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Stucky Rwagasana Presentation
 

Stucky Rwagasana Presentation

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At the 4th eLearning Africa International Conference, Dakar 28-30 May 2009

At the 4th eLearning Africa International Conference, Dakar 28-30 May 2009

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    Stucky Rwagasana Presentation Stucky Rwagasana Presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Strategic Options and Results of Introducing Blended Learning at the National University of Rwanda Prof. Dr. em. Peter Stucki Department of Information Technology University of Zurich, Switzerland p-stucki@bluewin.ch Rwagasana Gerald, Director Center of Instructional Technology / AVU Learning Center National University of Rwanda gerwaga@yahoo.com QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 1
    • Part 1 Strategic Options QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 2
    • Fast Evolution of Information and Communication Technologies Enables Educational Mobilization World-Wide Dramatic improvement of ICT Access Options speed, storage and cost Wireless, broadband Wired, broadband performance. Sophisticated Giga/Tera Byte commercial and open source media storage software systems. Batteries & Accus Ideally, students possess their own ICT equipment and Internet access facilities. They have adequate computer Laptop iPods application skills and they expect Handy (Video) professional services. Hard- and Software Today, ICT is the widely accepted Platform enabling tool for knowledge acquisition and learning. ICT End User‟s Gadget Choices QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 3
    • Fast Evolution of Information and Communication Technologies - Conclusions ICT applications become increasingly powerful, sophisticated and service oriented. Teaching, learning, testing and certification become increasingly ICT dependent. ICT end-user equipment and Internet infrastructure comply with ICT standards. They are (micro-) programmed as proprietary entities, reliable and world-wide merchandised by well known companies. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 4
    • Fast Evolution of Time- and Space-Independent E-Learning - The Paradigm Changes Conventional classroom teaching evolves into web-based classroom teaching (e.g. books and course material in electronic form, streaming, pot-casting) Conventional collaborative learning evolves into web- based collaborative learning (e.g. discussing and under- standing problems, objectives and results of given cases online, web-based social networks) Conventional individual learning evolves into web-based individual learning (e.g. online-learning trough self- motivation and self-responsibility) QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 5
    • Fast Evolution of Time- and Space-Independent E-Learning - Options for Source-Sink Knowledge Delivery Source Synchronous Asynchronous Point-to-Point Point-to-Point Broadcasting Communications Interactive Data Transfer Streaming Web-based online-courses Video- Missing navigation/interaction - that contain interactive, Conferencing Web- constructivistic learning hyperlinked multimedia ele- Television model does not apply. ments (print, audio, video) Casting Pedagogically preferred model for implementation Sink QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 6
    • Fast Evolution of Time- and Space-Independent E-Learning - Pedagogically Preferred Model • Define knowledge level and learning paradigm • Define granularity of factual knowledge • Provide 'lean content/course-structure' (index, body, ..) • Provide interactive elements (navigation, „learning-by-doing') • Provide test and assessment procedures • Provide e-communication facilities to break isolation (e.g. mail, chat, discussion, collaboration tools) • Set useful and stable links (glossaries, libraries, sites) • Select suitable rich-media elements (print, audio, video) • Provide pleasing, intuitive and motivating UI-design • Plan for human-communication sessions (blended model) • Develop e-Learning application on stable platforms • Provide student-centered new learning experience QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 7
    • Fast Evolution of Time- and Space-Independent E-Learning - Conclusions The classical knowledge development process in- creasingly relies on digital technologies (e.g. research, field experiments, publications and library services). Classroom teaching, collaborative and individual learning all tend towards web-oriented dependencies. The pedagogically preferred model is the web-based, interactive, rich-media, online course that is based on de-facto standard design guidelines. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 8
    • Perception of E-Learning by ist Players Educators: Difficulties to Students: move away from Generally in „status-quo‟ favor of change Lea rn ers Quest ions&Answers but against Institutions: Tea ch er Social environ ment any reduction Classroom Te aching Limited budgets, (Conventional & Web-bas ed) of classroom some understand events the strategic Collaborative Le arning importance (Conventional&Web-based) Policy Makers: Rich-Media Internet In support of Industry: accelerating E-learning as Individual Le arning change new qualification (Conventional&Web-based) QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 9
    • Reorganization of Curricula Structures - The Implementation of Layered Study Structures in Europe (The „Bologna‟ Process) The perception and acceptance of e-learning varies amongst the various players and perspectives involved. With the „Bologna‟ process under way, the acceptance and use of e-learning resources gains further momentum (structured module- and learning-units, blended learning). Stronger top-down guidance is needed to accelerate the acceptance of ICT resources in education (driving forces from politics, institution, industry). QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 10
    • Assessing E-Learning at the Nationa University of Rwanda - A Summary The structure that makes up a modern academic institution, e.g. rectorate, faculties, chairs, administration, support functions such as computer- and network-services, e-learning centers as well as the professional competence encountered all comply with common international levels and standards. However, there is a severe, general lack of funding for appropriate ICT infra-structure at large as well as the hiring of additional human resources (e.g. ICT specialists, media- didactics professionals, instructional technologists, etc.) QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 11
