2009-2010 IASA New Superintendents Conference
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2009-2010 IASA New Superintendents Conference

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This is the slide program used at the 2009 IASA New Superintendents Conference.

This is the slide program used at the 2009 IASA New Superintendents Conference.

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  • The facilitator will display, but not read the agenda slides. Program should begin with a continental breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Formal instruction should begin at 8:00 a.m. Duration of entire program is 480 minutes
  • Bond Issues for Illinois School Districts Dr. Bill Phillips, Assistant Professor Educational Leadership Program University of Illinois at Springfield
  • General Indebtedness Limitations Unit Districts 13.8% of Assessed Valuation Dual Districts 6.9% of Assessed Valuation Next we will consider “exceptions to the rules”…
  • General Indebtedness (Contd.) Exceptions For referendum that pass by 2/3 margin all Districts may go to 15% Super high growth Districts may qualify for 15% For referendum where there is a school construction grant, the debt limit may be exceeded by the amount the CDB certifies as the local District’s share Special legislation designed only for your district can allow a debt limit exception.
  • Bonds for Capital Purposes Building Bonds – These bonds may be issued only after a successful referendum has been held. An election may be held at one of the four consolidated election dates every two years, or a special election may be held with Circuit Court approval at the District’s expense. The Board of Education must adopt a resolution placing the question on the ballot no later than 65 days before the election. The resolution must be filed with the county clerk(s) at least 61 days before the election. Depending on the election, different publication requirements fall to the county clerk(s) regarding the election. Fire Prevention and Safety Bonds (Life/Safety Bonds) – These bonds are issued without referendum. To be authorized to issue these bonds the following must occur: 1) Licensed Architect or Engineer provides estimates in the form of an amendment or survey on District building(s). 2) Regional Superintendent of Schools approves the amendment or survey. Some items may be deleted. 3) State Superintendent approves the amendment or survey. Some items may be deleted or cost estimates reduced. 4) District and County Clerk(s) provide other Certificates and Filings. The amount of bonds that can be issued is limited to the District’s statutory debt limit as well as a two-pronged test: 1) Current Project Test. Bonds cannot be issued in excess of the approved estimates for work that has not yet been completed. 2) Cumulative Test. The amount of the bond issue plus prior bond issues and nickel tax levy extensions since 1967 may not exceed the amount of the cumulative approvals. Lease Certificates/ Debt Certificates – Unlike the previous types of bonds, this form of debt does not provide a separate property tax levy from which the debt is retired. There is no new money brought into the District. This type of financing utilizes existing District Revenues to make principal and interest payments. This normally carries a higher interest rate. This type of issue must mature within 20 years. No referendum is required for this type of financing. Energy Conservation Contract Certificates – Like Certificates of Participation above, this form of debt does not provide a separate property tax levy from which the debt is retired. There is no new money brought into the District. This type of financing utilizes existing District Revenues to make principal and interest payments. The concept is that the “savings” realized by the District from the work to be done will be sufficient to make the payments of principal and interest on the certificates over the maximum 10 year period of time. Districts should consider carefully the “Savings” whether they are guaranteed energy savings or “stipulated” “Capital Cost Avoidance” or other savings. This normally carries a higher interest rate. No referendum is required for this type of financing.
  • Bonds for Cash Flow Purposes Working Cash Fund Bonds (WCF) – These bonds are limited to a maximum fund balance equal to 85% of the maximum Education Fund tax extension plus 85% of the District’s Corporate Personal Property Replacement Tax allotment. Subject to a 30-day notice period during which 10% of the registered voters of the District may petition to have the issue voted at the next potential consolidated election date. (Petitions must be received by the secretary of the board at least 78 days before the election and filed with the county clerk(s) at least 61 days before the election. IRS arbitrage rules govern the tax exempt status of all bond issues but are becoming increasingly restrictive with respect to Working Capital Bonds. In general: A) The District must prepare month-by-month cash flow estimates that indicate the District will have a negative fund balance equal to or greater than the amount of bonds issued within 13 months from the issue date. B) To be unrestricted in how it invests the WCF Bond proceeds, the Bonds must mature within 2 years from the date of issuance. Otherwise the District must invest the unneeded proceeds in other municipal investments until such time as the proceeds are spent. In this event the bond issue may not exceed 5 years in length. Funding Bonds – These bonds are limited to the amount of outstanding claims against the District which cannot be paid due to insufficient funds. Commonly used to retire Teachers’ Orders (short-term debt issued for net certificed staff wages). More creative and recent uses include liabilities of early retirement payments to TRS, insurance premiums, text books and other ordinary operating expenditures for financially troubled Districts. Subject to a 30-day notice period during which 10% of the registered voters of the District may petition to have the issue voted at the next potential consolidated election date. (Petitions must be received by the secretary of the board at least 78 days before the election and filed with the county clerk(s) at least 61 days before the election). The issue is subject to the same IRS arbitrage restrictions as WCF Bonds if the proceeds are used for Working Capital purposes. Tort Judgment Funding Bonds – These bonds can be issued without referendum for the payment of any tort judgments or settlements entered against or entered into by the District. Limited to the amount necessary to discharge the District’s obligations. These bonds are subject to the District’s Statutory Debt Limit. Insurance Reserve Bonds – These bonds can be issued without referendum for the purpose of creating a reserve for the payment of costs, liabilities, or losses against which a District may normally protect itself against or levy a tax to fund. New legislation reduces the uses of these bonds and prohibits the transfer of interest earned on this reserve to other funds of the District. Alternate Revenue Bonds – These bonds may be sold with no utilization of the bond & interest fund. They do not count against your debt limit or your DSEB. These “double-barreled” bonds have a secondary levy that may be utilized if your pledged amount to pay the bonds of 125% expires. These bonds may also be sold in connection with the a County Sales Tax with different requirements.
  • Miscellaneous Bond Types Refunding Bonds These bonds are issued to prepay the outstanding bonds of a District. Often done for economic reasons (savings generated from a better interest rate environment than when the bonds were issued), they are often issued to restructure the District’s current debt burden. This may allow the District to issue more bonds for current needs while minimizing the impact on the District’s Bond & Interest tax rate.
  • Other Issues to Consider Structure of the Issue – An appropriate maturity structure can have a substantial impact on the total interest cost to a District. Things to consider when determining an appropriate maturity schedule include: 1) Does the District prefer to retire the debt within a particular time frame? (G.O. Bonds must mature within 20 years.) 2) Would the District prefer to maintain, increase, or decrease its current Bond & Interest tax rate? 3) How does the proposed bond issue coordinate with the District’s presently outstanding debt? 4) Does the District plan any future bond issues? 5) How soon will it be necessary to recover bonding capacity? 6) When will the District need the proceeds of the issue? 7) What tax year should the levy first apply to? The Effect of the Bond Notification Act on Proposed Issues – House Bill 2695 which passed the Legislature during the 1996 session requires that a public hearing be held for most all non-referendum bond issues prior to adopting the final bond resolution. Some of the highlights of the Bond Notification Act include: 1) The hearing required under the Act must be called by a resolution of the Board adopted at a regular or special meeting. The hearing cannot simply be set by action of a Board officer such as the President. 2) The notice of the hearing must be published at least 7 days, but no more than 21 days, ahead of the date of the hearing. The notice cannot be published in the Legal or Classified sections of the newspaper. 3) The hearing may be at a regular or special meeting of the board. 4) The final bond resolution may not be acted on for at least 7 days following the conclusion of the hearing.
