20Magazine%20page%2015%20-%2016.jpghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Documents/Fall%202011%20Empowement%20Magazine%20page%2015%20-%2016.jpg [4/21/2013 11:01:51 AM]
  • 171. We still don’t fully understand the effect ofplacebo or the ability of the mind to heal it-self, so I would say perception by the patient is just as important as the choice of medication. In a large studyearly on it was found that the group of depressed patients received only cognitive therapy with no medication im-proved as much as the patients on medication alone. I recall when Prozac came out it was found to be very helpfulto a lot of people the issue of how long to stay on medication came up. In my experience I found that when de-pression is improved on medication the person actually change their interaction with their environment and peoplearound them. This positive interaction feeds back into them positively. If you can copy that positive interactionand cognitive thinking and behavior and continue to do it without the medication you would be able to get off themedication. So somehow you need to learn that you are feeding into the environment that is causing some of theproblems you are experiencing. Your role in the environment is very important. In my experience, this method ap-plies with disorders like depression and anxiety. Bipolar and schizophrenia on the other hand, are purely biologicalconditions. In these situations in particular, the mind over matter approach would not be the preferred methodand would probably have little effectiveness. There is no doubt about it; I always encourage people to take stepsin the way of cognitive function which will eventually take place of the antidepressant or anti-anxiety.INTERVIEWER: So reinforcement of other strategies - cognitive behavioral, physical, spiritual, etc. – is veryimportant in the treatment process?DR. HASHEM: Definitely. But in medicine we learnt not to say always or never. So in many of the cases of de-pression or anxiety, the cognitive and behavioral and the spiritual aspects of treatment are as powerful as ormore powerful than the medication itself. This also has no side effects, obviously, because medication has sideeffects that you don’t want. Sometimes in the absence of this cognitive approach, no antidepressant can seem towork.INTERVIEWER: What can people do to take more personal responsibility for their health?DR. HASHEM: Complete awareness of your condition and treatment, in addition, a basic knowledge of what con-stitutes a healthy person. I actually like the spiritual aspect of thinking. The spiritual aspect of life gives us kindof reassurance, some degree of faith that takes away the sense of the depression. When you always feel thatthere is a higher power, you always feel that there is a hope and there is a reason. I think, spirituality also, in allreligion and all philosophies, encourages you to be healthy. All the exercises in all the religions are meant to keepyou healthy. A healthy body has a healthy mind and so forth. So to take more responsibility for your health is bybeing educated about health and being aware of what produces negative results in your body and your mind.INTERVIEWER: And, last but not least, is psychiatry a science or an art or both?DR. HASHEM: Well, I think psychiatry is primarily a science, and I would say it’s art that uses science. There are a lotof things that take this form, like computer graphics for example. It’s art that’s using the science. The reason is we arenot going to use any medication without a scientific experiment or testing that proves beyond doubt that this medicineis really effective in this group of people. Unfortunately, to do that, they have to pick patients who have only mostlypure, single conditions and change the environment so it will be very specific to this condition and use this medication inthat context and prove that his medicine works for this condition. On the other hand, humans are not created based ona textbook. God did not open the DSM to put the specific criteria in different people. All patients are a mix of differ-ent things. Nothing is exactly the same as the textbook. Nobody has one pure condition, or two or three, with all theother factors that get involved in that. So I would say that the science is actually the proof that each single medicineclearly has a function. The art is mixing all this together; matching medication together with people and conditions. Thisperfect balance cannot be taught and must be acquired through experience, observations, involvement, notions and feel-ings. That I believe is the definition of art. INTERVIEWER: So it keeps it interesting. DR. HASHEM: Yes, yes.INTERVIEWER: Well, I think that’s it. Thank you, Dr. Hashem. DR. HASHEM: Thank you.Q & A with Dr Hazem Hashem (Continued from page 7)Dr. Hashem is the Medical Director of Visions Unllimed and Wellness and Recovery Center Noth,Chief Psychiatrist/Chief of mental health at Solano State Prison, and Board certified in generalpsychiatry and Forensic Psychiatrist
  • 172. The Empowerment MagazineTable of ContentWelcome to the first issue of The Empowerment Magazine 2Activities That Will Help You Feel Good About Yourself 3The Pursuit of Contentment and Happiness 4 , 5Q & A with Dr Hazem Hashem 6, 7, 20Promote your Services and Programs in The Empowerment 8Living My Life with a Mental Illness 9Can Someone Please Color Me? 10The Resiliency Factor 11, 14Working with your Psychiatrist 12Kids Corner 13You Are The Only One You Have (Poem) 15Thinking Fresh and Eating clean 17,18Did you know That? 16Everything you Need to Know About Mental Health Services 19Quina Lasagna Recipe 21Resources 22, 23at least five of your strengths, for example, persistence, courage, friendliness, creativityat least five things you admire about yourself, for example the way you have raised your children, your goodrelationship with your brother, or your spirituality10 ways you can "treat" or reward yourself that dont include food and that dont cost anything, such as walkingin woods, window-shopping, watching children playing on a playground, gazing at a babys face or at a beauti-ful flower, or chatting with a friendthe five greatest achievements in your life so far, like recovering from a serious illness, graduating from highschool, or learning to use a computer10 things you can do to make yourself laugh10 things you could do to help someone else10 things that you do that make you feel good about yourselfSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services Web site: www.samhsa.gov.Make a list of —Activities That Will Help You Feel Good About YourselfSACPROS does not necessarily endorse the views, services or products advertised in this magazine. The opinions expressed in thearticles are solely of the author (s). We are not responsible for omissions or errors. Reproduction in whole or in part for reasons otherthan personal use, is strictly prohibited without prior written permission from the author or publisher.
