SolidWorks® 2000Getting Started
© 1995-2000, SolidWorks Corporation                  All warranties given by SolidWorks Corporation300 Baker Avenue       ...
Contents   Mastering the Basics        Installation                            1-1        Basic Functionality             ...
Working with Drawings and Detailing       Advanced Drawing and Detailing                      13-1       Bill of Materials...
Mastering the BasicsSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started
1                                                                           Installation     What is SolidWorks 2000?     ...
Mastering the BasicsPreparing to Install the SolidWorks 2000 SoftwareSystem Requirements         For the most recent infor...
Chapter 1 Installation            • If you are a new SolidWorks customer, you are asked to use the registration wizard    ...
Mastering the Basics             • Insert the SolidWorks 2000 CD-ROM in the computer’s CD drive and respond to            ...
Chapter 1 InstallationSolidWorks 2000 Service Packs         If you are a SolidWorks subscription customer, you can take ad...
2                                                          Basic Functionality         SolidWorks 2000 is supported under ...
Mastering the BasicsDesigning with SolidWorks 2000         As you do the examples in this guide, you will discover that th...
Chapter 2 Basic Functionality         q A SolidWorks 3D model consists of parts, assemblies, and drawings. Parts,         ...
Mastering the BasicsSolidWorks Terms           SolidWorks document windows have two panels:           A FeatureManager    ...
Chapter 2 Basic Functionality                                      Vertex                                               Ed...
Mastering the BasicsDocument Windows         In the SolidWorks application, each part, assembly, and drawing is referred t...
Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityIconize Documents         To organize your SolidWorks window, you can iconize open documents....
Mastering the BasicsMultiple Views            You can open additional views of the same document. Selecting an item in one...
Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityStarting SolidWorks 2000         1 Click the Start button on the Windows taskbar.         2 C...
Mastering the BasicsOpening a SolidWorks Part, Assembly, or Drawing          This section describes opening new or existin...
Chapter 2 Basic Functionality     To open a new part, drawing, or assembly document:         1 In the SolidWorks window, c...
Mastering the Basics          6 If you are opening an assembly or drawing document, you can change the path from          ...
Chapter 2 Basic Functionality     To open a part, a drawing, or assembly from Windows Explorer, do one of the following:  ...
Mastering the BasicsToolbars           The toolbar buttons are shortcuts for frequently used commands. Most of the availab...
Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityThe FeatureManager Design Tree         The FeatureManager design tree         makes it easy t...
Mastering the BasicsSymbols and Conventions         The FeatureManager design tree gives you information about any parts o...
Chapter 2 Basic Functionality         The tabs at the bottom of the FeatureManager design tree indicate the current       ...
Mastering the BasicsRebuild Symbol         If you make changes to a sketch or part that require the         rebuild of the...
Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityOptions Dialog Box          The SolidWorks 2000 application lets you customize functionality ...
Mastering the Basics Document Properties Detailing             Includes the following:                         • General d...
Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityGetting Help         If you have questions while you are using the SolidWorks software, you c...
3                                          The 40-Minute Running Start         This chapter guides you through the creatio...
Mastering the BasicsCreate a New Part Document         1 To create a new part, click New        on the Standard toolbar, o...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running Start                 .                                                                   ...
Mastering the BasicsSketching the Rectangle         The first feature in the part is a box extruded from a sketched rectan...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartAdding Dimensions         In this section you specify the size of the sketched rectan...
Mastering the BasicsChanging the Dimension Values         The dimensions for the block are 120mm x 120mm. To change the di...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartExtruding the Base Feature         The first feature in any part is called the base f...
Mastering the BasicsChanging View Mode and Display Mode         To magnify a model in the graphics area, you can use the z...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartSelecting from the Graphics Area         Most commands require you to make selections...
Mastering the BasicsSketching a Boss         To create additional features on the part (such as bosses or cuts), you sketc...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartDimensioning and Extruding the Boss         To establish the location and size of the...
Mastering the BasicsChanging View Orientation         You can use the buttons on the Standard Views toolbar to set the vie...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running Start         6 On the Sketch Relations toolbar, click Add Relation          ,           o...
Mastering the BasicsRotating and Moving the Part         To view the model from different angles, and to more easily selec...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartRounding the Corners of the Part         In this section you round the four corner ed...
Mastering the BasicsAdding Fillets         Now add fillets and rounds to other sharp edges of the part. You can select fac...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartShelling the Part         Next, you shell the part. Shelling hollows out the part by ...
Mastering the BasicsCreating a Named View         You can use the Orientation dialog box to:            • Create your own ...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartChanging a Dimension         This section illustrates a way to change the dimension o...
Mastering the BasicsDisplaying a Section View         You can display a 3D section view of the model at any time. You use ...
Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartDisplaying Multiple Views         Now that you have created your first model, you can...
4                                                                 Assembly Basics         In this chapter, you build a sim...
Mastering the BasicsCreating the Base Feature         You can use the same methods you learned in Chapter 3 to create the ...
Chapter 4 Assembly BasicsCreating a Lip on the Part         In this section, you use the Convert Entities and Offset Entit...
Mastering the BasicsChanging the Color of a Part         You can change the color and appearance of a part or its features...
Chapter 4 Assembly Basics         6 Save the assembly as Tutor. (The .sldasm extension is added to the file name.) If you ...
Mastering the BasicsManipulating the Components         When you add a part to an assembly, the part is referred to as a c...
Chapter 4 Assembly BasicsMating the Components         In this section, you define assembly mating relations between the c...
Mastering the BasicsAdding More Mates         1 Select the rightmost face of one component,   Select these faces          ...
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  1. 1. SolidWorks® 2000Getting Started
  2. 2. © 1995-2000, SolidWorks Corporation All warranties given by SolidWorks Corporation300 Baker Avenue as to the software and documentation are set forthConcord, Massachusetts 01742 in the SolidWorks Corporation License andAll Rights Reserved. Subscription Service Agreement, and nothing stated in, or implied by, this document or itsU.S. Patent 5,815,154 contents shall be considered or deemed aSolidWorks Corporation is a Dassault Systemes modification or amendment of such warranties.S.A. (Nasdaq:DASTY) company.Information is subject to change without notice. The information and the software discussed in thisNo material may be reproduced or transmitted in document are subject to change without noticeany form or by any means, electronic or and should not be considered commitments bymechanical, for any purpose without the express SolidWorks Corporation.written permission of SolidWorks Corporation. The software discussed in this document isAs a condition to your use of this software furnished under a license and may be used orproduct, you agree to accept the limited warranty, copied only in accordance with the terms of thisdisclaimer and other terms and conditions set license.forth in the SolidWorks Corporation License andSubscription Service Agreement, whichaccompanies this software. If, after reading the COMMERCIAL COMPUTERLicense Agreement, you do not agree with the SOFTWARE - PROPRIETARYlimited warranty, the disclaimer or any of the U.S. Government Restricted Rights. Use,other terms and conditions, promptly return the duplication or disclosure by the Government isunused software and all accompanying subject to restrictions as set forth indocumentation to SolidWorks Corporation and FAR 52.227-19 (Commercialyour money will be refunded. Computer Software - Restricted Rights),SolidWorks® and the SolidWorks logo are the DFARS 252.227-7013(c)(1)(ii)(Rights inregistered trademarks of SolidWorks Corporation. Technical Data and Computer Software) and in this Agreement, as applicable.SolidWorks® 2000 is a product name of Contractor/Manufacturer:SolidWorks Corporation. SolidWorks Corporation, 300 Baker Avenue,FeatureManager® is a jointly owned trademark of Concord, Massachusetts 01742.SolidWorks Corporation. Portions of this software are copyrighted by andFeature Palette™, and PhotoWorks™ are are the property of Unigraphics Solutions Inc.trademarks of SolidWorks Corporation. Portions of this software © 1990-2000ACIS® is a registered trademark of Spatial D-Cubed Limited.Technology Inc. Portions of this software © 1992-2000IGES® Access Library is a registered trademark Summit Software Company.of IGES Data Analysis, Inc. Portions of this software © 1990-2000FeatureWorks™ is a trademark of Geometric LightWork Design Limited.Software Solutions Co. Limited. Portions of this software © 1995-2000GLOBEtrotter® and FLEXlm® are registered Spatial Technology Inc.trademarks of Globetrotter Software, Inc. Portions of this software © 1998-2000Other brand or product names are trademarks or Geometric Software Solutions Co. Limited.registered trademarks of their respective holders. Portions of this software© 1999-2000 Immersive Design, Inc.Document Number: SWGSDENG021500 The IGES Access Library portion of this product is based on IDA IGES Access Library © 1989- 1998 IGES Data Analysis, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3. Contents Mastering the Basics Installation 1-1 Basic Functionality 2-1 The 40-Minute Running Start 3-1 Assembly Basics 4-1 Drawing Basics 5-1 Design Tables 6-1 More about Basic Functionality Working with Features and Parts Revolve and Sweep Features 7-1 Loft Features 8-1 Pattern Features 9-1 Fillet Features 10-1 More about Features and Parts Working with Assemblies Assembly Mates 11-1 Advanced Design Techniques 12-1 More about AssembliesSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started iii