  • Bond Issues for Districts Subject to PTELL Limited Bonds – 1) Issued in lieu of the traditional unlimited tax G.O. Bond. 2) Subject to the same authorization process as the unlimited tax G.O. Bond. 3) Subject to the District’s Debt Service Extension Base. Debt Service Extension Base – 1) For Cook and the Collar Counties = the 1994 levy for non-referendum bonds. 2) For all others = the levy at the time of the tax cap vote which places the District under the Caps for non-referendum bonds.
  • The issuance of short-term debt by an Illinois school district is governed by specific statutory provisions and related regulations. When borrowing becomes necessary, care must be given to understand: (1) the applicable debt instrument(s) given the district’s unique needs; (2) the amount of time such borrowing may be necessary; and (3) how borrowing will impact the district’s overall borrowing authority. The following summary of short-term debt/borrowing alternatives is meant to provide a general overview of the available options. Additional assistance may be required from the school district’s attorney, accountant, and/or lender. Section 18-18 of the Illinois School Code (105 ILCS 5/18-18) limits school districts' issuance of state aid anticipation certificates, general obligation notes, and tax anticipation warrants so that the total amount of state aid certificates, notes, and warrants outstanding for any fiscal year may not exceed 85% of the taxes levied by the district for that year. One exception to this limitation exists. Any district may now borrow up to 100% of the amount of General State Aid to be received in July even if it has borrowed to its maximum level as described above. A district is also limited in the amount which can be accumulated in the Working Cash Fund. Whether through the sale of working cash bonds or through annual levy, the maximum amount that can be accumulated in the Working Cash Fund is 85% of the taxes permitted to be levied for educational purposes for the then current year plus 85% of the district's last known Corporate Personal Property Replacement Tax entitlement (Section 20-2 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/20-2).
  • The Illinois School Code authorizes school districts to make interfund loans as follows: • Operations and Maintenance Fund to the Educational Fund or the Transportation Fund or the Fire Prevention and Safety Fund (Section 10-22.33 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/10-22.33), • Educational Fund to the Operations and Maintenance Fund or the Transportation Fund or the Fire Prevention and Safety Fund (Section 10-22.33 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/10-22.33), • Transportation Fund to the Educational Fund or the Operations and Maintenance Fund or the Fire Prevention and Safety Fund (Section 10-22.33 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/10-22.33), or • Working Cash Fund to any fund of the district for which taxes are levied (Section 20-4 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/20-4). Monies that are temporarily idle and/or surplus in specific funds may be loaned to cover anticipated interim needs in certain other funds, as cited above. Such monies, excluding Working Cash Fund loans, must be repaid to the proper fund within three years. Working Cash Fund loans must be repaid upon the collection of anticipated taxes. Exceptions to the payment of Working Cash Fund loans exist when tax anticipation notes are outstanding. Even though interfund loans can be made to the Fire Prevention and Safety Fund, no interfund loans are permitted to be made from the Fire Prevention and Safety Fund. Interfund loans require appropriate authorization by the board of education of the district.
  • When there is no money in the treasury to pay the necessary expenses of the district, a school board may issue warrants or may provide a fund by issuing and disposing of warrants drawn against, and in anticipation of, any taxes levied for payment of necessary district expenses for transportation, educational, fire prevention and safety, and operations and maintenance purposes, or for payments to the Illinois Municipal Retirement System (but not the Social Security System), or for payments of maturing principal and interest of bonds. Warrants may be issued to a legal maximum of 85% of the total amount of the tax levied less the amount available for loan in or loaned from the Working Cash Fund. The warrants show upon their face that they are payable in the numerical order of their issuance solely from such taxes when collected. Taxes must be set aside and held for warrant payment. Every warrant bears interest payable out of the taxes against which it is drawn at a rate not exceeding the greater of 9%, or 125% of the General Obligation Bonds Index of average municipal bond yields, per annum from the date of issuance until paid, or until notice is given that the money for the warrant is available (Section 17-16 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/17-16).
  • General Obligation Tax Anticipation Warrants are authorized by the Debt Reform Act. The warrants bear a specified due date and are secured by a levy of ad valorem taxes upon all taxable property in the district without limit as to rate or amount. No additional money should accrue to the district as a result of the tax levied to pay general obligation warrants because when the warrants are issued, the county clerk is instructed to reduce the specific tax rate by the percentage necessary to produce an amount to pay the principal of and interest on the warrants. A district may not issue general obligation tax anticipation warrants in excess of the 85% formula described above. Under the Debt Reform Act, a district may issue refunding warrants or general obligation bonds to refund warrants should taxes or other revenues be delayed or insufficient to pay the warrants. The refunding warrants or bonds may also be secured by a levy of ad valorem taxes upon all taxable property in the district without limit as to rate or amount or, for a district subject to the Extension Limitation Law, may be issued as limited bonds. Warrants initially issued are not regarded as or included in any computation of indebtedness for the purpose of any statutory provision or limitation. Refunding warrants and general obligation bonds issued to refund warrants may be issued without regard to existing debt limitations. Upon being issued, however, such general obligation refunding bonds or warrants must be included and regarded as indebtedness.
  • In lieu of issuing tax anticipation warrants in accordance with Section 17-16 of the Illinois School Code (105 ILCS 5/17-16), the school board of a school district may issue notes , bonds , or other obligations (and in connection with that issuance, establish a line of credit with a bank) in an amount not to exceed 85% of the amount of property taxes most recently levied for educational and building purposes. Moneys thus borrowed shall be applied to the purposes for which they were obtained and no other purpose. All moneys so borrowed shall be repaid exclusively from property tax revenues within 60 days after the property tax revenues have been received by the board. The borrowing shall bear interest at a rate not to exceed the maximum rate authorized by the Bond Authorization Act (30 ILCS 305), from the date of issuance until paid. Prior to the board borrowing or establishing a line of credit, the board shall authorize, by resolution, the borrowing or line of credit. The resolution shall set forth facts demonstrating the need for the borrowing or line of credit, state the amount to be borrowed, establish a maximum interest rate limit not to exceed the maximum rate authorized by the Bond Authorization Act, and provide a date by which the borrowed funds shall be repaid. The resolution shall direct the relevant officials to make arrangements to set apart and hold the taxes, as received, which will be used to repay the borrowing. In addition, the resolution may authorize the relevant officials to make partial repayments of the borrowing as the taxes become available and may contain any other terms restrictions, or limitations not inconsistent with the provisions of Section 17-17 of the Illinois School Code (105 ILCS 5/17-17).
