Responsive Classroom By Mary Whittle, Kelly McNab, and Ruth Demshick
In the Beginning… Stephen Elliot, study done in West Haven, CT   1991-92 1993-94 Stephen Elliot, study done in Washington,...
Procedures and Techniques <ul><ul><li>The first six weeks of school is the most vital time of the school year in which a R...
Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>C. A. R. E. S. </li></ul><ul><li>Approach in RC where 5 major clusters of social skills ...
Procedures and Techniques
Procedures and Techniques
Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>Discrimination Training </li></ul><ul><li>According to Chapter 9 of our text, we have le...
Procedures and Techniques Sample antecedents to Problem Behavior <ul><li>Lack of functional vocabulary to communicate </li...
Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>Antecedent Oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Proactive </li></ul><ul><li>Co-Created Rules and C...
Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>Social Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>“ How ” Children Learn </li></ul><ul><li>Social Inte...
Steps for Implementation Teaching Practices Of RC <ul><li>The Northeast Foundation for Children (2004) has stated specific...
Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Morning Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>“  Good Morning, _________, how are you today? </li></u...
Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Rules and Logical Consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom </li></ul><ul><li>+ Rules =  R...
Example of Rules and Logical Consequences
Rules and Logical Consequences
Rules and Logical Consequences RC encourages that the teacher ignore the problem behaviors while reinforcing the appropria...
Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Classroom Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers- </li></ul><ul><li>Effectively organize...
Classroom Organization
Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Guided Discovery </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage </li></ul><ul><l...
Teacher Language
Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Academic Choice </li></ul><ul><li>REFLECTION </li></ul><ul><li>Mistakes </li></ul><ul><li...
Academic Choice
Steps for Implementation <ul><li>REACH OUT TO PARENTS </li></ul><ul><li>“ Knowing the Families” </li></ul><ul><li>Encourag...
http:// www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey =ab9aeca583fd0bb0e1c6
Advantages <ul><ul><li>Children:  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increase in reading and math test scores </li></ul></ul><...
Disadvantages <ul><li>Teachers  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If not trained well…  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If teachers are...
Tying in to Applied Behavioral Analysis <ul><li>Behaviorists focus is on the “present environmental conditions maintaining...
URL <ul><li>http:// www.responsiveclassroom.org / </li></ul>
<ul><li>Start of slides that are already used in RC Show </li></ul>
Northeast Foundation for Children <ul><li>Emphasizing:  </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional </li></ul><ul...
Success in School Settings “ Survey Says….” Greater increases in reading and math scores Teachers more frequently engaged ...
Definition – Responsive Classroom <ul><li>Emphasizes Importance of  </li></ul><ul><li>Social  and  Academic  Learning </li...
Scenarios <ul><li>Who knows… </li></ul><ul><li>How can I help you? </li></ul><ul><li>I see that… </li></ul><ul><li>I notic...
Definition <ul><li>Charney (2002) said, “It is about teaching children to care.” </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Management </...
Strategies for Teacher Language <ul><li>Make yourself listen to your words </li></ul><ul><li>Tape record yourself in the c...
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Responsive Classroom

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Positive behavior support system used in K-6 grades.

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  • Look at article by Sara Rimm-Kaufman “ Social and Academic Learning Study on the Contribution for the RC Approach” Need to add notes before presentation Greater increases in reading and math scores Increased confidence led to effective teaching and stronger relationships with students Children had increased pro-social skills and increased trust for school, peers and teachers Teachers more frequently engaged in and placed higher value on collaboration
  • Ruth and Mary both discuss how this procedure plays Time spent in the first six weeks of school fostering self-discipline and positive social skills will be rewarded with student self-discipline that will save on interruptions throughout the school year. Elliott et al. (2001) contend that “educators who choose to assess and intervene to improve students’ pro-social behaviors will find that it can pay academic achievement dividends for individual students while improving their own instructional environment” (p. 22).