  • 173. Our brain has a kind of default because it just repeatsthe same automatic pattern of thinking — until we intro-duce a different thought and repeat the happy-producing thought. How do we rewire our brain and cre-ate new habits of thinking? Consider a commitment tochanging the thoughts, practice meditation or mindful-ness, or focus on the breath. When we change ourthoughts, our brain rewires itself, and now we have hap-pier patterns of thinking. Remember the saying,“garbage in, garbage out”? Our brains will help usachieve happier thoughts IF we deliberately feed itthoughts of love, joy, compassion, gratitude, altruism,optimism, etc.3. I seize the moment to be happy. In other words, Idon’t wait to get a different something or wait forsomeone to change, or for life to show up differently inorder to be happy. Happiness is available to you rightnow. Happiness exists when we develop an awarenessthat we are OK in our mind, heart, and spirit. We feelhappier as we learn to make peace with who we are andwhere we are. If we keep waiting to be happy for whenbetter days come (better health, better finances, bet-ter friends, better home, etc.), we have missed thebeauty of the precious moment of available content-ment. When we wake up to the idea that we have an al-ways and forever internal resource for happiness, wecan feel more peace and joy. Footnote: These strategiesare not about denial. These strategies combine -acceptance of “what is” with purposeful intention tomove in productive, beneficial, and more contented di-rections.Too many people think they can’t possibly change. Nottrue. It does take effort, lots of purposeful effort tomove from the familiar road of unhappiness to take aside route to a road of happiness (and let it grow to be-come your new Main Street). Focus and take the steps.Even if they are baby steps, make a change. Do some-thing different that will increase the moments of joyand peace. Develop a strategy of “I can do this.” Tellyourself, “I can be more grateful today. I can eliminatemy typical negative phrases and repeat new empoweringphrases. I can seize more moments to connect with myhappiness within whether circumstances change — ornot. My brain will help me out and in time it will becomeeasier to feel differently.” I discovered that I alwayshad Main Street available within. I made the changes Italk about. You can too. I believe in you wholeheartedly.Terry Zick M.A.Terry has a Master of Arts Degree in Counseling from Univer-sity of Colorado-Denver. She has 30 years experience workingwith adults, children and family preservation. She has workedin settings such as: non-profits, schools, justice system, alco-hol/drug programs. Her role as counselor, consultant andtrainer maintains a focus on spirituality, health and wellness.Terry currently facilitates groups and supports individualizedmentoring at the Wellness and Recovery Center North .Author’s Bio
  • 174. Sometimes there are no other symptoms that can be observed to determine if a patient’s depression is caused by thy-roid dysfunction. After discovering this, it has become standard to perform a test called TSH to check for this condi-tion so we can begin effective treatment. For other medications, such as lithium or Depakote, it has been found thatthe effectiveness of the drug is based on how much is actually being absorbed into your system. You need a certain levelof the medicine in your blood in order for the medication to be effective. Above that level, it may give cause side ef-fects without additional benefit and below that range is ineffective. In the case of lithium, monitoring the level in theblood is very important. Lithium is excreted in the kidney. If you have a fast kidney, you will need more lithium thansomeone who has a slow kidney in order to reach the ideal level in the blood. This is why therapeutic treatment some-times must also be complimented with lab tests to complete the treatment process.INTERVIEWER: So as opposed to a specific doesage, one must look at how the medication is interactingwith the individual’s body?DR. HASHEM: Exactly. There is also another realm of lab work we use in order to tell is a medication is doing harm toa patient’s body or is creating an adverse reaction when mixed with another medication. For example, Depakote, Tegre-tol or other seizure medications tend to sometimes harm the liver at a very slow pace. We periodically check liver func-tion and keep track of a patient’s blood count to make sure these harmful effects are not occurring. Commonly, with newsecond-generation antipsychotics like Zyprexa, Seroquel and Abilify, , it was found there was a high percentage of pa-tients who developed diabetes and high cholesterol while on these medications. In those cases we will closely monitorweight, BMI, blood sugar and cholesterol.INTERVIEWER: How do psychiatrists help empower people to accomplish their treatment goals?DR. HASHEM: In the last few years, Psychiatrists have actually been cornered into just being medication prescribers.But we also my use the short time we have to give “cognitive therapeutic hints.” The most empowered patient is a pa-tient who is knowledgeable about their condition. This is the foundation of empowerment. This is why I always encour-age people to research on internet, look up their symptoms and read about the conditions, read about the medications,and read about the different side effects and things like that. In some cases, the doctor may miss to ask the rightquestions. This can lead to a physician missing important clues to a patient’s condition, inevitably resulting in misdiagno-sis. When a patient says “I read about a particular condition and I feel it fit me perfectly.” I am happy to discuss andmatch their symptoms with the right treatment. Doctors should not feel insulted by that. Much to the contrary, it isvery helpful for the person to know exactly what symptoms they’re dealing with. So I also ask people to put every symp-tom they have on a scale of one to ten before we start treatment and a number after treatment. Each time we readjustthe dose or change a medicine. This way, you’re actually giving the doctor a good picture of whether the medicine hasworked or not. If a patient is not aware of or doesn’t keep track of their symptoms, the medicine may have worked per-fectly, but they deem it ineffective because they themselves were not aware of the changes taking place. So it is veryimportant for both the doctor and the patient to recognize what has been achieved and what has yet to be achieved.Knowing a patient’s preference is also helpful in the treatment. In some cases a patient might say,”oh, I heard horriblethings about Zyprexa,” or Prozac or any drug for that matter. If the doctor continues to insist on giving that medica-tion anyway, the patient may be reluctant to take it. Additionally, the patient will most likely give a negative report onthe medications effectiveness since they already have a bad impression of the medication anyway. So it is very impor-tant for the patient to know what they are taking and to be educated on exactly how they are being treated.INTERVIEWER: Medications help people feel better, but do people disempower themselves when they giveall the credit to medications during the healing process?DR. HASHEM: Absolutely. That’s a very good point, actually. I don’t feel medication by any means is the only reasonpeople get better or worse in certain cases. As we just mentioned, the perception people have about their condition isalso paramount. Placebo is a perfect example. I read an article that said drug companies are having big problems withthe impact of placebo because the placebo has such a strong impact in the healing process that placebo success ratesoften surpassed the success rates of the actual medication. The pharmaceutical company, Merck, tried to create anantidepressant they thought would be highly successful. Ironically, when confronted with the fact that they wouldbe trying a brand new highly successful antidepressant, when they gave the control group the placebo they feltbetter strictly by the perception and the new medication could not be approved.Continued on page 20
