EdCamp Detroit presentation - Flipped Classroom and Screencasting

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Dan Spencer's presentation at EdCamp Detroit on May 7th about the "Flipped Classroom" and screencasting.

Dan Spencer's presentation at EdCamp Detroit on May 7th about the "Flipped Classroom" and screencasting.

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  • My name is Dan Spencer and I teach chemistry at Michigan Center High School (Michigan)\n
  • For the next few minutes I want to share some changes that I’ve made in my classroom over the past year using a screencapture software called Camtasia for Mac, along with handheld devices like the iPod Touch to help my students learn at their own pace.\n
  • So I’ve been teaching for ten years now. I remember early in my teaching how excited I was to change the world. I had had some great teachers in high school and I was going to teach just like them. I was positive that when I was done my students love chemistry, hang on every word of my lectures, and remember every detail of what I had taught them.\n\nUnfortunately, no matter how much I prepared, after a while I started to look out at my students during my lectures and see some of these faces - maybe you’ve seen them too.\n\n*Play Ferris Buehler clip\n\nI don’t know how many of you have seen this face in your classrooms but it absolutely terrified me. It meant that even though I had spent hours preparing my lecture, some of my students just didn’t get it. It was a big wake-up call for me to realize that even though I learned that way, many of my students didn’t and if I didn’t find a better way to help them learn the material I was going to waste my time and theirs. There had to be a better way to help my students learn.\n
  • It was frustrating for me to realize that my students didn’t get a whole lot out of my lectures. They’d pick up an idea here and there but rarely retained anything meaningful. Unfortunately, I had to have an efficient way to get that important information to my students so we could move on and apply it.\n\nI soon realized that my system was flawed. I found that even though all my kids showed up at the same time, stayed the same amount of time and left at the same time each day, there was a wide range of how much my kids learned. If they were engaged by me talking at them for 40 minutes then they were going to learn a lot, but if they weren’t, then I was just wasting their time.\n\nTypes of Lecture Kids:\n1. Get everything done quickly - wait for everyone else to catch up - get bored - distract others.\n2. Write down every word\n3. Can you go back three slides?\n4. I can’t do this - I’m not even going to try\n\nThe problem with this is that in this system all my students are forced to learn under the same conditions. In other words - time is being held constant and the learning varies (relate this to science). I don’t think that’s the best way to teach.\n\nThe other problem is that in this system, it’s easy for my students to blame me when they don’t get it. “Mr. Spencer goes to fast”, “Mr. Spencer spits when he talks” . . . .\n
  • It was frustrating for me to realize that my students didn’t get a whole lot out of my lectures. They’d pick up an idea here and there but rarely retained anything meaningful. Unfortunately, I had to have an efficient way to get that important information to my students so we could move on and apply it.\n\nI soon realized that my system was flawed. I found that even though all my kids showed up at the same time, stayed the same amount of time and left at the same time each day, there was a wide range of how much my kids learned. If they were engaged by me talking at them for 40 minutes then they were going to learn a lot, but if they weren’t, then I was just wasting their time.\n\nTypes of Lecture Kids:\n1. Get everything done quickly - wait for everyone else to catch up - get bored - distract others.\n2. Write down every word\n3. Can you go back three slides?\n4. I can’t do this - I’m not even going to try\n\nThe problem with this is that in this system all my students are forced to learn under the same conditions. In other words - time is being held constant and the learning varies (relate this to science). I don’t think that’s the best way to teach.\n\nThe other problem is that in this system, it’s easy for my students to blame me when they don’t get it. “Mr. Spencer goes to fast”, “Mr. Spencer spits when he talks” . . . .\n
  • My big AHA moment came when I finally realized that my kids didn’t all learn the same way I do. I did well in the lecture - practice - test world, but I recognized more and more that my student’s brains were wired differently than mine. They have grown up in world of unlimited sources of information and able to access that information wherever and whenever they want. They also have their choice of tools for accessing the info as well. I needed to find a way to help them learn “their way”.\n