  • This is also a apart of the antecedent oriented
  • Kriete (2002) contended that real learning takes place when students take risks. When students feel safe and respected in their learning environment, they will offer ideas and solutions to problems even if they are not sure their answers are correct. Teachers who take the time to create a safe learning environment encourage their students to take risks in learning. It is not always easy in today’s test-driven educational climate for a teacher to allocate time for social instruction. Developing classroom rules - first step to establishing logical consequences. Classroom rules – Charney (2002) said that logical consequences are “respectful and reasonable” not meant to be a “punishment or permission” for learners (p. 144). Logical consequences are intended to help children be responsible for their own behavior, “not humiliate or hurt” (p. 145). Rules must be clear and consistent. Rules are taught in a proactive way, rather than waiting for a rule to be broken (p. 71). Rules created by the teacher and students because students are more likely to follow rules when they participate in creating them. Consequence must be seen as tied to a student’s behavior for a child to learn from his or her actions. Students agree on the consequences for breaking a rule and abide by the classroom rules and logical consequences that they have formed. When using logical rules and consequences, students learn to develop self-control and take responsibility for their actions. Rules and Logical Consequences- consequences that follow logically from the misdeed, already laid out,no questions need to be asked “you fix it, you bought it” Co-created rules by teacher and student that are positively worded
  • The social curriculum is as important as the academic curriculum. How children learn is as important as what they learn. The greatest cognitive growth occurs during social interaction. There is a specific set of social skills that children need to learn and practice in order to be successful academically and socially: cooperation, assertion, responsibility, empathy and self-control (CARES). Knowing the children we teach individually, culturally, and developmentally is as important as knowing the content we teach. Knowing the families of the children we teach is as important as knowing the children we teach. How we, the adults at school, work together is as important as our individual competence: lasting change begins with the adult community. (p. 3). Implementing a Social Curriculum Using the Responsive Classroom Approach
  • Morning meetings develop positive communication skills and promote a respectful way for students to begin the day. Help to create a caring and respectful classroom community by making students feel noticed. All members meet, greet one another, notice and are noticed by one another. (p. 14). See how fourth grade teacher Carolyn Bush prepares students for the One Minute Greeting that will begin their Morning Meeting. An excerpt from one of the DVDs in the Responsive Classroom® Morning Meeting Professional Development Kit. To learn more, visit www.responsiveclassroom.org
  • Classroom Rules need to be respectful and reasonable and not meant for punishment or permission Logical Consequences are to help children be more responsible for their behavior not humiliate or hurt Developing classroom rules - first step to establishing logical consequences. Classroom rules – Charney (2002) said that logical consequences are “respectful and reasonable” not meant to be a “punishment or permission” for learners (p. 144). Logical consequences are intended to help children be responsible for their own behavior, “not humiliate or hurt” (p. 145). Rules must be clear and consistent. Rules are taught in a proactive way, rather than waiting for a rule to be broken (p. 71). Rules created by the teacher and students because students are more likely to follow rules when they participate in creating them. Consequence must be seen as tied to a student’s behavior for a child to learn from his or her actions. Students agree on the consequences for breaking a rule and abide by the classroom rules and logical consequences that they have formed. When using logical rules and consequences, students learn to develop self-control and take responsibility for their actions.
  • Teachers: Effectively organize their classrooms they create a safe, warm and welcoming space that encourages social and academic excellence for children. Arrange classrooms in ways that promote students’ organization, cooperation and independence. Provide spaces for children to work independently and cooperatively. Students’ works are displayed throughout the classroom, promoting a feeling that students are valued and respected
  • Arrange classrooms in ways that promote students’ organization, cooperation and independence. Provide spaces for children to work independently and cooperatively. Students’ works are displayed throughout the classroom, promoting a feeling that students are valued and respected
  • Emphasizes methods that encourage students to become more engaged in learning while taking care of each other and their environment Introduces students to new ideas and materials, encouraging students to become excited about the lesson by promoting interest in the new materials. Antecedent oriented Praise to encouragement, teachers are specifically supporting the student while the student is being productive rather than waiting for the finished product to give praise. Proactive rather than reactive Students are encouraged to share their ideas and work. Teacher language guides students through the closure activity reinforcing student behavior in a positive way. Teachers encourage positive social interactions through “teacher language”. A teacher’s language, what she says and how she says it, has a powerful effect on the children she teaches. A teacher’s words can build up a child’s self-esteem or tear it down (Northeast Foundation for Children, 2003).
