energy resources done by timothy 2n2
wind energy The Virginia Coastal Energy Research Consortium (VCERC) was established in Chapter 6 of the Virginia Energy Pl...
wave energy Wave energy is an indirect and condensed form of solar energy. Several challenging engineering problems need t...
hydro energy We have used running water as an energy source for thousands of years, mainly to grind corn. The first house ...
Pumped storage Pumped storage reservoirs aren't really a means of  generating  electrical power. They're a way of  storing...
solar energy                                We've used the Sun for drying clothes and food for thousands of years, but onl...
Nuclear power produces around 11% of the world's energy needs, and produces huge amounts of energy from small amounts of f...
The tide moves a huge amount of water twice each day, and harnessing it could provide a great deal of energy - around 20% ...
biomass energy                                          Wood was once our main fuel. We burned it to heat our homes and co...
geothermal energy                                   The centre of the Earth is around 6000 degrees Celsius - hot enough to...
SO  don"t over use it
References <ul><li>://home.clara.net/darvill/altenerg/geothermal.htm </li></ul>Thank you
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Energy resources

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Energy resources

  1. 1. energy resources done by timothy 2n2
  2. 2. wind energy The Virginia Coastal Energy Research Consortium (VCERC) was established in Chapter 6 of the Virginia Energy Plan. The VCERC was created to &quot;serve as an interdisciplinary study, research, and information resource for the Commonwealth on coastal energy issues&quot; with an initial focus on offshore winds, waves, and marine biomass.
  3. 3. wave energy Wave energy is an indirect and condensed form of solar energy. Several challenging engineering problems need to be solved before this nonpolluting renewable energy source can be utilized on land and/or at sea. Over the past few decades, however, considerable progress has been made worldwide, through research and developmental work on conversion technologies. Developments in Japan began with Yoshio Masuda's experiments in the 1940's. These reached significant scales in the 70's, and since then, a number of prototypes have successfully been tested around the islands. In the 70's, the wave-energy group at JAMSTEC developed a large-scale floating prototype named Kaimei. That device was tested in the Sea of Japan, off the town of Yura in Yamagata Prefecture. Two series of tests were completed, one of these under the auspices of the International Energy Agency. In the early 80's, JAMSTEC developed a shore-fixed device for tests near Sanze, also in Yamagata Prefecture.
  4. 4. hydro energy We have used running water as an energy source for thousands of years, mainly to grind corn. The first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectricity was Cragside HousE, in Northumberland, England, in 1878. In 1882 on the Fox river, in the USA, hydroelectricity produced enough power to light two paper mills and a house. Nowadays there are many hydro-electric power stations, providing around 20% of the world's electricity. The name comes from &quot;hydro&quot;, the Greek word for water.
  5. 5. Pumped storage Pumped storage reservoirs aren't really a means of generating electrical power. They're a way of storing energy so that we can release it quickly when we need it. Demand for electrical power changes throughout the day. For example, when a popular TV programme finishes, a huge number of people go out to the kitchen to put the kettle on, causing a sudden peak in demand. If power stations don't generate more power immediately, there'll be power cuts around the country - traffic lights will go out, causing accidents, and all sorts of other trouble will occur. The problem is that most of our power is generated by fossil fuel power stations, which take half an hour or so to crank themselves up to full power. Nuclear power stations take much longer.
  6. 6. solar energy                                We've used the Sun for drying clothes and food for thousands of years, but only recently have we been able to use it for generating power. The Sun is 150 million kilometres away, and amazingly powerful. Just the tiny fraction of the Sun's energy that hits the Earth (around a hundredth of a millionth of a percent) is enough to meet all our power needs many times over. In fact, every minute, enough energy arrives at the Earth to meet our demands for a whole year - if only we could harness it properly.
  7. 7. Nuclear power produces around 11% of the world's energy needs, and produces huge amounts of energy from small amounts of fuel, without the pollution that you'd get from burning fossil fuels. Nuclear energy                                                         Nuclear power is generated using Uranium, which is a metal mined in various parts of the world. The first large-scale nuclear power station opened at Calder Hall in Cumbria, England, in 1956. Some military ships and submarines have nuclear power plants for engines.
  8. 8. The tide moves a huge amount of water twice each day, and harnessing it could provide a great deal of energy - around 20% of Britain's needs. Although the energy supply is reliable and plentiful, converting it into useful electrical power is not easy. There are eight main sites around Britain where tidal power stations could usefully be built, including the Severn, Dee, Solway and Humber estuaries. Only around 20 sites in the world have been identified as possible tidal power stations. tidal energy
  9. 9. biomass energy                                          Wood was once our main fuel. We burned it to heat our homes and cook our food. Wood still provides a small percentage of the energy we use, but its importance as an energy source is dwindling. Sugar cane is grown in some areas, and can be fermented to make alcohol, which can be burned to generate power. Alternatively, the cane can be crushed and the pulp (called &quot;bagasse&quot;) can be burned, to make steam to drive turbines. Other solid wastes, can be burned to provide heat, or used to make steam for a power station. &quot;Bioconversion&quot; uses plant and animal wastes to produce fuels such as methanol, natural gas, and oil. We can use rubbish, animal manure, woodchips, seaweed, corn stalks and other wastes.
  10. 10. geothermal energy                                  The centre of the Earth is around 6000 degrees Celsius - hot enough to melt rock. Even a few kilometres down, the temperature can be over 250 degrees Celsius. In general, the temperature rises one degree Celsius for every 36 metres you go down. In volcanic areas, molten rock can be very close to the surface. Geothermal energy has been used for thousands of years in some countries for cooking and heating. The name &quot;geothermal&quot; comes from two Greek words: &quot;geo&quot; means &quot;Earth&quot; and &quot;thermal&quot; means &quot;heat&quot;.
  11. 11. SO don&quot;t over use it
  12. 12. References <ul><li>://home.clara.net/darvill/altenerg/geothermal.htm </li></ul>Thank you

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