  • Story of the Khan Academy - www.khanacademy.org\n- Let students learn at their own pace\n- “Humanize” learning\n- Need to understand that an online tutorial does not replace the teacher, but allows teacher to focus on what he/she does best - guiding, working one-on-one with students to resolve problems, building relationships, etc.\n
  • Story of the Khan Academy - www.khanacademy.org\n- Let students learn at their own pace\n- “Humanize” learning\n- Need to understand that an online tutorial does not replace the teacher, but allows teacher to focus on what he/she does best - guiding, working one-on-one with students to resolve problems, building relationships, etc.\n
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  • So what I do is use a screencapture software called Camtasia for Mac to turn my lectures into screencasts, put them on handheld devices like the iPod Touch, and get them into my students hands so they can learn at their pace.\n\nThis was great because not only could my students watch these at their convenience, but they could also pause, rewind and review the screencasts as needed to make sure they really learned the material. That wasn’t possible in my old system. Not only that but this was also great for the kid who was absent for a week or who couldn’t understand his notes after writing them.\n\nThis picture is of Chelsea, one of my first hour chemistry students this past year. She was the classic “Can you go back three slides” kind of student. It wasn’t because she wasn’t paying attention, or was doing things she shouldn’t - she just couldn’t get everything the first time no matter what she tried. I remember her coming up to me one day with an iPod in her hand, a relieved smile on her face and said to me, “Mr. Spencer - it took me three times but I finally get it now!” That’s when I was sold on screencasts. I couldn’t help but think what would have happened to Chelsea in my old system.\n
  • This is what I use to create screencasts - there are lots of different options.\n1. MacBook\n2. C4M - (Camtasia Studio for PC users)\nI had to teach myself how to do this - dozens of 2-3 minute tutorials on how to use C4M.\n3. Tablet (Wacom Bamboo ~$60, but other options too)\n4. Microphone\n5. Two ways getting the screencasts to my students - iTunes U or screencast.com\n
  • This is what I use to create screencasts - there are lots of different options.\n1. MacBook\n2. C4M - (Camtasia Studio for PC users)\nI had to teach myself how to do this - dozens of 2-3 minute tutorials on how to use C4M.\n3. Tablet (Wacom Bamboo ~$60, but other options too)\n4. Microphone\n5. Two ways getting the screencasts to my students - iTunes U or screencast.com\n
  • This is what I use to create screencasts - there are lots of different options.\n1. MacBook\n2. C4M - (Camtasia Studio for PC users)\nI had to teach myself how to do this - dozens of 2-3 minute tutorials on how to use C4M.\n3. Tablet (Wacom Bamboo ~$60, but other options too)\n4. Microphone\n5. Two ways getting the screencasts to my students - iTunes U or screencast.com\n
  • This is what I use to create screencasts - there are lots of different options.\n1. MacBook\n2. C4M - (Camtasia Studio for PC users)\nI had to teach myself how to do this - dozens of 2-3 minute tutorials on how to use C4M.\n3. Tablet (Wacom Bamboo ~$60, but other options too)\n4. Microphone\n5. Two ways getting the screencasts to my students - iTunes U or screencast.com\n
  • Here’s a quick example of a screencast I made for my students.\n- Titles, music\n- Creates a video of what is happening on my computer screen\n- They can hear me explaining what is happening on my screen\n- webcam option\n- EDITING options\n\n
  • The idea is to get this into my students hands so they can learn it at their pace. Fortunately I have a classroom set of iPod Touches that my students can check out, but I’ve learned that regardless of the student’s home situation there is always a way.\n\nFor my kids with iPods, they can get the screencasts for free off of iTunes.\n\nFor my kids with a computer at home and high-speed internet they can access the screencasts through screencast.com (hosting site - free version)\n\nFor my kids with a computer but slow or no internet I can save these files on a USB drive and transfer it to their computer.\n\nFor kids without a computer we can burn them onto DVD’s so they can watch them.\n\nThere is always a way!\n
  • Matt Withers story\n- Typical teacher in the back of the room during PD\n- “Dan, there’s no way I could do this in my classes!”\n- I asked him to help me make a screencast and he was hooked.\n- Easy to learn how to use the Camtasia software.\n
  • Molly Scott - Michigan Center 8th grade ELA\n- Creates a screencast while grading student work\n- Talks to herself while “marking” papers\n- Students hear what she was thinking when she made the corrections/suggestions\n- Still conferences with students but students must watch screencast beforehand - makes conferences much more productive\n
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  • My contact info - don’t hesitate to use it.\n

