Using Facebook to Establish Trust

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Presented at Facebook Developer Garage Chicago on February 20, 2009

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  • Trust is more than just reputation – it is the establishment of comfort to engage in an action in the community. That’s posting or sharing on a messageboard or forum. You’ll have ratings left by users to give you trust in products. In a marketplace, it’s what gets you to buy or bid. On eBay, you have the additional trust issue of selling to someone – will they pay me? Will they pay me quickly? There is no need for trust for a lurker, except to get them comfortable to make an action. In that way, trust is especially important for newcomers to a community. If you’re at a review site, you’ll go to a new place or purchase a new product based in large part – or entirely – on the ratings left. Trust metrics sneakily establish hierarchy – keep that idea in mind. So let’s look at some different trust metrics…
  • If the other person is anonymous and online, you have every reason to assume that he’s a total fuckwad.
  • Here’s the simplest kind of trust metric: a score. Scores are explicit, and they’re just simple aggregates - +1 for up, -1 for down, and sometimes a zero for a neutral. The Amazon one gets you to an effective score of 402 if you want to assume the 198 who did not find it helpful are minus 1’s. But that one requires a bit of work. Math! Eek! That required a little bit of work, but it’s nothing compared to…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • This is Rihanna. Rihanna loves games. See how she’s super into it, with her Xbox 360 headset on, leaning forward, a look of concentration on her face? This girl is a hardcore gamer. Rihanna comes to Dawdle, registers her name, and she starts off with her default three stars.
  • So now that we know that Rihanna’s a good seller from her feedback (and lack thereof) and we know some stuff about her, we can say to our buyers that Rihanna is one of our very best sellers! So now she has a five star Seller Rating. But wait! How do I know that Rihanna is one of our very best sellers? Well, remember what I said early on about how trust metrics can be sneaky? Specifically, I said…
  • So now that we know that Rihanna’s a good seller from her feedback (and lack thereof) and we know some stuff about her, we can say to our buyers that Rihanna is one of our very best sellers! So now she has a five star Seller Rating. But wait! How do I know that Rihanna is one of our very best sellers? Well, remember what I said early on about how trust metrics can be sneaky? Specifically, I said…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Here’s how Amazon does it. There’s an overall star rating, where they give you an average which is off of the last 12 months. There are no simple Feedback ratings on the plus one/minus one scale, just percentages. Amazon does a 1/3/12 month breakdown and, again, gives you total number of ratings left. What I find interesting is that even though buyers leave star ratings, the percentages go to a simple positive/negative/neutral. So it’s pretty much the reverse of eBay. So we’ve seen how ratings and scores can get completely out of hand. Let’s talk about something a bit more simple… You can see pretty clearly that this is very clearly done to be “simpler” than eBay. Let’s look at something that *is* actually simpler than the deceptively complex scores…
  • Using Facebook to Establish Trust

    1. 1. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 1
    2. 2. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 2
    3. 3. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 3
    4. 4. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 4
    5. 5. *although we’d like to someday and I’d love to hear ideas on how we can CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 5
    6. 6. “So… WHAT THE FUCKare you doing speaking at theFacebook Developer Garage if Dawdle doesn’t even fucking integrate with Facebook?” CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 6
    7. 7. Using Facebook To Establish Trust February 20, 2009 CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 7
    8. 8. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 8
    9. 9. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 9
    10. 10. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 10
    11. 11. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 11
    12. 12. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 12
    13. 13. “Seller reputations are built arounduser reviews and the number of ways sellers identify themselves. “Their rankings go up, in particular,the more they link their storefronts to sites that reinforce their identities (Facebook, Twitter, Xbox Live, etc).” CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 13
    14. 14. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 14
    15. 15. You Should Get Your Own Store• They’re free – eBay, Amazon, Yahoo all charge ~$40 a month• They’re branded – Your logo, name, tagline, and message• You choose your URL – I’m at http://www.dawdle.com/sachinag – Get yours before someone else does • (We’ll go beyond gaming one of these days and you’re going to be really sorry when we add movies, music, cameras, cell phones, or whatever else you might want to sell.) CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 15
    16. 16. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 16
    17. 17. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 17
    18. 18. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 18
    19. 19. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 19
    20. 20. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 20
    21. 21. • Shipping time • Delivery Confirmation • Account age • Other sekret stuffCONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 21
    22. 22. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 22
    23. 23. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 23
    24. 24. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 24
    25. 25. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 25
    26. 26. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 26
    27. 27. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 27
    28. 28. Review (In Case You Were Drunk)• We don’t use Facebook Connect – (or a Facebook app or anything else)• Yet, we still use Facebook for identity – “Implicit third-party verification” • Optional for seller to display • Optional for buyer to click to verify • We rely on visual cues to provide comfort• Users can “just tell” if a seller is trustworthy CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 28
    29. 29. CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 29
    30. 30. Last Slide• We’d love to use Facebook Connect – But we don’t need to for our purposes• We reward sellers for sending users off of our site and going to Facebook – Pointers to proof of identity • “Good behavior” that we reward You don’t need to actually integrate with Facebook to leverage the platform CONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 30
    31. 31. Thanks YouCONFIDENTIAL – The Cono Project, Inc. 31

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