  4. 4. Working with Drawings and Detailing Advanced Drawing and Detailing 13-1 Bill of Materials 14-1 More about Drawings and Detailing Special Topics Sheet Metal Part 15-1 Mold Design 16-1 3D Sketching 17-1 Importing Files / Using FeatureWorks Software 18-1 Learning to Use PhotoWorks 19-1 More about SolidWorks Functionalityiv SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started
  5. 5. Mastering the BasicsSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started
  6. 6. 1 Installation What is SolidWorks 2000? SolidWorks® 2000 is mechanical design automation software that takes advantage of the familiar Microsoft® Windows® graphical user interface. This easy-to-learn tool makes it possible for mechanical designers to quickly sketch out ideas, experiment with features and dimensions, and produce models and detailed drawings. This Getting Started book discusses some basic concepts and terminology used throughout the SolidWorks 2000 application. It provides exercises to familiarize you with creating parts, drawings and assemblies, and introduces some of the most commonly used features of the SolidWorks 2000 mechanical design automation system. This chapter provides an overview of the following topics: q System requirements for installing and using SolidWorks 2000 software q Installing the SolidWorks 2000 software q SolidWorks 2000 service packs q The SolidWorks Web siteSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 1-1
  7. 7. Mastering the BasicsPreparing to Install the SolidWorks 2000 SoftwareSystem Requirements For the most recent information about system requirements, refer to the SolidWorks 2000 Release Notes. q Microsoft Windows NT® 4.0 (with Service Pack 5 or later), Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows 2000. q Pentium®-based computer q 64 MB RAM minimum; more memory improves performance q 250 MB of hard-disk space available for installation q Mouse or other compatible pointing device q CD-ROM drive q Microsoft Excel version available with Microsoft Office 97 Service Release 2 (SR-2) or Microsoft Office 2000 is required to use Design Table or Bill of Materials features in Solidworks q Internet Explorer version 4.0, or later, is necessary if you plan to open SolidWorks files with Microsoft Internet Explorer. q Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 is necessary for the computer that you use as the SolidNetWork License server, if you purchased the SolidNetWork License utility. It does not run under Windows 9x. Also, all license servers require a GLOBEtrotter® FLEXlm® hardware key (dongle). SolidNetWork License installation instructions are provided in a separate document.Required Information for Installation Before you install SolidWorks 2000, if you made changes to palette items, drawing templates, or PhotoWorksTM materials in a previous release of the SolidWorks software, you should save backup copies of these files. Put the backup files in a folder where they cannot be lost or overwritten during the installation. The SolidWorks 2000 Setup Wizard on the CD-ROM guides you through the installation procedure and asks for the following information: q SolidWorks Serial Number. For new SolidWorks customers or non-subscription customers, the serial number is located on the back of the SolidWorks CD-ROM case. Subscription customers should continue to use the serial number on the CD-ROM case from their first SolidWorks installation. q SolidWorks Registration Code: • If you are a SolidWorks subscription customer, the registration wizard provides a registration code during the SolidWorks 2000 installation.1-2
  8. 8. Chapter 1 Installation • If you are a new SolidWorks customer, you are asked to use the registration wizard during installation. This generates a registration form that you can email or fax to SolidWorks Corporation. A registration code is provided quickly by return email or fax. You have up to 30 days to use the product without the registration code. • If you are a continuing, non-subscription customer, you must have a registration code to update to the SolidWorks 2000 software. q Serial numbers for add-in software. If you purchased one or more of the software add-ins available with the SolidWorks application, a serial number for each purchased add-in is located on the back of the CD-ROM case. q Enable or disable MCD. This option applies only to Windows NT 4.0. You should enable MCD (Mini-Client Driver) if you are using a graphics card that has Mini-Client Driver support so that SolidWorks can take advantage of the card’s ability to accelerate 3D OpenGL. q Allow or disallow model changes from drawing. This option makes it possible for a user to disallow the ability to make changes to part or assembly dimensions from the drawing. (You must reinstall the SolidWorks software to change this option.) The default, and most common configuration, is to allow the part and assembly dimensions to be changed from the drawing.Installation Procedures The kinds of installations are, individual, client, server and client, and server only. The installation steps for an individual user or a server are the same, though some of the questions asked during the installation are different. q Individual installation - This installation is for a computer that will run the SolidWorks 2000 application from its own hard drive and will not share its executable files with any other computer, whether it is on a network or not. • To do an individual installation, insert the SolidWorks 2000 CD-ROM in the computer’s CD drive and respond to the directions from the install wizard. • A serial number and registration code are required. q Server only installation - This installation is for a computer that will not run the SolidWorks 2000 application, but will only act as a server, sharing its SolidWorks installation with one or more SolidWorks client computers. (You must reinstall if you want to change this selection.) With this option, the server does not need to be licensed to run the SolidWorks application, but each client must have a license. This installation should be performed by a network administrator or someone who has experience working with the network server. NOTE: The server and clients must be of the same platform type. There is no cross-platform installation. Before starting a SolidWorks server update installation, it is important to ensure that no SolidWorks clients are running.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 1-3
  9. 9. Mastering the Basics • Insert the SolidWorks 2000 CD-ROM in the computer’s CD drive and respond to the directions from the install wizard. • No serial number or registration code is required for a computer that is used exclusively as a server. • After installation, make sure that the folder containing the SolidWorks installation is shared and accessible to the client computers on the network. q Server and Client Installation - This installation is for a computer that will run the SolidWorks 2000 application, and will also act as a server, sharing its SolidWorks installation with one or more SolidWorks client computers. • To do a server and client installation, insert the SolidWorks 2000 CD-ROM in the computer’s CD drive and respond to the directions from the install wizard. • A serial number and registration code are required. • After installation, make sure that the folder containing the SolidWorks installation is shared and accessible to the client computers on the network. q Client installation - The client computer runs the SolidWorks software from a server. No executable files are installed on the client computer, but it is necessary to perform a SolidWorks client installation to prepare the client computer for sharing the application. To perform a SolidWorks client installation: 1 Make certain that the server installation is complete on the computer from which the clients will run the SolidWorks application. Make make sure that the folder containing the SolidWorks installation is shared and accessible to the client computers on the network. 2 Working on the SolidWorks client computer, browse to the folder under the SolidWorks installation directory on the server called: On Alpha Windows NT: setupalpha (As previously announced, SolidWorks will discontinue the Alpha computer as a supported platform during the year 2000.) On Intel Windows NT, Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows 2000: setupi386 3 Double-click setup.exe. 4 The install wizard guides you through the few steps needed to complete the client installation. NOTE: After installation, to learn about the new functionality in SolidWorks 2000, click or Help, SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide on the main toolbar.1-4