  • School districts are authorized to issue general obligation notes in an amount (including principal, interest, and costs of note issuance) not to exceed 85% of the taxes levied less the amount available for loan in or loaned from the Working Cash Fund. Anticipation notes may be issued in anticipation of all taxes, including those for which tax anticipation warrants may not be issued. No notes shall be issued during any fiscal year in which tax anticipation warrants are outstanding against the tax levied for the fiscal year. Anticipation notes bear interest at a rate not exceeding the greater of 9%, or 125% of the General Obligation Bonds Index of average municipal bond yields. Notes must mature within two years. A board of education is required to adopt a resolution fixing the amount of notes, the date and the maturity date, the rate of interest (unless the notes are to be sold by public bid), the place of payment, and the denomination (in equal multiples of $1,000). The board resolution must also provide for the levy and collection of a direct annual tax upon all taxable property in the district sufficient to pay the principal and interest on the notes to maturity (30 ILCS 305/2). When tax anticipation notes are outstanding, it is the duty of the county clerk to reduce a district's specific tax rate by the percentage necessary to produce an amount to pay the principal and interest on the outstanding notes. When the district has established a Working Cash Fund, the tax rate is not reduced below the amount necessary to reimburse any money borrowed from the Working Cash Fund. It is the duty of the clerk or secretary of the district annually, and not less than 30 days prior to the tax extension date, to certify to the county clerk the amount of money borrowed from the Working Cash Fund that is to be reimbursed from the specific tax levy. No reimbursement may be made to the Working Cash Fund until an amount sufficient to pay the principal of, and interest on, the notes to maturity has been accumulated from the tax levy. The notes are executed in the name of the district by manual or facsimile signatures of district officials designated by the resolution. At least one signature on each note must be a manual signature. The notes may be issued in excess of any statutory debt limitation and do not operate to reduce the authority to incur debt otherwise authorized for the district. The issuance of notes does not require a referendum (50 ILCS 420/5, 50 ILCS 420/6, and 50 ILCS 420/7).
  • Section 18-18 of the Illinois School Code (105 ILCS 5/18-18) allows school districts to issue a type of short-term debt known as State Aid Anticipation Certificates. Using certificates, money is loaned to a district against anticipated General State Aid payments. The certificates have the following general characteristics: • Certificates may not be outstanding for more than 13 months. • Certificates are payable solely from General State Aid payments. • Certificates may be issued without referenda. • The amount of certificates to be issued may not exceed 75% of the state aid allocated to the school district for that year as certified by the state superintendent after subtracting the amount of funds available for transfer from the district's Working Cash Fund. • The amount of certificates plus the amount of funds transferred from or available for transfer from the district’s Working Cash Fund, plus the amount of the district's general obligation notes and tax anticipation warrants outstanding for the year may not exceed 85% of taxes levied by the district for that year. • The board, prior to issuing the certificates, must adopt a resolution designating the purposes for which the proceeds of the certificates are to be expended, the amount to be issued, maturity dates, rate of interest, and other optional provisions. • Upon the issuance of said certificates, the board shall give written notification to the appropriate regional superintendent and the state superintendent of education of the issuance of the certificates and the terms thereof, including, but not limited to, any assignment of state aid payments made pursuant to this Section, the name and address of each assignee, the amounts and dates of the payments to be made by the state superintendent of education directly to each assignee under Section 18-11 [105 ILCS 5/18-11], the amount of the certificates held by each assignee and the maturity date of the certificates. • Districts may borrow up to 100% of their July state aid payments; these loans must be repaid by August 1.
  • The Anticipation of Revenue Act, commonly referred to as Revenue Anticipation Notes ( RANs ), (50 ILCS 425/1 et seq.) authorize s units of local government and school districts to issue obligations to anticipate revenue from any sources including, but not limited to , federal aid , state revenue sharing , local taxes and fees . Anticipatory obligations issued against such expected revenues for any purpose shall not exceed 85% of such revenues. Written assurance of the amount of revenue to be received from a particular source must be filed with the proper county clerk before the obligations can be issued. Obligations issued under this Act shall be due not more than 12 months from the date of issue and shall bear interest at a rate not exceeding the maximum rate authorized by the Bond Authorization Act (30 ILCS 305/0.01) at the time of issuance. No notes shall be issued or sold, unless such issuance and sale is authorized by a vote of at least 2/3 of the members of the school board. Several duties are imposed upon the treasurer of the district including authentication of notes and coupons, providing certificates of authenticity, keeping a registry of each series of notes issued, transmitting funds to pay principal and interest, and insuring that notes are paid. Severe penalties are provided if notes are issued in excess of the limitations. Any official of the unit of local government or school district who votes for or otherwise influences the issuance of notes under this Act in excess of the limitations provided in the Act…"shall be liable for twice the sum of such excessive notes to the unit of local government or school district as the case may be and shall be ineligible for his office and be subject to removal from office."
  • Personal property replacement tax notes may be issued in an amount not to exceed 75% of the entitlement of replacement taxes anticipated for the year less the amount available for loan in or loaned from the Working Cash Fund. The entitlement amount must be certified by the director of the Illinois Department of Revenue. If the entitlement has not yet been certified, notes may be issued based upon 90% of the last known entitlement as certified by the director of the Illinois Department of Revenue (50 ILCS 420/4.1).
  • Teachers' orders are, in effect, promissory notes for wages due, paid in lieu of cash or a check to a teacher. Wages of teachers are paid in a manner agreed upon by the school board, but at least one payment must be made during each school month. The board issues and delivers an order to the school treasurer for the amount of salary due. Teachers' orders must be issued when due, even though there is no money in the Educational Fund, and the orders become a liability against future Educational Fund revenue of the district. The school treasurer cannot pay out funds of a district except upon an order of the school board signed by the president and clerk, or secretary, or by a majority of the board. When teachers' orders are presented to the treasurer and cannot be paid because of lack of funds, the treasurer endorses the orders over his or her signature "not paid for want of funds," marks the date of presentation and records the endorsements. After an endorsement, the order becomes negotiable and bears interest not exceeding the greater of 9%, or 125% of the General Obligation Bonds Index of average municipal bond yields per annum. The order remains outstanding and interest accumulates until the treasurer notifies the clerk or secretary, in writing, that he or she has funds to pay the order. The order draws no interest after notice is given to the clerk or secretary (Section 8-16 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/8-16). * Charter school districts having a population of less than 500,000 may issue to teachers and other employees of the district orders in payment of salaries (Section 32-4.14 of the Illinois School Code/105 ILCS 5/32-4.14).

