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The AVIN - A unique code for every wine
 

The AVIN - A unique code for every wine

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A look at the AVIN a unique code similar to the ISBN but for wine. By using this code you can ensure that all your wine data is correct and up to date.

A look at the AVIN a unique code similar to the ISBN but for wine. By using this code you can ensure that all your wine data is correct and up to date.

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The AVIN - A unique code for every wine The AVIN - A unique code for every wine Presentation Transcript

  • AVIN, An ISBN for Wine In 2008 a small company called Adegga set out to make sure that their wine data would be clean and useful. What they didn’t know is that they were putting in place the foundation of a idea that could change the wine world forever. Let us tell you the story
  • Adegga.com • Founded in 2007 • Andre Ribeirinho, Emídio Santos, Andre Cid • Lisbon, Portugal • The idea to learn about and discover wine • But they needed a place to do it. • So they built a social tasting note site - a place to share their experiences
  • Adegga creates the AVIN • When Adegga started building their social tasting note site, they new they had a problem when it came to keeping the wine data clean. • Looking around the world they found many solutions in industries where data cleanliness was required. • After a long search they settled on creating system that would work similar to the ISBN system that is used in book industry today • This system now has it’s own life....but first a bit about it’s muse
  • ISBN - International Standard Book Numbering In 1965, W. H. Smith (the largest single book retailer in Great Britain) announced its plans to move to a computerized warehouse in 1967 and wanted a standard numbering system for books it carried. They hired consultants to work on behalf of their interest, the British Publishers Association's Distribution and Methods Committee and other experts in the U.K. book trade. They devised the Standard Book Numbering (SBN) system in 1966 and it was implemented in 1967. International Standard Book Number (ISBN) was approved as an ISO standard in 1970, and became ISO 2108. That original standard has been revised as book and book-like content appeared in new forms of media, but the basic structure of the ISBN as defined in that standard has not changed and is in use today in almost 150 countries.
  • ISBN - International Standard Book Numbering At the same time, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee on Documentation (TC 46) set up a working party to investigate the possibility of adapting the British SBN for international use. A meeting was held in London in 1968 with representatives from Denmark, France, Germany, Eire, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and an observer from UNESCO. A report of the meeting was circulated to all ISO member countries. Comments on this report and subsequent proposals were considered at meetings of the working party held in Berlin and Stockholm in 1969. As a result of the thinking at all of these meetings, the International Standard Book Number (ISBN) was approved as an ISO standard in 1970, and became ISO 2108. That original standard has been revised as book and book-like content appeared in new forms of media, but the basic structure of the ISBN as defined in that standard has not changed and is in use today in almost 150 countries.
  • So what exactly is the ISBN? • A unique 12 digit number + 1 “check digit” for every book • A new ISBN is assigned to each edition of a book.
  • How did the ISBN change the book industry? • ISBNs’ have allowed anyone to easily find information about a book simply by looking up the number • ISBN have allowed the book trade to exchange information efficiently while reducing errors within publishing houses and businesses. • Every ISBN is forever linked with a particular book and edition • Each ISBN is linked to a standard data set: DO we know what this is?
  • So how does the AVIN match up? ISBN AVIN • A unique 12 digit number + 1 “check digit” for • Each AVIN has 12 digits + 1 check-digit every book • A unique number of each wine and vintage • A new ISBN is assigned to each edition of a book. • An AVIN is assigned to each vintage of a wine. • ISBNs’ have allowed anyone to easily find • The AVIN is helping people easily find information about a book simply by looking up information about a wine. the number • The AVIN is working to help the wine trade • ISBN have allowed the book trade to exchange exchange information efficiently while reducing information efficiently while reducing errors errors. within publishing houses and businesses. • Every AVIN is forever linked with a particular • Every ISBN is forever linked with a particular book wine and vintage and edition • The AVIN is linked to a particular Data Set • Each ISBN is linked to a standard data set: • What’s different? • The AVIN is ready to be used online and offline!
  • Unique challenges • Wine information is spread globally • Why not an UPC or Barcode • Wine information is prone to errors • Global Adoption
  • Wine information is spread globally The AVIN aims to be a unique database that is accessible to anyone via an API. The more people use the AVIN, the more is becomes useful.When a producer in Australia enters their wines, they are giving that information to everyone.
  • Why not an UPC or Barcode The AVIN is unique for each vintage. That is not always true for UPCs. Each AVIN as 13 digits including a check-digit making it fully compatible with barcode scanners and UPC numbers. UPC’s are created often at a store level
  • Wine information is prone to errors Contrary to the ISBN, the AVIN has no information about the wine encoded. This is because wine information is prone to errors. To be able to create a unique AVIN that wouldn’t change we had to create a dumb number.
  • Global Adoption Without a large scale adoption there is no way to make this ubiquitous with wine. Fortunately Rome wasn’t built in a day and we’re persistent! Everyday we are getting requests from wineries for an AVIN for their wines. The secret is they can do it themselves!
  • So what’s next? How do we work to build this global idea?
  • Partners and Early Adopters • Wineries • Retailers • Events/Competitions • Bloggers/Journalists
  • Wineries Wineries by adopting the AVIN are taking control of the their wine data. They can “lock in” their information on a per wine basis to assure correct information. Early Adopters: Quevedo, Cortes de Cima, O’Vineyards, TEJO wine region, Esporão, Gentilini,
  • Retailer Be the first and create a buzz. You can print the AVIN on all your price tags with a “Google This:” before it. Show your customers your innovation. Also work with Adegga to have your shop show up when people search for your wines.
  • Events/Competitions Wine Competitions are the perfect place to implement the AVIN. Using the AVIN’s API link all awards to any wines unique number. Give the entrants a reason to enter your competition by ensuring their wines will be found. Events can create interactive catalogs
  • Bloggers and Journalists People who write about wine have to deal with misspellings, incorrect data, and confusion when it comes to reading labels. Writers can give wines AVIN’s if they don’t already have them. Articles that are tagged with the AVIN will be found when searching for wines.
  • So what does it cost? This is a big idea, what does it take to make it happen for my wines?
  • It’s FREE The AVIN will help everyone in the wine world, and needs to remain free for now. By the end of 2010 the independent database will be set up on a neutral server, and will be curated by a board of advisors.
  • How will we pay for this? Models for revenue include: • Fees for implementation • Donations • Eventual per wine fees • Region based licensing
  • How can you get involved? Are you interested in this? It’s simple to get involved
  • If your a winery Send us an email: info@AVIN.cc and we’ll get you an AVIN for all of your wines. Print the AVIN on your wine bottles Tell people that you are an early adopter Use it on your website
  • If your a retailer Send us an email: info@AVIN.cc and we’ll get you an AVIN for all of your wines. Ask us about how you can implement an AVIN checkout system, rather than an UPC system Use Adegga to showcase the wines
  • If you have a Competition or Event Send us an email: info@AVIN.cc and we’ll get you an AVIN for all of your wines. Look at the new Events @ Adegga for how you can have an online interactive catalog for your wines. Add your award to the AVIN dataset,
  • If you are Bloggers or Journalists Begin by entering your wines into the Adegga database. Tag all your articles with the AVIN’s of wines you talk about. Talk about us! We’re free for interviews.
  • What do we look like?
  • Contact us info@avin.cc We’re excited to hear from you!