Function, Commodity, Materiality Narrating the Intellectual Labor of The New Work of Scholarship
Digital Tenure Portfolio <ul><li>Which software to use? </li></ul><ul><li>How to design it?  </li></ul><ul><li>Why to desi...
Connecting Discussions N. Katherine Hayles:  Size of texts  --> reading time -->  heft/scope of project
Connecting Discussions Matthew Kirschenbaum:  Writers’ material artifacts are  increasingly digital, and so our  ways of s...
Connecting Discussions (my read of) Janet Murray:  Why read kaleidoscopic texts  when we can read the criticism?
Connecting Discussions Richard Miller & Paul Hammond:  What value does the university  bring to digital communication?
Connecting Discussions Anne Wysocki:  How do we recognize materiality  and bodies so that we can value  craft and labor?
Connecting Discussions Lev Manovich:  Texts are no longer fixed/static,  but are  performances  experienced  through softw...
Relational Issues <ul><ul><li>Reading Times  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Value-Added </li>...
Digital Scholarship A Possible 3D Axis to Map, Describe, and Value Digital Scholarship
A Short Example
Narrating Our Labor How do we make the work we do visible to (tenure) readers?
Size of Digital Works Electronic Literature Collection uses S, M, L, XL “ The designations reflect both the length of a wo...
Size of Digital Works
Size of Digital Works <ul><li>Count project from start to finish </li></ul><ul><li>What’s considered labor? </li></ul><ul>...
Digital Scholarship A Possible 3D Axis to Map, Describe, and Value Digital Scholarship
Thank you <ul><ul><li>Dr. Cheryl E. Ball </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Illinois State University </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>w...
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Functionality, Materiality, Commodification

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Plenary presented by Dr. Cheryl E. Ball at the Thomas R. Watson conference on Rhetoric and Composition, October 2008.

Published in: Education, Career
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  • Digital Scholarship sessions Lens of ”What Counts” How to make digital scholarship visible
  • Which software to use? [My needs] How to design it? [Audience needs] (Why to design it?) Which identities do I want to/should I perform? How can I make it useful to others? [in/out discipline] How do I help (tenure) readers read/value my born-digital work? [focus of talk]
  • Across disciplines here (in plenaries) fruitful ways of addressing my topic: Hayles: Size/Time
  • Kirchenbaum: materiality affects our reading
  • Combining Murray’s comment to Katherine Hayles with her theory of games as kaleidoscopes, I envision the same argument my tenure readers might say to me.
  • Miller and Hammond address what value I bring to my portfolio by making it digital
  • Wysocki reminds us to remember the author and her craft.
  • Manovich, in a moment that reminds me of Rosenblatt to me, says that the software I choose to present my tenure portfolio will have repurcussions on the expereince of each reader.
  • Key words this week
  • Other sessions &amp; discussions Time of Reading Commodities Labor of Producing Commodities Both are difficult to pinpoint in digital environments, especially for readers who aren’t familiar with our work. I want to focus on the issue of time and its relation to the intellectual labor is takes to produce a piece of multimedia that is creative but also persuasive, if not scholarly in the traditional sense.
  • A 3 minute partial remix, based on the original Mission Impossible TV show trailer, produced to introduce a one-hour student showcase of videos in a range of genres Three audiences: students, faculty, community
  • Piece makes sense on its own, but I use it here because Based on Convo with a tenure reader who was surprised to learn how long this video took to produce.
  • Going back to Hayles talk about ELC time: S, M, L. XL – Reading time What about production time? The labor of the author? For a tenure experience, this information could make a big difference in how our work is seen.
  • Production time: obvious to me, not obvious to tenure readers (it’s category in my tenure portfolio is another issue)
  • Purpose? Form? Research the original tv trailers Create a shot list Storyboard shoot the B-roll, Buy the theme song, Script the dialog and action sequences that needed to be filmed Prepare the locations convince my friends to help me (acting and cameras) ALL BEFORE the major scene shooting Importing video &amp; audio Learning final cut Editing clips Finding student videos samples to use as B-roll filler Timing shots to music Adding titles Testing and exporting drafts NOT INCLUDE Stringing students work together Fixing audio levels Adding titles and credits to all Exporting, burning, testing locally Testing at the theater Burning multiple copies for all my students Helping students make brochures and flyers ALL RHETORICAL ACTS My Video Alone = 30 hours over a week with collaboration from students and friends
  • I’m not suggesting that this axis alone will explain our work to readers, but I think it helps us get at the issue of production times and how we map our own work in order to explain it to readers. And one way of helping us map our work is to document our own intellectual labor and argue for why a text or performance should be placed in a particular location within our research or creative work.
  • Thank you.
  • Functionality, Materiality, Commodification

    1. 1. Function, Commodity, Materiality Narrating the Intellectual Labor of The New Work of Scholarship
    2. 2. Digital Tenure Portfolio <ul><li>Which software to use? </li></ul><ul><li>How to design it? </li></ul><ul><li>Why to design it? </li></ul><ul><li>Which identities should I perform? </li></ul><ul><li>How can I make it useful to others? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I help readers read/value born-digital work? </li></ul>
    3. 3. Connecting Discussions N. Katherine Hayles: Size of texts --> reading time --> heft/scope of project
    4. 4. Connecting Discussions Matthew Kirschenbaum: Writers’ material artifacts are increasingly digital, and so our ways of studying them will change.
    5. 5. Connecting Discussions (my read of) Janet Murray: Why read kaleidoscopic texts when we can read the criticism?
    6. 6. Connecting Discussions Richard Miller & Paul Hammond: What value does the university bring to digital communication?
    7. 7. Connecting Discussions Anne Wysocki: How do we recognize materiality and bodies so that we can value craft and labor?
    8. 8. Connecting Discussions Lev Manovich: Texts are no longer fixed/static, but are performances experienced through software.
    9. 9. Relational Issues <ul><ul><li>Reading Times </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Value-Added </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Materiality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Craft </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Labor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Digital Scholarship A Possible 3D Axis to Map, Describe, and Value Digital Scholarship
    11. 11. A Short Example
    12. 12. Narrating Our Labor How do we make the work we do visible to (tenure) readers?
    13. 13. Size of Digital Works Electronic Literature Collection uses S, M, L, XL “ The designations reflect both the length of a work and the difficulties it offers for reading and comprehension.”
    14. 14. Size of Digital Works
    15. 15. Size of Digital Works <ul><li>Count project from start to finish </li></ul><ul><li>What’s considered labor? </li></ul><ul><li>What’s left out of your count? </li></ul>
    16. 16. Digital Scholarship A Possible 3D Axis to Map, Describe, and Value Digital Scholarship
    17. 17. Thank you <ul><ul><li>Dr. Cheryl E. Ball </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Illinois State University </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.ceball.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul>
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