  • 175. My life has not ended up where I thought it would...thankfully. I was one of those children who received messages, bothverbal and non-verbal, that she was not going to be worth much. And I bought it, for a while. And then the course of mylife changed, and then it changed again, and again. Until I reached a place where I was able to break free from the liesand fully embrace the realization that I am deserving and able to create a healthy, happy life for myself. This article iswritten to illuminate one of the most powerful principles I have discovered in my wellness process.The universe has brought me a number of amazingly special people as I have navigated down my life’s path. Interest-ingly enough, these folks have always showed up at just the right time to help me overcome whatever was blocking myability to be healthy and whole at that point in my life. One lady in particular, Mrs. V., came along at just one of thesetimes. Mrs. V. was a very spunky, animated, fun-loving 75-year-old Vietnamese woman who came to the United Statesin 1955 as the bride of an American serviceman. To say she had a fascinating story would be an understatement.I believe the gift I received from her was the infusion of the concept of “resiliency” into my way of thinking. Since earlychildhood, I have had a place inside of me that has always felt lost. It is the place where my sadness lives. Sometimesthat place feels big enough to swallow me whole and sometimes it becomes so small I forget it is there. It is always aplace desperate for hope. In Mrs. V I found a woman who was overflowing with hopefulness. She seemed to haveenough for the both of us and I found myself being drawn more and more to her spiritual presence. No matter what cameher way, she would declare it to be a cause for celebration. To her, obstacles were seen not as hardship but rather asopportunities for growth and spiritual strengthening. That concept was new to me. I mean, I would have a meltdown justtrying to choose a type of breakfast cereal at the grocery store.In May of 2006 Mrs. V allowed me to interview her for one of my Social Work classes. At the end of the interview sheshared with me some of her memories from the war. People around her were sick and dying. Families struggled to findenough food to eat. Husbands, sons, and brothers were lost to the war. Her community underwent a complete culturalupheaval as hundreds of thousands of women found themselves suddenly head of their household, needing to findsome way to provide for their families. I was amazed at the manner in which she relayed her stories. There was nevereven a hint of defeat. I did at one point try to move the conversation toward the idea of adversity. Mrs. V simply trans-lated my statement into another example of resilience and continued to tell her story. Her story was not a story of victimi-zation, but rather of determination. By the end of the interview I was hooked. I wanted what she had. I altered my direc-tion academically and personally to incorporate the concept of resilience into my journey.What I found is that resiliency factors can be divided into several distinctive categories:Personality: Resilience is attributed to certain characteristics a person carries within their self that contribute to positivehealthy outcomes in spite of external chaos. A number of personality characteristics have been identified as contributingto resilience, including humor, empathy, and an easy temperament. These personality traits lend themselves to the like-ability of a person. A person who is likeable will presumably have more friends and therefore more support. This seemsto be of particular importance during the adolescent years when peer support becomes developmentally vital, but it alsoholds true into adulthood.Locus of control: Perception of self and the problem. People who see themselves as having control over their livestend to be healthier, happier, and more able to overcome difficulties. Likewise, those who see the problem(s) as beingoutside of their control tend to become more discouraged, depressed, and less able to take corrective action. Peoplewho believe they can create changes in their lives will act in ways congruent to that belief, such as getting an education,seeking services, or calling on their support system for help. A closely related resiliency factor is determination. Some-one who believes they are able to make changes in their life will be more inclined to override the desire to give up whenthings seem unbearable.Cognitive abilities and education: A person who has the cognitive ability to think through life’s difficulties and then de-velop and implement a plan of action is much more likely to avoid becoming stuck and discouraged. Directly connectedto cognitive abilities is education. Continued on page 14Resiliency Factor
  • 176. I was diagnosed with a mental illness in my early teens andhave had this cross to bear since then. Although I am able tomaintain a relatively “normal” lifestyle, my world is puncturedby episodes of drama brought on by my illness. Over theyears I have been helped by an assortment of medicationsthat help keep me within bounds. I am keenly aware of whichmedications and dosage I need to control my psychotic epi-sodes. I am also aware of the circumstances that triggerthese episodes, and I can only control them with the help andintervention of others.I came to Sacramento in late 2005 from Santa Rosa AcuteCounty Hospital. I was having some trust issues with the staffand my doctor that led to me lashing out and behaving in cer-tain destructive ways. For a period of time we had a very hos-tile relationship. When the staff there found out I had adaughter in Sacramento, they packed my few belongings intoa paper bag, drove me to her house, and dropped me offthere with no medications and no information on availablesupport services. It was a very dark period in my life. I wasdisoriented and in a strange new town.It was not easy for me to adjust to this situation, and hence Ihad several breakdowns and did some cuttings, which landedme in the hospital. It was from there that I was directed to anagency with wraparound services.In the beginning my outlook on my life was gloomy, and myrelationship with staff was an extension of the relationship Ihad with the Santa Rosa staff. I didn’t trust the staff or doc-tors. As far as I was concerned, they really didn’t care aboutme.It was at this time that I met a person by the name of Eugenewho for some unknown reason saw in me something no oneelse saw. Over the next several years he patiently and com-passionately taught me other ways of reaching out to thosewho were trying to help me and to trust in them, all the timewhile dealing with the horror that was my life.It was because of him that I finally started to accept the treat-ment that was being offered and to begin to build a relation-ship with my counselors and doctors. Being mentally ill mostof my life, I lacked coping skills when I became overwhelmedor stressed. My usual behavior when faced with drama Icouldn’t resolve immediately was to attempt suicide. The onlyway for me to break this cycle was for my doctors to balanceand monitor my medication and for the staff to be presentearly on in my crisis prevention and to be proactive in helpingme to stop a full-blown episode.This has not been easy, as a review of my records will show.I am aware of many circumstances that trigger my episodesand I can only control them with the help and intervention ofothers. It is important to know the triggers that can and willcause episodes, such as incorrect medication, frustration,anger, sleep deprivation, anxiety, isolation, and the failure -to respond of those I ask for help. After that it becomes acombination or a chain of events that leads to my break-down, usually ending in self-mutilation as I again try to killmyself. It is an endless cycle that those close to me haveseen all too often. From experience I know what the be-ginning signs are when I am about to have an episode. Itis during this initial stage that I have learned to ask forhelp. But sometimes asking for help is like telling adrowning person who is gulping water to relax and swimcalmly to shore; it is not easy in the moment.As I have grown with the assistance of this agency, I be-gan to attend more of the group sessions that were of-fered. I learned better ways of coping with the difficultiesof my life. I was better able to call and talk to the staffduring the night, a very critical time for me. Many timesthat was all I needed to avert an episode. As I began togain more self-control and more self-esteem, I was betterable to become responsible for controlling my own medi-cation. I found the confidence and with the assistance ofmy counselor, I was able to move out of the “room andboard” rotation and into a single room at a family resi-dence. I am better able to manage my money, to thepoint where I am responsible enough to pay my rent andassociated bills plus to budget my income so as to pro-vide nutritious meals for myself throughout the month.The hallmark of my accomplishments has been that I amable to work part-time as a receptionist at Turning Point’sfront desk, which they have kept available for me evenafter I have had setbacks.Over the years I have had some very difficult times.Through all this, the staff has always treated me like aperson who has a mental illness and not like the illnessitself, which is the way I have been treated most of mylife. Because of the support, the education, and my com-mitment, I am learning to value my own life and to lookfor other ways of responding to difficulties and breakinglifelong habits.I will always have a mental illness. I will never be able tohandle the consequences alone. Because of the waystaff treat me, I no longer feel like I am just a case num-ber. Now I am a person, a person who has a new family.The staff looks out for me in my darkest hour and con-tinually reaches out to welcome me back when I stumbleand fall. I no longer feel like I am alone. I have beengiven the strength to fight the demons that dwell withinme. You have helped me get back my life.Janet L Furia continues to work for Turning Point, shehas been employed for over a year. She has a personalgoal to help others in need and has expressed a desire tobecome a peer mentor. She is appreciated for her dedi-cation to educating others about the journey mentalhealth consumers experience.Author’s Bio