  10. 10. Chapter 1 InstallationSolidWorks 2000 Service Packs If you are a SolidWorks subscription customer, you can take advantage of SolidWorks service packs that are regularly posted on the SolidWorks Web site. These service packs contain software updates and enhancements to the SolidWorks 2000 software. To check for a new service pack: 1 Click Help, Service Packs. The Service Packs dialog box appears. 2 Click Check. The software checks the SolidWorks Web site to see if you have the latest service pack installed. 3 To have the software automatically check the SolidWorks Web site once a week for a new service pack, click the Check for a new service pack once a week check box. 4 Click OK to close the Service Packs dialog box.Visiting the SolidWorks Web Site If your computer has access to the Internet, you can visit the SolidWorks Web site after you complete the installation. You can learn more about the SolidWorks company and products by clicking in the Help menu on the main SolidWorks window. To access the SolidWorks Web site: 1 Click Help, About SolidWorks 2000. 2 Click Connect to visit the SolidWorks Web site. Some of the available topics are: • News and Events • Technical Support • VARs and Distributors • The SolidWorks Design GallerySolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 1-5
  11. 11. 2 Basic Functionality SolidWorks 2000 is supported under the Microsoft Windows graphical user interface. SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started assumes that you have used Windows before and know basic Windows skills, such as how to run programs, resize windows, and so on. Before you begin the examples in SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started, you should read Chapter 2, to familiarize yourself with some of the fundamentals, including: q SolidWorks 2000 design concepts q SolidWorks 2000 terms q SolidWorks 2000 application access q Window features, such as toolbars, menus, and views q The FeatureManager® design tree q Options dialog boxSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-1
  12. 12. Mastering the BasicsDesigning with SolidWorks 2000 As you do the examples in this guide, you will discover that the methods you use to design parts and assemblies, and to create drawings, represent a unique approach to the design process. q With SolidWorks 2000, you create 3D parts, not just 2D drawings. You can use these 3D parts to create 2D drawings and 3D assemblies. CAD: 2D drawings, made up of individual lines SolidWorks 2000: 3D parts q SolidWorks 2000 is a dimension-driven system. You can specify dimensions and geometric relationships between elements. Changing dimensions changes the size and shape of the part, while preserving your design intent. For example, in this part, the boss is always half as high as the base.2-2
  13. 13. Chapter 2 Basic Functionality q A SolidWorks 3D model consists of parts, assemblies, and drawings. Parts, assemblies, and drawings display the same model in different documents. Any changes you make to the model in one document are propagated to the other documents containing the model. DrawingsParts Assembly q You build parts from features. Features are the shapes (bosses, cuts, holes) and operations (fillets, chamfers, shells, and so on) that you combine to build parts. Base Boss feature Cut Fillet q You build most features from sketches. A sketch is a 2D profile or cross section. Sketches can be extruded, revolved, lofted, or swept along a path to create features. Sketch Sketch extruded 10mmSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-3
  14. 14. Mastering the BasicsSolidWorks Terms SolidWorks document windows have two panels: A FeatureManager design tree, which lists the structure of Graphics Model the part, assembly, area or drawing. For more information about the FeatureManager design tree, see page 2-15. A graphics area, where you create FeatureManager and manipulate the design tree part, assembly, or drawing. This section illustrates some common SolidWorks terms.Menu barToolbars Toolbars Drawing Part document document window window Status bar2-4
  15. 15. Chapter 2 Basic Functionality Vertex Edge Origin Axis Plane Face Drawing views FeatureManager Drawing sheet design tree Sheet tabsSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-5
  16. 16. Mastering the BasicsDocument Windows In the SolidWorks application, each part, assembly, and drawing is referred to as a document, and each document is displayed in a separate window. (Each drawing document can contain multiple drawing sheets, though.)Tile Documents You can have multiple part, assembly, and drawing document windows open at the same time. Also, you can have multiple views of the same document visible at the same time. To arrange the windows, you can drag them by the title bar, and resize them by dragging a corner or border. Also, from the Window menu, you can select Cascade, Tile Vertically, or Tile Horizontally. Part Sub-assembly Assembly2-6
  17. 17. Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityIconize Documents To organize your SolidWorks window, you can iconize open documents. Click the Iconize symbol in the upper right corner of the document border. An icon appears in the lower part of the SolidWorks window. If the icon is not visible, it may be behind another open document. Resize any open documents as necessary. Click Window, Arrange Icons to arrange them at the bottom of the SolidWorks window. Document icons Click Window, Close All to close all open documents. You are prompted to Save unsaved documents.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-7
  18. 18. Mastering the BasicsMultiple Views You can open additional views of the same document. Selecting an item in one view selects it in all views. For example, when creating a fillet you could select edges on the front of the model in one view and edges on the back in another view. q Click Window, New Window to open another view in a new window. q Drag the horizontal or vertical Split controls to split the window into two or four panes. You can zoom, rotate, and set the view mode for each of these views independently. Vertical Window size control Horizontal Split control Split control Click in the view, then set the view options.2-8
  19. 19. Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityStarting SolidWorks 2000 1 Click the Start button on the Windows taskbar. 2 Click Programs. 3 Click SolidWorks 2000. 4 Click SolidWorks 2000 again. Notice these important features of the SolidWorks window. Menu bar Standard Views toolbar Standard toolbar View toolbar Sketch toolbar Features toolbar Sketch Relations toolbar Sketch Tools Toolbar Status bar The toolbars may be arranged differently on your screen. You can rearrange the toolbars to suit your preferences. You can dock them at the edges of the graphics area, or you can pull them into the graphics area and allow them to float. In this window, you can do the following: q Click File to open a new or existing part, assembly, or drawing. q Click View, Toolbars, or press the right mouse button (called right-click) in the toolbar region, to select which toolbars to display. The View menu also lets you hide or display the status bar. q Click Tools to access the Features Palette, record a macro, select add-ins such as PhotoWorks™, or set SolidWorks options. q Click the Maximize icon in the upper-right corner to expand the window to full-screen size. NOTE: If a dialog box appears reminding you to register your copy of SolidWorks 2000, click OK.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-9
  20. 20. Mastering the BasicsOpening a SolidWorks Part, Assembly, or Drawing This section describes opening new or existing part, drawing, or assembly documents from within the application, or by using Windows Explorer.New SolidWorks Documents When you open a new part, drawing, or assembly, the New SolidWorks Document dialog box appears. The dialog box includes a preview area, and the General tab from which you can open a document template for a part, drawing, or assembly. When you open a drawing document, the Sheet Format to use dialog box appears. Use the Standard Sheet Format, to select formats based on standard paper sizes and orientation. Or you can select Custom Sheet Format that you create or No Sheet Format.Creating the Getting Started Tab Three templates (for parts, drawings, and assemblies), were created for the exercises in the SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started book. Templates are files that include pre-defined document parameters, such as units set to millimeters. Templates can be blank documents (such as the ones you will use in the SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started exercises), or pre- built parts, drawings, and assemblies. You need to create a folder and retrieve the three templates. Creating a folder adds a tab to the New SolidWorks Document dialog box. You can create new folders (as well as templates), at any time using this process. You can create as many tabs and templates as you need. For more information on creating tabs and templates, see the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. To create a new tab: 1 In the Microsoft Windows Explorer, create a folder called Getting Started under installation directoryLangEnglish. 2 In installation directoryLangEnglish, copy the three files assem.asmdot, draw.drwdot, and part.prtdot, into the Getting Started Folder. 3 In the SolidWorks 2000 application, click Tools, Options, and select File Locations. 4 In the Show folders for list, select Document Templates. 5 Click Add and browse, using the Choose Directory dialog box, to find the location of the Getting Started folder you created in step 1. 6 Click OK. The Getting Started tab appears in the New SolidWorks Document dialog box. NOTE: You can create folders for your templates in any location. This includes hard drives, floppy drives, or network drives. File Locations designates the path.2-10
