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Lubrication audit

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  • 1. Lubrication Audit Sabita Mishra
  • 2. Figure 2 Ref. AIMAN (Italian Association of Maintenance Engineers) and IRI (International Research Institute) in conjunction with SKF
  • 3. Factors that Enable Lubrication Excellence • People Preparedness. People are trained to modern lubrication skill standards and have certified competencies. • Machine Preparedness. Machines have the necessary design and accouterments for quality inspection, lubrication, contamination control, oil sampling, etc. • Precision Lubricants. Lubricants are correctly selected across key physical, chemical and performance properties, including base oil, viscosity, additives, film strength, oxidation stability, etc. • Precision Lubrication. Lubrication procedures, frequencies, amounts, locations, etc., are precisely designed to achieve the reliability objectives. • Oil Analysis. This includes optimal selection of the oil analysis lab, test slate, sampling frequency, alarm limits, troubleshooting rationale, etc.
  • 4. Advantages of an Audit  Identify duplication of lubricants  Learn about your hidden lubrication costs  Learn of potential safety and environmental issues  Cost out the R.O.I. of automating some of your critical production equipment  Up-dated manuals as required for your current automated lubrication system  A customized plan to reduce cost, improve productivity and safety, listing the opportunities in priority sequence
  • 5. Equipment Survey Overview  Develop an equipment list  Routine inspection, equipment survey and visual inspection  Identify and label equipments with equipment number and description  Equipment pictures  Machine criticality assessment and operating parameters  Identify lubricant sections from the OEM manual  Technical data sheet for the selected lubricant for the equipment  Selected lubricant MSDS  Leakage reports  Equipment temperature environment  Oil sampling as required  Lubrication inspection, top offs  Reliability, mean time between failure data on the equipments  Safety and operational hazards
  • 6. Equipment Assessment
  • 7. Lubricant Survey Overview  Lubricant technical selection practices  Lubricant application practices  Oil analysis program practices  Condition control practices  Lubrication practices standardization (SOPs)  Long term lubricant stability  Lubrication survey and lubricant vendor selection  Consolidate lubricants  Set lubrication preventive maintenance (PM) frequency  Root cause mapping and correction  Program effectiveness reporting  Program management and personal development
  • 8. Lubricant Survey Overview (Cont’d)  Eliminate unnecessary oil changes  Eliminate premature aging of lubricants  Verifying, defining lubrication practices  Verifying, defining re-lubrication activities like volumes, frequencies, route sequences, machine upgrades etc.  Purchase necessary lubrication equipment and tools  Perform financial analysis review and establish a cost basis  Reduce the number of lubricants in use and thereby reduce the chances for mis-application and cross contamination  Contamination control practices  Upgrading knowledge level  Develop a lubrication manual
  • 9. Lubricant Selection Chart
  • 10. Storage and Handling Survey Overview  Lubricant delivery, storage and handling practices should be followed  Wasteful practices of products, duplication and excess inventory should be eliminated  Storage room temperature extremes should be avoided  Fluctuating temperatures should be avoided  Containers should not be stored in a humid environment  First in first out (FIFO) system should be maintained such that stocks are rotated properly  All new drums should be filtered to an appropriate level. Use a ß3=200 filters for lubricants below 150 cSt @ 40⁰C. Use ß6=100 filters for lubricants above 150 cSt @ 40⁰C  All drums and containers should be labeled and color coded and filtered drums should be labeled as such with the date of filtration.
  • 11. Storage and Handling Survey Overview  Filtered drums should be fit with an appropriate air filter to offer air flow a path of least resistance allowing moisture and solid particulate to be captured prior to entering the drum.  When new oil is transferred to the top-up container, it should be transferred through a filter.  Oils should be stored in fluid storage racks  Fluid storage racks should have oil and air filtration  Proper dispensing containers should be used and stored in an explosion proof cabinet  Drums should be stored horizontally and covered to keep excess moisture and dirt from settling on them. The openings (bungs) should be at 3 and 9 o’clock positions to minimize the amount of breathing in the drums  Drums should be fitted with dispensing taps with covers
  • 12. Storage and Handling Practices
  • 13. Storage and Handling Practices
  • 14. Storage and Handling Practices
  • 15. Safety Survey Overview  MSDS are available and are reviewed  Lock out procedures are followed  Leakage control  Spill response is in place  Handling practices maintain a safe environment  Lubrication equipment use is understood  Sampling procedures are followed  Training to ensure effectiveness and consistency  Proper documentation and reports and manuals  Proper fire hazard precautions are taken
  • 16. Typical Checklist for an Audit
  • 17. Typical Audit Oil storage and dispensing:- Oils stored in fluid storage racks Fluid storage racks have oil filtration Fluid storage racks have air filtration Use of proper dispensing containers Lubricant stocks properly rotated Bulk oil changes performed using a filter carts
  • 18. Typical Audit Oil sampling techniques:- Oil sampling procedures are documented New oil deliveries are sampled Oil sampling ports are properly located Proper oil sampling hardware is installed Sample ports are properly labeled Automatic monthly scheduled oil change in place
  • 19. Typical Audit Contaminant ingression control:- Proper air breathers are installed on equipment Additional offline filtration is installed on critical equipment Lubrication ports are installed Off line filter carts are available and employed regularly Water stripping equipment is available Offline filtration and oil filter changes are performed on condition
  • 20. Typical Audit Oil analysis program:- Proper sampling frequencies are defined Oil analysis test slates are well defined Proper limits and targets are employed by machine type Oil analysis data is effectively communicated through the company A process exists for troubleshooting exception conditions
  • 21. Typical Audit Program Management:- Equipment criticality assessed and determined Regular and condition based PMs in place Oil changes are based on condition Qualified and trained technicians dispense lubricants PM schedules are tracked in a database Trend charts showing sample/analysis performance are publicly displayed
  • 22. Continuous Improvement

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