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Final essay Final essay Document Transcript

  • FrischknechtCaleb FrischknechtEDU 1400Professor Brett CampbellWed 5:30Final EssayWhen you think of prejudice, you tend to think more towards racismof different ethnicities, prejudice towards gender preference, religion andpolitical ideology; but the issue of rights for the disabled is not one thatwould come to mind if brought before the public. In my own mind in thepast, my thoughts towards those with disabilities was more pity, and feelingsof awkwardness, not knowing how to approach the topic or people ingeneral. What I’m trying to say is that it’s not a topic I ever really thoughtabout being a concern, and never realized that there was so muchdiscrimination towards the disabled.I think there should be more understanding and knowledge given tothe non-disabled in regards to what it’s like in the life of the disabled andhow they should be treated. Michael Hartman of NASA explained it verysimply but very well in their Equal Opportunity Program manual, “A personwith a disability does not necessarily need help. Most people withdisabilities try to be as independent as possible and will ask for assistanceonly if they need it. However, if you see a situation in where you think you1
  • Frischknechtmight be of some assistance, ask, but do not insist that the person acceptyour aid. If your offer for assistance is accepted or requested, ask how youcan best be of help, and then try to do it with minimum attention drawn tothe person with a disability, yourself, or your activities. Dont beembarrassed to admit that you dont know what to do or how to help. Simplyask the person for guidance, and he or she will instruct you.” (“People Withand Without Disabilities: Interacting & Communicating”) Often timespeople are just unfamiliar with most disabilities and because of that unsuretythey alienate those with disabilities to avoid confrontations. If we could justinclude more learning about these disabilities in schools as children grow upit would help build a bridge over the gap between the disabled and non-disabled.The process should start when children are younger and stillinfluenced easily by parents and personal experiences. As is mentioned inthe following health article, “The birth of a child with a disability or chronicillness, or the discovery that a child has a disability, has a profound effect ona family. Children suddenly must adjust to a brother or sister who, becauseof their condition, may require a large portion of family time, attention,money, and psychological support. Yet it is an important concern to anyfamily that the non-disabled siblings adjust to the sibling with a disability. It2
  • Frischknechtis important because the non-disabled childs reactions to a sibling with adisability can affect the overall adjustment and development of self-esteemin both children.” (“Children with Disabilities: Understanding SiblingIssues”) If we can build that better understanding in our children, when theygrow up they will be able to see their disabled friends as “normal” and notout of the ordinary. This will in turn help reduce discrimination and createmore opportunity and rights for the disabled. I know from personalexperience that growing up with a blind cousin helped me realize hownormal he is and that he’s no different from me besides his lack of sight.Blind people aren’t abnormal to me because it was a part of my life as achild. For those who grow up with a mentally handicapped child, or a deafperson, they accept the disability and know how to handle it without it beingawkward. It helps build a higher self-esteem for both sides and with thatbreaks down many barriers that would have been in the way otherwise.Another bridge that covers that gap between the disabled and non-disabled is proper etiquette in the work place as well as in society. If anemployer educates his employees on proper etiquette towards the disabled,he not only helps them at work but out in their own lives outside of work.The ADA has fought for rights for the disabled, this next quote is from them,“The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 was conceived with3
  • Frischknechtthe goal of integrating people with disabilities into all aspects of life,particularly the workplace and the marketplace. Sensitivity toward peoplewith disabilities is not only in the spirit of the ADA, it makes good businesssense. It can help you expand your practice, better serve your customers ordevelop your audience. When supervisors and co-workers use disabilityetiquette, employees with disabilities feel more comfortable and work moreproductively. Practicing disability etiquette is an easy way to make peoplewith disabilities feel welcome.” (“Disability Etiquette”)The ultimate goal is to make all people feel comfortable and welcomeand equal, regardless of race, religion, or if someone has disabilities. Thereare so many things we can do to try and change other’s opinions but inreality, it all starts with changing ourselves. The gap between the disabledand non-disabled is only as big as we make it. To end I will use a quote fromJames Baldwin, "Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothingcan be changed until it is faced."4
  • FrischknechtReferences:Hartman, Michael J.. "Equal Opportunity Programs Office." EqualOpportunity Programs Office. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 May 2013.http://eeo.gsfc.nasa.gov/disability/publications.htmlathealth.com. "Children with Disabilities: Understanding Sibling Issues." AtHealth Mental Health. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 May 2013.http://www.athealth.com/consumer/disorders/disabsibling.html"Disability Etiquette : United Spinal Association." United SpinalAssociation : United Spinal Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 May 2013.http://www.unitedspinal.org/disability-etiquette/Baldwin, James. "Disability Quotes - Collection of Quotations RegardingDisabilities." Disabled World News and Disability Information. N.p., n.d.Web. 2 May 2013. http://www.disabled-world.com/disability/disability-quotes.php5
  • FrischknechtReferences:Hartman, Michael J.. "Equal Opportunity Programs Office." EqualOpportunity Programs Office. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 May 2013.http://eeo.gsfc.nasa.gov/disability/publications.htmlathealth.com. "Children with Disabilities: Understanding Sibling Issues." AtHealth Mental Health. N.p., n.d. Web. 1 May 2013.http://www.athealth.com/consumer/disorders/disabsibling.html"Disability Etiquette : United Spinal Association." United SpinalAssociation : United Spinal Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 May 2013.http://www.unitedspinal.org/disability-etiquette/Baldwin, James. "Disability Quotes - Collection of Quotations RegardingDisabilities." Disabled World News and Disability Information. N.p., n.d.Web. 2 May 2013. http://www.disabled-world.com/disability/disability-quotes.php5