Transcript

  • 1. The Flipped ClassroomAny Time, Any Place, Any Way, Any Pace Dan Spencer Jackson County ISD dan.spencer@jcisd.org @runfardvs
  • 2. Dan Spencer• Educational Technology Consultant - Jackson County ISD• Former Chemistry, Physics and Engineering Teacher - Michigan Center HS
  • 3. Frustration #1So much to do, so little time
  • 4. Frustration #1So much to do, so little time
  • 5. Frustration #2Different Students - Different Levels
  • 6. Frustration #3Do they really “get it”? Apologies in advance to any native German speakers! YouTube: German Coastguard Trainee
  • 7. Frustration #3Do they really “get it”? Apologies in advance to any native German speakers! YouTube: German Coastguard Trainee
  • 8. Shifting Paradigms My “21st Century” Students: •Different ways to learn •Different “wiring” •Different schedules •Different expectations
  • 9. Shifting Paradigms My “21st Century” Students: •Different ways to learn •Different “wiring” •Different schedules •Different expectations
  • 10. Fixing My Frustrations Flipping + Moodle + Mastery “We want learning to be rewindable” -Kevin Honeycutt (this morning) TED Talk by Salman Khan “Using Video to Reinvent Education”
  • 11. Fixing My Frustrations Flipping + Moodle + Mastery “We want learning to be rewindable” -Kevin Honeycutt (this morning) TED Talk by Salman Khan “Using Video to Reinvent Education”
  • 12. My Classroom• “Flip” Assignments • Mastery • Screencasts become • Student paced* homework • Demonstrate • “Homework” now understanding before becomes classwork moving on • Class focus on most important activities
  • 13. My Classroom (cont.)• Grading • 50% - Weekly Progress, 50% - Test/Quiz• Great fit with layered curriculum, guided inquiry, standards based grading and project based learning.• Moodle-based
  • 14. Creating Screencasts• Computer• Camtasia screencasting software • www.techsmith.com tutorials• Tablet• Microphone• iTunes or screencast.com
  • 15. Creating Screencasts• Computer• Camtasia screencasting software • www.techsmith.com tutorials• Tablet• Microphone• iTunes or screencast.com
  • 16. Screencast ExampleS’mores & Conservation of Mass
  • 17. Screencast ExampleS’mores & Conservation of Mass
  • 18. Getting Screencasts in Student’s HandsThere’s always a way! • Handheld Device (iPod, iPad, Smartphone) • Computer • DVD Player
  • 19. Matt’s First Screencast
  • 20. Matt’s First Screencast
  • 21. ELA - Individualized Feedback Molly Scott - Michigan Center Junior High
  • 22. ELA - Individualized Feedback Molly Scott - Michigan Center Junior High
  • 23. Examples of Screencasting in the Classroom• Jon Bergmann - Differentiated Instruction goo.gl/KNmSm• Aaron Samms - The Flipped Classroom goo.gl/axGib• Dan Spencer - Mobile Learning goo.gl/u79ez• Eric Marcos - Kids Teaching Kids goo.gl/fkTDT• Shauna Hedgepeth - Tutorial Library goo.gl/bNQvQ
  • 24. Dan Spencer dan.spencer@jcisd.org Twitter: @runfardvsDave McCollom (Techsmith) @techsmithEDUd.mccollom@techsmith.com