  • 177. One hot day as I was walking home from schoolwhen my aunt called me on my cell phone “Hello”? I said,my aunt says “I will pay you two hundred and fifty dollarsto baby sit my friend’s baby, Lewis. He is the best baby inthe whole wide world”. I thought about all that moneyand all the candy I could buy, and besides it could be thestart of my new business. “I would love to baby sit babyLewis”. I said. So my aunt brought baby Lewis over rightaway and you know what, he was a monkey! That’s right!Lewis was actually a baby monkey! “I thought Lewis wasa baby!” I yelled. “He is,” said my aunt “a baby monkey”.Thinking about all that money and all that candy I couldbuy, I took Lewis in my care.Lewis was calm until my little brother gave him acandy Bar. After eating the candy bar, he went wild! Hewas acting like he was in the jungle. He climbed on thetable and jumped up and down like he was bananas!“Don’t do that!” I screamed. “Don’t swing from the ceilingfan. That is dangerous!” I yelled at the top of my lungs. Iwas worried about how much cash I would lose if he washurt. So I had to think of something quick. I gave Lewisthree bananas and put him in my little brother’s toy car. Iwanted to throw him out of my house, but I thought aboutall that cash. How long will he have energy? I don’t knowhow much more I can take.No Monkey BusinessK I D S C O R N E RI decided Lewis, my brother, and I would have a party. We turned on the radio to D.J. Jam, D.J. Jam, playedthe music while we danced. Lewis was happy. I thought about all the money I was going to make, and I began todance. It was so much fun. D.J. Jam played my favorite song and Lewis danced his tail off. He danced all over theplace. My brother and I chanted, “Go, Lewis! Go, Lewis!”Something went terribly wrong when Lewis went in my room. He was jumping up and down on my bed. Then, hestarted screaming. I was just about to catch him by his little tail when something strange happened. Lewis fell fastasleep just like that. I guess it was naptime for both of us because I fell asleep right next to him. Lewis snored like a loudelephant and he also slept with his eyes open. It was so scary. RING! RING! The phone woke me up. I answered. It wasmy aunt. “I am on my way, and if Lewis had a good time, the money is yours”, she boasted. Now all I could think about ismy new friend. He is different from my other friends, but that doesn’t matter. Do you want a new friend? Dr. De-onna WilemmeDr. Wilemme is a product of the Stockton and Sacramento School Districts. She worked in the mental health field in thebeginning of her career. She was employed by Turning Point Community Programs and then later went into education.She is currently employed by Memphis City Schools. She was a classroom teacher for many years. She now works asan administrator.PUZZLE WORLDAuthor’s BioYour opinion is welcomed, as well as any new ideas or suggestions, that you have for theKids Corner. Contact us at info@sacpros.org or by phone at (916) 222-7541
  • 178. I sit here alone, lost in thought, when I become suddenly aware that someone has quietly settled down next to me. Atfirst I attempt to remain focused on the task at hand, my meditation session, which has not been part of my daily routinefor quite some time now.Just then I reflect momentarily on that simple fact, and the sadness it brings to my heart. Then my mind jostles me backto my task. I relent with a deep inhale and exhale to re-center (or try to).As I sit with my eyes closed, refocusing on my breathing, I once again raised to that place in my inner eye that is mysanctuary. My mind lingers, watching a gorgeous butterfly that has alit onto the top of the coneflower. How majesticthey are. So delicate with their paper-thin, crisp wings emblazoned with color and gentle sloping curves of their poised,balanced bodies, swaying ever so slightly in the cool breeze.Wait! Something almost undetectable moves (shifts) and my fluttering wings of color have disappeared. At the samemoment I get an image of someone watching me (my eyes are still closed) ever so intently. I hesitate to look as I haveyet to know who it was that settled next to me. I carefully peek through one eye as I slightly turn my head just a bit so Ican discover who resides there in the next space.To my shock, gasping loudly (hand quickly covering my mouth to stifle the sound), I find that it is myself, staring back atme with the same intent look as I saw in my flash of an image previously. I also notice that there is something morebehind her gaze. I quickly calm myself as panic has no place here. After all, it is only myself sitting there, but how dis-concerting that can be at first, to fully realize the image of yourself staring back at you.I ask the presence of myself why she is there. Not speaking, she continues to gaze at me whilst smiling, serenely, with-out judgment, and with great sadness that mirrors the one inside my soul. I cannot go back to my meditation because Ijust have to know what "I" want. My mind races as I try to understand. I ask again with still no response. I relent towait for an answer, hoping that there truly is one.As we both sit in silence I turn my focus to the texture of the grass I am sitting on, and running my left hand through.Crisp – soft – slightly wet from the dew and miles and miles of it undisturbed. After a space of time indefinable in mymind, I do not recall how long, the image next to me speaks. Softly, quietly, simply she says "its wonderful to see youhere; its been a long time since you last visited your sanctuary". That catches me off guard, I asked "what do youmean?", knowing deep down that she meant my meditation sessions.She smiled sadly again and says, "You must take care of you every minute of every day. Remember your mindfulness;remember your joys as well as your losses. Honor them equally so you can recall where you been, where you are, andwhere you need to go". "Remember this...You are not and cannot be perfect, you will continue to grow, but only if youallow yourself to – you will fall short – you will triumph– you will have to stop and start according to your progress on anygiven day. Reflect on who you were, who you are, and who you can be. Remain true to yourself, grow as you need tofor you, make changes in yourself and your life that are for you not everyone else. Love yourself now as you are andwho you may become. Acceptance will be your best companion; you have forgotten yourself that is why Im sitting nextto you. You are not embracing all of you. Let us become one again, dont let me die away. Let us grow, prosper, youare too valuable to lose. Be gentle with yourself, you are the only one you have. RavenSong FrisellaMyFreeCopyright Registration Number---MCN:CNLS2-X62LM-YN535Author’s BioRavenson is a true artist at heart. She was a published poet before the age of 18. She is an avid reader, alwaysinquisitive and yearning for knowledge taking every opportunity to learn new ways to help her own recovery andhealth. She is in process of writing a book about her life.You Are the Only One You HavePOETRY CORNER
  • 179. Summer 2011 21Quina Lasagna RecipeThis is an original receipt by Melanie Martinez ofSacramento, California.The main ingredient in this delicious dish is calledQuina; what is Quina? Quina is a seed that origi-nated in South America, but it taste and cooks like agrain it often mistaken and called a grain.Quina has several health benefits therefore; it isalso called a super food a complete protein. Quinoacontains all 9 essential amino acids that are buildingblocks for your muscles. High levels of Magnesiumto help relax your muscles and blood vessels. Fiberto nourish and tone your colon and Manganese andcopper they act as an antioxidant in the body.Melanie introduced the Quina Lasagna to Phomma-sone Griffith who loved it so much and now makesthis dish on a regular base. except she added herown twist into the dish.The receiptUse your favorite 24 oz jar marinara, tomato orspaghetti sauce,Quina 1 cup – cook in two cups of water½ small OnionCheese shredded or sliced 2 cups1 Red Bell PepperEgg plant – sauté before adding to receiptMushrooms ½ cup2 Zucchini2 Yellow SquashTrader Joe’s meat less breakfast sausage – cutin round slices brown in a panSeasonings – Rosemary, Oregano, Parsley,Thyme or Italian seasoningMelanie’s version MMM MMM goodPhommasone took out the egg plant, meat lessbreakfast sausage and add broccoli, garlic poweralone with the other seasoning and couscous to theQuina to have a rice like texture (watch your highcarbohydrates content with eating couscous) Lasa-gna pictured aboveAdd sauce to the bottom of your dish, layer withyour vegetables then a layer of Quina with cheeseover the top. Repeat the prior step up to 2 layerscook for 45 minutes to one hour at 350 degrees letcool and serve. Try this nutritionals dish and addyour personal touch.About Phommasone GriffithPhommasone has been working in the mental health field for morethan 12 years. She has a bachelors degree in Social Work fromSacramento State University. She has many hobbies but her fa-vorite pastime is cooking and feeding family and friend healthydelicious meals.About Melanie MartinezMelanie is an advocate for people with disabilities and homeless.She holds an AA degree in Human Services; she is currently a vol-unteer at the Wellness and Recovery Center facilitating an artexpression group and an assistant co-facilitator in the Nutritionsupport group. She enjoys creating nutritional meals for friendsand family.
