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Speaker Camp - Full Deck, June 2013
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Speaker Camp - Full Deck, June 2013

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You’ve Got A Lot To Say. People Deserve to Hear It. ...

You’ve Got A Lot To Say. People Deserve to Hear It.

You don’t need to picture people in their underwear to get up on stage and share what you know. You do, however, need to have a compelling idea along with a well-written abstract and a well-structured, well-prepared presentation in order to give the talk you–and your audience–deserve.

That’s not all–show up with 5 minutes of a presentation and learn from seasoned professionals who have seen their fair share of stages. We’ll provide you with a safe, welcoming environment and help you by providing valuable and actionable feedback that will help you level-up your presentation game.

Start here, and evolve your own patterns and techniques that work best for you.

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  • @E. Samara - There is no recording; this was a full day workshop (http://speakercampchicago.com) and a forthcoming book.

    @Mikkel - We cover many of your points throughout the day; all very good points, too. Difficult to pull all of the things we talk about just through slides, of course!
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  • This is great. Is there a recording of the presentation? Thanks.
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  • Enjoyed that presentation, thanks! Regarding the crowd, (slide 159) a thing to do in terms of audience is to scope it out early on to find someone to draw your energy from. Find a person in the crowd that gives you a good vibe, someone that seems positively inclined, smiling and attentive to you. If you focus on that person in the audience intermittently, it will give you the good vibe to carry on in the best way forward. Don't look at the quiet people, the twitters or the notetakers. Look at people that are looking at you with a smile.
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    Speaker Camp - Full Deck, June 2013 Speaker Camp - Full Deck, June 2013 Presentation Transcript

    • Samantha Starmer - @samanthastarmerRuss Unger - @russu| Razorfish| GE Capital Americas
    • Big Thanks!
    • Our Sponsors
    • Our MentorsAndy Crestodina Andy Hullinger Brad Nunnally Clark Sell Dennis KardysLaura Creekmore Tim Frick Tonia BartzDennis Schleicher Gabby Hon
    • Jared SpoolOur Keynote
    • • Brainstorming Ideas• Writing Proposals• Break• Writing Bios• Submitting Proposals• Lunch• Reviewing Proposals• Presentation Structure• Presentation Tips &Techniques• YOUR Presentations & Critique• Jared Spool KeynoteThe Morning The AfternoonToday’s Agenda
    • BrainstormingYour Big Idea
    • • Provides the foundational grounding for your presentation• Establishes the framework and criteria for later winnowing ofexamples or sub-points.• Ensures you focus on the key learning or value you want theaudience to get out of your talk• Helps position your presentation within the larger eventcontextWhy you need a Big Idea™
    • • Inspirational• Practical• ControversialTypes of Big Ideas
    • • Ideas sound different on paper orshared with someone else than inthe quiet of your own head• Helps determine which ideas havethe most traction• Spark new ways of thinking that candrive even better ideasBrainstorming Your Big Idea
    • Think About...“Jeffrey Zeldman, An Event ApartA genuine idea. A fresh take on a serious problem,especially if that problem is currently vexing some of thebest minds in the business.