2009-2010 IASA New Superintendents Conference 2009-2010 IASA New Superintendents Conference Presentation Transcript

  • Illinois Association of School Administrators 2009-2010 New Superintendents Conference
    • Rick Schmitt, President, Sandwich #430
    • Dr. Gary Kelly, President Elect, DuQuoin #300
    • Robert Gillum, IASA Past President, Ball-Chatham CUSD #5
    • IASA Board of Directors
      • 21 Regions and one At-Large Representative
    • Dr. Brent Clark, Executive Director
    • Dr. Richard Voltz, Associate Director/Professional Development; Induction/Mentoring
    • Sara Boucek, Associate Director/Legal Counsel
    • Diane Hendren, Director of Governmental Relations
    • Cherry Middleton, Executive Secretary/Office Manager
    IASA
  • Agenda – August 4, 2009
    • 8:00 am Registration, Refreshments
    • 8:15 am Welcome – Dr. Brent Clark
    • 8:30 am Overview of Conference
    • 9:00 am Tips for Success
        • 365 Day Calendar
        • 90 Days To Superintendent Success
    • 9:15 am IASA New Superintendents Services
    • 9:30 am Communication
        • Superintendent & Board of Education
        • Superintendent & Administrators
        • Superintendent & Community
        • Gathering of Essential Information
        • Dealing with the Media
        • Opening Day Institute
    • 10:30 am Break
    • 10:45 am Conversation with three 2008-09 New Superintendents
      • Patrick Martin, Illini Central
      • Laura Nelson, Scales Mound
      • Mike Riordan, Oak Lawn
    • 11:30 am Working with Your Legislators
      • Diane Hendren, IASA
      • Dr. Calvin Jackson, IASBO
    • Noon Lunch
  • Agenda – August 4, 2009
    • 12:30 pm Services offered by PMA Financial Network, Inc. and ISDLAF+
      • Emmert Dannenberg
    • 12:45 pm Financial Projections by ISBE Financial Consultant
      • Brent Appell, ISBE
    • 2:15 pm Use of Charts and Graphs for School Board Meetings
      • Dr. Richard Voltz, IASA
    • 2:30 pm Break
    • 2:45 pm Bonds & Borrowing
      • Dr. Bill Phillips, UIS
    • 3:15 pm IASB Services
      • Conversation between Angie Peifer and Rich Voltz about Board-Superintendent Relationships
    • 4:00 pm Illinois ASBO Services
      • Dr. Michael Jacoby, Executive Director
    • 6:00 pm Reception and Dinner at Abraham Lincoln Hotel Sponsored by Chevron Energy Solution Company & SMART Technologies Corporation
  • Agenda – August 5, 2009
    • 8:00 am Coffee & Refreshments
    • 8:10 am Overview of day two
      • Dr. Brent Clark
    • 8:15 am Legal Issues for New Superintendents by Stephanie Jones, Attorney, HLERK
        • Employment Contract Issues
      • When should you call your school attorney.
      • Open Meetings Act
      • Freedom of Information Act
      • Gift Ban Act
      • E-Communications Issues
      • Miscellaneous issues
        • Cell phones, car expenses, personal actions
    • 10:15 am Demo on how to use the IASB PRESS Services
    • 10:30 am Break
    • 10:45 am School Board Meetings
      • Agenda Development
      • School Board Packet
      • Effective School Board Meetings
      • Communicating On-Line
    • 11:45 am Workers’ Compensation Self- Insurance Trust and Illinois School District Agency Services
      • James Woodard
    • Noon Lunch
  • Agenda – August 5, 2009
    • 12:30 pm Technology Use for Administrators
      • Dr. Richard Voltz, Associate Director, IASA
        • Podcasting
        • Blogs
        • Wiki’s
    • 2:00 pm Strategic Planning
      • Dr. Tom Bertrand, Rochester School District
    • 3:00 pm Break
    • 3:15 pm Using Data in School Improvement Planning
      • Dr. Tom Bertrand, Rochester School District
      • Dr. Don White, Troy School District
  • Workshop Objectives and Outcomes
    • This workshop is designed for the brand new superintendent and superintendents who are new to Illinois
    • Participants will actively participate in the workshop and will design and develop projects that can be used in their own school district.
    • Participants will be able to begin their new superintendency with knowledge and information that should help them succeed in their first year.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Participants will know and be able to…
    • Communicate with board members, administrators, staff, media and the public using written, oral and technology based sources.
    • Prepare effective school board meeting agendas, school board packets, run effective school board meetings, and communicate school board business to the public.
    • Use essential concepts for school finance, budgeting, levy preparation, financial forecasting and borrowing.
    • Learn effective board-superintendent relationship strategies.
    • Interpret important school law concepts such as open meetings act, freedom of information act, gift ban act, and e-communication laws.
    • Learn from some of last year’s new superintendents.
    • Learn how to use technology as a superintendent.
    • Learn how to work with your legislators.
    • Learn from an experienced superintendent how to use IWAS, strategic planning and effective time management skills.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • 365 Day Calendar
      • Tips from an experienced administrator
      • Important information from education leadership books and publications
      • Quotes from various sources
      • Information on IASA and it’s programs
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • IASA Opportunities for New Superintendents
    • Provide continuing support to all new superintendents through a direct line of contact with the IASA Associate Director via cell phone and email.
      • Cell phone is 217-741-0466
      • Email address is [email_address]
    • New Superintendent Update pushed via email to new superintendents each week.
    • Mentoring
    • ISBE ½ day session
    • Triple I – 90 minute session
    • Podcasts
    • Webinars
    • Round Robin discussion with Dr. Voltz
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • New Superintendent Update © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Dr. Voltz Podcast Site © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • IASA services for all superintendents
    • Listserver
    • Legal Support
    • Return of Dues
    • ComPsych Services
    • Professional Services
    • Professional Development
    • Podcasts
    • Newsletter
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • American Association of School Administrators
    • AASA Daily News ; email sent daily
    • AASA New Superintendents publications:
      • The AASA New Superintendents E-Journal is a quarterly electronic newsletter written specifically for those who are in their first months and years of the superintendency. Even if you are a veteran superintendent who just landed a job in a new district, these e-journal articles provide a refresher course on issues to keep front and center during the early tenure of your new post.
        • To subscribe to this quarterly electronic newsletter, send your subscription request to [email_address] .
      • The New Superintendents Journal is published annually each fall and includes articles written by recognized national experts on topics identified by new superintendents as areas where they need help. (IASA will provide you with a copy)
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Communication with and from IASA
    • E-News and Notes Flash
    • Alliance Legislative Reports
    • School Year Calendar “To Do” List
    • IASA Listserver Documents
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Communication Topics
    • Divide into groups of four
    • Communication between Superintendent and Board of Education
      • Discuss how you plan to communicate with board members.
        • Each group will report out one means of communication with school board members.
        • Each subsequent group may not use a means already mentioned by a prior group.
      • What is important to communicate to board members?
        • Case study examples
          • Rumor of student bringing a gun
          • Coach arrested for theft day of regional game
        • What other examples can you think of?
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Small Group Activity
    • Factors to consider
      • How often to send?
      • What information should it contain?