  21. 21. Chapter 2 Basic Functionality To open a new part, drawing, or assembly document: 1 In the SolidWorks window, click New on the Standard toolbar, or click File, New. 2 From the New SolidWorks Document dialog box, use the General tab, or select another tab. For the exercises in SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started, use the Getting Started you just created. 3 Click on the icon to see a preview, and click OK, or double-click to open a blank part, drawing, or assembly without seeing the preview. The view configurations allow you to: q Select to display items by using large icons as in Windows Explorer. q Select to display items by using small icons as in Windows Explorer. q Select to display information about each item in the window as in Windows Explorer, including columns for file size and date modified.Existing SolidWorks Documents To preview and open an existing part, drawing, or assembly document: 1 In a SolidWorks window, click Open or File, Open. Use the browser to select the part, drawing, or assembly. 2 Select Open as read-only if you want the document to be opened in read-only mode. This allows other users to have write access to the part at the same time. 3 Select Configure to open the model or document in a specified configuration. For more information, see “Assemblies, Configurations” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. 4 Select the Preview check box to see a preview of the part. 5 Click View-Only to open the document for viewing. (Only documents saved in SolidWorks 98 or later may be opened in View-Only mode.) If you are in a part or assembly document, you can change to editing mode by right-clicking in the graphics area and selecting Edit.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-11
  22. 22. Mastering the Basics 6 If you are opening an assembly or drawing document, you can change the path from which referenced parts are taken by clicking References. In the dialog box that appears, select and type the New pathname, and click Replace. For more information, see “SolidWorks Fundamentals, Customizing SolidWorks” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. 7 Click Open to open the document. Multi-Threaded Retrieval Documents saved in SolidWorks 98 or later are retrieved in multi-threaded mode. When you retrieve a large part, drawing, or assembly document, the document immediately appears in a view-only state while the actual document and all its components are being retrieved in the background. During the view-only state, you can use all functions supported in the SolidWorks Viewer (Zooming, Rotation, and so on), but you cannot switch to another document or start opening another document. After the retrieval is completed, SolidWorks changes to the normal edit state.Existing Parts from Windows Explorer You can preview and open a part, drawing, or assembly document directly from the Microsoft Windows Explorer. To view a part, drawing, or assembly without opening the document: Right-click the name of the part, drawing, or assembly in Windows Explorer, and select Quick View. Quick View displays the part in a SolidWorks Viewer window. You can also view thumbnail images of SolidWorks parts and assemblies in Windows Explorer as well as in the File, Open and File, Save As dialog boxes. The graphic is based on the view orientation of the model when the document was saved. To enable this functionality, click Tools, Options. Under System Options - System General, select the option Show thumbnail graphics in Windows Explorer. For more information, see “SolidWorks Fundamentals, Customizing SolidWorks” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide.2-12
  23. 23. Chapter 2 Basic Functionality To open a part, a drawing, or assembly from Windows Explorer, do one of the following: q Double-click the name of the part, drawing, or assembly document in Windows Explorer. q Right-click the name of the part, drawing, or assembly document in Windows Explorer and select Open from the shortcut menu. q Drag and drop any SolidWorks document from Windows Explorer into an empty area of the SolidWorks window, not occupied by another document window. Dragging and Dropping Files q Drag and drop a part or assembly from Windows Explorer to an open SolidWorks assembly window to add an instance of the part or sub-assembly to the assembly. q Drag and drop a part or assembly from Windows Explorer to an open and empty SolidWorks drawing document to create a Standard 3 View. q Drag and drop SolidWorks part files from Internet Explorer, version 4.0 or later, to: • the Feature Palette window • a new, empty part document • a drawing or assembly document • an empty area of a SolidWorks windowSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-13
  24. 24. Mastering the BasicsToolbars The toolbar buttons are shortcuts for frequently used commands. Most of the available toolbars are displayed in this illustration of the SolidWorks initial screen, but your SolidWorks window probably will not be arranged this way. You can customize your toolbar display in a way that is convenient for you. Some toolbars are always displayed; other toolbars display automatically when you open a document of the related type. For example, when you open an assembly document, the assembly toolbar appears. To display or hide individual toolbars: Click View, Toolbars, or right-click the SolidWorks window frame. A list of all the toolbars is displayed. The toolbars with a check mark beside them are visible; the toolbars without a check mark are hidden. Click the toolbar name to turn its display on or off. NOTE: For more information about customizing toolbars, see “More about Basic Functionality” at the end of “Mastering the Basics” section.2-14
  25. 25. Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityThe FeatureManager Design Tree The FeatureManager design tree makes it easy to: FeatureManager design tree • Select items in the model by name. • Adjust the kind and amount of lighting that illuminates a shaded part or assembly. For more information, see Rollback bar “Parts, Color and Lighting” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. Graphics area • Select a plane to sketch on. • Suppress or hide selected features. • Temporarily roll the model or assembly back to an earlier state using the rollback bar. For more information, see “Parts” and “Assemblies, Working with Parts within an Assembly” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. • Do a text search of the FeatureManager design tree for an item. Right-click the name of the part or assembly at the top of the tree and select Go To from the shortcut menu. Type the name of the item (or a part of the name) in the box and click the Find Next button. The name scrolls into view. • Find an item in the FeatureManager design tree by right-clicking it in the graphics area and selecting Go To Feature (in Tree). • Identify and change the order in which features are rebuilt. • Display the dimensions of a feature by double-clicking the feature’s name. • Rename features by slowly double-clicking the name and then typing a new name (a standard Windows behavior). You can also right-click a name, select Properties, and type a new name in the Name box. NOTE: Feature names are not case sensitive: “Boss1” and “boss1” are the same. Feature names may not contain the @ character. • Add a new equation, edit, or delete an equation by right-clicking the Equations folder , and selecting the action you want. For more information, see “Parts, Equations” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. • Switch between the features list and the list of named configurations using the tabs at the bottom of the FeatureManager design tree. The tabs also have tool tips. • Control the display of dimensions and annotations by right-clicking the Annotations folder and selecting the options. For more information, see “Parts, Annotations in Parts” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-15
  26. 26. Mastering the BasicsSymbols and Conventions The FeatureManager design tree gives you information about any parts or features with external references. An external reference is a dependency on geometry that exists in another document. For more information, see “Derived Parts” and “Assemblies, Working with Parts within an Assembly” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. q If a part contains any features with external references (one document dependent on another for its solution), the part name at the top of the tree list is followed by –>. The name of any feature with external references is also followed by –>. q If an external reference cannot be found, the feature name and the part name are followed by ->?. The FeatureManager design tree uses the following conventions: q A symbol to the left of an item’s icon indicates that it contains associated items, such as sketches. Click the to expand the item and display its contents. q Sketches in the FeatureManager design tree are preceded by one of the following symbols, unless they are fully defined (no symbol). • A (+) if they are over defined • A (–) if they are under defined • A (?) if the sketch could not be solved For more information about over defined and under defined sketches, see Adding Dimensions on page 3-5 and “Sketching with SolidWorks” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. q Assembly components in the FeatureManager design tree are preceded by one of the following symbols, unless their position is fully defined (no symbol). • A (+) if their position is over defined • A (–) if their position is under defined • A (?) if their position could not be solved • An (f) if their position is fixed (locked in place) q Assembly mates are preceded by: • A (+) if they are involved in over defining the position of components in the assembly • A (?) if they could not be solved q In an assembly, some components may be used more than once. For that reason, each component is followed by a number in angle brackets <n> that increments with each instance of that component.2-16
