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Niles Township HS Presentation on Student Growth
 

Niles Township HS Presentation on Student Growth

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Presentation made by Niles Township HS administrators at the IASA workshop on November 18, 2011 on the subject of using student performance for teacher and principal evaluation purposes.

Presentation made by Niles Township HS administrators at the IASA workshop on November 18, 2011 on the subject of using student performance for teacher and principal evaluation purposes.

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Niles Township HS Presentation on Student Growth Niles Township HS Presentation on Student Growth Presentation Transcript

  • Ensuring Success for Every StudentFacilitating academic success for allthrough rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
  • District 219 Mission 1To ensure a student-focused learning environment where every student succeeds. DISTRICT 219 ALIGNED PHILOSOPHYD219 GROWTH MODEL Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
  • LOCAL growth model 1 Uses Local Norming – not State, Regional or FederalSame testing windowsSame Assessments or combination of assessments – District choosesAccounts for confounding variables, i.e. SES, Sp. Ed., RaceGrowth is determined under local programs, courses and teachersPropensity scores can capture achievement potential from multiplepast achievement records with different growth projections/scales
  • D219’S LGM 1In addition benchmarking growth against state, national andcollege readiness benchmarks, the growth model benchmarksindividual and aggregate growth against local norms. Local norms provide the following benefits: Eliminate known limitations of the EPAS system for measuring growth Reliably identify students at risk for not being on track to meet or exceed state standards Capture individual and aggregate value-added growth Provide more meaningful growth benchmarks; benchmarks individual student growth against typical growth of similar D219 students Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
  • Application 1PLACING STUDENTS into the most rigorous courses; ensuring allstudents have equitable access to instruction within the curriculum;academic intervention placement MONITORING THE ACHIEVMENT GROWTH of every individual student; setting realistic but rigorous individual targets Program and course evaluation – RETURN ON INVESTMENTTEACHER AND ADMINISTRATOR EVALUATION
  • Current D219 EPAS Program 2EXPLORE PLAN Practice ACT/PSAE ACT(for courseplacement)GRADE 8 SPRING GRADE 9 SPRING GRADE 10 SPRING GRADE 11 Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
  • Local Norms 2 Example: Mathematics 35.0 C RL 1: 1-12 C RL 2: 13-15 C RL 3: 16-19 C RL 4: 20-25 DISTRIC T 30.0 25.0MEAN SCORE 20.0 15.0 CRL = College Readiness Level 10.0 GR 8 EXPLORE GR 9 PLAN MATH GR 10 IAC T MATH GR 11 AC T MATH MATH Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
  • Setting Individual Targets 2 YOUR EPAS PERFORMANCEIndividual Student Targets: Mathematics SCORE PLAN IACT ACT SCORE 35 25 27 29 34 25 24 26 28 33 24 YOUR SCORES 23 25 27 32 23 30 TARGETS 22 24 26 31 22 CRL LEVEL 21 23 25 30 21 20 22 24 29 20 25 19 22 23 28 19 18 21 22 27 18 17 20 21 26 17 20 16 19 20 25 16 15 18 19 23 15 15 14 17 18 22 14 13 16 17 21 13 12 17 18 21 12 10 11 16 17 20 11 10 15 16 19 10 9 14 15 18 9 5 8 13 14 17 8 GR 8 EXPLORE MATH GR 9 PLAN MATH GR 10 IACT MATH GR 11 ACT MATH 7 12 13 16 7 6 11 12 15 6 *Note: Student has not yet taken ACT 5 10 11 14 5 4 9 10 13 4 Every student will grow one point greater 3 8 9 12 3 2 7 8 11 2 each year than comparable students in 1 6 7 10 1 the norm group. SCORE PLAN IACT ACT SCORE CRL = College Readiness Level Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
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  • Value-Added Education 1If the District 219 Instructional Program isimproving, students should outperform the projections. How are we going to do that? One student at a time by: Setting realistic, but rigorous individual student targets for every single student. Ensuring students have access to the most important components of the curriculum through appropriate course placement and access to interventions. Improving the effectiveness of all programs. Adds to the conversation – HIGH SCHOOL READINESS Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
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  • Course Placement 2District 219 will also be using the models toreliably and analytically recommend eighth-gradestudents into freshman-year courses. Rigor will be stressed when considering placement. Students will be placed in the highest-level course that is supported by the data. Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
  • Course Placement: Rules of Thumb 2Placement decision rules are based onsophisticated analytical procedures. The followingtable shows a simple rule of thumb that works formost cases. Rules of Thumb: MathEXPLORE Math EXPLORE Math, Science Recommendation 17-25 Math + Science > 38 A05/07 Math + Science < 38 A03 14-16 2*Math + Science > 43 A03 2*Math + Science < 43 A01 12-13 Science > 12 A01 Science < 12 B01 1-11 B01 Facilitating academic success for all through rigorous, individual achievement growth targeting
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  • 2 Freshman Math Course Enrollment By Graduating Class & Grade Weight80%70%60%50%40%30%20%10%0% 2012 2013 2014 2015 2 31% 30% 19% 8% 3 42% 43% 54% 68% 4 27% 27% 27% 24%
  • Summer 2010 2
  • Summer 2011 Algebra Readiness Results 2• 131 students enrolled in Algebra Readiness to improve mathematics deficiencies• 33% of these students tested out of the extension course• Average proficiency went from 20% to 52% mastery of learning targets for Algebra• Algebra Readiness students increased their EXPLORE math scores by an average of 2.6 points
  • Summer 2011Algebra Proficiency Results 2• 75 students enrolled in Algebra Proficiency• 88% were promoted to Geometry• Due to both summer Algebra Proficiency and the Algebra Proficiency exam, 223 students who would have normally retaken Algebra as freshmen are taking Geometry.• This alters their destiny, as they will be able to take Calculus as a senior
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  • EVALUATION and Value-Added Growth Models 1Value-added growth models are designed to answer a basic questionthat has frustrated educators for decades. How do we know if a student or group of students performed any better than they would have anyways: - In a different school - Under a different curriculum -If they were not in a particular program -With a different teacher Historically, our inability to answer this question has been related to the absence of control groups.
  • Teacher/Administrator 1 Evaluation
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  • Legal Context for Use of Growth Models in Evaluation• Performance Evaluation Reform Act (PERA) requires student growth to be a significant factor in teacher and principal evaluations.• Significant factor not yet codified but likely at least 30% of the evaluation. 50% in state model.• Begin using data by no later than 2016 but can be earlier by agreement.
  • Considerations for Negotiations• Growth data in evaluations. D219 is piloting beginning this year.• Four tiers in evaluations. Evaluation criteria is bargained in D219.• Professional development plan for teachers needing improvement. D219 will use PAR.• Job descriptions specifying qualifications• Distribution of teacher ratings. Avoid over 90% of teachers receiving excellent ratings.• Reductions in force based on performance. Four groupings. Annual performance rankings given to union by 75 days before the end of school.
  • Presenter InformationDr. Nanciann Gatta, Superintendentnangat@d219.orgDr. Anne Roloff, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instructionannrol@d219.orgJohn Heintz, Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources/Chief Legal Officerjohhei@d219.org