    • Know your audience; make the material relevant to the people youare presenting to, even if you have given the presentation before.• Match language from the conference or event• Adapt level of depth to expected level of audience• Scope your idea to your time limitIdea: Check.But Wait--You’re Not Done Yet
    • Your Turn!Quantity vs. Quality• 3 minutes: Things you want to talk about• 3 minutes: Things you are an expert at• 3 minutes: Things you want someone else to talk about
    • Your Turn!Group Share• Put your “Things You Want Someone Else to Talk About” on thewhiteboard• Take one idea that you didn’t write and that you are passionateabout• Cover it with your hands• Utter “Preciousssssss”
    • Partner UpActivity• If you have multiple ideas, try to get to a single topic• Relate the idea to something in the industry• Example:
    • How to WriteYour Proposal
    • The Composition of a ProposalThe Parts That Make it Whole Are:• The Title• Get ‘em Engaged and Interested• The Write-Up• Tell ‘em What You’re Going to Tell ‘em• Support It with Your Story• Your Bio• Tell ‘em Why You’re the One to Tell ‘em
    • The TitleEvolution of the Title of Your Presentation• First: What Do You Think Your Talk Will Be About? What’s theIdea?• Last: When You Have a Write-Up, Revisit the Title• Final: Review It with Friends, Peers, Conference Organizers• FinalFinal_v2: You May Change It Again (and Again), After You’vePresented It
    • The TitleWhat Makes a Good Title?• Interesting: Is Your Title Good Enough to Make Someone Wantto Read the Entire Abstract?• Targeted: Does Your Title Let People Know Who the Content isFor?• Clear: Does Your Title Clearly Articulate the Content of Your Talk?
    • My TitleIm a Good Designer and Suddenly Im Leading People.Now What?• Evokes Interest; Frightening Position, Possibly Not Uncommon?• Audience is Targeted; Designers Who Are Now Managers/Leaders with Little Direction?• Not Very Clear; Could Cover a Wide Variety of Topics?
    • “The TitleHugh Forrest, SXSWA good title will spark my interest as a reviewer and make me wantto read the entire abstract.
    • The Title“Jeffrey Zeldman, An Event ApartA clear title tells you that you actually have a well-structuredpresentation in mind--a presentation that makes a real andimportant point (or two).
    • “The TitleAndy Budd, UX London, dConstructI really hate titles that are clever but leave you having no idea whatthe session is actually going to be about.
    • My (Updated) TitleThings I’ve Learned (and Am Still Learning!)from Managing UX Designers• Evokes Interest; What Has He Learned?• Audience is Targeted; Presentation Should Help SomeoneManaging UX Designers• Very Clear; Tells You What the Presentation is About and WhatYou Can Expect to Learn
    • My (Updated) TitleThings I’ve Learned (and Am Still Learning!)from Managing (UX Designers)I will probably change this at leastone more time.At least.See what Idid there?
    • The Write-upEvolution of the Write-up• First: Write Hard & Fast; Get Ideas Out• Put It Down: Walk Away; Come Back Later• Revise: Review It with Friends, Peers, Conference Organizers• FinalFinal_v2: You May Change It Again (and Again), After You’vePresented It; Some Conferences Require More or Less ThanYou’ve Written
    • The Write-up: StructureThe Three “Tell ‘em”s• Tell ‘em What You’re Going toTell Them• Tell ‘em• Tell ‘em What You Told Them
    • The Write-up: StructureSimple Structure• Tell Them What You’re Going to Tell Them• Be clear, concise, brief, and provide details• Do this in a small-to-medium-sized paragraph• Tell Them Why You’re Telling Them• What’s your take on this? What is the story that got you to thispoint? Your rationale?• Do this in a small-to-medium-sized paragraph
    • “The Write-upRuss Unger, Hi-I’m Right Here!I think a lot of people get shot down because they write in the[conference submission] form.
