• Save
07 19-2011 daily advanced cae and proficiency idioms, phrasal
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

07 19-2011 daily advanced cae and proficiency idioms, phrasal

on

  • 651 views

ADVANCED AND PROFICIENCY. ENGLISH EXPRESSIONS FOR LEARNERS OF ESL.

ADVANCED AND PROFICIENCY. ENGLISH EXPRESSIONS FOR LEARNERS OF ESL.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
651
Views on SlideShare
651
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

07 19-2011 daily advanced cae and proficiency idioms, phrasal Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Daily advanced cae and proficiency idioms, phrasal verbs, slang and sayings with pictures. BASIC VOCABULARY. 07-19-2011. BLOG WITH RESOURCES FOR LEARNING ENGLISH. http://www.madremiraqueluna.blogspot.com
  • 2. roost‧er [countable]
    • a male chicken = cock British Englishs
  • 3. Flour  [uncountable]
    • a powder that is made by crushing wheat or other grain and is used for making bread, cakes etcwhite/wholemeal/rice/wheat etc flour
    • ➔ plain flour ,  self - raising flour
  • 4.   Surf‧board [countable] 01.
    • 1 a shelter
    • a long piece of plastic, wood etc that you stand on when you go surfing
  • 5. Sink [countable].  
    • a large open container that you fill with water and use for washing yourself, washing dishes etc [↪ basin]: Dirty plates were piled high in the sink.
  • 6. Hip 01.
    • Meaning: trendy, stylish, fashionable among young people
    • For example:
    • It's hip for young guys to look cute and a bit "fem" these days, so many are taking good care of their skin and spending a lot on clothes and haircuts. 
    • When we were young smoking was hip, but these days it's not so hip to smell of cigarettes and damage your lungs.
    • Origin: Many etymologists believe that the terms hip, hep and hepcat (e.g., jazz musicians' now cliched "hip cat") derive from the west African Wolof language word hepicat, which means "one who has his eyes open". (from Wikipedia)
  • 7. Hip.02.
    • Quick Quiz:
    • There's a hip new club in the centre of Tokyo where all the
    • A.-old people with hip problems go
    • B.-cool and trendy young people go
    • C.-middle-aged businessmen go
    • PICTURE SOURCE:
    • thefreedictionary.com
  • 8. The wish is father to the thought. 01.
    • Possible interpretation: Our opinions or beliefs are often influenced by our desires and hopes. The phrase "father to" is used in the sense of parentage: the thought is born from the wish.
    • Note: wish (noun): desire, hope | thought (noun): an idea or opinion in the mind Origin: This proverb is based on Shakespeare's King Henry IV Part 2 (1597):Prince Henry (Harry): I never thought to hear you speak again. King Henry IV: Thy wish was father, Harry, to that thought: I stay too long by thee, I weary thee.
  • 9. The wish is father to the thought. 02.
    • Quick Quiz:
    • The saying "The wish is father to the thought" suggests that the way we think may depend on
    • A.-things that are further away
    • B.-what we want to happen
    • C.-.how our parents think
    • PICTURE SOURCE: http://peacemotivate.com
  • 10. Get sth in. 01.
    •   Meaning: to submit or send something like a document, a form or a report
    • For example:
    • get sth in Make sure you get your application in on time, or you won't get the job.
    • get sth in My son hasn't even started his homework assignment yet, and he has to get it in by Friday.
  • 11. Get sth in. 02.
    • Quick Quiz:
    • If you don't get your tax return in on time, you
    • A.-should stop worrying about it
    • B.-could go to jail
    • C.-won't have to pay tax Picture Source: newhomessection.com
  • 12. Feather your own nest. 01.
    • Possible interpretation: If you feather your own nest, you use your position or your job illegally for personal gain.
    • For example:
    • Kelly says it's accepted in many developing countries that a government official will use their position to feather their own nest, and this is why government salaries are kept so low.
    • In some countries a person who feathers their own nest isn't seen as being dishonest or corrupt; they're seen as being clever.
  • 13. Feather your own nest. 02 .
    • Quick Quiz: Government officials in the Republic of Amoralia feather their own nests by
    • A.-catching birds
    • B.-taking bribes
    • C.-working hard
    • Picture source: splendid-things.blogspot.com
  • 14. Sources.
    • http:// madremiraqueluna.blogspot.com
    • www.englishclub.com
    • Longman Dictionary of contemporary English for advanced learners.
    • Pictures from the web sites written at the bottom of them.