  • Enables students to choose from several different educational opportunities Teachers offer students different options to learn a new task that may include reading, writing or drawing activities Academic choice allows students to develop their interests and expand their knowledge. Children learn by attempting new tasks and making mistakes Encourages student learning by promoting reflection on both successful and unsuccessful decision making and problem solving Antecedent oriented Praise to encouragement, teachers are specifically supporting the student while the student is being productive rather than waiting for the finished product to give praise. Proactive rather than reactive
  • For teacher to know the students must also know the parents Teachers encourage communication from home inviting parents to be a part of the school community by being involved participants in their child’s education from the start of the new school year Encourages collaboration between parents and teachers throughout the school year. Parents are included in goal setting and recognize that the teacher truly knows and understands their child
  • References: www.responsiveclassroom.org Dr. Elizabeth Bondy: Creating the Responsive Classroom by Mary Brownell and Chris Walther-Thomas (1999)
  • References Blueprint for the Responsive Classroom by Donna M. Sobel and Sheryl V. Taylor (2006) Dr. Elizabeth Bondy: Creating the Responsive Classroom by Mary Brownell and Chris Walther-Thomas (1999)
  • Northeast Foundation for Children was formed to investigate ways to meet this need. Responsive Classroom is an Approach to elementary teaching that emphasizes social, emotional, and academic growth in a strong and safe school community.
  • Because social skills play an important role in the success of students’ educational experience, providing a social curriculum is as essential as providing an academic one. Responsive Classroom provides a proven social curriculum which benefits both students and teachers. Social skills are learned behaviors that students use to communicate with others. Positive social skills include sharing, listening to others while they speak and working together cooperatively. Elliott, Malecki and Demaray (2001) citing a previous article by Elliott and Gresham (1991) Negative behaviors include teasing, bullying, interrupting others and demonstrating a lack of empathy.
  • Most appropriate scenario: Majority of students, including those who have mild disabilities, easily imitate the behavior of a model
  • The Responsive Classroom Approach teaches educators how to manage a classroom so that it is nurturing, respectful and full of learning. Charney (2002) said, “It is about teaching children to care”. Teachers focus on modeling pro-active teaching practices that build a learning community through a social curriculum, practicing appropriate attitudes and behaviors with students rather than reacting to inappropriate ones.