    • The Write-upEvolution of the Write-up• First: Write Hard & Fast; Get Ideas Out• Put It Down: Walk Away; Come Back Later• Revise: Review It with Friends, Peers, Conference Organizers• FinalFinal_v2: You May Change It Again (and Again), After You’vePresented It; Some Conferences Require More or Less ThanYou’ve Written
    • The Write-upMy First DraftFinding top talent in the UX field has been a challenge for quite some time now. It doesnt helpmatters when we hear that there are several times more jobs than there are UXers to fill the roles,which ultimately puts the power into the hands of people looking for jobs, and they can now afford tobe choosy about who and where the work. This means that there is less tolerance for hiring a UXerto be the UX bandaid and then have them report into marketing or some other. Sooner or later,someone is going to need to lead and manage the UX talent pool, and that someone will need to besomeone who has been in the trenches themselves.Through the course of my career, Ive had the opportunity to lead and manage teams, and Ive notalways been the best at it. Im still learning, and Ill be the first to admit that. In many cases, myexperience has been like most of my career: trial by fire. The good news is that Ive been doing what Ithink youre supposed to do: get better through iteration, research, and adjustment. Much of whatIve learned applies to managing UX Designers, but also applies to managing just about anyone, andIll be sharing those with you. F+
    • The Write-upEvolution of the Write-up• First: Write Hard & Fast; Get Ideas Out• Put It Down: Walk Away; Come Back Later• Revise: Review It with Friends, Peers, Conference Organizers• FinalFinal_v2: You May Change It Again (and Again), After You’vePresented It; Some Conferences Require More or Less ThanYou’ve Written
    • The Write-upMy Second DraftIve had the opportunity to lead and manage teams multiple times in my career, and while I may nothave always been the best a it, I have picked up and learned a few things along way that I try to putinto practice today. Many of these lessons havent been easy to learn, and sometimes they werentthat easy to endure, however, theyve all helped me become much better at what I do, and they allowme to have empathy for those people who either report to me or manage me in one way or another.If youre interested in learning from some of the hard lessons Ive learned, or in just laughing along atmy folly, Ill have plenty of material to provide you with that opportunity.Most of my career has been an exercise in trial-by-fire. This process may work well when youre adesigner and youre trying to master the art of the task flow, site map, wireframe, prototype,personas, and so on, but with leadership, the option to go back to the drawing board isnt quite asreadily available--nor as painless to your pride, and potentially your pocketbook. Im going to sharesome of things Ive learned in my efforts to become a better manager of designers, and in the worldof business in general.C+
    • The Write-upEvolution of the Write-up• First: Write Hard & Fast; Get Ideas Out• Put It Down: Walk Away; Come Back Later• Revise: Review It with Friends, Peers, Conference Organizers• FinalFinal_v2: You May Change It Again (and Again), After You’vePresented It; Some Conferences Require More or Less ThanYou’ve Written
    • The Write-upI Have Some Pretty Great, Honest Friends
    • Seriously Great Friends
    • The Write-upMy Third, Mostly-Final DraftMost of my career has been an exercise in “trial by fire.” This process worked well when I was adesigner and was trying to master the art of the task flow, site map, wireframe, prototype, personas,and so on. In leadership positions, the option to go back to the drawing board or to iterate hasnt  always been readily available--nor as painless to my pride and potentially my pocketbook.Many of these lessons haven’t been easy for me to learn. It’s been tough to simultaneously removeobstacles without becoming one,  or learning how to say “no” (and the flavors of yes and no!) whenIve also wanted people to be satisfied with me and the work Im doing. However, these lessons haveall helped me become better at managing to some degree, while instilling a strong sense of empathyfor those people who either report to me, or bless their souls, manage me in one way or another.If you’re interested in learning from some of the hard lessons I’ve learned, or in just laughing at myfolly, I’ll have plenty of material to provide you with either opportunity.B+
    • The Write-upEvolution of the Write-up• First: Write Hard & Fast; Get Ideas Out• Put It Down: Walk Away; Come Back Later• Revise: Review It with Friends, Peers, Conference Organizers• FinalFinal_v2: You May Change It Again (and Again), After You’vePresented It; Some Conferences Require More or Less ThanYou’ve Written
    • The Write-upThings I’ve Learned (and Am Still Learning!)from Managing (UX Designers)Most of my career has been an exercise in “trial by fire.” This process workedwell when I was a designer and was trying to master the art of the task flow,site map, wireframe, prototype, personas, and so on. In leadership positions,the option to go back to the drawing board or to iterate hasnt  always beenreadily available--nor as painless to my pride and potentially my pocketbook.Many of these lessons haven’t been easy for me to learn. It’s been tough tosimultaneously remove obstacles without becoming one,  or learning how tosay “no” (and the flavors of yes and no!) when Ive also wanted people to besatisfied with me and the work Im doing. However, these lessons have allhelped me become better at managing to some degree, while instilling astrong sense of empathy for those people who either report to me, or blesstheir souls, manage me in one way or another.If you’re interested in learning from some of the hard lessons I’ve learned, orin just laughing at my folly, there will be plenty of material to provide you witheither opportunity.This is where I’m telling themwhat I’m going to tell themabout, and who should come tothe presentation.This is where I’m supporting thepresentation with the reasonswhy this talk makes sense,coming from me.This is a little bit of wit.
