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Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe
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Managing Growth on the Rural urban fringe

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keynote presentation at the RTPI annual Convetion CPLAN13#A

keynote presentation at the RTPI annual Convetion CPLAN13#A

Published in: Technology, Real Estate
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  • Use of the word fuzzy signifies soft and fluid boundaries of the RUFImportant addition to many definitions by looking at the people who shape the area. See RUF defined by nature/interests of people who live there as much as land uses. This brings into RUF zone commuter areas in what might have been seen as previously rural.
  • The academic literature has been notably silent on the URF and RUF but these snapshots seeing some important contributions that reinforce the negative and positive aspects conveying both potential and urgency in sound planning and policy responses.
  • The natural environment is based on reward , whilst the built environment is based on restraint and control. 2. The natural environment is driven by the Natural Environment White Paper whilst  the built environment is being driven by the emerging National Planning Policy Framework with limited connection between the two.3. The natural environment is focussed at the habitat and landscape scale whilst  the built environment is currently moving towards a local scale.4. The natural environment is overseen by Defra with its delivery agencies (Natural England, Environment Agency and Forestry Commission) whilst  the built environment is over seen by the Department for the Communities and Local Government with its delivery agencies being local authorities.5. The natural environment champions the ecosystem approach whilst the built environment champions spatial planning.6. The natural environment classifies habitats and species whilst the built environment zones and orders using land use plans.7. The natural environment uses the UK National Ecosystem Assessment  whilst the built environment uses Sustainability Assessments incorporating Strategic Environmental Assessment.8. The natural environment currently uses the umbrella of Integrated Biodiversity Delivery Areas whilst the built environment uses the umbrella of Development plans.9. The natural environment is promoting Nature Improvement Areas for environmental funding  whilst the built environment is promoting enterprise zones for economic funding.10. The natural environment is developing Local Nature Partnerships whilst  the Built Environment has developed Local Enterprise partnerships. 
  • The natural environment is based on reward , whilst the built environment is based on restraint and control. 2. The natural environment is driven by the Natural Environment White Paper whilst  the built environment is being driven by the emerging National Planning Policy Framework with limited connection between the two.3. The natural environment is focussed at the habitat and landscape scale whilst  the built environment is currently moving towards a local scale.4. The natural environment is overseen by Defra with its delivery agencies (Natural England, Environment Agency and Forestry Commission) whilst  the built environment is over seen by the Department for the Communities and Local Government with its delivery agencies being local authorities.5. The natural environment champions the ecosystem approach whilst the built environment champions spatial planning.6. The natural environment classifies habitats and species whilst the built environment zones and orders using land use plans.7. The natural environment uses the UK National Ecosystem Assessment  whilst the built environment uses Sustainability Assessments incorporating Strategic Environmental Assessment.8. The natural environment currently uses the umbrella of Integrated Biodiversity Delivery Areas whilst the built environment uses the umbrella of Development plans.9. The natural environment is promoting Nature Improvement Areas for environmental funding  whilst the built environment is promoting enterprise zones for economic funding.10. The natural environment is developing Local Nature Partnerships whilst  the Built Environment has developed Local Enterprise partnerships. 
  • “However, it’s important to realise that every part of the GI network doesn’t have to deliver against each one these benefits. For example in a SSSI, biodiversity conservation and enhancement may take priority, whereas in new residential development climate change resilience, sustainable transport and community cohesion may come to the fore.“Many of the actions that would result from effective Green Infrastructure planning also support the ecosystem approach, whether or not this is factored into the decision-making process.“Take for example a watercourse. Watercourses are an obvious linear feature which can thread through and link up urban and rural areas, making them a natural part of the Green Infrastructure network. The Green Infrastructure led management of the watercourse could include influencing appropriate management of the floodplain or the re-naturalisation of the watercourse, protecting or restoring its natural functions. This is good for the environment and good for nearby communities.“It is here that the inherent multifunctionality of Green Infrastructure immediately takes it beyond just planning, or just ecology. However, to make Green Infrastructure happen, a wide range of partners need to work together.“The Green Infrastructure approach is gaining popularity in town and country planning because it integrates different environmental themes, such as biodiversity and the historic environment, in a way which provides a holistic understanding of the natural and built environment. And then puts this into a format which can be applied including being used proactively by planners in policy development, masterplans and informing their decisions on development.“The key point is that the sum value of the Green Infrastructure network is greater than its constituent parts.”
  • the green infrastructure in Birmingham evaluated within this ecosystem assessment has been valued at £11.8 million annually or £420.5 million capitalised over 50 years
  • the green infrastructure in Birmingham evaluated within this ecosystem assessment has been valued at £11.8 million annually or £420.5 million capitalised over 50 years
  • Transcript

