Preview - Stop! Playing the Dice: Devices to Design Amazing Products

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Book Preview - Stop! Playing the Dice: Devices to Design Amazing Products

Introduction

The most important aspect for developing new ideas about products and subsequently designing it requires a proper methodology, which is generally simple but effective. Every successful company has their set of method to design the products but the fundamental ideas remain same. This book tries to reveal the effective but simple methodology of designing the great products. The methodology discussed in the book has four segments and is called READ Technique. READ stands for Research, Experience, Analyze and Discover. ‘Research segment’ focuses on capturing and analyzing the information available in the market, ‘Experience segment’ focuses on checking out the views and ideas generated, ‘Analyze Segment’ focuses on observing the aspects for product and ‘Discover Segment’ focuses on surveys and interviews. Each of the four segments has several devices and methods specified in this work which would help the professionals in designing a great and winning product.

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Preview - Stop! Playing the Dice: Devices to Design Amazing Products

  1. 1. Title Page STOP! Playing the Dice Devices to Design Amazing Products Anshuman Sharma
  2. 2. Copyright Copyright ©2012 Anshuman Sharma All Rights Reserved ISBN: 978-1-105-99132-5
  3. 3. Dedication Dedication To my beautiful daughters Gunn and Kli To my lovely wife Nilam
  4. 4. ContentsCONTENTSTitle PageCopyrightDedicationContentsIntroductionRESEARCH SEGMENTDevice 1: Research - Scenario AnalysisDevice 2: Research - SalabilityDevice 3: Experience - Extreme ConditionsDevice 4: Research - LegalityDevice 5: Research - AssumptionsDevice 6: Research - Efficiency AnalysisDevice 7: Research - Past trends AnalysisDevice 8: Research - Design PublicationsDevice 9: Research - Trends and DesignDevice 10: Research - Visualize FutureDevice 11: Research - Product SupportDevice 12: Research - One-time BuyersDevice 13: Research - Product EvolutionDevice 14: Research - Manufacturing CapabilitiesDevice 15: Research - Present Trends AnalysisDevice 16: Research - Future ViewDevice 17: Research - Micro AnalysisDevice 18: Research - Other Industries DesignersDevice 19: Research - Relationships studyDevice 20: Research - Physical Attributes AnalysisDevice 21: Research - Demographic StudyDevice 22: Research - Psychographic StudyDevice 23: Research - Repeat Buyers
  5. 5. Device 24: Research - Secondary ResearchDevice 25: Research - Behavioral StudyDevice 26: Research - Competitive AnalysisDevice 27: Research - Cultural DifferencesDevice 28: Research - Other MarketsDevice 29: Research - Third Person AnalysisDevice 30: Research - Product DisposalDevice 31: Research - Customer DelightDevice 32: Research - Customer DislikesDevice 33: Research - Need RingDevice 34: Research - Design AttractionDevice 35: Research - Customer FinancialsDevice 36: Research - Other ValuesDevice 37: Research - PerceptionsDevice 38: Research - Product MaterialDevice 39: Research - Other Industries MarketersDevice 40: Research - Profitability AnalysisDevice 41: Research - Feasibility StudyDevice 42: Research - Macro AnalysisEXPERIENCE SEGMENTDevice 43: Experience - In Other’s ShoesDevice 44: Experience - Extreme UsageDevice 45: Experience - Use as ConsumerDevice 46: Experience - Design Touching SensesDevice 47: Experience - RobustnessDevice 48: Experience - Extreme Environment and ClimatesDevice 49: Experience - Training to Use the ProductDevice 50: Experience - Create Working ModelDevice 51: Experience - New EnvironmentDevice 52: Experience - Interaction DesignDevice 53: Experience - Look into the Future
  6. 6. Device 54: Experience - Feel it physicallyDevice 55: Experience - Basic ModelDevice 56: Experience - On StageDevice 57: Experience - Usage ModelsDevice 58: Experience - Various Users TestingDevice 59: Experience - Usage StoriesDevice 60: Experience - Use itDevice 61: Experience - Product AssemblingDevice 62: Experience - LimitationsDevice 63: Experience - Live With ThemDevice 64: Experience - Product PackagingDevice 65: Experience - PrecautionsDevice 66: Experience - Existing UsersDevice 67: Experience - Product IntegrationDevice 68: Experience - Designer PerceptionANALYZE SEGMENTDevice 69: Analyze - Invisible PresenceDevice 70: Analyze - Other Product’s UsageDevice 71: Analyze - Buying Behavior in StoresDevice 72: Analyze - New Product and LifeDevice 73: Analyze - Carrying the ProductDevice 74: Analyze - Product failingDevice 75: Analyze - Visual AffectsDevice 76: Analyze - Innovative Usage of ProductDevice 77: Analyze - Capture PicturesDevice 78: Analyze - Project VisitsDevice 79: Analyze - Daily ObjectsDevice 80: Analyze - Become their FriendDevice 81: Analyze - Product and LifeDevice 82: Analyze - Body DoubleDevice 83: Analyze - Social Connections
  7. 7. Device 84: Analyze - Problems from ProductDevice 85: Analyze - Supporting Product or ServiceDevice 86: Analyze - How They Live?Device 87: Analyze - All Categories of CustomersDevice 88: Analyze - Consumer’s HabitsDevice 89: Analyze - Video CaptureDevice 90: Analyze - Consumer DayDevice 91: Analyze - Personal ProductivityDevice 92: Analyze - Movement PatternsDISCOVER SEGMENTDevice 93: Discover - Segmented Users TestingDevice 94: Discover - Customer’s DislikesDevice 95: Discover - Ask for FeaturesDevice 96: Discover - Feature PrioritiesDevice 97: Discover - Customer JournalDevice 98: Discover - Customer FeedbackDevice 99: Discover - Product ValueDevice 100: Discover - Cross QuestionDevice 101: Discover - ConceptualizeDevice 102: Discover - Other MarketsDevice 103: Discover - Think AloudDevice 104: Discover - InterviewingDevice 105: Discover - Focus GroupsDevice 106: Discover - Word DesignDevice 107: Discover - Requirement AnalysisDevice 108: Discover - Meet CriticsDevice 109: Discover - Other MarketsDevice 110: Discover - Buying Thinking ProcessDevice 111: Discover - PerceptionsDevice 112: Discover - Picture BookDevice 113: Discover - Card Organization