    • “The Write-upHugh Forrest, SXSWAs detailed a plan as possible on what the presentation will be.Don’t assume that the person reviewing the proposal understandswhat you are talking about if you only explain it in one sentence.
    • “The Write-upBrad Smith, WebVisionsGreat ones have a catchy / intriguing title, convey 1-3 big ideas, andcommunicate what an attendee will take away. About 2 shortparagraphs and maybe some bullet points.
    • “The Write-upBarak Danin, UX IsraelThe value that someone would get from attending the talk. Quitedirectly: In what way would someone be more knowledgeableand / or what new tools or skills would a person have after thispresentation?
    • “The Write-upClark Sell, That ConferenceA couple of well-thought concise paragraphs. I don’t want a book,but rather something that will draw the attendee to come andinteract with you.
    • “The Write-upAndy Budd, UX London, dConstructYou need to paint a picture in the mind of the audience, allowingthem to imagine what the talk is going to be about, why theyshould care, and what they’re going to get out of the experience.“There are no hard and fast rules.
    • The Write-upYOURTURN
    • The Write-upThings I’ve Learned (and Am Still Learning!)from Managing (UX Designers)Ive worked for a lot idiot managers in my career. And then, one day, after Ihad become a manager, it dawned on me: I am now the idiot! Most of mycareer has been an exercise in “trial by fire.” This process worked well when Iwas a designer and was trying to master the art of the task flow, site map,wireframe, prototype, personas, and so on. In leadership positions, the optionto go back to the drawing board or to iterate hasnt  always been readilyavailable--nor as painless to my pride and potentially my pocketbook.Many of these lessons haven’t been easy for me to learn. It’s been tough tosimultaneously remove obstacles without becoming one,  or learning how tosay “no” (and the flavors of yes and no!) when Ive also wanted people to besatisfied with me and the work Im doing. However, these lessons have allhelped me become better at managing to some degree, while instilling astrong sense of empathy for those people who either report to me, or blesstheir souls, manage me in one way or another.If you’re interested in learning from some of the hard lessons I’ve learned, orin just laughing at my folly, there will be plenty of material to provide you witheither opportunity.This is where I’m telling themwhat I’m going to tell themabout, and who should come tothe presentation.This is where I’m supporting thepresentation with the reasonswhy this talk makes sense,coming from me.This is a little bit of wit.Got feedback; madeanother change
    • Break!
    • How to WriteYour Bio
    • Your BioNO ONE Likes Writing Them. Or Reviewing Yours for You.• The 3 Types of Bios You Need• For Your Website / LinkedIn (Long)• For Your Conference Submission (Medium)• For the Person Introducing You (Short)
    • The BioThe Long Bio - Your Website, LinkedIn
    • The BioThe Medium Bio - Conference SubmissionsPro Tip:Get a Professional (or Just Nice)Headshot
    • The BioThe Short Bio - Conference IntroductionsRuss Unger is an Experience Design Director for GE CapitalAmericas and has co-authored books on UX Design andfacilitation. Today he’ll be presenting on Lessons Learned fromManaging UX Designers. Please help me welcome Russ Unger!
    • Your BioWhat Makes a Good Bio?• Brief & Succinct: Keep It to 1-2 Brief Paragraphs; 3-4 Sentences• 3rd Person: Howard Jones is from High Wycombe, UK.• Where You Work: Howard Jones is a singer/songwriter forElektra Records.• Big Achievements First: Howard Jones had 5 Number 1 Hits inthe US.• Something Witty (If You Desire & It Works): Howard is one of5 people who still own a keytar, and can still rock it.