    • 1. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Managing Growth on the Rural Urban fringe Alister Scott BA PhD MRTPI
    • 2. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Planning for Growth: Big Questions • Demographic change • Economic growth • Housing need • Employment land • Climate change • Species decline • Managing uncertainty • Conflicting values • Trade offs
    • 3. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Talk Outline 1. Re-discovering the Rural-Urban Fringe 2. The Growth Agenda 3. Exposing Disintegrated Development Narratives 4. Overcoming Disintegration – Conceptual Framework – Good Planning Practice 5. Re-inventing Growth on the Fringe
    • 4. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Re-discovering the Rural-Urban Fringe  Messy space where town & countryside meet  Arena where growth issues are contested DEFINED  Land Use (edge)  Green Belt (barrier)  Values and Lifestyles (commuter)  Urban-rural relationships (complex)
    • 5. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Academic Commentary  Dominant 20C space (OECD 2011)  Dynamic and productive environments (Spedding 2004)  Misunderstood space (Gallent 2006)  A ‘weed’ (Cresswell 1997)  Battleground for urban and rural uses (Hough 1990)  Landscape out of order (Qvistrom 2007)
    • 6. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Fragmented Identity “Many agencies did not have a particular view on the fringe space except when it was part of an actual project.... Although some pieces of work and evidence were commissioned, they only addressed particular features of the fringe landscape” BCU
    • 7. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Re-imagining the Fringe • Farley and Roberts 2012 p10 “ ……..complicated unexamined places that thrive on disregard…..”
    • 8. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Economic Growth on the Fringe • Overall government directive for growth • Dualism between NIMBY and Pro-growth lobbies • Barometer of growth impacts • Benefits of growth – Improve Society & Environment
    • 9. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme BUT • Single basket of growth • Disintegrated development outcomes………. Economic Growth on the Fringe
    • 10. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Narrative 1 Natural vs Built Environment Divide Natural Environment lens 1. Natural Environment White Paper 2. Habitat and Landscape 3. DEFRA 4. Ecosystem Approach 5. Classifying and Valuing 6. National Ecosystem Assessment 7. Integrated Biodiversity Development Areas 8. Nature Improvement Areas 9. Local Nature Partnerships Built Environment lens 1. National Planning Policy Framework 2. Local 3. DCLG 4. Spatial Planning 5. Zoning and Ordering 6. Sustainability Assessments 7. Development/Neighbourhood Plans 8. Enterprise Zones / Green Belts 9. Local Enterprise Partnerships
    • 11. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Policy Focus Natural Environment lens 1. Natural Environment White Paper 2. Habitat and Landscape 3. DEFRA 4. Ecosystem Approach 5. Classifying and Valuing 6. National Ecosystem Assessment 7. Integrated Biodiversity Development Areas 8. Nature Improvement Areas 9. Local Nature Partnerships Built Environment lens 1. National Planning Policy Framework 2. Local 3. DCLG 4. Spatial Planning 5. Zoning and Ordering 6. Sustainability Assessments 7. Development/Neighbourhood Plans 8. Enterprise Zones / Green Belts 9. Local Enterprise Partnerships
    • 12. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Theory Natural Environment lens 1. National Ecosystem Assessment 2. Integrated Biodiversity Development Areas 3. Nature Improvement Areas 4. Local Nature Partnerships Built Environment lens 1. Zoning and Ordering 2. Sustainability Assessments 3. Development/Neighbourhood Plans 4. Enterprise Zones / Green Belts 5. Local Enterprise Partnerships Eurocities 2004SuRCase Project University of Liverpool
    • 13. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Government Natural Environment lens 1. em Approach 2. Classifying and Valuing 3. National Ecosystem Assessment 4. Integrated Biodiversity Development Areas 5. Nature Improvement Areas 6. Local Nature Partnerships Built Environment lens 1. al Planning 2. Zoning and Ordering 3. Sustainability Assessments 4. Development/Neighbourhood Plans 5. Enterprise Zones / Green Belts 6. Local Enterprise Partnerships
    • 14. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Government Policy Natural Environment lens 1. Habitat and Landscape 2. DEFRA 3. Ecosystem Approach 4. Classifying and Valuing 5. National Ecosystem Assessment 6. Integrated Biodiversity Development Areas 7. Nature Improvement Areas 8. Local Nature Partnerships Built Environment lens 1. DCLG 2. Spatial Planning 3. Zoning and Ordering 4. Sustainability Assessments 5. Development/Neighbourhood Plans 6. Enterprise Zones / Green Belts 7. Local Enterprise Partnerships
    • 15. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Scale Natural Environment lens 1. DEFRA 2. Ecosystem Approach 3. Classifying and Valuing 4. National Ecosystem Assessment 5. Integrated Biodiversity Development Areas 6. Nature Improvement Areas 7. Local Nature Partnerships Built Environment lens 1. DCLG 2. Spatial Planning 3. Zoning and Ordering 4. Sustainability Assessments 5. Development/Neighbourhood Plans 6. Enterprise Zones / Green Belts 7. Local Enterprise Partnerships
    • 16. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme New Designation Natural Environment lens Built Environment lens 1. Local Enterprise Partnerships Forest of Bowland Nature Improvement Area Birmingham Enterprise Zone