      • How about closed session information such as personnel?
      • Is this communication open to disclosure?
      • Can somebody file a FOI request on these reports and gain access?
  • Communication with Other Administrators
    • Participants will determine the recommended make-up of a Superintendent Cabinet if you choose to use this process.
      • Will you include district level administrators?
      • Will you include principals?
      • Will you include assistant principals?
      • Will you include the teacher association president?
    • The issues of trust and time .
    • Book studies for administrators.
    • Academy training together on a specified topic.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Opening Teacher Institute Activities
    • Addressing staff members for the first time at your opening day activities is very important to your successful start as a school superintendent.
      • How will you prepare for this speech?
        • Who will be included in the audience?
        • Will you invite school board members?
        • Will you invite support staff?
        • What will you say?
        • Will you have completed a planning process with the school board? With the staff? With the community?
    • In small groups, develop an outline of topics for the speech you will deliver at the opening teacher institute.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Opening Speech
    • Use data gathered from research and talking to others
    • Prepare thoughts about themes that emerged in meetings
    • Share your thoughts with district office staff and building administrators
    • Determine personal and district goals around which you would like to rally stakeholders’ efforts
    • Check with Board of Education and interested stakeholders to determine if you are on track
    • Deliver your message
    • Last year we showed “Did You Know”
    • This year we will show “A Vision of K-12 Students Today”
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Possible videos to use © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Thoughts for Your First Few Months
    • You can’t move faster than your community or board will allow.
    • Do not criticize the way it has been done in the past.
      • One of the important tenets of Stephen Covey’s book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is to never criticize someone behind his/her back, if you say something state it as if the person is in the room.
    • Try to refrain from “in my former district we did…”
    • What was the board looking for when they hired you?
    • What happened to your predecessor?
    • What do you see as the challenges for your new position?
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Thoughts continued
    • What is the status of labor and contract negotiations?
      • It takes time to develop trust to build a “Win-Win” conversation.
    • Where would you like the district to be in one year? (start with the end in mind)
    • Good advise is to concentrate on “student learning”
    • “ You first must understand to be understood” – Covey
    • Gather essential data for all stakeholder groups – school board; administrators; teachers; parents; students; and community members
    • What questions would you ask these different groups and how would you use this information to form goals and/or action plans?
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Other Communications
    • Internal communications such as newsletters to staff, audio podcasts to staff, web pages dedicated to staff
    • Superintendent Articles published in daily newspapers
    • District Newsletters
    • On-line access to the public for school board information
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Gathering Essential Information About Your New School District
    • Joining community organizations
      • Chamber of Commerce
      • Lions Club
      • Church
      • Others
    • Being involved
      • Education Foundation
    • Attending extracurricular events
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Engaging the Media in a Meaningful Way
    • Answer promptly
    • Answer truthfully
    • Know how to answer media questions
    • Frame the issue and repeat main goals
    • Admit mistakes; if you make a mistake admit it - “Fess up if you mess up”
      • Randy Pausch says you should do these three things when you mess up
        • “ I’m sorry”
        • “ It was my fault”
        • “ How do I make it right?”
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • School Board Meeting Organization
    • Agenda development
      • Role of school board president
      • Role of superintendent
      • Role of other administrators
    • Preparing the board packet and agenda
      • District office personnel and principal involvement in agenda items
    • Consent agenda
    • Closed session topics
    • Run an effective meeting
      • Need to have rules for public engagement
    • On-line agenda communication to board and public
      • In today’s digital and information age it is important to keep people informed
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Types of Meetings
    • Regular
      • School board must annually post a list of their regular meetings
      • May only act on matters listed on the agenda
      • The school board president must certify that all issues discussed in closed session were proper
    • Organizational
      • Within seven days following the election of the school board members an organizational meeting of the board must be held.
        • Transfer responsibilities from old to new
        • Elect new officers
        • Establish date & time of regular meetings
    • Rescheduled - with 48 hour notice
    • Special
      • Can be called by board president or any three members
      • Must be called 48 hours in advance
      • Is limited to agenda
    • Emergency - notice as soon as practical
    • Reconvened - when volume of business is too great
  • Activity
    • Participants will discuss various school board agenda formats, descriptors and recommendations and report out to the group as a whole suggestions for all.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Services offered by PMA Financial Network, Inc. & ISDLAF+ © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Services offered by PMA Financial Network, Inc. & ISDLAF+ © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Financial Projections © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Charts and Graphs by Dr. Voltz © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Forecasting
    • Need to be able to predict
      • Future salary increases
      • Future staff demands
      • Future major technology purchases
      • Future supplies, equipment and capital outlay percentage increases
      • Future special education costs
      • Allow room for contingencies
    • Do any of your counties collect property taxes early and disburse to school district?
    • Growth in EAV in school district is important to predict
    • General State Aid
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Forecasting PowerPoint Presentation
    • Use LCD Projector if possible
    • Keep information simple and easy to understand
    • Example of Budget Presentation
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Current Finance Issues
    • Predicting GSA
      • Listen to the Governor’s Budget Address
      • Historically final Foundation Level increase is seldom less than Governor reports
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • 2009-2010 Budget Enter District Name Here Enter Date Here
  • Total Funds Summary © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Total revenue for all funds $34,322,280 Total expenditures for all funds $33,596,055 All funds balance is estimated to increase +$726,225
  • Education Fund Revenue Summary
    • Total revenue up $859,010 or 3.6%
      • Local ed fund taxes up $842,000 or 8.9%
      • State revenue up $296,000 or 3.4%
      • General State Aid up $235,000 to Ed Fund
        • ADA up 74 students for 2007-08
        • Foundation level increased by $125/student
      • Federal funding down $50,500 or –5.89%
        • Medicaid at $375,000 due to uncertainty of funding
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Remember GSA is figured on previous year enrollment
  • Education Fund Expenditures
    • Continued summer school freshmen advantage program at $10,000
    • Continued full time Intervention Coordinator
    • $150,000 for computer hardware
    • Salary and fringe benefit increase based on new contract figures
      • Net two new K-12 regular ed teachers
      • Net two new K-12 special ed teachers
    • 3% supplies and materials
    • Special education budget increase of $334,000 or 15%
    • CACC tuition down by $70,000
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Four Operating Funds Sources (ISBE) © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Graph from ISBE File © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Copied from ISBE Excel Sheet You will need to resize graphs, copy and paste into your PowerPoint file
  • O&M Fund Highlights
    • Revenue
      • $111,000 additional local taxes
      • $427,000 tort deposited in O&M
    • Expenditures
      • Salaries up
      • Fringe Benefits up
      • $20,000 BE freezer
      • $15,000 for BE driveway
      • $25,000 for CE phone system
      • $83,000 for CE windows
      • $26,000 for GIS flooring and abatement
      • $147,000 for GMS windows
      • $15,000 for GMS hot water heater
      • $10,000 to fix GMS intercom system
      • $160,000 for new GMS track
      • $25,000 for new windows, fascia and soffit at DO
      • Contingency at $50,000
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • From ISBE File © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators From Graph Fund Balance
  • Transportation Fund © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Continue to purchase five new buses every year.
