Basic Purposes Of Business Writing

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  • Basic Purposes Of Business Writing

    1. 1. Basic Purposes of Business Writing English Three, SY 2007-2008 Sources: Lesikar, R.V., Pettit, J.D. Jr., & Flatley, M.E. (2000). Lesikar's basic business communication, 8th edition. Boston: McGraw-Hill Locker, K.O. & Kaczmarek, S.K. (2001). Business communicatio: Building critical skills. N.Y.: McGraw-Hill . Prepared by: Dianne Siriban, College Faculty, DLSC
    2. 2. Three Basic Purposes of Business Writing <ul><li>To INFORM </li></ul><ul><li>To REQUEST or PERSUADE </li></ul><ul><li>To BUILD GOODWILL </li></ul>* Most organizational writing often have two or all of these purposes at the same time.
    3. 3. Differences between writing for school and writing documents for organizations: To meet an organizational need. What the writer already knows becomes secondary to the solutions the writer can give. To show that you have learned the course material and to demonstrate your intelligence. Purpose BUSINESS SCHOOL ASPECT
    4. 4. Differences between writing for school and writing documents for organizations: People both inside and outside the organization. They will read messages only if they seem important, relevant or interesting. Without instilling need or motivation, the document fails. Limited to instructor and other students. Even if the instructor disagrees with your opinions, if they are well-supported your paper will earn a good grade. Audience BUSINESS SCHOOL ASPECT
    5. 5. Differences between writing for school and writing documents for organizations: Usually new to your reader; need extra effort in making it sound interesting. Information may be new to you but not for your instructor. Information BUSINESS SCHOOL ASPECT
    6. 6. Differences between writing for school and writing documents for organizations: Organized to meet the psychological needs of the reader (ex. delivering bad and good news messages, etc.) Follow traditional essay form, thesis statement, paragraphs of evidence and concluding paragraph. Organization BUSINESS SCHOOL ASPECT
    7. 7. Differences between writing for school and writing documents for organizations: Should be friendly, not formal. Short, familiar words and a mix of sentence and paragraph lengths are best. Often formal; big words, long sentences and paragraphs are often rewarded. Style BUSINESS SCHOOL ASPECT
    8. 8. Differences between writing for school and writing documents for organizations: Allows readers to skim document elements such as headers, lists; single spaced paragraphs with double spacing between paragraphs, help the reader find information quickly. Traditionally considerable in length, double-spaced, no particular attention to visual design. Document Design BUSINESS SCHOOL ASPECT
    9. 9. Differences between writing for school and writing documents for organizations: Writers are expected to choose the most effective way to convey information (tables, graphs, charts, maps, slides, etc.) Except for math and engineering. Few classes expect writing to contain anything other than words. Visuals BUSINESS SCHOOL ASPECT
    10. 10. Five criteria for good business and administrative writing: <ul><li>It is clear . </li></ul><ul><li>It is complete. </li></ul><ul><li>It is correct . </li></ul><ul><li>It saves the reader time. </li></ul><ul><li>It builds goodwill . </li></ul>These five criteria depend on the interactions among the writer, the audience, the purposes of the message, and the situation or context. No single set of words will work in all possible situations .
    11. 11. Assignment: Writing a letter of request <ul><li>Write a short persuasive letter addressed to your chosen subject for case study. </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose: ask for his or her consent to being your source/subject for certain requirements in English Three, and—upon consent—a copy of his or her CV. </li></ul><ul><li>Request that the subject respond within a set period of time through your chosen medium. </li></ul><ul><li>Submit typewritten letters (first draft) in class next meeting (June 27, 2007). </li></ul>
    12. 12. Using Microsoft Word to Layout A Formal Letter <ul><li>Under the tab “File,” click “New...” </li></ul><ul><li>The “New Document” pop-up will appear on your screen. Select “General Templates” under “New from Template.” </li></ul><ul><li>Choose “Professional Letter.” </li></ul><ul><li>Disregard or delete text box for COMPANY NAME. Fill out all other data, especially the body of your letter. </li></ul><ul><li>Write the full name of your subject. </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Provide a way for the subject to contact your for his or her response. </li></ul><ul><li>Bring this draft of the letter next meeting for peer reviewing and revision. </li></ul><ul><li>Note: Not bringing the letter would get you a grade of 30 for this activity. </li></ul>Using Microsoft Word to Layout A Formal Letter

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