Social Media in Medical Education: Embracing a New Medium

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This talk was given at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine on October 27, 2011, as part of the UNC Academy of Educators Lecture Series.

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  • And thank you for doing what you have been doing!

    Re: your question...

    Your concern is certainly valid; protecting patient privacy is paramount. The framing is very important. Bobby asked a general question about a disease entity (eosinophilic esophagitis), about which we had a discussion. For example, I could send a tweet out to ask Howard Luks to find out if he is seeing any increased incidence of certain types of fractures in such-and-such a disease (or with PPIs, etc). For all intents and purposes, it could be just a general question (for knowledge) or about someone I have specifically in mind. The framing here is just for knowledge.

    I didn't ask Bobby publicly about the case or why he asked. Of course, if it started getting specific I would do what Bryan Vartabedian recommends and take it private. If Bobby had said something like 'I just saw a 19 year old that I think has EoE'...that's a different story altogether.

    There have been occasions that I've mentioned to friends that they should be careful because their tweets/posts are in the grey zone...no specific patient information, but enough to be concerned (e.g., something like, 'I just delivered my first set of twins!' is non-specific, but I think there is enough to warrant concern).

    RDM
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  • Thanks for mentioning me! I wanted to ask about slide 33 and clinical advice online. How did you do that safely? It is still something that I avoid so would like to get your feedback. Thanks again, AM
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  • Also look at what he says at the bottom…
  • Social Media in Medical Education: Embracing a New Medium