    • 17. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme New Partnerships Natural Environment lens 1. National Ecosystem Assessment 2. Integrated Biodiversity Development Areas 3. Nature Improvement Areas 4. Local Nature Partnerships Built Environment lens 1. Development/Neighbourhood Plans 2. Enterprise Zones / Green Belts 3. Local Enterprise Partnerships
    • 18. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Disintegrated Policy Outcomes in the Fringe National Park Authority required demolition whilst Welsh government promoted roundhouse as exemplar Flooding: shortly afterwards 5000 new houses built.
    • 19. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme 1. Local Enterprise Partnerships What is the Missing Ingredient? Natural Environment lens Built Environment lens
    • 20. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme 1. Local Enterprise Partnerships What is the Missing Ingredient? Natural Environment lens Built Environment lens
    • 21. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Narrative 2: Whose Authority? • No Room • Duty to Co-operate vs Duty to Protect • Scalar tension produces different outcomes
    • 22. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Narrative 2: Whose Authority? • Administrative boundaries vs. natural boundaries • Whose boundaries are best; spoilt for choice!
    • 23. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Narrative 3: Building Sustainable Communities? • New Settlement • 7500 new houses • Community infrastructure – Section 106 trigger – Economic vs social viability
    • 24. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Overcoming Disintegration
    • 25. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Overcoming Disintegration Should have gone to Spec systems
    • 26. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Overcoming Disintegration Natural Environment Built Environment
    • 27. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme TIME: Learning and Applying Lessons • To boldly go…………. • “Path to excellence is paved with failure” • Critical examination of past policy interventions West Midland Planners learning lessons from Regional Planning
    • 28. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme TIME: Learning and Applying Lessons “What about Ebenezer Howard and his visions these were long term; we don't have this kind of thinking anymore ... Why ?” BCU
    • 29. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme TIME: Learning and Applying Lessons  Countryside Management Approach  Integrated remit  Field-based  Needs based BUT  Funding vulnerability  Rarely linked to statutory planning policy and plans
    • 30. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme CONNECTIONS: Securing Multifunctionality
    • 31. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme CONNECTIONS: Securing Multifunctionality “Green infrastructure planning across landscape scale areas crossing administrative boundaries.... The role of infrastructure planning is crucial but needs to be at the right scale”. BEP
    • 32. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme CONNECTIONS: Securing Multifunctionality
    • 33. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme VALUES: Achieving Creative Fringes by Challenging Convention “How can we bring about a cultural shift to get away from taking it for granted that population and consumption per capita will continue to grow” BEP
    • 34. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme VALUES: Achieving Creative Fringes by Challenging Convention “Land value is the main barrier to RUF being used for local food production and other innovative things ......” LWM
    • 35. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme VALUES: Achieving Creative Fringes by Challenging Convention Baseline £ Value of Green Services Multiple Benefits • Heat island • Flood protection • Food production • Pollination • Water quality • Soil quality • Carbon sequestration • Biodiversity • Health • Recreation
    • 36. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme VALUES: Achieving Creative Fringes by Challenging Convention Baseline £ Value of Green Services Multiple Benefits • Heat island • Flood protection • Food production • Pollination • Water quality • Soil quality • Carbon sequestration • Biodiversity • Health • Recreation
    • 37. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme VALUES: Achieving Creative Fringes by Challenging Convention Chemin De Fer - Paris Sandwell: Urban Agriculture
    • 38. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme VALUES: Achieving Creative Fringes by Challenging Convention • “..... Green Belt just protects now very affluent commuter belt settlements ........ This culture of negativity and restriction restricts freedom of manoeuvre for planners and the development industry”. WMRAF
    • 39. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme What is the Core Ingredient for Success?
    • 40. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Re-inventing Growth on the Fringe • Orchestrate bold new visions of the fringe • Secure multiple benefits from/for economy, nature and community • Enable adaptation through experimentation and creativity • Employ core principles of equity (social & environmental) & quality of life • Cross boundaries to identify opportunities
    • 41. relu Rural Economy and Land Use Programme Alister.scott@bcu.ac.uk twitter @bcualisterscott

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