The Mobile Effect-Measuring New Shopping Behaviors & Attitudes

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This presentation will explore findings from a study combining both mobile exit surveys and passive behavioral data collected on a group of shoppers’ phones while they were in store. By connecting attitudinal, demographic, passive behavioral, and survey data streams, we can glean who is doing what while they’re shopping—and even why they’re doing it.
• Insights into how in-store usage (and non-usage) breaks out by demographics, trip mission and channel
• What kind of apps are used in store and what kind of websites are visited
• An understanding of top phone-based activities conducted in store

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The Mobile Effect-Measuring New Shopping Behaviors & Attitudes

  1. 1. The Mobile Effect Measuring New Shopping Behaviors & Attitudes Ryan Rothe Director, Client Development Research Now Mobile
  2. 2. 2 Life of eRiN Will have a self-contained video play when starting out the presentation. http://vimeo.com/68550353
  3. 3. 3 Smartphone Users Reach to Phone ~150x a Day # of Times Typical User Checks Phone per Day Other includes voicemail, charging, and miscellaneous activities. Source: TomiAhonen Almanac 2013.
  4. 4. 4 Smartphones = Extraordinary Attributes – Connected + Excited + Curious/Interested + Productive Source: IDC. 3/13. Facebook-sponsored research asked smartphone owners how an array of social and communication activities on their phones made them feel. Most owners use ~7.4 social and communications apps on their phones. Responses are indexed above. USA Smartphone User Relative Sentiment Index (10 = Strongest, 0=Weakest), 3/13 When Asked How Social and Communication Activities on Smartphones Made You Feel
  5. 5. 5 The Reality is: Mobile is a Mainstay of Our Everyday Lives Which makes it a key path-to-purchase ‘touchpoint’ Source: www.eMarketer.com
  6. 6. 6 Make Mobile Devices a Focus of Research Not just a data collection tool Source: Pew Research Center; National Center for Heath Statistics, National Health Interview Survey
  7. 7. 7 Today’s Path to Purchase Is More Complex Than Ever… How do you capture better insights? Awareness Interest Desire Action
  8. 8. 8 The New Multi-Screen World Understanding Cross-Platform Consumer Behavior Source: Google/Ipsos/Sterling, 2012.
  9. 9. 9 Total Respondents = 5826 Survey fielding Nov 19-21, 2012 Behavioral tracking Nov 19-30, 2012 Sample Behavioral: 1150Sample Size: 5826 Sample Size: 5826 Store visits: 800 Web-based Surveys Web-behavioral Data Mobile Survey & Behavioral Data GPS Data A single-source methodology The study: holiday shopping
  10. 10. 10 Multi Channel Shopping Intent
  11. 11. 11 3389 3316 3789 4969 5404 3885 4593 5757 3221 3098 2930 2710 0 7000 11/19 11/20 11/21 11/22 11/23 11/24 11/25 11/26 11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 242 247 256 136 207 167 144 153 144 202 254 245 0 300 11/19 11/20 11/21 11/22 11/23 11/24 11/25 11/26 11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 Total#ofVisits Store Visits GPS Sample = 800 376 281 279 456 701 745 921 543 547 475 204 223 0 1000 11/19 11/20 11/21 11/22 11/23 11/24 11/25 11/26 11/27 11/28 11/29 11/30 Total#ofVisits Mobile Websites Sample = 1150 PC Websites Sample = 5398 Total#ofVisits Traffic
  12. 12. 12 Mobile isn’t the entire answer, but proving to be a revolutionary methodology 1 2 3
  13. 13. 13 Self-reported and Behavioral Data &
  14. 14. 14 What Can Be Captured 2 Primary Mobile Platforms 7 Types of Data Collected Passively •  Location: GPS •  Apps: usage (foreground time) •  Phone calls: incoming, outgoing, missed, duration •  Text/SMS Messages: sent, received •  Email: sent, received •  Web: URL/websites visited, bookmarks •  Camera: usage
  15. 15. 15 What We Can Do With… Location Data (GPS) Considerations •  Filter behavioral data by location •  Derive location type (e.g. home, work) •  Target and push surveys •  Advanced analytics •  Not everyone is trackable •  GPS accuracy: Satellite vs. Network •  Frequency of communication
  16. 16. 16 What We Can Do With… App Data Considerations •  Target based on apps installed •  Measure “stickiness” •  Slice and dice •  Capture foreground & background usage •  Passive or “active” usage •  Raw data allergies
  17. 17. 17 What We Can Do With… Web/URL Data Considerations •  Track websites/URLs visited •  Aggregate – top sites by category, user •  Compare website usage vs. app usage •  What is captured, what is delivered, and what may be lost •  Time measurement