  • 180. Empowerment Magazine Submission AgreementThank you for your submission to Empowerment Magazine. Please fill in the blanks bellow and sign at thebottom. Its good idea to keep a copy of this agreement for your records. Remember that although youare giving Empowerment Magazine permission to publish your interviews, photos,manuscripts, videos, and so on, you still own the copyright.Description or Title of interviews,photos, manuscripts, videos, and so on :Name of the contributor:Submission Terms and ConditionsBy signing this document, the contributor guarantees that he/she owns all the copyrights of interviews,photos, manuscripts, videos, and so on described above and is authorized to grant the EmpowermentMagazine:1) the right to publish the material described above in its magazine, on its websites or any advertising orpromotional material it wishes and2) to edit, rewriter, and re-organize the interviews, photos, manuscripts, videos, and so on asnecessary for style, length, clarity, content and philosophical considerations.Again, even though the contributor is giving these rights to Empowerment Magazine, the contributor still ownsthe copyrights and is free to submit his/her material to other publications at will. The contributor herebyirrevocably agrees to release Empowerment Magazine from any and all responsibility or liability.Contributor further understands that his/her participation in Fall 2011 issue ofEmpowerment Magazine is voluntary, without compensation of any kindDate this Submission Agreement is made: _____/______/_____.Name (printed):Signature:E-mail:Phone: ( )Hwww.EmpowermentMagazine.orgH
  • 181. WINTER 2011 SUBMISSION CONTRACTEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWINTER 2011 ISSUE SUBMISSION CONTRACTBelow is the SUBMISSION CONTRACT for 2011 Winter Issue.The links below allow for downloading the form in MS Word or PDF format. Please fill out this form and return as soon as possible.● Contract Winter 2011 Issue - Empowerment Magazine.docx● Contributors Contract Winter 2011 Issue - Empowerment Magazine.pdfThank you again for your valuable contribution tothe Empowerment MagazineAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/SUBMISSIONCONTRAC.aspx [4/21/2013 11:02:54 AM]
  • 182. Living My Life with a Mental Illness by Janet L. FuriaEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsLiving My Life with a Mental Illness by Janet L. FuriaI was diagnosed with a mental illness in my early teens and have had this cross to bear since then. Although I am able to maintain a relatively“normal” lifestyle, my world is punctured by episodes of drama brought on by my illness. Over the years I have been helped by an assortmentof medications that help keep me within bounds. I am keenly aware of which medications and dosage I need to control my psychotic episodes. I amalso aware of the circumstances that trigger these episodes, and I can only control them with the help and intervention of others.I came to Sacramento in late 2005 from Santa Rosa Acute County Hospital. I was having some trust issues with the staff and my doctor that led tome lashing out and behaving in certain destructive ways. For a period of time we had a very hostile relationship. When the staff there found out I hada daughter in Sacramento, they packed my few belongings into a paper bag, drove me to her house, and dropped me off there with no medicationsand no information on available support services. It was a very dark period in my life. I was disoriented and in a strange new town.It was not easy forme to adjust to this situation, and hence I had several breakdowns and did some cuttings, which landed me in the hospital. It was from there that Iwas directed to an agency with wraparound services.In the beginning my outlook on my life was gloomy, and my relationship with staff was an extension of the relationship I had with the Santa Rosa staff.I didn’t trust the staff or doctors. As far as I was concerned, they really didn’t care about me. It was at this time that I met a person by the nameof Eugene who for some unknown reason saw in me something no one else saw. Over the next several years he patiently and compassionatelytaught me other ways of reaching out to those who were trying to help me and to trust in them, all the time while dealing with the horror that was my life.It was because of him that I finally started to accept the treatment that was being offered and to begin to build a relationship with my counselorsand doctors. Being mentally ill most of my life, I lacked coping skills when I became overwhelmed or stressed. My usual behavior when faced withdrama I couldn’t resolve immediately was to attempt suicide. The only way for me to break this cycle was for my doctors to balance and monitormy medication and for the staff to be present early on in my crisis prevention and to be proactive in helping me to stop a full-blown episode.This has not been easy, as a review of my records will show. I am aware of many circumstances that trigger my episodes and I can only controlthem with the help and intervention of others.It is important to know the triggers that can and will cause episodes, such as incorrect medication, frustration, anger, sleep deprivation, anxiety,isolation, and the failure to respond of those I ask for help. After that it becomes a combination or a chain of events that leads to my breakdown,usually ending in self-mutilation as I again try to kill myself. It is an endless cycle that those close to me have seen all too often. From experience Iknow what the beginning signs are when I am about to have an episode. It is during this initial stage that I have learned to ask for help. Butsometimes asking for help is like telling a drowning person who is gulping water to relax and swim calmly to shore; it is not easy in the moment.As I have grown with the assistance of this agency, I began to attend more of the group sessions that were offered. I learned better ways of copingwith the difficulties of my life. I was better able to call and talk to the staff during the night, a very critical time for me. Many times that was all I neededto avert an episode. As I began to gain more self-control and more self-esteem, I was better able to become responsible for controlling myown medication. I found the confidence and with the assistance of my counselor, I was able to move out of the “room and board” rotation and intoa single room at a family residence. I am better able to manage my money, to the point where I am responsible enough to pay my rent andassociated bills plus to budget my income so as to provide nutritious meals for myself throughout the month. The hallmark of my accomplishmentshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LivingMyLifewithaMentalIllness.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:02:57 AM]
  • 183. Living My Life with a Mental Illness by Janet L. Furiahas been that I am able to work part-time as a receptionist at Turning Point’s front desk, which they have kept available for me even after I havehad setbacks.Over the years I have had some very difficult times. Through all this, the staff has always treated me like a person who has a mental illness and notlike the illness itself, which is the way I have been treated most of my life. Because of the support, the education, and my commitment, I am learningto value my own life and to look for other ways of responding to difficulties and breaking lifelong habits.I will always have a mental illness. I will never be able to handle the consequences alone. Because of the way staff treat me, I no longer feel like I amjust a case number. Now I am a person, a person who has a new family. The staff looks out for me in my darkest hour and continually reaches outto welcome me back when I stumble and fall. I no longer feel like I am alone. I have been given the strength to fight the demons that dwell within me.You have helped me get back my life.Janet continues to work for Turning Point. She has been employed for over a year. Janet has a personal goal tohelp others in need and has expressed a desire to become a peer mentor. She is appreciated for her dedicationto educating others about the journey mental health consumers experience.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/LivingMyLifewithaMentalIllness.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:02:57 AM]
