post war theatre

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post war theatre

  1. 1. “ HISTORY MAP” POST-II WORLD WAR THEATRE EXTENDED VERSION
  2. 2. Consequences of War <ul><li>Many theatres, especially throughout London had to close as a result of the War, because of air raids, heavy bombings and blackouts. </li></ul><ul><li>1941, German air force dropped bombs on London and other major cities in great Britain, over 30.0000 Londoners die… </li></ul><ul><li>A lot of paint and materials were rationed during the war and for some years after it, making it difficult to put on a production. </li></ul>
  3. 3. ENSA <ul><li>Entertainments National Service Association. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s main purpose was to provide entertainment for HM forces and for munitions workers. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Creator-Basil Dean </li></ul><ul><li>First show was </li></ul><ul><li>performed on 10 th </li></ul><ul><li>December 1939 in </li></ul><ul><li>Camberley </li></ul><ul><li>First overseas show took place on 15 th November 1939 in Douia, France </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Some people involved </li></ul><ul><li>in ENSA were – </li></ul><ul><li>Frances Day, Joyce </li></ul><ul><li>Grenfell, Arthur </li></ul><ul><li>Riscoe and Beatrice </li></ul><ul><li>Lillie. </li></ul><ul><li>ENSA pulled down </li></ul><ul><li>the curtain in July </li></ul><ul><li>1946 </li></ul>
  6. 6. 1926 THE GREAT STRIKE Initiated in defence of miners' wages and hours...
  7. 7. Political Theatre from the late 20‘s <ul><li>TIMES OF DEPRESSION, HIGH UNEMPLOYMENT AND POVERTY, DISCONTENT AND STRUGGLE…AFTER THE GREAT STRKE MANY PEOPLE REMAINED UNEMPLOYED. </li></ul><ul><li>AIM TO SEEK A RADICAL CHANGE AND SOLUTION TO THE INJUSTICES OF CAPITALISM SYSTEM AND THE RISE OF FASCISM ALL OVER EUROPE. </li></ul><ul><li>EXPRESSION TROUGH THEATRE, MANIFESTATION IN ALTERNATIVE WAYS, rejecting completely all the theatrical conventions at the times was directly agitational lead to the.. </li></ul><ul><li>“ WORKERS THEATRE MOVEMENT” A LEFT WING THEATRE, OF THE WORKING CLASS. </li></ul><ul><li>using street agit- prop style, later on, giving way to indoor theatre, with full- length plays and consequently the need to improve the artistic and technical levels of performance. </li></ul>(news paper) OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE WORKERS' THEATRE MOVEMENT
  8. 8. WORKERS THEATRE MOVEMENT 1928-38 “STILL TALKING ” <ul><li>An interior of a hall become an improvised stage, no props, costumes or décor, or special lighting.. that was an intrinsic part of the dramatic situation.. basically two people looking like any other two people in the hall, suddenly confronted the audience.. the play starts; conceived as an open ended&quot; happening” at a political meeting. Actors will become political orators… </li></ul>
  9. 9. Agit-prop theatre <ul><li>Red megaphones, was an agit prop troupe (1930) members of the w.t.m with radical left-wing political ideas…they performed several parodies of popular songs and anti-war agit prop style sketches. </li></ul><ul><li>Theatre was taking to a non theatrical venues; halls, pubs, community centers, places of work and on the streets </li></ul><ul><li>after they will change the name to theatre of action (1934) </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Agitprop comes from Russian language. ( Агитпроп ) “ agit ation and prop aganda” especially pro-communist political propaganda disseminated through literature, drama, music, or art. </li></ul><ul><li>propaganda used in the soviet union during the II world war, to influence and mobilize public opinion… </li></ul><ul><li>Agitprop style its used against today's targets, big government and big business&quot; (George F. Will). </li></ul>
  11. 11. PRE-WAR THEATRE MOVEMENT, “THEATRE UNION” 1936-45 Manchester. <ul><li>Jhon bullion, Fuente ovejuna, Miracle at verdum…were another productions from theatre union with politics messages. </li></ul>
  12. 12. 1945 manifesto
