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The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching
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The Use Of Social Networking In Teaching

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  • 1. Learning 2.0 -- The use of social networking in teaching James Kalmakoff and Russell Butson December 3rd, 2007
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  • 3. The aim of this project was to engage the ‘digital age students’ in a course using the social networking of Web 2.0. The overall objective was to provide an environment which promoted and enhanced students to become autonomous and self-motivated learners.
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  • 6. What the emerging technologies offer is not simply new software but a new perspective, a new way of thinking about the way we use Information Communication Technology. Tim O’Reilly argues that while Web 1.0 was about connecting computers and making technology more efficient for computers . Web 2.0 is about connecting people , and making technology more efficient for people . This distinction has relevance for teaching & learning, for collaboration in research and for the use of ICT in administration. Emerging Technologies – Web 2.0
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  • 11. The Educational Paradigms Adapted from the work of : Barr, R. B., & Tagg, J. (1995). From Teaching to Learning: A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education. Change, 27(6), 13-25. Instructional Paradigm Traditional Self-Directed Paradigm Emerging Knowledge Transfer from faculty to students Jointly constructed by students and faculty Students Passive vessel to be filled by faculty’s knowledge Active constructor, discoverer, transformer of own knowledge Faculty Purpose Classify and sort students Develop students competencies and talents Relationships Impersonal relationships among students and between faculty and students Personal transactions among students and between faculty and students Context Competitive and individualistic Collaborative learning involving teams and faculty Assumptions Any expert can teach Teaching is complex and requires considerable training
  • 12. Instructional Paradigm - Centralised Model Static & Inflexible Information is stored in a central place for individual students to access Bb Traditional Paradigm
  • 13. Connect & Communicate -- see MICR337 model Dynamic & flexible
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  • 15. the software used …
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  • 18.
    • Position Yourself
    The Source for Information The Source for Conversation The Source for Feedback The “first stop” on the internet
  • 19. http://virology.otago.ac.nz/
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  • 22. Russell Butson
  • 23. The Educational Paradigms Tertiary Education Strategy 2007/12 Instructional Paradigm Traditional Self-Directed Paradigm Emerging Knowledge Transfer from faculty to students Jointly constructed by students and faculty Students Passive vessel to be filled by faculty’s knowledge Active constructor, discoverer, transformer of own knowledge Faculty Purpose Classify and sort students Develop students competencies and talents Relationships Impersonal relationships among students and between faculty and students Personal transactions among students and between faculty and students Context Competitive and individualistic Collaborative learning involving teams and faculty Assumptions Any expert can teach Teaching is complex and requires considerable training
  • 24.
    • The government expects tertiary education organisations to have in place the necessary systems and structures to ensure that:
      • individuals are motivated to learn, engaged and have the skills
      • and information needed to be effective students.
      • they foster professional learning communities, and offer the
      • resources and support needed for teaching and learning.
    Tertiary Education Strategy 2007/12
  • 25. The Potential of the Emerging Model In higher education the focus has been on content and the delivery of this content to the student. Adopting a this new paradigm would see us harnessing the collective intelligence of our students to continually improve the student experience through a more intensive interaction in the educational process. This represents a far more complex environment than is presently in place. Students would be viewed not as receptacles for information but as an integral element of the educational process. In fact, to adopt this approach is to make students an essential part of the educational process in ways that blur the boundaries between our traditional conceptions of teaching and learning.
  • 26. What did the students experience?
  • 27.
    • Observations
    • Questions
    • Face to Face
    • Discussions
    Approach
  • 28. Did they use the site more or less as the course progressed? Yes – students felt their use increased over the course as they became more familiar with the site and got to know other students Did they feel the site had an influence on their degree of involvement in this course? Yes – definitely. Most were on the sites daily. Did they feel the site encouraged interactions, collaborations, friendships? Yes – definitely. The pictures of others was very important. The site allow interactions between students who said they wouldn’t have connected without the site. Who controlled the site? Some Key Questions...
  • 29. Group projects start Exam Prep – study groups start Due! System Data
  • 30. System Data
  • 31. System Data
  • 32. Comments from Students This site is much more user friendly than Blackboard and is actually enjoyable to use. I only use Blackboard because I have to. This site I use because I enjoy it. I think this site has been very successful. The best part is that we can post information and set up study groups very easily. It has been an excellent way to communicate and has enabled the class to get to know each other well.
  • 33.
    • Yes this site has fostered a great community!!! With all other courses I have had little to do with the others in the class outside of Labs and Lectures. This site has created a quick and easy way to communicate with others and has very big appeal to it.
    • The fact that you are free to adapt the site to your own ends, eg create groups have friends use blogs etc. I have loved everything about this site. All the courses at this uni should have a site like this!!! Down with Blackboard!!!!!!!!!
    Hey Russell
  • 34. This site is Kick Arse, its great because:
    • Its made Microbiology less boring and even kinda exciting (dare i say it) cause we have a mechanism to meet and find out about the people in our class. And they are really cool and share the same goals and want to work together.
    • We can organise things like the study posse for collaboration on exam prep
    • It can largely replace group meetings cause we are all busy and organising a time to meet is a nightmare. Also everything is recorded in the discussions so info/ideas/opinions can be looked up and referred back to super easily.
    • definite sense of community
    • My flatmates and friends are jealous and want a site like this for their course.
    • It beats blackboard any day.
  • 35. I now know a lot about this subject and about science generally. I would like to be able to have access to the site to help new students next year. End of the course ? Hey! In the ultimate form of procrastination Lisa and I have made a bebo page for the micro department. It is by no means as serious (or useful!) as the v-net but is just a bit of fun and a good way to keep in contact for everyone that’s leaving at the end of this year. You can find it www.bebo.com/otagomicro :) Everyone join! Its heaps of fun!
  • 36.  

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