  • 184. Tough Times by Cynthia WakefieldEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsTough Times by Cynthia WakefieldTough times dont last, tough people do. ~ Robert SchullerI think, we can all agree, life is getting tough. It seems as if everything around us is collapsing, and crumbling before our very eyes. Many people areuncertain about the future, money, relationships, health, and careers. In fact, we are beginning to question the very nature of life itself.In these uneasy times, my advice is simply: When things go wrong, dont go with them. Have you watched the news lately? Its quite depressing isnt it?With all of this mess going on around us, you have to monitor your mind and mouth. Im not oblivious to shocking headlines and a poor economy, but Icant consume myself with it; because, whatever you focus on the longest becomes the strongest.Everyone has one friend who calls with nothing but bad news. I have to talk to people who see opportunities in the eye of the storm. Not the person whoadvises me to put my money under a mattress, or recommends taking self-defense classes because crime rates are increasing. I have to observe mysurroundings for mental protection or else, Id be afraid to live!Cynthia WakefieldElise Robinson said, Things may happen around you and things may happen to you, but the only thing that matters is what happens in you. In the midstof chaos, you have to brace yourself, build your faith, feed your mind with positive materials, and seek opportunities youve never considered before. Youshould be getting stronger, smarter, and strategizing to launch a new life, blindsiding everyone with your success and tenacity.In times like these, we have to look for opportunities and act fast like never before. I agree with speaker Steve Duncan, Opportunity stands bysilently, waiting for us to recognize it. And remember, opportunities may not come in cute, carefully wrapped packages. Opportunities may come indefeats, setbacks, and failures.Dr. Robert Schuller once said, Tough times never last, but tough people do. Make no mistake about it, times are tough, but you are tougher. Whatare the odds of surviving 400 million sperm? Those are the odds you beat to get here! You areresilient beyond your wildest imagination. Stop looking at the circumstances around you and as Tony Robbins would say,bring out the Giant Within.Lastly, find your true self. We live within the conversations in our heads and the recommendations of others. For years, I operated as the broken girl,which was my families’ nickname for me. Believe it or not, I answered to it! There was one person, my former teacher, who interrupted the years ofnegativity and low expectations for me by saying, “Never let someones opinion of you become your reality.”Author’s BioCynthia has her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and is currently working on her Masters in Counseling. She has over 15 years of experienceworking in the mental health field and her passion is working with the low income and/or homeless that have experienced trauma in their lives. Shehttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ToughTimes.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:01 AM]
  • 185. Tough Times by Cynthia Wakefieldis currently a Medication Support Mentor with the Wellness & Recovery Center, North and is excited to be back in the Non-profit sector. She willcontinue working with those with PTSD by facilitating support groups and offering others educational information about trauma related disorders.If you find this story useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ToughTimes.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:01 AM]Submit Query
  • 186. You are The Only One You HaveEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsYou are the only one you haveWritten by RavenSong Frisella, February 4, 2011I sit here alone, lost in thought, when I become suddenly aware that someone has quietly sat down next to me. Asked firstI attempted to remain focused on the task at hand, my meditation session, which has not been part of my daily team forquite some time now.Just then I reflect momentarily on the simple fact, and said this it brings to my heart. Then my mind jostles me back tomy task. I relent with a deep inhale and exhale to re-center (or try to).As I sit with my eyes closed, refocusing on my breathing, I once again raised to that place in my inner eye that is mysanctuary. My mind lingers, watching gorgeous butterfly that has a lit onto the top of the coneflower. How majestic.So delicate with their paper-thin, crisp wings emblazoned with color and gentle sloping curves of their poise, balancedbodies, swaying ever so slightly in the cool breeze.Wait! Something almost undetectable moves (shifts) and my fluttering wings of color have disappeared. At the samemoment I get an image of someone watching me (my eyes are still closed) ever so intently. I hesitate to look as I have yetto know who it was who settled next to me. I carefully peeked through one eye as I slightly turn my head just a bit so Ican discover who reside there in the next space.To my shock, gasping loudly (hand quickly covering my mouth to stifle the sound), I find that it is myself, staring back atme with the same intent look as I saw it in my flash of an image previously. I also notice that there is something morebehind gaze. I quickly call myself this panic has no place here. After all, it is only I sitting there, but how disconcerting thatcan be at first, to fully realize the image of yourself staring back at you.I asked the presence of myself why she is there Not speaking, she continues to gaze at me whilst smiling, serenelywithout judgment, and with great sadness that mirrors the one inside my soul. I cannot go back to my meditation becauseI just have to know what "I" want. My mind races as I try to understand. I ask a can was still no response. I relent to waitfor an answer, hoping that there truly is one.As we both sit in silence I turn my focus to the texture of the grasslands sitting on, and running my left hand through. Crisphttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/RavenSongFrisella.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:05 AM]Submit Query
  • 187. You are The Only One You Have– soft – slightly wet from the due and miles and miles of it undisturbed. After a space of time indefinable in my mind, I donot recall how long, the image next to her speaks. Softly, quietly, simply she says "its wonderful to see you here; its beena long time since you last visited your sanctuary". That catches me off guard, I asked "what do you mean?", Knowingdeep down that she meant my meditation sessions.She smiled sadly again and says, "You must take care of you every minute of every day. Remember yourmindfulness, remember your choice as well as your losses, honor them equally so you can recall where you been, whereyou are, and where you need to go". "Remember this...You are not and cannot be perfect, you will continue to grow, butonly if you allow yourself to – you will fall short – you will triumph– you will have to stop and start according to yourprogress on any given day. Reflect on who you were, who you are, and who you can be. Remain true to yourself, grow asyou need to for you, make changes in yourself and your life that are for you not everyone else. Love yourself now as youare and who you may become. Acceptance will be your best companion; you have forgotten yourself that is why Imsitting next to you. You are not embracing all of you. Let us become one again, dont let me die away. Let us grow,prosper, you are too valuable to lose. Be gentle with yourself, you are the only one you have.About Ravensong FrusellaRavenson is a true artist at heart. She was a published poet before the age of 18. She is an avid reader, always inquisitiveand yearning for knowledge taking every opportunity to learn new ways to help her own recovery and health. She is in processof writing a book about her life.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/RavenSongFrisella.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:05 AM]
