Doing Your Own P.R. (Faculty & Staff Portfolios)
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Doing Your Own P.R. (Faculty & Staff Portfolios)

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Slides from a talk on electronic portfolios given by Cheryl Ball at Findlay University.

Slides from a talk on electronic portfolios given by Cheryl Ball at Findlay University.

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  • Kinds of portfolios depend on needs, audiences, technologies, and may occur across several of these identities These often competing issues can be summed up, if inadequately, as process vs. product
  • Helen Barrett, eportfolio scholar Workspace = collection or repository, immediate reflections for learning, chronological, internal and external audiences (ex. FYC portfolios) Showcase = narrative, thematic, for external audiences, for accountability, reflection is retrospective (ex. Tenure portfolio)
  • My story: going up for tenure next year, trying to use an all-digital portfolio. Process of getting to the digital portfolio I have now… started in 2003. Missing image, taken from wayback machine Sending sample portfolios to TechRhet to get some audience feedback (usabilty testing)
  • Competing audience responses
  • In response to the graphics, in particular… I also got varying feedback.
  • The differentiation between wanting to express my personality versus what senior colleagues in the field thought I should do started to become evident. I’m stubborn, so I chose to listen to the ones I wanted.
  • Like this comment by a fellow graduate student.
  • Using my business card for about 3 years by that point, and flamingos had been a featured element of my website since the fall of 2000.
  • In the end, I decided to take it as a compliment what one of my revered professors said to me even about my print portfolio, which at the time (in 2003) was still the preferred method of receiving job materials.
  • I also took my major professor’s advice to heart and scaled back on the artistic intensity of my digital portfolio designs, but kept the flamingo for consistency.
  • Another response: from a guy I ended up going to work with…
  • In preparing for this talk, I went back to all this feedback from 6 years ago and I realized that the same advice still holds true. Back then, I was designing in Dreamweaver (WYSIWYG/HTML editor), creating all the graphics by hand (which I still do), trying to display myself as an academic in a field that was only beginning to respect digital technologies, and trying to create a presentation that would appeal to MYSELF MY FRIENDS - EMPLOYERS who wanted a computers and writing scholar.
  • I wanted a portfolio that was both professional and personal.
  • At my first job, I had a minimal online presence in part because of the expanse of CMS usage there. One problem with that – google searches of phrases like tech comm , computers and composition, etc., -- never hit on that school. BECAUSE faculty didn’t have web presences. (i.e., Christine Tulley’s website) So I had little web presence. The problem was that every year was a tenure review, and I made print binder after print binder, then decided in my third year, that things needed to change.
  • Started using a blog (because that’s what I knew in 2006 and I could easily change it). So I created an online tenure binder where I put the equivalent of everything that needed to be in the print binder on a website. I want to show you part of a video I created recently that highlights all of the reasons why I migrated all my professional portfolio materials to an online portfolio. [tell them it’s a DRAFT]
  • I want to talk about who my audience is for my portfolio why I made that decision, and how I’ve categorized things in relation to my own school’s tenure guidelines. [LINK OUT TO WEBSITE: DESCRIBE HOW IT WORKS]
  • familial memories & keepsakes (blogs, vlogs, scanned archives, etc.) digital scrapbook reflection/journaling (internal) showing our teaching processes documenting our research processes to keep track up-to-the-minute CVish (plug n promote) personal (and potentially university) repository statistics (iow, unofficial ‘impact factors’ for humanities) streamlining/single-sourcing repository program assessment merit Board of Trustees reports showcase (external) research & teaching area (related to online technologies) “ designed” academic portfolio job-market necessity promotion self (e.g., New Humanities Consortium) teaching // student work university recruitment tenure (my site, my video) dissemination timely distribution (RSS feeds; immediacy – typical for sciences, not HU) ease of research (searching: tags, metadata) open-access/closed-access (faculty repository) “ new” kinds of activities databases/archives repositories of student work born-digital work
  • Questions?

Doing Your Own P.R. (Faculty & Staff Portfolios) Doing Your Own P.R. (Faculty & Staff Portfolios) Presentation Transcript

  • Doing Your Own P.R. Developing Online Faculty and Staff Portfolios to Disseminate Teaching, Research, and Service Activity Dr. Cheryl E. Ball Illinois State University
  • Portfolios
    • personal, professional
    • student, teacher
    • print, digital
    • process, product
    • chronological, thematic
  • Two Faces of E-Portfolios Workspace/Process Vs. Showcase/Product http://helenbarrett.com/balance/
  • Case Study
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “ I was on a hiring committee for a tech writing job…with three other people…. I think one would have thought it was " cool " and a good thing , but the other two people would probably have said something like " can we take her seriously? ” (S. Krause)
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “ My big problem with the designs is that they don't seem professional; they seem more like a personal web site , mostly due to the graphics, I think.” (M. Bauman)
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “ I like version 5. I know. It's probably the most boring, but you're talking about hiring committees. Think about how you're going to sell yourself. Are you trying to be "professional" or "artistic"?” (B. Maid)
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “… you're already infamous for pink flamingoes, so roll with it  ”
      • (E. Wright)
  • Case Study
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “ I guess you don’t want to work anywhere that doesn’t have a sense of humor.”
      • ( paraphrasing M. Cooper)
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “ A little new media goes a long way.”
      • ( paraphrasing A. Wysocki)
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “ Your website should reflect the sort of job you want to get and if you are particularly looking for a new media job, then one of your new designs makes a lot of sense. Your portfolio will be a key piece in telling your story .” (J. Kalmbach)
  • Case Study
  • Case Study
      • Feedback on my first portfolio:
      • “ My big problem with the designs is that they don't seem professional; they seem more like a personal web site , mostly due to the graphics, I think.” (M. Bauman)
  • Case Study
  • Case Study
  • Digital Tenure Portfolio
  • Digital Portfolio Purposes
      • familial
      • reflective
      • organizational
      • single-source
      • showcase
      • promotion
      • dissemination
      • digital affordances
  • Thank You
      • Dr. Cheryl E. Ball
      • [email_address]
      • http://www.ceball.com