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Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
Culture of peace
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Culture of peace

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  • 1. Culture ofPeace
  • 2. If the world order is to move awayfrom its present chaotic and violentcondition, building cultures ofpeace is the remedy.The creative management ofdifferences is at the core of peaceculture. Havva KOK USAK Center for Eurasian Studies
  • 3. What is Culture of Peace? A culture of peace is an integral approach to preventing violence and violent conflicts, and an alternative to the culture of war and violence. 1998 UN resolution on the culture of peace
  • 4. History of CoP it is a global movement 1995; final chapter of the UNESCO monograph on a culture of peace 1996; chapter on the global movement in the report on the El Salvador Culture of Peace Programme. 1999; confirmed by the UN General Assembly in Programme of Action on a Culture of Peace 2000; put into practice during the campaign for the Manifesto which engaged 75 million people.
  • 5. History of CoP 2003, the global movement has developed far beyond its initial scope, to such an extent that it is difficult to keep track of its myriad manifestations around the world. 2005; World Report on the Culture of Peace includes information from 700 organizations.
  • 6. Culture of War and Violence Belief in power that is based on force Having an enemy Authoritarian governance Secrecy and propaganda Armament Exploitation of people Exploitation of nature Male domination
  • 7. Culture of Peace and Non-Violence Education for a culture of peace Understanding, tolerance and solidarity Democratic participation Free flow of information Disarmament Human rights Sustainable development Equality of women and men
  • 8. Culture of War and Violence Dysfunctional Unjust Illogical, irresponsible Cognitive dissonance No integration Unethical Inequity Uncompassionate Disrespect
  • 9. Culture of Peace and Non-violence Functional Just Logical, responsible Inner congruence Integration of self with others Ethical Equity Compassionate Respect
  • 10. UN Declaration and Programme of Action for a Culture of Peace The 8 Points education for peace, the promotion of sustainable economic and social development, respect for human rights, equality between women and men, democratic participation, tolerance, the free flow of information and disarmament
  • 11. Where Peace Culture Can Be Found  The familial household is an important source of peace culture in any society. It is there that womens nurturing culture flourishes. Women have been the farmers as well as the bearers and rearers of children, the feeders and healers of the extended family. Women have had to learn for the human species to survive is central to the development of peaceful behavior Elise Boulding
  • 12. Zones of Peace As far back as the historical record goes, we know of sanctuaries, or safe places, for anyone under threat. Temples and holy sites have become sanctuaries; sometimes the land immediately around a kings palace has been designated as safe for persons fleeing their enemies. Market places have always been treated as zones of peace, since violence would destroy trading activities.
  • 13. Zones of Peace Torah and Koran declare croplands and orchards, as well as the women and children who tend them, protected in time of war. Catholic Church protecs the Pax Dei to pilgrims, merchants, and cattle, and controls the violence of war by forbidding soldiers to fight on certain days of the week.
  • 14. Zones of Peace Since the beginning of the nuclear age, there have been many grassroots movements to persuade states or regions to declare themselves nuclear-weapon- free zones, and counterpart movements to define individual towns and cities as zones of peace. Combination of traditional sanctuary practice with new peace-movement activity has resulted in a gradual spread of physical areas that have a certain political and social commitment to peace culture.
  • 15. Future of Peace Culture Peace, like war, is a social invention If humans did nothing but bond with one another, societies would be dull, lacking in adventure. If they did nothing but claim individual space, societies would be full of action, but it would be aggressive and violent action. Global corporations weaken local economic and social capacity. The military-industrial system seems beyond the ability of states to control biosphere is losing its capacity to regenerate itself and feed the growing population of humans.
  • 16. Future of Peace Culture People who cannot imagine peace will not know how to work for it. Those who can imagine it are using that same imagination to devise practices and strategies that will render war obsolete. However, peace culture is not just imagination. It exists in daily life and habitual interaction as people get on with their lives and work, negotiating differences rather than engaging in interminable battles over just how to solve each problem as it comes up.

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