  18. 18. 18 What We Can Do With… Text/SMS, Email, Phone, Camera, Music Considerations •  Track ingoing and outgoing communications •  Log camera usage •  Capture specific details of music played •  Music listening varies by platform •  Boolean capture •  When content is important, ask
  19. 19. 19 SATQ4bUSA  At  which  .me  of  the  day  would  you  prefer  e-­‐Rewards  to  send   surveys  similar  to  this?  What This Means for Research Behavioral data stands alone… or hand in hand with other data points On its own/ Aggregated • Key indicators and measures • Trend spotting Sliced and diced • Place and time • Demographics • Attitudes and behaviors Combined with survey data • Stated vs. actual • Trust but verify • Understand the “why”
  20. 20. Mobile Shoppers: In-store Smartphone Use In Context
  21. 21. 21 Study Overview Methodology •  Pre and post shopping surveys were pushed to respondents based on location •  With geo-validation, panelists were invited to take surveys while within the “fence” •  Behavioral data was collected along with the surveys •  Focus was on the Grocery channel, but also collected Mass, Club, Drug •  Study was fielded March through May 2013
  22. 22. 22 Study Overview Why combine survey and behavioral data? •  Synthesize data from both sources •  Stated vs. Actual Behaviors •  Trust but Verify •  Understand the in-store shopping experience and gain a better idea of what shoppers are actually doing on their phones while in store •  Does behavior vary by trip type, category, etc.?
  23. 23. 23 51% Used their phones while in store What did they do? CASE STUDY 36% 21% 10% 19% 15% 15% 19% 13% 22% 15% Send or receive a text message Make or receive a phone call Use Facebook Send or receive an email Use the internet Behavioral Survey Which of the following did you do in the store today?
  24. 24. 24 Reasons for using the internet varied 1 in 3 internet users compared prices online CASE STUDY 32% 23% 26% 15% 36% For what reasons did you use the internet on your phone while in the store today?
  25. 25. 25 Phone and Text Usage Shoppers commonly called and texted regarding purchases 43% 57% Did you TALK with someone on the phone to discuss a purchase you made or were thinking of making? 32% 68% Did you TEXT with someone about a purchase you made or were thinking of making?
  26. 26. 26 Shopper Profile Greg Grocery Fred Meyer – April 18, 2013 Male, 53, Divorced Game, Facebook $14 Special Trip, Under 15 minutes
  27. 27. 27 Shopper Profile Suzy Shopper Stop & Shop – March 28, 2013 Female, 38, Married Coupon Phone, Email, Retailer App $96 Stock Up, 46-60 Minutes
  28. 28. 28 Takeaways Research •  People act like people when in grocery stores. They are on Facebook. They play games. While they wield smartphones, they don’t typically use them like retailers might want them to. •  Human element impacts purchase decision: old school communication – phone – and new school – text - impact the purchase decision. Apps and web, to a lesser degree. •  Shopping apps are still nascent and retailer apps especially are underutilized. Opportunity to engage but need to break the usual stride. People are not accustomed to using their phones in these newfangled ways – at least in grocery.
  29. 29. 29 Takeaways Methodology •  Geo, survey and behavioral all complement and stand stronger together than on their own •  Again, trust but verify •  Here we limited to one shopper, one trip. Can make longitudinal. •  Aggregate and break out •  Competitor analysis
  30. 30. 30 CASE STUDY
  31. 31. 31 Questionnaire Design New methodology, new considerations §  Survey Length §  Short vs. Long §  Great medium for daily diaries §  Hybrid collections
  32. 32. 32 Online vs. Offline Connectivity availability §  Cellphone reception §  App-based or mobile-optimized survey §  Planning for conjoint/maxdiff elements
  33. 33. 33 Rich Media Added depth and texture §  Keep use of audio, photos, or video capture to <5 per survey §  Magnitude of collection §  Be careful what you ask for… §  Power of hearing the voice of the customer BeforeAfter
  34. 34. 34 Respondent Recruitment Research objective vs. respondent engagement §  In-the-moment vs. pre-recruitment §  Recruiting for missions §  Geo-based surveys – physical address vs. lat/long (think mall) §  Billboards, C-Stores, Retail
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. Ryan Rothe Director, Client Development rrothe@researchnow.com Thank you!

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