  27. 27. Chapter 2 Basic Functionality The tabs at the bottom of the FeatureManager design tree indicate the current FeatureManager function: A part or a sketch document is open for editing and or viewing. For more information, see “Sketching with SolidWorks,” and “Features” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. An assembly is open for editing, adding components, creating configurations, and viewing. For more information, see the Assembly Basics chapter and “Assemblies” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. The PropertyManager functionality is in use. For more information, see “Sketching with SolidWorks” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. The ConfigurationManager tab is in use, where you create, select, and view the configurations of a part or assembly. For more information, see Viewing the Configurations on page 6-7 and “Assemblies, Configurations” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. A drawing document is open for viewing or editing. For more information, see “Drawings” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide.FeatureManager Design Tree Options Select options for the FeatureManager design tree by clicking Tools, Options, and selecting the System Options tab, under Feature Manager. Select from the following options: • Scroll selected item into view. Scrolls to display the text that is related to the selected items in the graphics area. • Name feature on creation. When you create a new feature, the feature’s name is selected and ready for you to type a new name. • Arrow key navigation. Lets you use the arrow keys to traverse the FeatureManager design tree, and expand or collapse the design tree and its contents. • Dynamic highlight. The geometry in the graphics area (edges, faces, planes, axes, and so on) highlights when the pointer passes over the item in the FeatureManager design tree. For more information, see “FeatureManager design tree” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-17
  28. 28. Mastering the BasicsRebuild Symbol If you make changes to a sketch or part that require the rebuild of the part, a rebuild icon is displayed beside the part’s name as well as beside the feature that requires the rebuild. Look for the rebuild icon on the Status Bar, also. The rebuild symbol also appears when you edit a sketch. When you exit the sketch, the part rebuilds automatically.Shortcut Menus Whether you are working with a sketch, a model, an assembly, or a drawing, you have access to a wide variety of tools and commands from the shortcut menu accessed by pressing the right-mouse button. This gives you an efficient way to do your work without continually moving the pointer to the main menus or the toolbar buttons. As you move the pointer over geometry in the model or over items in the FeatureManager design tree, right-clicking pops up a shortcut menu of commands that are appropriate for whatever you clicked on. For example, with the shortcut menu, you can: • Select a sketch tool • Open and close sketches • Change or view the properties of an item • Give a new name to a feature or dimension using the Properties dialog • Hide or Show a sketch, plane, axis, or assembly component • Open an assembly component for editing • Access the dimension tools and an annotations menu when in a drawing • Find an item in the FeatureManager design tree by right-clicking it in the graphics area and selecting Go To Feature (in Tree).2-18
  29. 29. Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityOptions Dialog Box The SolidWorks 2000 application lets you customize functionality to suit your needs. Click Tools, Options to display the Options dialog box. The dialog box includes: q The System Options tab that displays an item tree with topics for all documents on the left pane, and user-selectable options for each topic on the right pane. q The Document Properties tab that displays an item tree with document-related topics on the left pane, and user-selectable options for each topic on the right pane. NOTE: The Document Properties tab is available only when you have a document open. For more information, see “SolidWorks Fundamentals, Customizing SolidWorks” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. The following table describes a few ways in which you can customize the SolidWorks 2000 application: System Options System Includes the following: • General system settings • Backup parameters • FeatureManager design tree settings • View rotation options Drawings Includes the following: • General drawing settings • Default Edge and tangent displays Colors Select color display for such entities as text, sketch definitions, annotations, and so on. Sketch Select sketch parameters such as toggle the display of arc centerpoints or entity points. Edge Display/Selection Select how you want hidden edges or tangent edges to display in parts and assemblies. Performance Select performance-related parameters such as verification on rebuild or transparency quality. External References Select how to handle external references, such as opening referenced documents with read-only access or defining a search folder for referenced documents. Default templates Path for default sheet formats for parts, drawings, and assemblies. File Locations Select where you want to set file locations for such items as documents, palette features, or sheet formats. Spin Box Increments Set length and angle increments for dimension spin boxes.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-19
  30. 30. Mastering the Basics Document Properties Detailing Includes the following: • General detailing settings and dimensions • Dimension parameters • Notes • Balloons • Arrows • Virtual sharps • Annotation display options. Grid Snap Select display grid parameters as well as snap options. Units Select units, including linear (for example, millimeters, inches, and so on), as well angular units (for example, degrees, radians, and so on. Colors Select colors for models and features. Material Properties Select the density and crosshatch patterns, as well as the scale and angle of the pattern. Line Font Select the style (solid, dashed, phantom, and so on) as well as the thickness for any type of edge (for example, visible edges, hidden edges, construction curves, and so on.). Settings here affect only the edges in drawing documents. Image Quality Select the image quality for both shaded and wireframe models.2-20
  31. 31. Chapter 2 Basic FunctionalityGetting Help If you have questions while you are using the SolidWorks software, you can find answers in several ways: q For Online help, click or Help, SolidWorks 2000 Help Topics in the menu bar. The online help also includes a special section about New Functionality in SolidWorks 2000, a summary of the enhancements in SolidWorks 2000. q For helpful hints, click Help, Tip of the Day. To see a tip each time you start SolidWorks 2000, click Show Tips at Startup in the Tip of the Day dialog box. q For Dialog box help that describes the active dialog box, and provides access to the full online help system, click the Help button in the dialog box or press the F1 key. q For Tooltips that identify buttons on a toolbar, point at the button, and a moment later, the tooltip pops up. q As you point at toolbar buttons or click menu items, the Status Bar at the bottom of the SolidWorks window provides a brief description of the function. q The SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide provides detailed information about using, and getting the most out of the SolidWorks software. For more information and the latest news about the SolidWorks software and company, visit the SolidWorks web site, http://www.solidworks.com, or click Help, About SolidWorks 2000, Connect.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 2-21
  32. 32. 3 The 40-Minute Running Start This chapter guides you through the creation of your first SolidWorks model. You create this simple part: This chapter includes: q Creating a base feature q Adding a boss feature q Adding a cut feature q Modifying features (adding fillets, changing dimensions) q Displaying a section view of a part q Displaying multiple views of a part You should be able to complete this chapter in about 40 minutes. NOTE: Some of the illustrations in this book have been modified for clarity. For that reason, what you see on your screen may look different from the illustrations.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-1
  33. 33. Mastering the BasicsCreate a New Part Document 1 To create a new part, click New on the Standard toolbar, or click File, New. The New SolidWorks Document dialog box appears. 2 Click the Getting Started tab and select the Part icon. If you do not see the Getting Started tab, refer to Creating the Getting Started Tab on page 2-10. TIP: The icons on the Getting Started tab represent document templates that are specially prepared for working with the sample parts, assemblies, and drawings in the Getting Started book. To set other options to use when you are doing your own work, click Tools, Options and select from a variety of system settings and user preferences. See the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. 3 Click OK. A new part window appears.Open a Sketch 1 To open a 2D sketch, click the Sketch button on the Sketch toolbar, or click Insert, Sketch on the menu bar. This opens a sketch on Plane1 (one of the three default planes listed in the FeatureManager design tree). 2 Notice that: • A sketch origin appears in the center of the graphics area. • The Sketch Tools and Sketch Relations toolbars are displayed. • “Editing Sketch” appears in the status bar at the bottom of the screen. • Sketch1 appears in the FeatureManager design tree. • The status bar shows the position of the pointer, or sketch tool, in relation to the sketch origin.3-2
  34. 34. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running Start . Sketch toolbarMenu bar FeatureManager design tree Sketch Relations toolbar Sketch origin Sketch Graphics area Tools toolbar Pointer Status bar TIPS: If you prefer to work with the sketch grid turned on, click Tools, Options. On the Document Properties tab, select Grid/Snap and click the Display grid check box. If you prefer to work with snap behavior turned on, click Tools, Options. On the Document Properties tab, select Grid/Snap and select from the Snap options.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-3