    • Your BioHow to Write Your Bios• Review Your Resume / LinkedIn Profile• Find Your Biggest Achievements in Your Career• Find Your Biggest Achievements in Your Life• Prioritize Your Achievements• Biggest / Best First• Only Relevant Achievements (Unless They’re Witty & They Work)
    • Your BioBio Tips• Grammar is Your Friend• Spelling & Punctuation Count• Keep It Brief• Short 1-2 Paragraphs; 3-4 Sentences• Only Relevant Achievements (Unless They’re Witty & They Work)• Use Common Language• Easy to Read Bio = Easy to Listen To Presenter
    • The Bio“Jeffrey Zeldman, An Event ApartShorter is better. A good bio can be anywhere from 50 to 200words, depending on the format of the conference website andthe level and number of your accomplishments.
    • The Bio“Bruno Figueiredo, UX LisbonThe best ones not only state a bit of the presenter experience, butoffer also a glimpse into them as persons. I love the ones that endwith something like: “has an unhealthy obession with robots andloves to eat blueberry pancakes at midnight.”
    • The Bio“Brad Smith, WebVisionsA bio is NOT a CV. You want people to want to get to know you, tosee that you’re “real” and that you’re not selling something.
    • Composition of a BioSample Write-upRuss UngerRuss Unger is an Experience Design Director for GECapital Americas where he leads teams and projects indesign and research . He is co-author of the book “AProject Guide to UX Design”, “Designing theConversation”, and the forthcoming “Speaker Camp”for Peachpit Press (Voices That Matter). Russ is alsoworking on a book on guerrilla design and researchmethods that is due out well, sometime.Russ is co-founder of ChicagoCamps, which hosts low-cost, high-value technology events in the Chicago area,and he is also on the Advisory Board for theDepartment of Web Design and Development atHarrington College of Design. Russ has 2 daughterswho both draw better than he does and are currentlybeginning to surpass his limited abilities in coding.Specific job title and employer.Big achievements, a little bit ofwit.Secondary achievements.A little personal, with a lighttouch of wit.
    • The BioYOURTURN
    • Composition of a BioSample Write-upRuss UngerRuss Unger is an Experience Design Director for GECapital Americas where he leads teams and projects indesign and research . He is co-author of the book “AProject Guide to UX Design”, “Designing theConversation”, and the forthcoming “Speaker Camp”for Peachpit Press (Voices That Matter). Russ is alsoworking on a book on guerrilla design and researchmethods that is due out well, sometime.Russ is co-founder of ChicagoCamps, which hosts low-cost, high-value technology events in the Chicago area,and he is also on the Advisory Board for theDepartment of Web Design and Development atHarrington College of Design. Russ has 2 daughterswho both draw better than he does and are currentlybeginning to surpass his limited abilities in coding.Specific job title and employer.Big achievements, a little bit ofwit.Secondary achievements.A little personal, with a lighttouch of wit.
    • Submit YourPresentation
    • Submit Your PresentationThis is a Real System. This is a Real Task.• Okay, So This Didn’t Work• We Did a Peer Review, Instead
    • Lunch!
    • ReviewingProposals
    • Reviewing ProposalsWhat We Are Critiquing• The Title• Does it Pique Your Interest?• Is It Targeted? To Whom?• Does It Describe the Talk?• The Write-Up• Is It Interesting?• Is It Clear What Will Be Included?• Does It Sync to the Title?
    • Reviewing ProposalsWhat We Are Critiquing• The Bio• Brief, Yet Complete?• Employer & Job Title Listed?• Highlights Relevant to the Topic?• General• Uses Common Language?• Typos / Grammar Issues?• Too Much / Too Lengthy?