    1. 1. Social Media in Medical Education: Embracing a New Medium Ryan D. Madanick, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology UNC School of MedicineTwitter: @RyanMadanickMDBlog: Gut Check (ryanmadanickmd.wordpress.com) #uncaoe
    2. 2. Learning ObjectivesThe information presented at this educational activityshould improve your ability to:1. Explain how social media is currently being employed for medical education2. Describe risks, limitations, and opportunities with regard to the use social media in medicine and medical education3. Incorporate social media into teaching medicine and the competencies #uncaoe
    3. 3. What is (are) Social Media?You may have heard of some of these:• MySpace• Facebook• Twitter• LinkedIn• Sermo• Various blog sites #uncaoe
    4. 4. #uncaoe
    5. 5. What are the Risks of Being involved in Social Media?• Patients “friend” or “follow” you• HIPAA violations• Professionalism issues• Time issues #uncaoe
    6. 6. “Twitter is a big cocktail party that you are dropping in on from time to time to listen to what people are saying and join in.” -- Vineet Arora (@FutureDocs) Top Twitter Myths & Tips, FutureDocs Bloghttp://futuredocsblog.com/top-twitter-myths-tips/ #uncaoe
    7. 7. Why Should Medical Educators Care About Social Media?• Our students/learners are already there – Whether or not you like it – We need to educate about it• Our patients/the public #uncaoe
    8. 8. How Can Social Media Be Used to Advance a Medical Academic Career?http://futuredocsblog.com/2011/05/02/twitter-to-tenure-7-ways-social-media-advances-my-career/ #uncaoe
    9. 9. How Can Social Media Be Used to Advance a Medical Academic Career? • Media interviews • Workshop presentations • Acquisition of new skills • Lecture invitations • Committee invitations • Grant opportunities • Disseminationhttp://futuredocsblog.com/2011/05/02/twitter-to-tenure-7-ways-social-media-advances-my-career/ #uncaoe
    10. 10. Competency 1: Medical Knowledge #uncaoe
    11. 11. #uncaoe
    12. 12. The Blog as a Teaching Toolhttp://casesblog.blogspot.com/ #uncaoe
    13. 13. Competency 2: Patient Care #uncaoe
    14. 14. Slide courtesy of Dr. Ves Dimov: AllergyCases.org/@DrVes
    15. 15. The e-Patient Revolution “Participatory Medicine is a movement in which networked patients shift from being mere passengers to responsible drivers of their health, and in which providers encourage and value them as full partners.”http://e-patients.net/http://participatorymedicine.org/ #uncaoe
    16. 16. e-Patient Dave #uncaoe
    17. 17. Competency 3:Interpersonal and Communication Skills #uncaoe
    18. 18. Blogging (and Micro-blogging) #uncaoe
    19. 19. NetworkingSome leaders in the #SMIME arena #uncaoe
    20. 20. Blogginghttp://tworabbits-medicaleducation.blogspot.com/2011/10/my-third-day-at- #uncaoe
    21. 21. Competency 4:Professionalism #uncaoe
    22. 22. #HCSMGATE: A Lesson about Professionalism @Doctor_Vhttp://33charts.com/2011/05/unprofessional-physician-behavior-twitter.html #uncaoe
    23. 23. Physicians on Twitter: A Study in Professionalism • Identified 260 docs on Twitter* – With at least 500 followers – Analyzed last 20 tweets – Total 5156 tweets analyzed • 148 (3%) considered “unprofessional” – Potential pt privacy violations: 38 (0.7%) • 27 users (10%), 25 were identifiable – Profanity: 33 (0.6%) – Sexually explicit: 14 (0.3%) *Doctors identified between in May 2010Chretien KC et al. JAMA 2011;305: 566. #uncaoe
    24. 24. “…social networks may be considered the new millennium’s elevator: a public forum where you have little to no control over who hears what you say, even if the material is not intended for the public.”Mostaghimi A, Crotty BH. Ann Int Med 2011;154: 560. #uncaoe
    25. 25. Our Students Future Employers May Be Watchinghttp://www.allfacebook.com/facebook-law-schools-students-2011-10 #uncaoe
    26. 26. AMA Policy: Professionalism in the Use of Social Media a. Physicians should be cognizant of standards of patient privacy and confidentiality that must be maintained in all environments, including online, and must refrain from posting identifiable patient information online.http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/meeting/professionalism-social-media.shtml #uncaoe
    27. 27. AMA Policy: Professionalism in the Use of Social Media b. When using the Internet for social networking, physicians should use privacy settings to safeguard personal information and content to the extent possible, but should realize that privacy settings are not absolute and that once on the Internet, content is likely there permanently. Thus, physicians should routinely monitor their own Internet presence to ensure that the personal and professional information on their own sites and, to the extent possible, content posted about them by others, is accurate and appropriate.http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/meeting/professionalism-social-media.shtml #uncaoe
    28. 28. AMA Policy: Professionalism in the Use of Social Media c. If they interact with patients on the Internet, physicians must maintain appropriate boundaries of the patient-physician relationship in accordance with professional ethical guidelines just, as they would in any other context.http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/meeting/professionalism-social-media.shtml #uncaoe
    29. 29. AMA Policy: Professionalism in the Use of Social Media d. To maintain appropriate professional boundaries physicians should consider separating personal and professional content online.http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/meeting/professionalism-social-media.shtml #uncaoe
    30. 30. AMA Policy: Professionalism in the Use of Social Media e. When physicians see content posted by colleagues that appears unprofessional they have a responsibility to bring that content to the attention of the individual, so that he or she can remove it and/or take other appropriate actions. If the behavior significantly violates professional norms and the individual does not take appropriate action to resolve the situation, the physician should report the matter to appropriate authorities.http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/meeting/professionalism-social-media.shtml #uncaoe
    31. 31. AMA Policy: Professionalism in the Use of Social Media f. Physicians must recognize that actions online and content posted may negatively affect their reputations among patients and colleagues, may have consequences for their medical careers (particularly for physicians- in-training and medical students), and can undermine public trust in the medical profession.http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/meeting/professionalism-social-media.shtml #uncaoe
    32. 32. Competency 5:Practice-Based Learning & Improvement #uncaoe
    33. 33. “Instant” Feedback from Experts #uncaoe
    34. 34. Slide courtesy of Dr. Ves Dimov: AllergyCases.org/@DrVes
    35. 35. Cycle of Online Information and Cycle of Physician Patient Education Education Image source: https://www.iot-at-work.eu/downloads_press-related.htmlSlide courtesy of Dr. Ves Dimov: AllergyCases.org/@DrVes
    36. 36. Competency 6:Systems-Based Practice #uncaoe
    37. 37. Systems-Based Practice• Teamworking – Nurses, Pharmacists – Patients• New technologies to advance care/education #uncaoe
    38. 38. Lessons from Being at the Crossroads of Healthcare and Social Media 1. Getting involved in Social Media means starting small 2. It is easy to feel overwhelmed in Social Media 3. “If you post it, they will come” 4. Both the compliments and the criticisms come more quicklyhttp://ryanmadanickmd.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/lessons-from-my-first-six-months-at-the-crossroads-of-healthcare-and-social-media/ #uncaoe
    39. 39. Lessons from Being at the Crossroads of Healthcare and Social Media 5. Venturing into Social Media is great way to communicate with a broad audience 6. Don’t enter Social Media expecting to become wildly successful 7. The proliferation of Social Media is not a passing fad 8. Getting involved in Social Media is not for everyonehttp://ryanmadanickmd.wordpress.com/2011/07/11/lessons-from-my-first-six-months-at-the-crossroads-of-healthcare-and-social-media/ #uncaoe
    40. 40. Final Thoughts…With Social Media, medical educators haveOPPORTUNITIES and RESPONSIBILITIES• For ourselves• For our patients• For our learners• And for the public #uncaoe
    41. 41. Social Media in Medical Education: Embracing a New Medium Ryan D. Madanick, MD Assistant Professor of Medicine Center for Esophageal Diseases and Swallowing Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology UNC School of MedicineTwitter: @RyanMadanickMDBlog: Gut Check (ryanmadanickmd.wordpress.com) #uncaoe

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