  • From ISBE File © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Working Cash from ISBE © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Three Operating Funds from ISBE © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Four Operating Funds from ISBE © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • ISBE Charts © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Ed Fund by Object (ISBE) © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • IMRF & SS Fund © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Working Cash Fund © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Financial Watch List Figure © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • ISBE Profile Score © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • ISBE Tax Rate Chart © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • ISBE EAV Chart © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • School Finance
    • Development of your first budget
    • Property tax cycle
    • Important variables to make finance projections and how to get information to predict variables
    • Making one and five year budget projections
    • Making your first levy
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Fiscal and Business Management
    • The Superintendent is responsible for the School District’s fiscal and business management.
      • This responsibility includes annually preparing and presenting the District’s statement of affairs to the School Board and publishing it before December 1 as required by State law.
    • School Board must
      • Designate an individual to prepare budget
      • Secretary of Board must publish a notice of where, when and during what hours the tentative budget will be on display
      • The tentative budget must be on display 30 days prior to the budget hearing
      • Hold one public hearing on the budget and public may ask questions
      • Must roll call vote on budget and file by September 30 th
    • District must file with County Clerk certified copies of the budget within 30 days of adoption
    • Districts that have a web site must post the budget on the site
      • Make a PDF copy of the ISBE format and post link on web site
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Budget Planning
    • The District’s fiscal year is from July 1 until June 30.
    • The Superintendent shall present to the School Board, no later than the first regular meeting in August, a tentative budget with appropriate explanation.
      • This budget shall represent the culmination of an ongoing process of planning for the fiscal support needed for the District’s educational program.
      • The District’s budget shall be entered upon the Illinois State Board of Education’s “ School District Budget Form .”
      • To the extent possible, the tentative budget shall be balanced as defined by the State Board of Education guidelines. The Superintendent shall complete a tentative deficit reduction plan if one is required by the State Board of Education guidelines.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Designation of a Person or Persons to Prepare Tentative Budget
    • BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Education of School District Number ______ in the County of _______________, State of Illinois, that_______________________________ is hereby appointed to prepare a tentative budget for said School District for the fiscal year beginning ___________, 20__, and ending ____________, 20__, which tentative budget shall be filed with the Secretary of this Board.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Notice of the Availability of Tentative Budget for Public Inspection and Public Hearing
    • Notice of Public Hearing
    • NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Board of Education of School District Number ____, in the County of _____________, State of Illinois, that tentative budget for said School District for the fiscal year beginning __________, 20__, will be on file and conveniently available to public inspection at_________________________________, Illinois in this School District
    • Address City
    • from and after _______o’clock _____m., on the _________day of __________, 20__. Notice is further hereby given that a public hearing on said budget will be held at ______ o’clock ___m., on the _________day of _________ 20__, at ____________________ in this School District Number _____,. Dated this _________day of _________, 20__. Board of Education of School District Number_____, in the County of ___________, State of Illinois.
    • By _________________________________
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Budget Processes
    • Reviewing Revenue and Expenditure History
      • Get this information from past audits, levies, financial annual report and budget forms
      • It is a very good idea to have someone enter past five years history in a spreadsheet for you to make future predictions
    • Analyzing Current Budget Data - Receipts and Expenditures
    • Monitoring Monthly/End of Year Revenue and Expenditure Printouts
    • Prioritizing Needs from the School Improvement Plan
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Important Education Fund Revenue Variables
    • Local Revenue
      • Local EAV & property taxes
        • General Levy
        • Tort Immunity Levy
        • Leasing Levy
      • CPPRT
      • Tuition
      • Earnings on Investment
      • Food Service
      • Pupil Activities (Athletics)
      • Textbooks
    • State Revenue
      • General State Aid
        • Student enrollment (ADA)
        • Hold Harmless
      • Restricted Grants (Categorical Aid)
        • Special Education
        • Vocational Education
        • State Free Lunch
        • Driver Education
        • Early Childhood
        • Reading Improvement
        • ADA Block Grant
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
    • Federal Revenue
      • Title V
      • National School Lunch Program
      • Title I Low Income
      • Title IV Safe & Drug Free Schools
      • Federal Special Education
      • Medicaid
  • GSA Calculation
    • Formula
      • (2005 Adjusted Real EAV * Calculation Rate (Unit = .0300; Elementary = .0230; High School = .0105)) + 2004 CPPRT = Available Local Resources
      • Available Local Resources * (either 2006-07 ADA or Three-Year Average ADA; whichever is higher)
      • Local Resources / Foundation Level = Local Resources Per Pupil
      • Foundation Level = (Best three months ADA * Foundation Level)
      • Foundation Level – Available Local Resources = Foundation Level Claim Amount
      • Foundation Level Claim Amount + Low Income at $355 per student – Audit Adjustment = Actual General State Aid
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Education Fund Expenditure Variables
    • Instruction
      • Regular Programs
      • Special Education Programs
      • Educationally Deprived/Remedial Programs
      • Adult/Continuing Education Programs
      • Vocational Programs
      • Interscholastic Programs
      • Summer School Programs
      • Gifted Programs
      • Bilingual Programs
      • Truant Alternative & Optional Programs
    • Support Services - Students
      • Attendance & Social Work
      • Guidance
      • Health Services
      • Psychological
      • Speech Pathology
    • Support Services – Instructional Staff
      • Improvement of Instructional Services
      • Educational Media Services
      • Assessment & Testing
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Education Fund Expenditure Variables
    • Support Services - General Administration
      • Board of Education
      • Executive Administrative
        • Administrative Cost Cap
      • Special Area Administrative
    • Support Services - School Administration
      • Office of the Principal
    • Support Services - Business
      • Direction of Business Support
      • Fiscal
      • O & M of Plant Services
      • Pupil Transportation
      • Food
      • Internal
    • Support Services - Central
      • Director of Central Support
      • Planning, Research
      • Information Services
      • Staff Services
      • Data Processing
    • Payments to other Govt. Units
      • For regular education
      • For Special Education
      • For Adult/Continuing Education
      • For Vocational Education
      • For Community College
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Operations & Maintenance Fund
    • Local Revenue
      • Local EAV & property taxes
        • General Levy
        • Tort Immunity Levy
        • Leasing Levy
      • Earnings on Investment
      • Rentals
      • Payments from other LEA’s
      • Permanent transfer from other funds
    • State Revenue
      • Can deposit GSA
    • Expenditures
      • Support Services – Business
        • Direction of Business Support
        • Facilities Acquisition & Construction Services
        • O & M of Plant Services
        • Pupil Transportation
        • Food Services
      • Payments to other Govt. Units
        • For Special Education
        • For Vocational Education