    • Reviewing ProposalsFocus On:+ ∆Positives Deltas• This was great use of...• This showed me you know...• You met the goal by...• This was strong because...• This could be improved bybetter connecting to...• This could benefit from...• The abstract could usemore...
    • Reviewing ProposalsRemember:• Review the Content Only• This is NOT About the Person Who Submitted it!• Avoid Using “You did <this>” Sentences• Use a Filter• Think Before You Write• Review as You’d Like to Be Reviewed• Be Constructive• Provide Direction Wherever You Can
    • Structuring YourPresentation
    • from
    • to
    • how?
    • 4 Key Principles1. Start with you2. Learn the environment3. Build the bones4. Leave time to adjust
    • 1. Start With You
    • 1. Start With You• What is the ONE thing?• Think about the story• What is your style?• Are you scared?
    • What is the ONE Thing?http://www.flickr.com/photos/14617207@N00/4872111479
    • What is the ONE Thing?• Why are you speaking?• What is your point?• What is the ONE thing you want your audience toremember?
    • Think About the Storyhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/sugarpond/3016905349
    • Think About the Story• Beginning, middle and end• (Make sure there is an end)• All should point to your ONE thing• How would you tell to your grandmother? To a child?
    • What Is Your Style?
    • What Is Your Style?• Formal or informal?• Deep details or inspirational?• Don’t try to be funny if it isn’t you• Get feedback - lots of it
    • Are You Scared?http://www.flickr.com/photos/sugarpond/3016905349
    • Are You Scared?• The more nervous you are, the more structure you need• Unless you are a very skilled improvisor. In which case,you probably wouldn’t be in this workshop• It’s okay to be scared! Own it.
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/brue/48065329542. Learn the Environment
    • 2. Learn the Environment• Scout the space• Know your audience• Build to your time limit• Understand expectations
    • Scout the Spacehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/4157191493
    • Scout the Space• Ideal is to get on stage in advance• Note placement of lights, screens, any podium• Find out how full the room might be• Size and ‘feel’ of room should impact your structure
    • Know Your Audiencehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/36714668@N02/4598065240
    • Know Your Audience• Level of expertise• What are they expecting?• What do they want from you?• Mood?Voluntary or hostage?Interested or bored?Friendly or combative?
    • Build to Your Time Limithttp://www.flickr.com/photos/wwarby/3297205226
    • Build to Your Time Limit• Focus topic on time limit• Adjust scope and detail to time limit• The less time to prepare, the more structure you need• Again - know your style (rambler? fast talker?)• Experience will improve your gut sense
    • Understand Expectationshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/kristin-and-adam/2778203028
    • Understand Expectations• Do they expect results? or is the journey more relevant?• Technical or creative?• Overview or in depth?• Teaching or sharing?
    • 3. Build the Boneshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/ianturton/9555513
    • 3. Build the Bones• Free your mind• Remember the story• Just jump in• Make it FUN!
    • Free Your Mindhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PhrenologyPix.jpg
    • Free Your Mind• Don’t constrain too early• Use your creative juice makers• Let it percolate• Be willing to throw out initial ideas• (Which means you need twice the planning time youinitially expect)
    • Just Jump Inhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/ccheviron/3603397114
    • Just Jump In• Don’t be afraid to scribble• Paper prototype, but only if it works for you• Get into the tool as soon as you have the guts (of thestructure, as well as your nerve)
    • Remember the Storyhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/sugarpond/3016905349
    • Remember the Story• Ah, there is a point to all of this• Keep the narrative - linear or not - as your north star• Throw out anything extraneous to the story• No matter how cool you think it is
    • Make it FUN!