    • Assessing E-Learning at the Nationa University of Rwanda - A Summary There is a common understanding and recommendation that e-learning activities must continue in spite of unsatisfactory ICT infra-structure and human resources funding conditions. All opportunities and efforts that will raise the level of e-learning must be taken to contribute and improve the access to higher education for all. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 12
    • Results of Introducing Blended Learning at the National University of Rwanda QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 13
    • Situation at the National University of Rwanda - NUR (May 2009) Challenges • More than 10.000 students and 520 lecturers and infrastructure for 4,000 students • Lack of modern equipped library: now money → old books, no journals • Lack of equipped science laboratories • Lack of sufficient and equipped classrooms • Lack of sufficient number of qualified teachers: 120 PhD holders, 31 Professors and Associate Professors • Low internet connection (bandwidth) QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 14
    • Opportunities  Full support of Government to promote ICT in Rwanda and its educational system  Fiber optic installation in the whole country  Purchasing more computers for educational institutions ( now 2000 in NUR)  One Laptop Per Student Project at NUR: 7,000 students and all lecturers  Wireless connection covers the whole NUR campus (May 2009)  Installation of optic fiber in the whole country  Rwanda connected through optic fiber to the Mombasa submarine cable July 09, increased bandwidth from 2MB to 50 MB QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 15
    • ICT in teaching/learning at the NUR  Creation of a Center for Instructional Technology – CIT, Jan. 2004  Purchasing 500 new computers and installation of new computer labs (room of 20 – 80 computers) to be implemented by July 2009  Improved internet connectivity by installation of optic fiber at all NUR campuses  Introduction of blended learning approach of teaching/learning approach  Adoption of eLearning policy document prepared by the CIT  Adoption and installation of Moodle (LMS) on the NUR local server. More than 50 lectures have course modules on MOODLE  Intensive trainings of staff in basic IT Skills and usage of Moodle  Training in finding and using OERs (MERLOT, etc.)  Installing mirror sites of some OERs on NUR server (MIT Courseware, HyperPhysics) and finding best links for specific subjects QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 16
    • Blended learning + OERs practices at NUR What are Open Educational Resources? Learning content: Full courses, courseware, content modules, learning objects, collections and journals (MIT OCW, MERLOT, Connexions,etc.) Tools: Software to support the development, use, reuse and delivery of learning content, including searching and organisation of content, content and learning management systems, content development tools, and online learning communities (Moodle, Sakai, Educommons, Wikis, etc.) Implementation resources: Intellectual property licenses to promote open publishing of materials, design principles of best practice and localize content (Creative Commons, QuickTime™ and a (OECD, 2007) decompressor are needed to see this picture. 17
    • What is Blended learning? “A combination of face-to-face and on-line delivery,” ( BECT) Such a blend of e-learning and face to face based learning combines the any time/pace/place advantages of online facilities and materials, often through a mix of media, with opportunities for tutor support . Scheme:  In class face to face introduction of new concepts and orientation  Online discussions in small groups, teacher as facilitator, chat, forum, quizzes  In class face2face meeting teacher – students for further explanations Many pedagogists have accepted that blended learning is about developing skills and knowledge by engaging and challenging the learner in different ways. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 18
    • Blended learning + OERs usage for teaching Introductory Phsics at the NUR (1st year compter science department We used OERs as solution to the lack of library, laboratories, journals, etc. Mainly used OERS  MERLOT (simulations, animations), http://merlot.org  MIT OCW for courses materials. http://www.ocw.nur.ac.rw/ mirror site  Phet for simulations. Free downloadable at http://phet.colorado.edu/index.php  Hyper Physics for course materials. http://hyperphysics.phy- astr.gsu.edu/hbase/HFrame.html. mirror site And Other free courses found on the Web QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 19
    • Blended learning in physics, 1st year computer science department (2008, 2009) Mainly used OERS  MERLOT (simulations, animations), http://merlot.org  MIT OCW for courses materials. http://www.ocw.nur.ac.rw/ mirror site  Phet for simulations. Free downloadable at http://phet.colorado.edu/index.php  Hyper Physics for course materials. http://hyperphysics.phy- astr.gsu.edu/hbase/HFrame.html. mirror site QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 20
    • Students’ work organization  Students’ small groups work collaboratively on Moodle  small groups’ synchronous and asynchronous sessions of discussions + chat and forum  Online readings and related questions posted on the platform  Answers to the questions are submitted before the next face to face lecture  Quizzes and feedback from the lecturer. also partially assessed on the platform. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 21
    • Assessment and Outcomes  Comparison of average marks obtained: 13,5 / 20 in blended learning using OERs; while 11.2 / 20 in traditional classroom approach.  Increased student’s motivation, interest and better understanding of physics concepts was observed.  85% of students expressed their satisfaction and preference of the new method of teaching  Students gained new ICT skills and knowledge that hey can use in many other  conditions.  Students learned to work collaboratively and gained better social behaviour. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 22
    • Assessment and Outcomes  The results provide interesting information that can be used for further study on the impact of blended learning mode combined with OERs on the quality of undergraduate physics’ teaching at the University.  The results show the interest of using OERs to make physics teaching more motivated and flexible without reducing learning benefits QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 23
    • Thank you for your attention Merci de votre aimable votre attention QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. 24