  • Responsive Classroom

    1. 1. Responsive Classroom By Mary Whittle, Kelly McNab, and Ruth Demshick
    2. 2. In the Beginning… Stephen Elliot, study done in West Haven, CT 1991-92 1993-94 Stephen Elliot, study done in Washington, DC 1996-97 and 1997-98 Stephen Elliot, study done in Springfield, MA NEFC received sponsorship from DuBarry Foundation 1999 2001-02 and 2003-04 Sara Rimm-Kaufman, Social and Acedemic Learning Study 1981 4 teachers decided to start NEFC and emphasize social curriculum
    3. 3. Procedures and Techniques <ul><ul><li>The first six weeks of school is the most vital time of the school year in which a Responsive Classroom is implemented. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Elliott et al. (2001) said that, “Educators who choose to assess and intervene to improve students’ pro-social behaviors will find that it can pay academic achievement dividends for individual students while improving their own instructional environment” </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>C. A. R. E. S. </li></ul><ul><li>Approach in RC where 5 major clusters of social skills which are in the repertoire of socially competent individuals </li></ul><ul><li>C ooperation </li></ul><ul><li>A ssertion </li></ul><ul><li>R esponsibility </li></ul><ul><li>E mpathy </li></ul><ul><li>S elf-control </li></ul>
    5. 5. Procedures and Techniques
    6. 6. Procedures and Techniques
    7. 7. Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>Discrimination Training </li></ul><ul><li>According to Chapter 9 of our text, we have learned, that the concept formation of DT is to teach by presenting positive and negative examples. </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers want students to: obey rules, follow instructions, perform specific academic skills </li></ul><ul><li>A major part of teaching task </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Establishing specific times, places, instructions and other antecedent events as discriminative stimuli for student behaviors </li></ul></ul>First Six Weeks of School, Continued
    8. 8. Procedures and Techniques Sample antecedents to Problem Behavior <ul><li>Lack of functional vocabulary to communicate </li></ul><ul><li>Physical environment: for example noise, number of students </li></ul><ul><li>Meaningless repitition </li></ul><ul><li>Non-functional activity </li></ul><ul><li>Rate of physical prompting or verbalizations </li></ul>
    9. 9. Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>Antecedent Oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Proactive </li></ul><ul><li>Co-Created Rules and Consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Clear and Consistent </li></ul><ul><li>Developing Self control </li></ul><ul><li>Taking Responsibility for Actions </li></ul>Creating a Safe Learning Envrionment
    10. 10. Procedures and Techniques <ul><li>Social Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>“ How ” Children Learn </li></ul><ul><li>Social Interaction </li></ul><ul><li>CARES </li></ul><ul><li>“ Knowing ” the children </li></ul><ul><li>“ Knowing ” the families </li></ul><ul><li>Implementing a Social Curriculum </li></ul>Principles of Responsive Classroom
    11. 11. Steps for Implementation Teaching Practices Of RC <ul><li>The Northeast Foundation for Children (2004) has stated specific teaching practices that have arisen from the seven principles of RC: </li></ul><ul><li>Morning Meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Rules and Logical Consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Guided Discovery </li></ul><ul><li>Academic Choice </li></ul><ul><li>Reaching out to Parents </li></ul>
    12. 12. Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Morning Meeting </li></ul><ul><li>“ Good Morning, _________, how are you today? </li></ul><ul><li>COMMUNITY BUILDING </li></ul><ul><li>Antecedent Oriented </li></ul>http:// www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey =77ab95753b79935ced01
    13. 13. Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Rules and Logical Consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom </li></ul><ul><li>+ Rules = Respect and Reason </li></ul><ul><li>Logic </li></ul><ul><li>+ Consequences = Responsibility </li></ul>
    14. 14. Example of Rules and Logical Consequences
    15. 15. Rules and Logical Consequences
    16. 16. Rules and Logical Consequences RC encourages that the teacher ignore the problem behaviors while reinforcing the appropriate behaviors. For example.. A student is running to the cafeteria. The teacher says please walk. When the student begins walking the teacher should immediately reinforce the student by saying “I like how you listened and followed the rules of our school.” Differential Reinforcement
    17. 17. Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Classroom Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers- </li></ul><ul><li>Effectively organize classrooms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>create safe, warm and welcoming space </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>encourages social and academic excellence </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Arrange classrooms </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ways that promote students’ organization, cooperation and independence. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provide spaces </li></ul><ul><ul><li>children work independently and cooperatively. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students’ works displayed throughout the classroom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>students feel valued and respected </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Classroom Organization
    19. 19. Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Guided Discovery </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher Language (antecedent oriented) </li></ul><ul><li>For example: Instead of “Quit goofing off!” How about, “ Thumbs up to show me your ready” </li></ul>For Example: In closure, the teacher asks one student to model a careful cleanup of the materials, suggesting that the other students also model appropriate behavior in the cleanup task.