    • Make it FUN!• You should enjoy creating the story• You should enjoy building the structure• You will feel a quiet ‘ping’ when it starts to come together
    • 4. Leave Time to Adjusthttp://www.flickr.com/photos/clintjcl/4001170877
    • 4. Leave Time to Adjust• Lift your head out of the trees• Remember the ONE thing• Practice time is critical• Use this formula: 5/10/5/3
    • Lift Your Head Out of the Treeshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/mountjoy/5194910368
    • Lift Your Head Out of the Trees• Check the whole arc regularly• Don’t get too hung up on the exact words or pictures• The whole is greater than the sum of the parts
    • Remember the ONE Thinghttp://www.flickr.com/photos/14617207@N00/4872111479
    • Remember the ONE Thing• When you think you are done, go back to the beginning• Is the ONE thing clear?• Is your narrative intact?• Does it flow? Can you easily remember your points?
    • Dress Rehearsal is Criticalhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/evilpeacock/2194032579
    • Dress Rehearsal is Critical• Rehearse more than you want to• Rehearse out loud• Rehearse in presentation mode• Rehearse with a timer• Rehearse standing up• Then CUT - if you have built the structure right you shouldhave too much vs. too little
    • Use This Formulahttp://www.flickr.com/photos/joao_trindade/4362414729
    • Use This Formula• Take the time allotted• Multiply by 5 = minimum thinking/planning time• Multiply by 10 = minimum building (in tool) time• Multiply by 5 = minimum dress rehearsal time• Multiply by 3 = minimum tweaking time• e.g. 20 minutes presentation =100 minutes thinking200 minutes building100 minutes rehearsing60 minutes tweaking(and untold weeks stressing)
    • Structure is Keyhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/saroy/3455464539
    • Structuring Your Presentation3. Build the bones• Free your mind• Remember the story• Just jump in• Make it FUN!!1. Start with you• What is the ONE thing?• What is the story?• What is your style?• Are you scared?2. Learn the environment• Scout the space• Know your audience• Build to your time limit• Understand expectations4. Leave time to adjust• Lift your head out of the trees• Remember the ONE thing• Dress rehearsal is critical• Use this formula
    • PresentationTips & Techniques
    • IIntroduction
    • Russ UngerWho Am I?GE Capital AmericasWhere Do I Work?Experience Design DirectorWhat Do I Do?Uh...
    • Who ReallyCares?Hint: Rhymes with “no one”
    • IIWhat I’m Goingto Tell You
    • • Preparation• Structure• Timing• Pre-Gaming• On Stage• Q & A• General NicetiesPresentation Tips & Techniques
    • IIIPreparation
    • • Tell ‘em• Tell ‘em• Tell ‘emWell, Maybe.But It’s a Good Place to Start.Structure
    • ImageSource©TimeInc.• Creation Hours• Slides Per Minute?• Minutes Per Slide?• Average adult attentionspan: 15-30 secondsTiming
    • Research Notes / Outline CardsSlides Practice
    • “Whitney HessI walk through each section, writing in any voice-over that I want tobe sure to hit into the Notes area for each slide.
    • • Buy a Good One!• Logitech RS800 is Jared Spool’s Current FavoriteThe Clickerhttp://t.co/dX8aG2DThe Jared Spool 9000™
    • IVPre-Game
    • “Chris FaheyYou aren’t going to sleep the night before, so get plenty of sleepduring the week leading up to the night before.
    • • Easy on the caffeine• Light meals / snacks• Find your happy placeLight & Easy
    • “Jesse James GarrettHave something small to eat, not a full [meal] or anything heavy. Ifyou’re going to have coffee, do it well before you have to be onstage.
    • Case the Joint
    • “Alex DittmerI always go pee when they call “five minutes to places”. I’m not surehow I started that habit, but it seems to relax me.
    • “C.E. LaneIt seems like there’s some sort of inverse formula stating the harderyou are about to rock, the more silent you will become beforehand.Before the biggest solo show I ever played, I fell asleep under acard table.
    • VOn Stage
    • ImageSource©TimeInc.• Prepare!• Prepare!• Prepare!• Remember: You’re the Proand Authority on the Topic!Stage Fright!
    • “Eytan MirskyI try to do some [content] I am most comfortable with in thebeginning because I know that if/when those go well, I will becomemore relaxed.