  8. 8. Device 114: Discover - Navigation ChartsDevice 115: Discover - Cultural DifferencesDevice 116: Discover - Visualize and DrawAbout Author
  9. 9. Introduction The success of a company depends mainly upon the quality of the products itdevelops and sells in the market. A successful product needs to be unique and shouldbe according to the requirements of the customers. A good product becomes its ownmarketer as every time it is used, it delights its users, which makes them the advocatesof the product. We can observe this phenomenon in some of the winning products inthe market. A winning product has great design, quality and gives satisfactoryexperiences to its users. Few companies have mastered the art of product design and they are extremelysuccessful in the market with high profitability and growth. These companies use theproduct design skills as their competitive advantage and protect it like trade secret. Infact, the process of creating great products is not complex. It is a set of tools andmethods which, if used properly and sincerely, can support any design team todevelop amazing products. We have tried to expose these methods and devices in thiswork. To contrast the available books on product design methods, we have kept thisbook extremely simple. The specified devices can be used by any sincere personlooking to design products. The simplicity of the devices is evident from the fact thateven a layperson, with no knowledge about product design, can understand and usethese devices. A successful product needs to be holistic, equipped with innovativemarketing, superior quality and emphatic support. An innovative design of a productwith weak support cannot get success in the market. The products are differentiated by their value proposition, quality and features. Anexcellent product has great design, which evolves from the culture of the companywhere everybody is serious about design and focuses on improving it consistently. Agreat design evolves mainly from the attitude rather than technical expertise. It has always been difficult for companies to create great products. Somecompanies hire highly qualified technical experts to create the magic, while othersoutsource the product design process. Sometimes the responsibilities of creating newideas and products lie on few elite individuals, in other cases R&D department bearsthe complete responsibility of developing successful products. In most cases theseefforts fail. The main reason for this failure is the wrong approach. The most important aspect for developing new ideas about products andsubsequently designing it requires a proper methodology, which is generally simple buteffective. Every successful company has their set of method to design the products butthe fundamental ideas remain same. This book tries to reveal the effective but simplemethodology of designing the great products. The methodology discussed in the book has four segments and is called READTechnique. READ stands for Research, Experience, Analyze and Discover. ‘Research
  10. 10. segment’ focuses on capturing and analyzing the information available in the market,‘Experience segment’ focuses on checking out the views and ideas generated,‘Analyze Segment’ focuses on observing the aspects for product and ‘DiscoverSegment’ focuses on surveys and interviews. Each of the four segments has severaldevices and methods specified in this work which would help the professionals indesigning a great and winning product. To design a great product the designers need to focus on a specific area of thedesign process. The specified segments and devices in the book would serve thedesigners by focusing their attention to each area of the design process. Each devicedescribed in the book briefly describes it, specifies its importance & value, explain theway to use it and supported by an example to describe it. The design devices list specified in this book is exhaustive and every device wouldnot be suitable for your projects. Design team needs to identify and list the devices tobe used for a specific project. These devices would motivate the design team in variousways by suggesting them relevant methods to solve the design problem. It is suggested that this resource should be used as a guide and reference to createbetter product designs.
  11. 11. RESEARCH SEGMENT Research segment of the READ Model includes the devices which focus oncollecting and researching the available data, information, insights in archives,published or tacit format. This segment equips the designers with substantial grasp ofthe project to graduate to other segments of the model.
  12. 12. Device 1: Research - Scenario AnalysisCheck with various scenarios to identify different ways which would create operationaldifficulties for the product.This device would help the designer to identify the various situations when the productwould be affected negatively with user’s actions.Identify various scenarios which can fail the product due to human actions. Find thereason for these failures. These can be through human mistakes, negligence or actions.The purpose is to design the product robust enough to protect itself for possibleproblems.Example: Identify various ways when a glass container can break during its usage.
  13. 13. Device 2: Research - SalabilityCheck for the salability of the designed product.This analysis is important as the designed product should be marketable andcommercially viable.Conduct a market survey asking the target segment about their intention to buy theproduct based upon product features, value proposition and pricing.Example: Check the salability of the newly designed software based upon its features,value proposition, interactivity, user friendliness and pricing.

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