  13. 13. Joan Littlewood 1914-2002 <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Joan was one of the most influential theatre directors in Britain. 1930-75 (active) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>She joined initially theatre of action in 1934 called later theatre union 1936. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>She founded “theatre workshop” in 1945, along with Jimmie Miller ( Ewan mccoll ) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Her most celebrated creation was , “oh what a lovely war”, a satire on world war I( against war in general) produce by theatre workshop and staged at the theatre royal in 1963. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It broke the mould of British drama (bbc news) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. POST WAR “THEATRE WORKSHOP” 1945 <ul><li>Theatre workshop , was a popular working class theatre lead by Joan littlewood and Ewan mcoll, inspired some of the pioneers of the political theatre in the lates 60’s and 80’s.. </li></ul><ul><li>1945 post-war ‘theatre workshop’ entertained orphaned children freed from Nazi camps. </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Uranium 235’ was a modern </li></ul><ul><li>morality play for the atomic </li></ul><ul><li>era. ( ANTI- BOMB PLAY) </li></ul><ul><li>Europe’s most outstanding </li></ul><ul><li>group theatre, with a </li></ul><ul><li>sensational success of the </li></ul><ul><li>‘ 51 Edinburgh Festival. (Press) </li></ul>
  15. 15. Post War and the ‘Old Vic’ <ul><li>● The ‘Old Vic’ was the only theatre that stayed open at the height of the German blitz. </li></ul><ul><li> ● Donald Wolfit tried to keep the Theatre alive by putting on afternoon showings, but most of the English theatre life was demolished. </li></ul><ul><li> ● After the war the ‘Old Vic’ along with the Shakespeare festival company became the most respected theatrical groups in England. </li></ul>● The ‘Old Vic’ returned to London in 1944 after spending many years in the provinces.
  16. 16. <ul><li>● The management of the ‘Old Vic’ was passed onto Lawrence Olivier, Ralph Richardson and John Burell. </li></ul><ul><li>● After 1948 Olivier and Richardson spent more time on other commitments therefore the ‘Old Vic’ started to decline and the management was passed onto Hugh Hunt who had spent many years as a director there. </li></ul><ul><li>As the ‘Old Vic’ declined, the </li></ul><ul><li>Stratford festival company gained </li></ul><ul><li>more power and respect in the </li></ul><ul><li>theatre world and reviews from </li></ul><ul><li>Stratford were starting to </li></ul><ul><li>overpower those of the ‘Old Vic’. </li></ul><ul><li>● As more festivals such as Edinburgh, </li></ul><ul><li>Chichester, Canterbury and </li></ul><ul><li>Aldeburgh started to gain power, </li></ul><ul><li>British Theatre by 1960 had become </li></ul><ul><li>one of the best in the world. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Conclusion <ul><li>What does theatre do for history? </li></ul><ul><li>It can capture moments of history in performance. </li></ul><ul><li>It represents and reflects the feelings and emotions of the performers and the audience at the certain times. </li></ul><ul><li>And what does history do for theatre? </li></ul><ul><li>History influences the theatre through politics and events that have happened. </li></ul><ul><li>The theatre and play-wrights are inspired by historic events and different periods through time. </li></ul><ul><li>The circumstances at the time will effect the way a production is run. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Conclusion II <ul><li>HOW CAN THE THEATRE BE ENTERTAINING AND INSTRUCTIVE AT THE SAME TIME? HOW CAN IT BE TAKEN OUT OF THE HANDS OF INTELLECTUAL DRUG TRAFFIC AND BECOME A PLACE OFFERING REAL EXPERIENCES RATHER THAN ILLUSIONS? HOW CAN THE UNLIBERATED AND UNKNOWING MAN OF OUR CENTURY WITH HIS THIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE AND FREEDOM, THE TORTURED AND HEROIC, MISUSED AND INVENTIVE MAN OF OUR TERRIBLE AND GREAT CENTURY, HIMSELF CHANGEABLE AND YET ABLE TO CHANGE THE WORLD, HOW CAN HE BE GIVEN A THEATRE WICH WILL HELP HIM TO BE MASTER OF HIS WORLD?. </li></ul><ul><li>BERTOLD BRETCH </li></ul><ul><li>ALTERNATIVE THEATRE MOVEMENT , IS THERE TO SHAKE AND STIMULATE AS WELL, OUR CRITICAL AWARNESS, RISING QUESTIONS ABOUT OUR SOCIETY… </li></ul>
  19. 19. Sources <ul><li>www.googleimages.co.uk </li></ul><ul><li>www.billyscarrow.co.uk/waryears </li></ul><ul><li>www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar </li></ul><ul><li>www.well.com/~jhonross/discographies/ewanmaccoll.htm </li></ul><ul><li>www.wclm.org.uk/people/em/timeline.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Digging up the stories, By James Thompson </li></ul><ul><li>Joan’s book, Joan littlewood’s peculiar history as she tells it. 1994 by Joan littlewood. Methuen, London. </li></ul><ul><li>Agit-prop to Theatre Workshop, political play scripts 1930-50 By Howard Goorney and Ewan MacColl/eds. 1986. Manchester university press, uk. </li></ul><ul><li>History of the Theatre, By Oscar G. Brockett </li></ul>

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