    • “David ArmanoTry to focus your presentations on something you feel passionateabout. That’s one of the reasons my stage fright is pretty minimal.
    • Break the Ice
    • ImageSource©NathanaelBoehmhttp://www.scottberkun.com/blog/2010/speak-to-bored-audience/“Scott BerkunIf you prepared correctly (meaning you practiced, have clear points,are enthusiastic about them, and understand why the audienceshowed up) you’ll look like a rock star.(On talking to a bored audience)
    • ImageSource©TimeInc.• Posture• Podium use / reliance• Mics - handhelds, lavalieres,and how to use them• Know your clicker• Don’t T-RexStage Presence
    • “1. Stand Tall2. Keep your head and eyes UP3. Smile4. Never retreat5. Move with purpose, energy & enthusiasm5 Tips for a Good Stage Presence
    • • Love it• Or Leave it• A story: How I Sucked.Enthusiasm! YEAH!
    • ImageSource©SouthParkDigitalStudiosLLC• Stand up• Sit down• I own youAuthoritah
    • ImageSource©TimeInc.• S l o w d o w n• Let people absorb your information• Don’t read your slides• Look at / face the audience• Kill the sarcasmPresenting
    • ImageSource:http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/143626“Lee IacoccaYou can have brilliant ideas, but if you can’t get those ideas across,they don’t do anybody any good.
    • Perception of Spoken Message in Regards to Communicating Feeling & Attitudes015304560Words (7%) Voice (38%) Non-verbals (55%)5%95%Who uses the“Disabled” toiletSource: Monarth & Kase, “ﬔe Confident Speaker”Source: ﬔe InternetPeople Like Stats
    • • Quiet != Bad• Note takers (& Sketchers!)• The TwittersReading the CrowdImageSource©TimeInc.
    • • Diplomacy wins• YOU have the microphone• Be nice• Until you can’tHostiles & Haters
    • • Don’t make a scene• Find your bearings• If all else fails: be honest and forge onwardLosing Your FlowImageSource©TimeInc.
    • “Erik SoensA simple retort such as “Whew... that got away from me, let mereiterate” works just fine.
    • “Eytan MirskyMost times people are not as aware of any mistakes as you mightthink. They are not focusing on things the way you, as theperformer, are.
    • VIQ&A
    • • Repeat the question• IDK is OK (just follow-up)• Being wrong: also OK• Manage the questioneer• Get out of the way!Basics of Q&AImageSource©TimeInc.
    • VIIGeneral Niceties
    • ImageSource©TimeInc.• Organizing is hard work• Mistakes happen• Audience is there for you• Be classyAppreciation
    • VIIITake Aways(What I Told You)
    • • Preparation and Rehearsal are your best friends• Pre-Gaming rituals help you find your “A” game• Be aware of your stage presence• Find ways to engage your audience• S L O W D O W N• Don’t forget to think about Q & A• Be nice, be appreciative, stay classyPresentation Tips & Techniques
    • IXResources
    • Additional Resources
    • ImageSource©NathanaelBoehmQuotes / Interview ExpertsAlex Dittmer David Armano Scott Berkun Jesse James GarrettC.E. Lane Erik Soens Whitney Hess Chris Fahey Eytan Mirsky
    • XClosing Slide
    • Thank You!Thank the AudienceTitle of the PresentationYour Name / Twitter / Etc.Name of the EventHashtagPromotional Stuff About You (Employer, Affiliations, etc.)
    • Trial by Fire:Presentations & Critique
    • Trial By FireWe Have Four Rooms and Ten Mentors• 5 Minute Presentations• Given by You!• 5 Minute Critiques• Led by Mentors• Recordings Will Be Shared in a Few Days• Email Link Sent Directly to You• Afternoon Snack Starts at ~3:00pm• But Only After You’ve Presented!
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    • Jared SpoolOur Keynote
    • Thank YOU! Samantha Starmer - @samanthastarmerRuss Unger - @russu| Razorfish| GE Capital Americas