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Bond & Interest Fund
    • Local Revenue
      • Local EAV & property taxes
        • General Levy
      • Earnings on Investment
    • Expenditures
      • Debt Services
        • Tax Anticipation Warrants
        • Tax Anticipation Notes
        • Bonds
        • CPPRT Notes
        • State Aid Anticipation Certificates
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Transportation Fund
    • Local Revenue
      • Local EAV & property taxes
        • General Levy
        • Tort Immunity Levy
      • Earnings on Investment
      • Rentals
      • Payments from other LEA’s
    • State Revenue
      • Regular Transportation
      • Special Education Transportation
    • Expenditures
      • Support Services – Business
        • Pupil Transportation
      • Payments to other Govt. Units
        • For Regular Education
        • For Special Education
        • For Adult/Continuing
        • For Vocational Education
        • For Community College
      • Debt Services
        • Tax Anticipation Warrants
        • Tax Anticipation Notes
        • CPPRT Notes
        • State Aid Anticipation Certificates
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Municipal Retirement/Social Security Fund
    • Local Revenue
      • Local EAV & property taxes
        • SS & IMRF Levy
      • Earnings on Investment
    • Expenditures
      • Instruction Programs
      • Support Services – Pupil
      • Support Services – Instructional Staff
      • Support Services – General Administration
      • Support Services – School Administration
      • Support Services – Business
      • Support Services – Central
      • Payments to Sp Ed Programs
      • Payments for Voc Ed Programs
      • For Debt Services
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Fire Prevention & Safety Fund
    • Local Revenue
      • Local EAV & property taxes
        • General Levy
      • Earnings on Investment
    • Expenditures
      • Facilities Acquisition & Construction Services
      • Operations & Maintenance of Plant Services
  • Possible Finance Resources
    • Mechanics of a School District Budget
      • http://www.isbe.net/sfms/pdf/mechanics.pdf
    • Illinois Program Accounting Manual
      • http://www.isbe.net/sfms/pdf/ipam.pdf
    • The State, Local and Federal Financing for Illinois Public Schools
      • http://www.isbe.net/sfms/pdf/slf01.pdf
    • The School District Annual Financial Report (ISBE Form 50-35)
      • http://www.isbe.net/sfms/ABCsofAFR/AFRComponents.htm
    • School District Budget Form
      • http://www.isbe.net/sfms/budget/2008/SDB2008FORM.xls
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Bond Issues for Illinois School Districts Dr. Bill Phillips Associate Professor Educational Leadership Program University of Illinois at Springfield © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • General Indebtedness Limitations
    • Unit Districts
      • 13.8% of Assessed Valuation
    • Dual Districts
      • 6.9% of Assessed Valuation
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • General Indebtedness (Continued)
    • Exceptions
      • For referendum that pass by 2/3 margin all Districts may go to 15%
      • Super high growth Districts may qualify for 15%
      • For referendum where there is a school construction grant, the debt limit may be exceeded by the amount the CDB certifies as the local District’s share
      • Legislative Exception
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Bonds for Capital Purposes
    • Building Bonds
    • Fire Prevention and Safety Bonds (Life/Safety Bonds)
    • Lease Certificates/ Debt Certificates
    • Energy Conservation Contract Certificates
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Bonds for Cash Flow Purposes
    • Working Cash Fund Bonds (WCF)
    • Funding Bonds
    • Tort Judgment Funding Bonds
    • Insurance Reserve Bonds
    • Alternate Revenue Bonds
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Miscellaneous Bond Types
    • Refunding Bonds
      • These bonds are issued to prepay the outstanding bonds of a District.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Other Issues to Consider
    • Structure of the Issue
    • The Effect of the Bond Notification Act on Proposed Issues
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Bond Issues for Districts Subject to PTELL
    • Limited Bonds
    • Debt Service Extension Base
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • What Are The Short-Term Debt/ Borrowing Alternatives?
    • When borrowing becomes necessary, care must be given to understand:
      • The applicable debt instrument(s) given the district’s unique needs
      • The amount of time such borrowing may be necessary
      • How borrowing will impact the district’s overall borrowing authority
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Interfund Loans
    • The Illinois School Code authorizes school districts to make interfund loans…
      • Operations and Maintenance Fund (1,2,3)
      • Educational Fund (2,3,4)
      • Transportation Fund (1,3,4)
      • Working Cash Fund (5)
        • 1-Educational Fund
        • 2-Transportation Fund
        • 3-Fire Prevention and Safety Fund
        • 4-Operations and Maintenance
        • 5-Any fund of the district for which taxes are levied
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Pete Paul
  • Tax Anticipation Warrants (TAWs)
    • When there is no money in the treasury to pay the necessary expenses of the district, a school board may issue warrants…
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • General Obligation Tax Anticipation Warrants
    • General Obligation Tax Anticipation Warrants are authorized by the Debt Reform Act.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Issuance of Notes, Bonds, or Other Obligations in Lieu of Tax Anticipation Warrants
    • In lieu of issuing tax anticipation warrants
      • Notes
      • Bonds
      • Other obligations
    • “ Moneys thus borrowed shall be applied to the purposes for which they were obtained and no other purpose.”
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Tax Anticipation Notes (TANs)
    • School districts are authorized to issue general obligation notes in an amount not to exceed 85% of the taxes levied, less the amount available for loan-in or loaned-from the Working Cash Fund.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • State Aid Anticipation Certificates
    • Using certificates, money is loaned to a district against anticipated General State Aid payments.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Revenue Anticipation Notes (RANs)
    • RANs authorize units of local government and school districts to issue obligations to anticipate revenue from any sources including, but not limited to…
      • Federal aid
      • State revenue sharing
      • Local taxes
      • Fees
    • Severe penalties are provided if notes are issued in excess of the limitations.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Personal Property Replacement Tax Notes
    • Personal property replacement tax notes may be issued in an amount not to exceed 75% of the entitlement of replacement taxes anticipated for the year less the amount available for loan in or loaned from the Working Cash Fund.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Teacher/Employee* Orders
    • Teachers' orders are, in effect, promissory notes for wages due, paid in lieu of cash or a check to a teacher.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Board – Superintendent Problems
    • Top ten communication problems between superintendents and school boards:
        • No common goals
        • Failure to communicate important issues
        • School finances going south
        • Election of new school board members
        • Superintendent gone from school district too much
        • Somebody’s relative gets fired
        • Superintendent gets caught lying about a situation
        • Superintendent has some sort of moral breakdown
        • Communication with board members is not two way
        • Poor negotiations resulting in a work stoppage
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Common School Board Member Problems
    • Pursuing single issues
    • Pursuing personal gain
    • Pursuing personal power
    • Rejecting professional status of superintendent
    • Failing to maintain confidentiality
    • Causing factionalism
    • Intruding into administration
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Common Superintendent Problems
    • Lacking integrity
    • Lacking respect for board members
    • Failing to maintain confidentiality
    • Failing to lead
    • Failing to manage
    • Failing to be accessible
    • Failing to communicate
    • Failing to comply with ethical and moral standards
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Activity
    • In small groups – discuss three problems you have observed as a non-superintendent participant at school board meetings. Write the problem on the supplied poster paper.
