Ajs the biodiversity 2020 strategy final version

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  • Talk focusses on the opportunity spaces within what we call the RUF. This is a interdisciplinary team project funded by the RELU programme . I am leading this presentation today
  • InterdisciplinaryUnified research team comprising academics and policy and community groups Shape steer and evolve the project NEW way of doing research
  • Issue of social learning from experiments as a coping mechanism from uncertainty
  • The partnership has prepared a series of concept plans which set out the environmental constraints and functional opportunities for key development sites Strategic ObjectiveTo create a cohesive and sustainable community which is inspired by the landscape setting and which provides an attractive living environment for a wide range of household types. To protect and enhance the existing GI resource by designing a framework of green corridors, networks and open spaces which connect the development to the city of Worcester and to the surrounding rural hinterland. Led by the Strategic Planning & Environmental Policy team of the County Council, the plans have been endorsed by Partnership members including statutory consulteesA statement of aims and objectives for GI that the partners would expect to see addressed in site masterplanningThe Concept Plans are based on primary baseline data and the multifunctional characteristics of each site... Identify the GI assets and spatial patterns that give rise to opportunities for a connected and multifunctional green infrastructure network... The way we did it initially Hold a workshop for specialists for each subject/themeExpectation that the development will provide 40% GI – based on best practice as set out in Ecotowns Supplement to PPS1 and TCPA Eco Towns GI WorksheetNegotiation between subject areas with the focus on multifunctionality These concept plans provide the focus for the funding and viability research work, enabling indicative costs to be grounded in the reality of future development sitesIntention to integrate this into a Version 2 of each Concept Plan Concept Plans have proved really popular with Worcestershire DistrictsSome are including them in their Core Strategy

Transcript

  • 1. The Biodiversity 2020 Strategy: A New Framework For The Future Of Biodiversity A Spatial Planner’s Response Alister Scott BA PhD MRTPI Professor of Spatial Planning and Governance
  • 2. Beyond the stereotypes
  • 3. To boldly go…• Beyond boundaries• Beyond biodiversity• Beyond the status quo• Beyond comfort zones
  • 4. Disintegrated planning…Box 1: Environmental lens Box 2: Planning lens• Incentives • Control• Biodiversity 2020 • NPPF• Defra • CLG• Ecosystem Approach • Spatial Planning• Classifying and valuing • Zoning and order• NEA • SA• IBDAs • GI• NIAs • EZ• LNPs • LEPS
  • 5. Biodiversity 2020 : “A planner’s response”• Green space designation• Biodiversity offsets/ Habitat banking• Presumption in favour of Sustainable Development• Policies to protect and conserve the environment (NPPF)
  • 6. Is there a method in the madness? Uniting Spatial Planning and the Ecosystem Approach Alister Scott Claudia Carter, Mark Reed, Peter Larkham, Nicki Schiessel, Karen Leach, Nick Morton, Rachel Curzon relu David Jarvis, Andrew Hearle, Mark Middleton, Bob Forster, Keith Budden, Ruth Waters, David Collier, Chris Crean, Miriam Kennet, Richard Coles Rural Economy andrelu Use Programme and Ben Stonyer LandRural Economy andLand Use Programme
  • 7. The Response • New ways of doing research and policy • Building a new model of interdisiciplinarity • Bridging the environment- planning dividerelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 8. Building a Team • BCU Prof Alister Scott PI • Claudia Carter Forest Research • David Collier NFU • Aberdeen Dr Mark Reed CI • David Jarvis DJA Consultants • BCU Prof Richard Coles CI • Ruth Waters/Andrew Hearle Natural England • BCU Dr Nick Morton CI • Karen Leach/Chris Crean Localise West • BCU Dr Rachel Curzon CI Midlands • BCU Claudia Carter CI* • Miriam Kennet Green Economics Institute • Nick Grayson Birmingham Environment • BCU Nicki Schiessel CI* Partnership • Bob Forster West Midlands Rural Affairs Forum • Mark Middleton Worcestershire County Council, WMRArelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 9. “… we must learn to apply an adaptive ecosystem approach to ecological planning. This will allow us to deal with the thorny issues of sustainability, itself taken complexly in regional and urban planning, in novel and ultimately more realistic ways.” Vasishth 2008: 101 Vasishth, A. (2008) ‘A scale-hierarchic ecosystem approach to integrative ecological planning’, Progress in Planning 70: 99-132.relu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 10. Reflective Papers • Team members produced their own reflective papers on – Spatial Planning – Ecosystem Approachrelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 11. Co-production of bridging concepts • Papers acted as boundaries for synthesis – Identified synergies and differences within a working paper – Critical explorations of SP and EA to define integrative principles srelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 12. SP and EA Compatibilities  New ways of thinking  Connectivity  Holistic frameworks  Governance  Cross-sectoral  Inclusivity  Multi-scalar  Equity goals  Negotiating  Regulatory  Enabling  Market-orientated  Long term perspectivereluRural Economy andLand Use Programme
  • 13. Beyond boundariesrelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 14. Unpacked • Time – Long-termism – Learning lessons from the past • Connectivity – Flows and linkages vs urban and rural – Multi-scalar relationships and dependencies • Values – Core values and belief systems – Professionals (Planner, Environmentalist) and Publicsrelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 15. New Ways of thinking • Understanding each others language • Joined up dialogue • Working together on problems and solutions • Starting the journeyrelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 16. RUFopolyrelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 17. relu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 18. Concept Plans via Worcestershire GIPreluRural Economy andLand Use Programme
  • 19. Summary • Legacy of the planning-environment divide • Danger of preparing plans in isolation • Sector targets risk agency insularity • Power of inclusive processes and partnerships integrate economy, society and environment • Importance of planners and environmentalists becoming bedfellowsrelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme
  • 20. Questions ? • http://www.bcu.ac.uk/research/-centres-of- excellence/centre-for-environment-and- society/projects/relu • http://twitter.com/#!/reluruf • alister.scott@bcu.ac.ukrelu Building interdisciplinarity across theRural Economy and rural domainLand Use Programme