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  • Ask students for examples of medical or professional terminology that they have encountered in the past.
  • Eponyms: a word based on the name of a person, such as Parkinson disease, or bundle of His Acronyms: a word formed from the first letters of the words in a set phrase, such as SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)
  • What are the main source languages for medical terminology?
  • Word root: the core of a word. Each medical term contains at least one word root. A prefix often indicates a number, direction, time, or negation. A suffix often indicates a procedure or condition. A combining vowel is used to connect two word roots or a word root and a suffix. It is not used to connect a prefix and word root.
  • What is the difference between a word root and a prefix? What is the difference between a prefix and suffix? What is the purpose of adding a combining vowel to a medical term?
  • The word parts are separated by vertical slashes.
  • Why is it important to understand the basic rules of combining word parts into medical terms?
  • What medical terms can be formed by the word parts listed on the slide?
  • Which term has a suffix meaning “inflammation”? Which term has a root meaning “bone”? Which term has two root words?
  • What term is formed by the word parts indicated on the slide? (osteoarthritis)

M med chapter_001 M med chapter_001 Presentation Transcript

  • Chapter 1 Introduction to Word Parts Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Chapter 1 Lesson 1.1 Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-2
  • Objectives Describe four origins of medical terms. Identify and define the four word parts and combining forms. Analyze and define medical terms. Build medical terms for given definitions. Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-3
  • Understand the Content of Chapter 1 Before Moving on to Chapter 2 Chapter 1 is the most important chapter in the text because it is here that you are introduced to word parts—word roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining vowels—and the rules for combining them to build medical terms. You will use this information in each of the subsequent chapters to analyze, build, define, and spell terms built from word parts. Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-4
  • Medicine Has a Language of Its Own Current medical vocabulary includes terms built from Greek and Latin word parts, eponyms, acronyms, and terms from modern language Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-5
  • Origins of Medical Language Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-6
  • Clicker QuestionThe medical term SARS (severe acuterespiratory syndrome) is an example of a(an)d) term built from word partse) acronymf) eponymg) term taken from modern language Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-7
  • Four Word Parts1. Word Root: fundamental meaning of a medical term – the core of the word2. Prefix: attached to beginning of a medical term to modify its meaning3. Suffix: attached to end of a medical term to modify its meaning4. Combining Vowel: used to ease pronunciation – usually an “o” Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-8
  • Table 1.1 Guidelines for UsingCombining Vowels Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-9
  • ExamplesWord Roots: arthr: joint hepat: liver ven: vein oste: bonePrefixes: intra-: within sub-: underSuffixes: -itis: inflammation -ic: pertaining to -ous: pertaining to -pathy: diseaseCombining vowel: o Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-10
  • Clicker QuestionThe word part that is thecore of the word is ad) combining vowele) suffixf) word rootg) prefix Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-11
  • Combining FormWord Root + Combining VowelExamples: arthr/o hepat/o ven/o oste/o Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-12
  • Table 1.2 Word Parts andCombining Form Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-13
  • Some Basic Rules All medical terms have at least one word root Not all medical terms have a prefix, suffix, or combining vowel Combining vowels are used to connect word roots or word root and suffix When a suffix begins with a vowel, the combining vowel is usually not used Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-14
  • Some Basic Rules (cont’d.) When connecting two word roots, a combining vowel is usually used even if vowels are present at the junction Example: oste/o/arthr/itis Usually medical terms are defined by starting at the end of the term and going back to the beginning Example: oste/o/arthr/itis–inflammation of the bone and joints Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-15
  • Some Basic Rules (cont’d.) A few terms are more easily and accurately defined by starting at the beginning of the term. Example: melan/oma melan = black -oma = tumor Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-16
  • Clicker QuestionIf vowels are present at the junction of two wordroots (such as oste and arthr) in a medical term,a combining vowel is usuallye) still usedf) not usedg) used twiceh) the letter i Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-17
  • Table 1.3 Techniques To Learn MedicalTerms Built From Words Parts Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-18
  • Word Parts for PracticeWord Roots: Prefixes:(Comb. Forms) intra-: withinarthr/o: joint sub-: underhepat/o: liverven/o: veinosteo: bone Suffixes:Combining Vowel: -itis: inflammationo -ic: pertaining to -ous: pertaining -pathy: disease Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-19
  • Analyze and Define arthritis intravenous osteitis osteoarthritis subhepatic osteopathy arthropathy hepatitis Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-20
  • Building Medical Terms inflammation of a joint pertaining to within a vein inflammation of the bone inflammation of the bone and joint pertaining to under the liver disease of the bone disease of the joint inflammation of the liver Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-21
  • 1. 2. 1. Normal knee joint. 2. Knee joint showing bone / cv / joint / inflammation. Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-22
  • Clicker QuestionWhich of the following is analyzed correctly? WR CV S S WR CV Sa) arthr/o/path/y b) arthr/o/pathy CF CF P CV Sc) arthr/o/pathy CF Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-23
  • Grimm Cartoon Copyright © 2009, 2006 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1-24