  35. 35. Mastering the BasicsSketching the Rectangle The first feature in the part is a box extruded from a sketched rectangular profile. You begin by sketching the rectangle. 1 Click Rectangle on the Sketch Tools toolbar, or click Tools, Sketch Entity, Rectangle. 2 Move the pointer to the sketch origin, and hold down the left mouse button. Drag the pointer to create a rectangle. Release the mouse button to complete the rectangle. As you drag, notice that the pointer displays the dimensions of the rectangle. 3 Click the Select button on the Sketch toolbar, or right-click in the graphics area and click Select on the shortcut menu. Notice that the two sides of the rectangle that touch the origin are black. Because you began sketching at the origin, the vertex of these two sides is automatically related to the origin. (The vertex is not free to move.) The other two sides (and three vertices) are blue. This indicates that they are free to move. 4 Click one of the blue sides, and drag the side or the drag handle at the vertex to resize the rectangle.3-4
  36. 36. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartAdding Dimensions In this section you specify the size of the sketched rectangle by adding dimensions. The SolidWorks software does not require that you dimension sketches before you use them to create features. However, for this example, you should add dimensions now to fully define the sketch. As you add dimensions, note the state of the sketch displayed in the status bar. Any SolidWorks sketch is in one of three states–each state is indicated by a different color: q In a fully defined sketch, the positions of all the entities are fully described by dimensions or relations, or both. In a fully defined sketch, all the entities are black. q In an under defined sketch, additional dimensions or relations are needed to completely specify the geometry. In this state, you can drag under defined sketch entities to modify the sketch. An under defined sketch entity is blue. q In an over defined sketch, an object has conflicting dimensions or relations, or both. An over defined sketch entity is red. 1 Click Dimension on the Sketch Relations toolbar, or click Tools, Dimensions, Parallel. The pointer shape changes to . 2 Click the top edge of the rectangle, then click where you want to place the dimension. Notice that the vertical line at the right (and the lower-right vertex) changed from blue to black. By dimensioning the length of the top of the rectangle, you defined the position of the rightmost segment. You can still drag the top segment up and down. Its blue color indicates that it is not fully defined; therefore, it can move. 3 Click the right edge of the rectangle, then click to place its dimension. Now the top segment and the remaining vertices turn black. The status bar in the lower-right corner of the window indicates that the sketch is fully defined.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-5
  37. 37. Mastering the BasicsChanging the Dimension Values The dimensions for the block are 120mm x 120mm. To change the dimensions, you use the Select tool. 1 Use one of these methods to access the Select tool: • Click the Select button on the Sketch toolbar. • Click Tools, Select on the menu bar. • Press Esc. • Right-click in the graphics area to display the shortcut menu, then click Select. TIP: Taking advantage of the shortcut menus helps you work more efficiently. 2 Double-click one of the dimensions. The Modify dialog box appears. 3 To change the dimension to 120mm, type a new value or click the arrows, then click or press Enter. 4 Double-click the other dimension and change its value to 120mm. 5 To display the entire rectangle at full size and to center it in the graphics area, use one of the following methods: • Click Zoom to Fit on the View toolbar. • Click View, Modify, Zoom to Fit. • Press the f key. You can edit dimension values as you create them by enabling the Input dimension value option. Each time you add a new dimension, the Modify dialog box is displayed immediately, ready for you to enter the value. 1 Click Tools, Options. 2 On the System Options tab, under System, click General. 3 Select the Input dimension value check box. 4 Click OK.3-6
  38. 38. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartExtruding the Base Feature The first feature in any part is called the base feature. You create this feature by extruding the sketched rectangle. 1 Click Extruded Boss/Base on the Features toolbar, or click Insert, Base, Extrude. The Extrude Feature dialog box appears, and the view of the sketch changes to isometric. 2 Specify the type and depth of the extrusion: Sketch • Make sure that Type is set to Blind. • Set Depth to 30mm. Either use the arrows to increment the value, or enter the value. When you click the arrows, a preview of the result is displayed in the graphics area. 3 To see how the model would look if you extruded the sketch in the opposite direction, select the Reverse Direction check box. Then click to clear the Reverse Direction check box to extrude the sketch as shown. Preview of the extrusion 4 Make sure that Extrude as is set to Solid Feature. 5 Click OK to create the extrusion. Notice the new feature, Base-Extrude, in the FeatureManager design tree. 6 Click the plus sign beside Base-Extrude in the FeatureManager design tree. Notice that Sketch1, which you used to extrude the feature, is now listed under the feature. Click hereSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-7
  39. 39. Mastering the BasicsChanging View Mode and Display Mode To magnify a model in the graphics area, you can use the zoom tools on the View toolbar. Click Zoom to Fit to display the part full size in the current window. Click Zoom to Area, then drag the pointer to create a rectangle. The area in the rectangle zooms to fill the window. Click Zoom In/Out, then drag the pointer. Dragging up zooms in; dragging down zooms out. Click a vertex, an edge, or a feature, then click Zoom to Selection. The selected item zooms to fill the window. Here are some other ways to zoom: • Select a zoom mode from the View, Modify menu. • Right-click a blank area, and select a zoom mode; right-click on the model, select View, then choose a mode. • To zoom in steps, press the z key to zoom out or the Z key to zoom in. To display the part in different modes, click the buttons in the View toolbar. You can also change the display mode by selecting from the View, Display menu. Wireframe Hidden In Gray Hidden Lines Shaded Removed The default display mode for parts and assemblies is Shaded. You may change the display mode whenever you want.3-8
  40. 40. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartSelecting from the Graphics Area Most commands require you to make selections. For example, to create a fillet, you have to select the model edges or faces you want to fillet. q Selecting. Click the Select button, then click the item you want to select. Notice that items change color as the pointer passes over them. This dynamic highlighting helps you locate the item to select. NOTE: For information about turning dynamic highlighting off or on, see “SolidWorks Fundamentals, Customizing SolidWorks, Edges” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. q Using the Selection Filter. The Selection Filter allows you to more easily select the item you want in the graphics area by selecting the type of entity that you want from the Selection Filter toolbar. For more information, see Using the Selection Filter on page 4-2 or “Selection Filter” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-9
  41. 41. Mastering the BasicsSketching a Boss To create additional features on the part (such as bosses or cuts), you sketch on the model faces or planes, then extrude the sketches. NOTE: You sketch on one face or plane at a time, then create a feature based on one or more sketches. • To open a new sketch, click a plane or face on which to sketch, then click the Sketch tool . • To close a sketch, click the Sketch tool again, or select Exit Sketch from the shortcut menu. • To edit a sketch you worked on previously, right-click the feature created from the sketch, or the sketch name, in the FeatureManager design tree, then select Edit Sketch from the shortcut menu. 1 Click Hidden Lines Removed on the View toolbar, or click View, Display, Hidden Lines Removed. 2 Click Select on the Sketch toolbar, if it is not already selected. 3 Click the front face of the part to select it. The edges of the face become dotted lines to show that it is selected. TIP: The pointer changes to to show that you are selecting the face. 4 Click Sketch on the Sketch toolbar. – or – Right-click anywhere in the graphics area and select Insert Sketch. 5 Click Circle on the Sketch Tools toolbar, or click Tools, Sketch Entity, Circle. 6 Click near the center of the face and drag to sketch a circle.3-10
  42. 42. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartDimensioning and Extruding the Boss To establish the location and size of the circle, add the necessary dimensions. 1 Click Dimension on the Sketch Relations toolbar, or right-click anywhere in the graphics area and select Dimension from the shortcut menu. 2 Click the top edge of the face, click the circle, then click a location for the dimension. Notice the dimension preview as you click each entity. The preview shows you where the witness lines are attached, and helps you see that you have selected the correct entities for the dimension. When you add a locating dimension to a circle, the witness line is attached to the centerpoint by default. 3 Set the dimension value to 60mm. If you enabled the Input dimension value option (see page 3-6), the Modify dialog box appears, and you can enter the new value now. Otherwise, double-click the dimension, then enter the new value in the Modify dialog box. 4 Repeat the process to dimension the circle to the side edge of the face. Set this value to 60mm also. 5 Still using the Dimension tool , click the circle to dimension its diameter. Move the pointer around to see the preview for the dimension. When the dimension is aligned horizontally or vertically, it appears as a linear dimension; if it is at an angle, it appears as a diameter dimension. 6 Click a location for the diameter dimension. Set the diameter to 70mm. Now the circle turns black, and the status bar indicates that the sketch is fully defined. 7 Click Extruded Boss/Base on the Features toolbar, or click Insert, Boss, Extrude. 8 In the Extrude Feature dialog box, set the Depth of the extrusion to 25mm, leave the other items at the defaults, and click OK to extrude the boss feature. Notice that Boss-Extrude1 appears in the FeatureManager design tree.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-11