    • Then discuss how these problems could have been resolved and write a recommended solution below the problem on the poster paper.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Chevron Energy Solutions © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Legal Issues for Superintendents
    • Legal issues for new superintendents by IASA HLERK Attorney Stephanie Jones
      • Contract issues
      • When should you call your school attorney
      • Open Meetings Act
      • Freedom of Information Act
      • Gift Ban Act
      • E-Communications Issues
      • Miscellaneous issues
        • Cell phones, Car expenses, Personal actions
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Illinois Open Meetings Act
    • Definition
      • Any gathering of the majority of a quorum of the members of a public body held for the purposes of discussing public business . Applies to committee meetings also. ( This means three school board members cannot meet to discuss public school business )
    • Exceptions
      • Appointments, employment, compensation, discipline performance, or dismissal of specific employees
      • Collective bargaining negotiations
      • Selection of a person to fill a public office
      • Student disciplinary hearing
      • Purchase or lease of real property
      • Setting of price for sale or lease of property
      • Sale or purchase of securities, investments
      • Emergency security procedures
      • Special education placement
      • Pending, probable or imminent litigation
      • Settlement of insurance claims
      • Board self evaluation when meeting with a representative of statewide org.
      • Discussion of closed session minutes
    • SB 1756 (2002) requires public bodies that have websites to post meeting notices, agendas, and minutes on its website.
    5 ILCS 120 Chapter 5 Article 120
  • Closed Session
    • The Superintendent, or the Board Secretary when the Superintendent is absent, shall record audio for all closed meetings.
    • After 18 months have passed since being made, the audio recording of a closed meeting is destroyed provided the Board approved:  (1) its destruction, and (2) minutes of the particular closed meeting.
    • Written minutes still need to be kept, approved by board members in closed session and reviewed every six months to determine if the closed session minutes can be made public.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Public Records
    • The District’s “public records” are those documents, tapes, photographs, letters, and any other recorded information or material, regardless of physical form or characteristics, that were prepared, used, received, or possessed by, or under the control of, the District, a school, a school official, or an employee.
    • Public records, including email messages, shall be preserved and cataloged, if they:  (1) are evidence of the District’s organization, function, policies, procedures, or activities, or (2) contain informational data appropriate for preservation
    • Public records that are required to be preserved and cataloged may be destroyed when authorized by the Local Records Commission.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Gift Ban Act
    • The State Officials and Employees Ethics Act prohibits State employees from engaging in certain political activities and accepting certain gifts.
    • The Act requires all school districts to adopt an "ordinance or resolution" "in a manner no less restrictive" than the Act's provisions. 
    • Districts may not inhibit or prohibit employees from petitioning, making public speeches, campaigning for or against political candidates, speaking out on public policy questions, distributing political literature, making campaign contributions, and seeking public office. An employee may not use his/her position of employment to coerce or inhibit others in the free exercise of their political rights or engage in political activities at work. Id .
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Gift Ban Act continued
    • "Gift" means any gratuity, discount, entertainment, hospitality, loan, forbearance, or other tangible or intangible item having monetary value including, but not limited to, cash, food and drink, and honoraria for speaking engagements related to or attributable to government employment or the official position of a Board Member or employee.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • The following are exceptions to the ban on accepting gifts from a prohibited source
    • Opportunities, benefits, and services that are available on the same conditions as for the general public.
    • Anything for which the Board Member or employee, or his or her spouse or immediate family member, pays the fair market value.
    • Educational materials and missions
    • Travel expenses for a meeting to discuss business
    • Food or refreshments not exceeding $75 per person in value on a single calendar day; provided that the food or refreshments are: (a) consumed on the premises from which they were purchased or prepared; or (b) catered.  "Catered" means food or refreshments that are purchased ready to consume which are delivered by any means.
    • Any item or items from any one prohibited source during any calendar year having a cumulative total value of less than $100.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Gift Ban Act continued
  • Important Resources
    • Keep within arms reach of your desk
      • The School Code of Illinois
      • Illinois School Law Survey by Brian Braun
      • Open Meetings Act Summary
      • Illinois Administrative Code
      • Teacher Association – School Board Contract
      • Contracts with any other district groups
      • School District Policy Manual
      • Student – Parent Handbooks
      • Employee Handbook
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Demo on IASB PRESS Services © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Small Group Activity
    • Practice accessing IASB On-Line Policy Services information (username = iasbpolicyservices) (password = update2008)
      • Look up student discipline procedures 7:200 Suspension Procedures
      • Look up vacancies on school board 2:70 Vacancies on school board
      • Look up school board meeting procedures 2:220
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Expulsion
    • ILCS 5/10-22.6
    • Gives school boards the authority to expel students who are guilty of gross disobedience or misconduct.
    • Must conduct a hearing.
    • Request for hearing shall be made by registered or certified mail and shall state the time , date , place and purpose of the meeting.
    • Board must state reasons for dismissal and date it becomes effective.
    • Board may expel for up to two years.
    • Weapon violations are for two years
      • Can be adjusted by Board on a case by case basis.
    • Expulsion may include from school and all school activities and a prohibition from being present on school grounds.
    • Review a student’s permanent and temporary file prior to recommending expulsion to see if the parent can make a claim for special education services.
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Factors to Consider in Expulsion
    • Courts in Illinois will look at these five factors in expulsion cases:
      • The egregiousness of the misconduct;
      • The history or record of the student’s past conduct;
      • The likelihood that such conduct will affect the delivery of educational services to other students;
      • The severity of the punishment;
      • The interests of the student.
  • © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Use of Hearing Officer
    • School boards in Illinois can use hearing officers to conduct student disciplinary hearings.
      • Can be attorney, school employee, or independent third party
      • Or can be a committee of the board
    • Hearing officer or committee must conduct the expulsion hearing in essentially the same fashion as the school board would.
    • The hearing officer makes a report to the board and the full school board acts.
  • IASBO Services to Superintendents © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Workers’ Compensation Self-Insurance Trust and Illinois School District Agency Services © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators Jim Woodard
  • Activity
    • What do you think should be on a district’s web site?
    • What do you think should be on a superintendent’s web site?
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Technology at School Board Meetings
    • Video record school board meetings
    • Use LCD projector to project information related to school board agenda items
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Working with Your Legislators by Diane Hendren and Dr. Calvin Jackson © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • RV Suggestions
    • Read Alliance Legislative Update
    • Also read State School News Service
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators
  • Listservers
    • IASA Listserver
      • The IASA Listserver is a fast and easy way to communicate with your colleagues.  After subscribing to the service, you will receive a confirmation message from IASA.  As soon as you receive this message, you can begin posting questions. Go to the IASA website to subscribe.
    © 2009 by the Illinois Association of School Administrators