  • 188. The Box You Made For Me by Tammy Dyer, M.S.W.EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact Us● The Box You Made For Me by Tammy Dyer, M.S.W.Children come into this life, sparkly and new.“Oh how beautiful” the world exclaims! “10 fingers, 10 toesShe’s perfect, well nearly perfect, in every way”Then we begin to grow: walk, talk, expressAlarm bells ring! Merciful heavens look how she acts.What will people think? She’s a wild child, a heathen.If she is to succeed she will need to conformWe must help her achieve the social normTo keep her safe and in her place, so she will fit inside the boxAnd so they begin their daunting task, to fulfill moral obligationThey take that which is sparkly and newPerfect, well nearly perfect, in every way and work to make her fit.Fit for service, fit for life, fit to make a lovely wifeFit inside the box please dear; we know you will be safe in thereFor we made it out of loveWith hammer and chisel they go to work.Tap tap, tap tapA bit more off the top please, she still does not quite fitI want them all to love me; I see their heart’s concernI must find a way to fit,Fit inside the boxThe box they made from loveAs time goes by, the dilemma grows clearNot all of me will fitIt is time to make hard choices, time to finally decidePerhaps if I let go of a few non-essential itemsThen I can fit,Fit inside the box,The box they made from loveWhat to put in, what to leave out, well…I must have my body for without it life will ceaseMy soul will have to stay out; it just takes up too much roomThere is no light, no love, no joyPlenty of air, but I can hardly breathFinally I realize where things had gone so wrongAll the best parts of me were left outside the boxI must get out of hereI am dying,Dying in the box,The box they made from loveI find my way to freedomSpread my wingsBegin to flyHow good it is feel alive and sing a dreamer’s songI see their puzzled faces, hear their sighs of dismay“Dear, why must you think about those things? You shouldn’t feel that way!You know how much we love you. Did you take your pills today?”“She’s crazy you know, but it’s ok, she’s medicated”Will that help all of you, to label me this way?Is this how you can make sense of my rejection of the box,The box you made from loveIf giving me a label will free me up to think and feel,Express and create,Breathe the air and stretch my wings,Design my own fateThen I accept. As a matter of fact, I’ll take two, they’re small.Being crazy’s not so bad. It comes with certain freedoms.I can create my own box. Some can see the new box and they cheer me on.Those who cannot say “We know there’s no box there,but we let her think there is… it seems to make her happy.”Will you see, ever see, the beauty that is truly me?How can you love me if you don’t know me?How can you know me if you don’t understand?How can you understand, if you refuse to see,http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/TheBoxYouMadeForMe.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:08 AM]
  • 189. The Box You Made For Me by Tammy Dyer, M.S.W.My body cannot function without my heart and brainBut how to make them fit? I know, I’ll empty them firstThey should fit just fine now, void of thought and feelingMy lungs must come to fill me with air,But my wings will need to stay behindThat’s probably best, there’s no room to fly in here anywayLook everyone, look at me!I have finally fit,Fit inside the box,The box you made from love“Marvelous dear, we are so pleased!Of course, if you lost a few pounds YOU would be more comfortable in there”More comfortable? Yes that’s what I needI need to be more comfortable,Here inside the box,The box they made from loveBut it is so dark in hereNever mind flying: I cannot even moveI cannot think or feelThe box you created, created from love,Was meant to comfort you, not meTammy Dyer, M.S.W.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/TheBoxYouMadeForMe.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:08 AM]
  • 190. 2011 Winter ContactEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsWinter 2011 Submission ContractThank you for your interest in submitting an article/photo to Empowerment Magazine. You may also want visit www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/Submissions.aspx for more information on the kind of articles we are looking for.Submission TimelineYou may submit at any time. Deadline for submission is one month prior to the quarterly publication. (December, March, June & September). Onlyapproved articles will be published in the printed version of the Magazine . We accept articles/stories in the600-1200 range.Please follow the following guidelines when sending you article.1. Email your article to: contact@empowermentmagazine.com2. In the subject line of your email, type "THE TITLE OF YOUR ARTICLE"3. Include your article in the body of the email, and as WORD document attached to your email.4. Include the information on top of your email:First Name & Last NameAddressPhoneYour Email address5. Brief bio (110 words or less)6. You may submit an article with your photos.Submission Terms and ConditionsWe also reserve the right to share/publish the article/photo in any manner we choose in any our online and print edition magazine issues. We also reservethe right to edit manuscripts for style, length, clarity, content and philosophical considerations.By sending us your article/photo, you are certifying that you are the author or sole owner of the material that you are submitting to EmpowermentMagazine.You agree to indemnify Empowerment Magazine for all damages and expenses that may be incurred in connection with the material.The Empowerment reserves the right to use the articles in any of its online and print edition magazine issues. It also reserves the right to edit manuscriptsfor style, length, clarity, content and philosophical considerations.Click to the link to Download Submission Agreementhttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/2011WinterContact.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:11 AM]
  • 191. 2011 Winter ContactFall 2011- Submission Agreement - PDFFall 2011- Submission Agreement- Microsoft Word DocThank you for your interest in Empowerment Magazine! We look forward to working with you! If you have further questions, please call us at (916) 222-7541 or send us e-mail atcontact@empowermentmagazine.comAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/2011WinterContact.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:11 AM]
  • 192. Articles Being ReviewedEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsArticles being Reviewed for Publication● Zumba Fitness with “Hmong” Flavor Spiritual Retreats in Mental Health Programs by Cindy TuttleAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ArticlesBeingReviewed.aspx [4/21/2013 11:03:12 AM]
  • 193. Hope as Resiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer. M.S.W.EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsHope as Resiliency Factor by Tammy Dyer. M.S.W.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/TammyDFall2011.aspx [4/21/2013 11:03:14 AM]
  • 194. Immigration ResourcesImmigration Resourceshttp://www.newusimmigrants.comwww.NewUSimmigrants.com provides a wealth of information related to preparing children for school, all compiled into one user-friendly website.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ImmigrationResources.aspx [4/21/2013 11:03:15 AM]
  • 195. Living in the Present by Terry Zick, M.A.EMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsLiving in the Present by Terry Zick, M.A.All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/TerryZFall2011a.aspx [4/21/2013 11:03:17 AM]
  • 196. Phommasones Kitchen, Recipe for Mushroom TacosEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsPhommasones Kitchen, Recipe for Mushroom Tacoshttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/PhommasoneFall2011.aspx (1 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:18 AM]
  • 197. Phommasones Kitchen, Recipe for Mushroom TacosAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/PhommasoneFall2011.aspx (2 of 2) [4/21/2013 11:03:18 AM]
  • 198. Read the Magazine OnlineEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsRead the Magazine OnlineClick here to read The Empowerment Magazine Summer2011 Issue onlineAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ReaMagazineOnline.aspx [4/21/2013 11:03:20 AM]
  • 199. Spiritual Retreats in Mental Health Programs by Cindy TuttleEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsSpiritual Retreats in Mental Health Programs by Cindy TuttleFor more than 30 years, Cindy Tuttle has been dedicated to enriching the lives of adults and children challenged by mental illness or physical disabilities.She is the author of Joining the Dance of Life: Thirty Days to a Happier You!.She provides spiritual retreats for family members of adults with mental illness and consumers. These non-denominational retreats provide a time andspace to reflect on our purpose in life, our holiness, and how love is with us each day. Cindy has organized retreats for residential homes,churches, conferences, and mental health programs.“My hope is to offer a peaceful and fun environment where people can experience their own sacredness and share their challenges and how theyhave overcome them. My vision is to provide a place where people will walk away with a sense of hope and realize how precious and holy they are andhave some practical spiritual tools to take home with them to create their own spiritual path which they have already startedYou can contact Cindy at cindytuttle08@comcast.net. She would be glad to come to your program, conference, hospital, board and care; etc. This could bea one hour retreat on up to a week retreat. Details would be discussed to suit the programs needs. Below are examples of short retreats I offer.www.cindytuttletheauthor.com Spiritual Retreats for Caregivers of Adults and children Prayers of the Soul http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004UBGARWIf you find this page useful, please share with a friend!All materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/CindyTuttle.aspx [4/21/2013 11:03:28 AM]