  43. 43. Mastering the BasicsChanging View Orientation You can use the buttons on the Standard Views toolbar to set the view orientation of the sketch, part, or assembly. Front Top Back Bottom Left Isometric Right Normal To (the selected plane or planar face) The default planes of the part correspond to the standard views as follows: • Plane1 - Front or Back • Plane2 - Top or Bottom • Plane3 - Right or LeftCreating the Cut Next, create a cut concentric with the boss. 1 Click the front face of the circular boss to select it. 2 Click Normal To on the Standard Views toolbar. The part is turned so that the selected model face is now facing you. 3 Open a new sketch. 4 Sketch a circle near the center of the boss as shown. 5 Click Dimension , and dimension the diameter of the circle to 50mm.3-12
  44. 44. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running Start 6 On the Sketch Relations toolbar, click Add Relation , or click Tools, Relations, Add on the menu bar. The Add Geometric Relations dialog box appears. 7 Select the sketched circle (the inner circle) and the edge of the boss (the outer circle). Notice the contents of the Selected Entities box. Only those relations that are appropriate for the selected entities are available. The most likely relation is automatically selected. 8 Make sure that Concentric is selected, click Apply, and click Close. 9 Click Extruded Cut on the Features toolbar, or click Insert, Cut, Extrude. 10 In the Extrude Cut Feature dialog box, select Through All in the Type list, and click OK.Saving the Part 1 Click Save on the Standard toolbar, or click File, Save. The Save As dialog box appears. 2 Type Tutor1 and click Save. The extension .sldprt is added to the filename, and the file is saved to the current directory. To save the file to a different directory, use the Windows browse button to browse to that directory, then save the file. NOTE: File names are not case sensitive. That is, files named TUTOR1.sldprt, Tutor1.sldprt, and tutor1.sldprt are all the same part.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-13
  45. 45. Mastering the BasicsRotating and Moving the Part To view the model from different angles, and to more easily select faces, edges, and so on, you can rotate and move the model in the graphics area. To rotate the part, use one of the following methods: • To rotate the part in steps, use the arrow keys. • To rotate the part in 90° increments, hold down the Shift key and use the arrow keys. • To rotate the part to any angle, click Rotate View on the View toolbar, or click View, Modify, Rotate, then drag. • To rotate the part clockwise and counterclockwise around the center of the graphics area, using the increment value, hold down the Alt key and use the arrow keys. • To rotate the part around an edge or vertex, click Rotate View , click the edge or vertex, then drag. To move the part view, use one of the following methods: • Click Pan on the View toolbar, or click View, Modify, Pan, then drag the part to move it around in the graphics area. • Hold down the Ctrl key and use the arrow keys to move the view up, down, left, or right. • Use the scroll bars to pan to a different area of the window.3-14
  46. 46. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartRounding the Corners of the Part In this section you round the four corner edges of the part. Because the rounds all have the same radius (10mm), you can create them as a single feature. 1 Click Hidden In Gray . This makes it easier to select the hidden edges. 2 Click the first corner edge to select it. Notice how the faces, edges, and vertices highlight as you move the pointer over them, identifying selectable objects. Also, notice the changing pointer shape: edge face vertex 3 Rotate the part approximately as shown. Use any Select these of the methods discussed in the previous section. four edges 4 Hold down the Ctrl key and click the second, third, and fourth corner edges. 5 Click Fillet on the Features toolbar, or click Insert, Features, Fillet/Round. The Fillet Feature dialog box appears. Notice that the Edge fillet items box indicates four selected edges. 6 Make sure the Radius is set to 10mm. Leave the remaining items at the default values. 7 Click OK. The Fillet1 feature appears in the FeatureManager design tree.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-15
  47. 47. Mastering the BasicsAdding Fillets Now add fillets and rounds to other sharp edges of the part. You can select faces and edges either before or after opening the Fillet Feature dialog box. 1 Click Hidden Lines Removed . 2 Click Fillet or Insert, Features, Fillet/Round. 3 Click the front face of the base to select it. Both the outside and inside edges (around the boss) are highlighted when you select the face. Notice that the Edge fillet items list shows that one face is selected. 4 Change the Radius to 5mm, and click OK. The inside edge is filleted and the outside edge is rounded in a single step. 5 Click Fillet again. 6 Click the front face of the circular boss. 7 Change the Radius to 2mm, and click OK. Notice the features that are listed in the FeatureManager design tree. They are listed in the order in which they were created. Feature names include the name of the feature type and a number that increments by one each time you add another feature of the same type. For example, the corner fillet that you created in the previous section is named Fillet1 in the FeatureManager design tree. The fillets you created in this section are named Fillet2 and Fillet3. If you delete Fillet3, the next fillet you create is named Fillet4; the numbers are not reused.3-16
  48. 48. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartShelling the Part Next, you shell the part. Shelling hollows out the part by removing material from the selected face, leaving a thin-walled part. 1 Click Back on the Standard Views toolbar. The back of the part is now facing towards you. 2 Click Shell on the Features toolbar, or click Insert, Features, Shell. The Shell Feature dialog box appears. 3 Click the back face to select it. 4 Change the Thickness to 2mm and click OK. The shell operation removes the selected face. 5 To see the results, use the arrow keys on the keyboard to rotate the part approximately as shown.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-17
  49. 49. Mastering the BasicsCreating a Named View You can use the Orientation dialog box to: • Create your own named views. • Switch to any of the standard views (see page 3-12) and to two additional views, *Trimetric and *Dimetric. • Change the orientation of all the standard views. • Restore all of the standard views to their default settings. For more information about the Orientation dialog box, see the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide. Now create a named view. 1 Click View Orientation on the View toolbar, or click View, Orientation, or press the Spacebar, to display the Orientation dialog box. 2 In the Orientation dialog box, click New View . 3 Type Shell Back in the Named View dialog box. 4 Click OK. The new view name, Shell Back, is added to the Orientation dialog box, and you can select it at any time. To switch to a different view, double-click a different view name in the Orientation dialog box. 5 Click Save to save the part.3-18
  50. 50. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartChanging a Dimension This section illustrates a way to change the dimension of an extruded feature using feature handles. You can also change the dimension using the Modify dialog box method as discussed earlier (see page 3-6). 1 Examine the FeatureManager design tree. It shows the features of the part in the order in which you created them. 2 Double-click Base-Extrude in the FeatureManager design tree. Notice that in the FeatureManager design tree, the Base-Extrude feature is expanded to show the sketch it was based on. 3 Click Move/size features on the Features toolbar. The feature handles for the extruded feature Resize are displayed. Feature handles allow you to (depth) move, rotate, and resize some types of features. 4 Drag the Resize handle to increase Rotate the depth of the extrusion from 30mm to 50mm. Watch the pointer for feedback about the dimension you are changing. When you Move release the pointer, the part rebuilds using the new dimension. 5 Click Move/size features to turn off the features handle display. 6 To hide the dimensions, click anywhere outside the part in the graphics area. 7 Click Save to save the part. For more information about feature handles, see the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-19
  51. 51. Mastering the BasicsDisplaying a Section View You can display a 3D section view of the model at any time. You use model faces or planes to specify the section cutting planes. In this example, you use Plane3 to cut the model view. 1 Click Isometric , then click Shaded view mode. 2 Click Plane3 in the FeatureManager design tree. 3 Click Section View on the View toolbar, or click View, Display, Section View. The Section View dialog box appears. 4 Specify Section Position of 60mm. This is the offset distance from the selected plane to the section cut. 5 Click Preview. When this option is selected, the view is updated each time you change a value in the dialog box. Notice the arrow direction. 6 Click Flip the Side to View to cut the section in the opposite direction. 7 Click OK. The section view of the part is displayed. Only the display of the part is cut, not the model itself. The section display is maintained if you change the view mode, orientation, or zoom. 8 To return to a display of the complete part, click View, Display, and click to clear Section View. – or – Click Section View again.3-20
