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C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
C3 measuring impact   nancy kopf - neighbor works
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C3 measuring impact nancy kopf - neighbor works

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Many of us know the value of our work in the community, and investors and supporters think they know the value of our work in the community. Having an established method to collect and assess data …

Many of us know the value of our work in the community, and investors and supporters think they know the value of our work in the community. Having an established method to collect and assess data that measures this value is a powerful tool. Participants will learn to anticipate which types of data they should collect, how to collect and assess it, and how to use it to improve productivity and show off their accomplishments.

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  • Quality: you can address now Quality: take some time to review how you collect information. What is the work flow? Are there standard definitions for terms? Is there duplication of effort? Are their opportunities to collect information in the course of the work so it’s not a separate effort? Collect enough details to be able to talk about different types of people served and different types of communities you work in. It’s hard to go back and get that information Data you collect should be useful for you and funders/potential funders. Those goals are not mutually exclusive! Think about who needs information? Be entrepreneurial about use. You need to think this through so you can deploy your limited resources wisely. Notice, I didn’t say no resources. You need to be sure that the time and money you spend is well worth it.
  • But before we talk about some examples, let’s spend a minute going over the basics. I know many of you are familiar with outcome approaches, but it never hurts to go over it.
  • Let’s go over some basics: most of you know about outcome measurement. Outcomes are about change. As Chris says, it’s about the value that results from your work.
  • For specific people: tenants who live in your properties Residents that live in homes you have built and facilitated their ownership Residents living in homes that have been renovated
  • This is a practical way of thinking about evaluation.
  • Observations are relatively easy to do Ability to demonstrate change/or upkeep Can help to identify where to put limited dollars for maximum benefit Some examples: People
  • Support organizations to select several appropriate data collection tools. In some cases, tailor content from data collection tools to better fit organization’s needs
  • Through the construction of those 10 units we: Contributed $790,000 to the local economy Supported $430,000 in local business wages Generated $62,148 in local government taxes and fees paid.
  • The local government received more than $4000 in fees from the home sales transaction and sales generated $12,877 in local income to businesses.
  • In their first year as homeowners, it is estimated these 10 low-income households generated income to the local economy of more than $11,000. Total local business income from construction, sales, and first year move-in expenses was $542,399…
  • Transcript

    • 1. Success Measures:Transforming Outcome EvaluationPresentation to the National Rural Housing ConferenceDecember 6, 2012Nancy Kopf, Senior Manager,Success Measures Evaluation Servicesnkopf@nw.org
    • 2. Success Measures is. . .  Participatory outcome evaluation approach  Data collection tools measuring range of outcomes  Web-based data system  Training and TA program
    • 3. Let’s change the conversation! What are some ways you can think about, talk about, and implement data collection that creates value for your organization? What are some practical ways you can begin to create value from information?
    • 4. Evaluation is in your interest! Capitalize on the information you already collect—quality is critical. Data that you collect should be useful for your organization and for engaging funders. Determine how you are going to use data before you start collecting. Think about how to communicate your value to different types of audiences.
    • 5. Outputs/Production/PerformanceMeasurement What you do How you spend your funding Types of people you are serving Participation rates for programs
    • 6. Success Measures is OutcomeEvaluation Outcomes are the benefits that occur as a result of our work. Outcomes can be changes in: Attitudes or values Knowledge Skill Behavior Conditions Policies, laws, regulations, practices
    • 7. Outcomes Programs can have outcomes for Individuals  Groups of people/families  Communities  Organizations
    • 8. Categories of Change in Our Work Change in physical conditions  Observations of buildings, infrastructure, public spaces Change in quality of life for individuals and the community  Surveying residents who live in your properties, broader community  Key informant interviews Economic impact  Calculation tools
    • 9. UseTo identify where to focus resourcesTo demonstrate accomplishmentsTo look at “spillover” effect
    • 10. Samples from Community Survey
    • 11. A sample of data from the Wells Fargo evaluation effort.Success Measures at NeighborWorks America
    • 12. ¿Cree usted que los siguientes son los problemas de su comunidad? Do you think the following are issues in the community?Tráfico/exceso de velocidad-Traffic/Speeding Graffiti Basura - Trash Las drogas - Drugs Vandalismo - Vandalism Iluminación de las calles - Street Lighting Gatos callejeros / perros-Stray Cats/Dogs Dumping 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%
    • 13. Is there Confidence in the Community’s Future?
    • 14. Calculation: Local Economic Impactof New Construction/RenovationWhat does the tool do? Estimates the total economic impact of a housing project as each dollar spent on construction or rehabilitation flows through the local economyHow does it work? Uses mathematical calculations to trace the original investment through the purchase of goods and services by the developer, construction workers, residents and the local governmentWhy use the tool? Demonstrate the benefits of community development efforts in housing projects to the locality and societyWhere did the tool’s framework and multiplier come from?  National Association of Homebuilders  Multipliers used are from economic modeling done in 2002  Numbers were re-validated in 2008
    • 15. ExpleIn 2007, within Randolph County, we built 10 units serving householdswith an average income of just over $11,000 each. Click each moduleto view the results. Module A Module B Module C Through the construction of those 10 units we: Contributed $790,000 to the local economy Supported $430,000 in local business wages Generated $62,148 in local government taxes and fees paid. 20 of 20 of 16 16
    • 16. ExampleIn 2007, within Randolph County, we built 10 units serving householdswith an average income of just over $11,000 each. Click each moduleto view the results. Module A Module B Module C The local government received more than $4000 in fees from the home sales transaction and sales generated $12,877 in local income to businesses. 21 of 21 of 16 16
    • 17. ExampleIn 2007, within Randolph County, we built 10 units serving householdswith an average income of just over $11,000 each. Click each moduleto view the results. Module A Module B Module C In their first year as homeowners, it is estimated these 10 low- income households generated income to the local economy of more than $11,000. Total local business income from construction, sales, and first year… 22 of 22 of 16 16
    • 18. Ways to Use Findings Demonstrate the local economic contributions of building or rehabbing affordable housing. – results can be analyzed by council district, ward, congressional district, etc. Create a compelling case to a local jurisdiction considering new nonprofit development. Demonstrate economic contribution of low income homeowners to the community. Disseminate at press events such as groundbreaking ceremonies, in stakeholder communications, and annual reports.

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