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B4 connecting your non profit in the digital age hand out - connecting your nonprofit

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  • 1. 11/20/2012 Connecting your Nonprofit in the  Digital Age Jesse Ward Manager,  Industry & Policy  Analysis December 6, 2012 NTCA• NTCA represents 570 small and rural  telecommunications cooperatives and locally‐owned  companies.• NTCA’s members create, maintain, and evolve “future‐ proof” fiber broadband networks. • NTCA’s members serve more than 40% of the nations  land mass—but less than 5% of the nations telephone  subscribers.   They provide services in the most  sparsely populated, highest‐cost rural areas.• NTCA members have a vested interest in their  communities.  1
  • 2. 11/20/2012Agenda• What is Broadband?• Importance to Residential Customers• Connectivity Options• Challenges to Rural Broadband  Deployment• What Can Rural Housing Providers Do?What is Broadband? The ability to transfer large amounts of  information (data) over  telecommunications networks very  quickly. • Wired networks • Wireless networks But not all networks are  created equal. 2
  • 3. 11/20/2012Broadband Drivers• Education & Job  • Locally‐based  Training national and global • Health Care commerce• Safety • Government • Efficient Utility Use Services Access Network, a.k.a.  “Local Loop” or “Last Mile” NetworkConnects local businesses & local residences with  Internet Service Providers (ISPs) Local Loop Backbone Network ISP’s Central  Middle‐mile  Office (CO)  Network 3
  • 4. 11/20/2012 Last‐Mile (a.k.a. Local Loop)  Broadband Access Technologies• Wired – Copper Wires (DSL) – Hybrid Fiber Coax (cable company networks) – Fiber Optics• Wireless – Fixed Wireless Broadband (point‐to‐multi‐ point network) – Mobile Networks (cell phone/smartphone) – Satellite (direct broadcast satellite (DBS))Fixed & Mobile Wireless TechnologyThroughput (bandwidth) is dependant  upon: – User’s distance from the tower – Number of users sharing the connection  point and available bandwidth – Frequency of spectrum – Obstacles to line‐of‐sight transmission  paths – Environmental conditions 4
  • 5. 11/20/2012Quality Determined by Four Metrics• The connection’s speed (size of the “pipe”)• The connection’s latency (delay)• The connections jitter (variation in packet  delay)• Service reliabilityBroadband Access Speeds and ApplicationsUpstream &  ApplicationsDownstream Speeds500 Kbps–1 Mbps Voice over IP, texting, basic email and Web browsing1 Mbps–5 Mbps Complex web browsing, streaming music, file sharing,  standard definition (SD) video streaming5 Mbps–10 Mbps Telecommuting, remote education apps, medical file  sharing, SD video streaming with multiple channels, SD video downloads10 Mbps–100 Mbps SD and HD video streaming such as surveillance, real‐ time interactive gaming 100 Mbps–1 Gbps Telemedicine, multiple educational services1 Gbps–10 Gbps Research applications, telemedicine applications with  real‐time remote control of scientific/medical instruments, HD video streaming 5
  • 6. 11/20/2012Network Access Architectures and SpeedsNetwork Typical  Access SpeedsArchitecture DSL over copper  Speeds dependant upon distance from ISPs Central Office twisted pair and DSL technology. Realistic max of 50 Mbps over short  loops/distances, up to 3,000 feet. Typical real‐world speeds of 1 Mbps ‐28 Mbps. Generally more downstream  bandwidth, but moving to symmetric deployments. Satellite Bandwidth is shared; speeds dependent upon number of  subscribers. Improvements in past year. Advertised as up  to 12 Mbps‐15 Mbps downstream, 1 Mbps‐3 Mbps  upstream. Historical issues with latency, obstacles and  interference. Cellular and  Bandwidth is shared; speeds dependent upon number of Fixed Wireless subscribers. 4G LTE advertised as up to 5 Mbps‐12 Mbps  downstream, 2 Mbps‐5 Mbps upstream.  Fiber “Future proof” technology with greatest capacity.  75 Mbps ‐ 100 Mbps upstream and downstream, or more;  Technology is quickly advancing  Broadband Network Cost Components • Outside plant costs• Land & rights‐of‐way costs• Skilled labor costs• Spectrum licensing costs (wireless network)• Electronics• Middle‐mile transport costs• Interconnection with backbone providers• Customer premises equipment (CPE) 6
  • 7. 11/20/2012 Rural Broadband Deployment  Challenges• Greater network expense and less  revenue in rural America. • Longer loop lengths lead to higher  network costs. • Very few customers over which to spread  the infrastructure costs. • Customers also reside more distantly  spaced from one another. • Terrain can be challenging. Funding for Rural Broadband Networks• Funded through:  – End‐user fees – Private investment  – State and federal government‐administered  programs• State and federal cost recovery programs  in flux 7
  • 8. 11/20/2012What Can You Do?• Advocate for rural broadband with  your local officials.• When constructing a greenfield housing site, install wired  infrastructure – “dig once.” • Talk with your local broadband  providers about your connectivity  options.Contact Information Jesse Ward Manager, Industry & Policy Analysis 703‐351‐2007 jward@ntca.org 8