  52. 52. Chapter 3 The 40-Minute Running StartDisplaying Multiple Views Now that you have created your first model, you can display multiple views of the part in a single window, as discussed in Multiple Views on page 2-8. When you select a feature in one view, it is selected in all the views. 1 Drag one or both of the split boxes at the corners of the window to create panes. Split boxes 2 Drag the split bars as needed to Isometric Top adjust the size of the panes. The pointer changes to when it is on a split bar. 3 Click in a pane, and change the view mode, zoom, or orientation of the view in that pane. 4 Repeat for each pane. 5 To return to a single view, drag the split bars to the side, leaving the desired view visible. You can adjust the width of the FeatureManager design tree pane in Front Right the same way. Place the pointer on the vertical split bar, and drag as needed.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 3-21
  53. 53. 4 Assembly Basics In this chapter, you build a simple assembly. This chapter discusses the following: q Adding parts to an assembly q Moving and rotating components in an assembly q Specifying the assembly mating relations that make the parts fit togetherSolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 4-1
  54. 54. Mastering the BasicsCreating the Base Feature You can use the same methods you learned in Chapter 3 to create the base for a new part. 1 Open a new part from the Getting Started tab. If you do not see the Getting Started tab, refer to Creating the Getting Started Tab on page 2-10. 2 Click Sketch , and sketch a rectangle beginning at the origin. 3 Click Dimension , and dimension the rectangle to 120mm x 120mm. 4 Click Extruded Boss/Base , and extrude the rectangle as a Solid Feature, with a Type of Blind, to a Depth of 90mm. 5 Click Fillet , and fillet the four edges shown with a radius of 10mm. 6 Click Shell . Select the front face of the model as the face to remove, and set the Thickness to 4mm. 7 Save the part as Tutor2. (The .sldprt extension is added to the file name.)Using the Selection Filter The Selection Filter allows you to more easily select the item you want in the graphics area. To show or hide the Selection Filter toolbar, click Toggle Selection Filter Toolbar on the Standard toolbar, or press F5. The first three tools on the Selection Filter toolbar behave as follows: Turns the Selection Filter on or off Clears all of the selected filters Selects all of the filters The rest of the tools are filters. Select the filters that match the items you want to select in the graphics area. TIPS: While the Selection Filter is active, the pointer changes to . After using the Selection Filter, click Clear All Filters so that you are not limited to the currently selected filters the next time you want to select items. For more information, see “SolidWorks Fundamentals, Selection Methods” in the SolidWorks 2000 Online User’s Guide.4-2
  55. 55. Chapter 4 Assembly BasicsCreating a Lip on the Part In this section, you use the Convert Entities and Offset Entities tools to create sketch geometry. Then a cut creates a lip to mate with the part from the previous chapter. TIP: Use the Selection Filter to make selecting the faces in this section easier. 1 Zoom in on a corner of the part, select the thin wall on the front face of the part, and click Sketch to open a sketch. The edges of the part face are highlighted. 2 Click Convert Entities on the Sketch Tools toolbar, or Tools, Sketch Tools, Convert Entities. The outer edges of the selected face are projected (copied) onto the sketch plane as lines and arcs. 3 Click the front face again. 4 Click Offset Entities on the Sketch Tools toolbar or Tools, Sketch Tools, Offset Entities. The Offset Entities dialog box appears. 5 Set the Offset distance to 2.00mm. The preview shows the offset extending outward. 6 Click Reverse to change the offset direction. 7 Click Apply, then click Close. A set of lines is added in the sketch, offset from the outside edge of the selected face by 2mm. This relationship is maintained if the original edges change. 8 Click Extruded Cut or Insert, Cut, Extrude. 9 In the Extrude Cut Feature dialog box, set the Depth to 30mm, and click OK. The material between the two lines is cut, creating the lip.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 4-3
  56. 56. Mastering the BasicsChanging the Color of a Part You can change the color and appearance of a part or its features. 1 Click the Tutor2 icon at the top of the FeatureManager design tree. 2 Click Edit Color on the Standard toolbar. The Edit Color dialog box appears. 3 Click the desired color on the palette, then click OK. In Shaded mode , the part is displayed in the new color. 4 Save the part.Creating the Assembly Now create an assembly using the two parts. 1 If Tutor1.sldprt is not open, click Open on the Standard toolbar and open it. 2 Open a new assembly from the Getting Started tab. 3 Click Window, Tile Horizontally to display all three windows. Close any extra windows. 4 Drag the Tutor1 icon from the top of the FeatureManager design tree for Tutor1.sldprt, and drop it in the FeatureManager design tree of the assembly window (Assem1). Notice that as you move the pointer into the FeatureManager design tree, the pointer changes to . Adding a part to an assembly this way results in the part automatically inferencing the assembly origin. When a part inferences the assembly origin: • the part’s origin is coincident with the assembly origin. • the planes of the part and the assembly are aligned. 5 Drag the Tutor2 icon from Tutor2.sldprt, and drop it in the graphics area of the assembly window, beside the Tutor1 part. Notice that as you move the pointer into the graphics area, the pointer changes to .4-4
  57. 57. Chapter 4 Assembly Basics 6 Save the assembly as Tutor. (The .sldasm extension is added to the file name.) If you see a message about saving referenced documents, click Yes. 7 Drag a corner of the assembly window to enlarge it, or click Maximize in the upper-right corner to make the window full size. You no longer need to have the Tutor1.sldprt and Tutor2.sldprt windows in view. 8 Click Zoom to Fit .SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 4-5
  58. 58. Mastering the BasicsManipulating the Components When you add a part to an assembly, the part is referred to as a component of the assembly. You can move or rotate the components individually or together using the tools on the Assembly toolbar. The first component you add to an assembly is fixed in place by default. A fixed component has the prefix (f) in the FeatureManager design tree. You cannot move or rotate a fixed component unless you float (unfix) it first. q To float a fixed component, right-click the component in either the FeatureManager design tree or in the graphics area, then select Float from the shortcut menu. The prefix changes to (-), indicating that the component’s position is under defined. q To move and rotate a component in the assembly, you can use the following tools on the Assembly toolbar. Click Move Component, click the component’s name in the FeatureManager design tree or click one of the component’s faces, then move the component. Click Rotate Component Around Centerpoint, click the component’s name in the FeatureManager design tree or click one of the component’s faces, then rotate the component. Both the Move Component and Rotate Component Around Centerpoint tools remain active so that you can move other non-fixed components in succession. Hold down Ctrl and click both the component and an axis, linear edge, or sketched line. Then click Rotate Component Around Axis, and rotate the component. If the axes are not currently displayed, click View, Axes (for user-defined axes) or View, Temporary Axes (for axes defined implicitly by the software.) q To exit from move or rotate mode, you can: • Click the tool again. • Click another tool. • Click Tools, Select. • Click Select from the shortcut menu or the toolbar. • Press Esc. q To change the orientation of the entire assembly in the graphics area, use the tools on the Standard Views toolbar. q To scroll or rotate the entire assembly in the graphics area, use the Pan and Rotate View tools on the View toolbar.4-6
  59. 59. Chapter 4 Assembly BasicsMating the Components In this section, you define assembly mating relations between the components, making them align and fit together. 1 Click Isometric on the Standard Views toolbar. 2 Click Mate on the Assembly toolbar, or click Insert, Mate. The Assembly Mating dialog box appears. 3 Click the top edge of Tutor1, then click the Select these edges outside edge of the lip on the top of Tutor2. The edges are listed in the Items Selected list. 4 Select Coincident under Mate Types, and Closest under Alignment Condition. 5 Click Preview to preview the mate. The selected edges of the two components are made coincident. 6 Click Apply. The position of the Tutor2 component in the assembly is not fully defined, as shown by the (-) prefix in the FeatureManager design tree. Tutor2 still has some degrees of freedom to move in directions that are not yet constrained by mating relations. 1 Click Move Component , then click the Tutor2 component. Notice the pointer shape . 2 Drag the component from side to side, then use one of the methods discussed in the previous section to exit move mode. 3 Select Tutor2, hold down Ctrl, select the mated edge, and click Rotate Component Around Axis . Notice the pointer shape . 4 Drag to rotate the component around the mated edge, then exit rotate mode.SolidWorks 2000 Getting Started 4-7
  60. 60. Mastering the BasicsAdding More Mates 1 Select the rightmost face of one component, Select these faces then hold down Ctrl, and select the corresponding face on the other component. 2 Click Mate or Insert, Mate. 3 In the Assembly Mating dialog box, select Coincident and Closest again. 4 Click Preview to preview the mate. 5 Click Apply. 6 Repeat Steps 1 through 5, selecting the top faces of both components, to add another Coincident mate. Select these faces 7 Save the assembly.4-8

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