    20. 20. Teacher Language
    21. 21. Steps for Implementation <ul><li>Academic Choice </li></ul><ul><li>REFLECTION </li></ul><ul><li>Mistakes </li></ul><ul><li>Develop Interests </li></ul><ul><li>Options </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities </li></ul>
    22. 22. Academic Choice
    23. 23. Steps for Implementation <ul><li>REACH OUT TO PARENTS </li></ul><ul><li>“ Knowing the Families” </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage communication </li></ul><ul><li>Inviting parents to be a part of the school community </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Include parents in goal setting </li></ul>
    24. 24. http:// www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey =ab9aeca583fd0bb0e1c6
    25. 25. Advantages <ul><ul><li>Children: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increase in reading and math test scores </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Better social skills among classmates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sense of community </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Behavioral improvements </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>More positive attitudes about school </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feeling more effective and positive about teaching experience </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Attitudes of teachers using this curriculum have also changed </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Some offer more high-quality instruction </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers collaborated with their peers more. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Disadvantages <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If not trained well… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If teachers are not trained ahead of time or well informed about the program… </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If the right attitude is not displayed during these lessons… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What will happen during this time? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Classroom Setting </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If classroom is messy/cluttered, program will not be effective because of display of work aspect </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Tying in to Applied Behavioral Analysis <ul><li>Behaviorists focus is on the “present environmental conditions maintaining behavior and on establishing and verifying functional relations between such conditions and behaviors” (pg. 16) </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Procedures: prompts (thumbs up, show me your ready), modeling, fading (singing a song to humming) </li></ul><ul><li>Two Principles of ABA: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Behavior is largely a product of its immediate environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Behavior is shaped better by positive (reinforcement) than negative (punitive) consequences </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. URL <ul><li>http:// www.responsiveclassroom.org / </li></ul>
    29. 29. <ul><li>Start of slides that are already used in RC Show </li></ul>
    30. 30. Northeast Foundation for Children <ul><li>Emphasizing: </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Emotional </li></ul><ul><li>Academics </li></ul><ul><li>Safe School Community </li></ul>Goal: Optimal Student Learning
    31. 31. Success in School Settings “ Survey Says….” Greater increases in reading and math scores Teachers more frequently engaged in and placed higher value on collaboration Children had increased pro-social skills and increased trust for school, peers and teachers Increased confidence led to effective teaching and stronger relationships with students
    32. 32. Definition – Responsive Classroom <ul><li>Emphasizes Importance of </li></ul><ul><li>Social and Academic Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Academic Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on knowledge of educational material </li></ul><ul><li>Social Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on knowledge of positive behaviors and relationship </li></ul>
    33. 33. Scenarios <ul><li>Who knows… </li></ul><ul><li>How can I help you? </li></ul><ul><li>I see that… </li></ul><ul><li>I notice… </li></ul><ul><li>I see you…  </li></ul><ul><li>You need to… </li></ul><ul><li>Who can tell me… </li></ul><ul><li>Show me… </li></ul><ul><li>Remind me… </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers model desired words and behaviors </li></ul>
    34. 34. Definition <ul><li>Charney (2002) said, “It is about teaching children to care.” </li></ul><ul><li>Classroom Management </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nurturing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respectful </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Full of Learning </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. Strategies for Teacher Language <ul><li>Make yourself listen to your words </li></ul><ul><li>Tape record yourself in the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Have a colleague record your words and phrases </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on one phrase at a time </li></ul><ul><li>Ask children to help </li></ul><ul><li>Replace inappropriate words right at the moment </li></ul><ul><li>Think before you speak </li></ul><ul><li>Agree with colleagues to work on changing the same word or phrase </li></ul><ul><li>Post replacement words on classroom walls </li></ul><ul><li>Use signals instead of words to get children’s attention </li></ul><ul><li>Use more open-ended questioning as a way to interact with children </li></ul>
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