  • 200. The Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain by Deonna Wilemme, PhDEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsThe Trip to Six Flags Magic Mountain by Deonna Wilemme, PhDAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/DRWilemmeFall2011.aspx [4/21/2013 11:03:30 AM]
  • 201. Zumba FitnessEMPOWERMENT MAGAZINEPromoting Overall Wellness and Mental Health Resiliency forthe Greater SacramentoHome Current Issue Magazine Sections Interviews Advertising/Sponsorship Distributions Contributors Calendar Videos Announcements Photos Contact UsZumba Fitness with “Hmong” FlavorAfter the birth of my fourth child, I was at an unbelievable 160 lbs for my 5 feet frame. My knees hurt, my back ache, and I was walkingup the stairs short of breath. I was devastated and depressed. I had become the stereotypical Hmong mother, short, stalky, anddefinitely very pear shaped.As a Social Worker, I understood I neededsomething to help myself.I attempted running again however the weight was not coming off. InOctober 2010, I was introduced to ZUMBA Fitness. ZUMBA Fitness is aLatin and International music based dance exercise. I instantly fell in lovewith ZUMBA Fitness. ZUMBA Fitness worked out my core, back, lower,and upper body.In 10 months working out with Zumba Fitness, I have reversed my body 13years to the weight I was before my first child. I currently weigh 120 lbs. Ifeel stronger and look better now than I did when I was a teenager.The feeling of being able to fit into clothes which I like, run pain free, andhave the energy to keep up with the children is an amazing motivator.ZUMBA Fitness is such a strong inspiration in my life, that I decided tobecome a LICENSED ZUMBA INSTRUCTOR.When the Hmong lived in the rural mountains of Laos 50 years ago, we hadminimal worries about diabetes, blood pressure, and obesity. The Hmongworked hard on their mountainside farms climbing up and down the land,http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ZumbaFitness.aspx (1 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:03:34 AM]Submit Query
  • 202. Zumba Fitnesscarrying heavy tools, and ate only when necessary.As we, Hmong live in a modern world where food is plentiful and at the tip of our fingers, ourHmong obesity levels and health complications have increased. The 3rd and 4th generationHmong youth waistlines are double the size of the first generation Hmong from the 1970-80’s.Therefore, we the Hmong need to adapt to different forms of exercise. ZUMBA Fitness is amodern exercise that is effective in combination with a good nutrition program. I lost all myweight naturally. I trained extremely hard, running with 10 lb weights on feet, strengthexercises, and balancing my nutrition. I did not use diet pills or go on any crazy diet fads.Diet pills and extreme dieting roller coasters weight loss making weight gain easier. When Isaw an unhealthy food or snack I would tell myself “…food/snack, you are not my friend…” andwalk away. I started using a smaller plate to eat my meals in and only one serving of the food.When I was finished eating, I would put my spoon down and push the plate away or get upfrom the table.I have tried all different forms of exercises. My list includes P90x, Tae Bo, Step Aerobics,Yoga, Tai Chi, Jogging, Bicycling, Bula Ball, and the Helix Machine. I enjoy each form and stillincorporate these exercises into my fitness routing.http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ZumbaFitness.aspx (2 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:03:35 AM]
  • 203. Zumba FitnessI have tried all different forms of exercises. My list includes P90x, Tae Bo,Step Aerobics, Yoga, Tai Chi, Jogging, Bicycling, Bula Ball, and the HelixMachine. I enjoy each form and still incorporate these exercises into myfitness routing.However, I use the ZUMBA Fitness program every day. I look forward toteaching the ZUMBA classes and can feel the excitement emergingthroughout the day. I teach in a variety of environments such as privatehouses, gyms, studios, therapy groups, classrooms, conferences, andparks. Zumba Fitness can be done everywhere and anywhere.There is a difference in the feeling of attending a 60 minute ZUMBA classvs a 30 minute run on the treadmill. I teach private and public classesranging from 1 student to 50 students during a one class period. Women,men, and children have attended ZUMBA classes. I have had randompeople jump in on the classes I have held at the park just because the classand I were having such a great time exercising with Zumba Fitness.One of the Hmong participants in my Zumba Fitness classes stated “Youand your weight loss is believable because you’re Hmong. You eat thesame thing we eat!”I am very proud to be a HMONG woman who is a LICENSED ZUMBAINSTRUCTOR. As Beto, the creator of Zumba Fitness always says “Addyour own flavor!” Here it is Zumba Fitness with Hmong Flavor and I want toshare this with the whole Hmong community. For further information onand to book a classes with Zumba Fitness, do contact: kaabzaub@If you find this article useful, please share with a friend!http://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ZumbaFitness.aspx (3 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:03:35 AM]Submit Query
  • 204. Zumba FitnessAll materials on these pages are copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose other than personal use. Therefore,reproduction, modification, storage in a retrieval system or re-transmission, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, for reasons other than personal use, is strictlyprohibited without prior written permission from the author/publisher. Empowerment Magazine is a quarterly online and in print mental health publication devoted to the promotion of overallwellness and resiliency for the Greater Sacramento region. The magazine is published by www.sacpros.org,a leading mental health website dedicating to strengthening and empoweringindividuals and families with reliable and easily accessible information about available services in the community. If you have any questions, please e-mail contact@empowermentmagazine.orghttp://www.empowermentmagazine.org/Pages/ZumbaFitness.aspx (4 of 4) [4/21/2013 11:03:35 AM]
  • 205. Empowerment Magazine Submission AgreementThank you for your submission to Empowerment Magazine. Please fill in the blanks bellow and sign at thebottom. Its good idea to keep a copy of this agreement for your records. Remember that although youare giving Empowerment Magazine permission to publish your interviews, photos,manuscripts, videos, and so on, you still own the copyright.Description or Title of interviews,photos, manuscripts, videos, and so on :Name of the contributor:Submission Terms and ConditionsBy signing this document, the contributor guarantees that he/she owns all the copyrights of interviews,photos, manuscripts, videos, and so on described above and is authorized to grant the EmpowermentMagazine:1) the right to publish the material described above in its magazine, on its websites or any advertising orpromotional material it wishes and2) to edit, rewriter, and re-organize the interviews, photos, manuscripts, videos, and so on asnecessary for style, length, clarity, content and philosophical considerations.Again, even though the contributor is giving these rights to Empowerment Magazine, the contributor still ownsthe copyrights and is free to submit his/her material to other publications at will. The contributor herebyirrevocably agrees to release Empowerment Magazine from any and all responsibility or liability.Contributor further understands that his/her participation in Winter 2011 issue of theEmpowerment Magazine is voluntary, without compensation of any kindDate this Submission Agreement is made: _____/______/_____.Name (printed):Signature:E-mail:Phone: ( )Hwww.EmpowermentMagazine.orgH