240496 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 17JUL09 SLIDES
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

240496 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 17JUL09 SLIDES

on

  • 1,236 views

240496 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 17JUL09 SLIDES

240496 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 17JUL09 SLIDES

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,236
Views on SlideShare
1,236
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

240496 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 17JUL09 SLIDES 240496 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 17JUL09 SLIDES Presentation Transcript

  • EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN NANTAPON JUNNGURN, SILPAKORN UNIVERSITY @COPY RIGHT 2009 BY NANTAPON JUNNGURN
  • EXPERIMENT A scientific test that is carried out in order to study what happens and to gain new knowledge A new activity, idea or method that you try out to see what happens or what effect it has
  • DESIGN APPROACH BASIC DESIGN DESIGN AS RESEARCH
  • FUNCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CULTURAL FRAMEWORK PERCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FORMAL FRAMEWORK LITERAL IMITATION METAPHORICAL ANALOGY LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
  • DESIGN APPROACH BASIC DESIGN DESIGN AS RESEARCH
  • PIG CITY, MVRDV The Netherlands is the European Union’s largest exporter of pig meat. But how can this pork production line be streamlined and modernized? MVRDV, a firm known for their emphasis on intensive research and presentation, created Pig City as a means of demonstrating the high rise’s potential as a tool for solving problems of density, simultaneously calling into question the very same issues of quality of life that have dogged the residential tower since its inception. This porcine utopia proposed 76 towers of over 610 metres (2,000 feet), with a 90 meter x 90 meter (300 x 300 foot) floor plan, giving each inhabitant plenty of space to wallow. Pig City is naturally, only a concept. But, more importantly, it is a concept steeped in architecture critical thinking, a stern warning about what might lie ahead should Modernist principles be applied on purely economic grounds and not ethical ones.
  • FUNCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CULTURAL FRAMEWORK PERCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FORMAL FRAMEWORK LITERAL IMITATION METAPHORICAL ANALOGY LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
  • NETHERLANDS EMBASSY BERLIN, GERMANY, BERLIN, OMA : 2005 Mies van der Rohe Award (The European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture)
  • NETHERLANDS EMBASSY BERLIN, GERMANY, BERLIN, OMA 2005 Mies van der Rohe Award (The European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture) A continuous trajectory reaching all eight stories of the embassy shapes the building’s internal communication. The workspaces are the ‘leftover areas’ after the trajectory was ‘carved’ out of the cube and are situated along the facade. Reception spaces are activated inside the cube. Other semi-public spaces are located closer to the facade and at one point cantilever out over the drop-off area. From the entry, the trajectory leads on via the library, meeting rooms, fitness area and restaurant to the roof terrace. The trajectory exploits the relationship with the context, river Spree, Television Tower (‘Fernsehturm’), park and wall of embassy residences; part of it is a ‘diagonal void’ through the building that allows one to see the TV ower from the park. The (slightly over pressurized) trajectory works as a main airduct from which fresh air percolates to the offices to be drawn off via the double (plenum) facade. This ventilation concept is part of a strategy to integrate more functions into one element.
  • FUNCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CULTURAL FRAMEWORK PERCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FORMAL FRAMEWORK LITERAL IMITATION METAPHORICAL ANALOGY LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
  • TERMS VALS,SWITZERLAND, 1996 , PETER ZUMTHOR Zumthor uses images of quarries and water flowing spontaneously from the ground to describe the conception of the building, ideas charged with an archaic atmosphere. Its geometric rigor reflects a huge rock embedded in the hillside. The building is made from local Valser quartzite and concrete. Water, light and to some extent steam and heat, add to the definition of areas within the ritual of the bath.
  • BROTHER KLAUS FIELD CHAPEL, PETER ZUMTHOR The interior of the chapel room was formed out of 112 tree trunks, which were configured like a tent. In twentyfour working days, layer after layer of concrete, each layer 50 cm thick, was poured and rammed around the tent-like structure. In the autumn of 2006, a special smouldering fire was kept burning for three weeks inside the log tent, after which time the tree trunks were dry and could easily be removed from the concrete shell. The chapel floor was covered with lead, which was melted on site in a crucible and manually ladled onto the floor. The bronze relief figure in the chapel is by sculptor Hans Josephsohn.
  • FUNCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CULTURAL FRAMEWORK PERCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FORMAL FRAMEWORK LITERAL IMITATION METAPHORICAL ANALOGY LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
  • BIG DUCK To stand out in this flock of ducks, Riverhead duck-farmer Martin Maurer got an idea. While holidaying in California, he stopped at a roadside shop shaped like a giant coffeepot. He thought this was a clever advertising gimmick, and imagined how he could do the same at home, but utilising a duck. When Maurer returned to Long Island, he hired a local carpenter named George Reeve, who in turn hired two stage show set designers to build the Duck. They used a cooked chicken carcass and a live duck tied with a string to a perch as models. Concrete applied over a wooden frame was used to build the Duck. The finishing touch was the eyes, which were the taillights of a Model T Ford, which would glow red at night when cars passed by.
  • PIANO AND VIOLIN HOUSE, AN HUI PROVINCE, CHINA DUCK ARCHITECTURE Buildings such as this are classified as follies. However, in architecture the term "duck" is used more specifically to describe buildings that are in the shape of an everyday object they relate to. According the Long Island newspaper Newsday, "The Big Duck has influenced the world of architecture; any building that is shaped like its product is called a 'duck'." Edward Tufte's The Visual Display of Quantitative Information uses the term "duck", explicitly named after this building, to describe irrelevant decorative elements in charts. The Big Duck was the target of widespread criticism during the 1960s and early 1970s but the building did have its architectural defenders. Robert Venturi said that since the building combined functional and symbolic aspects of architecture it was noteworthy. It was Venturi who coined the term "duck" to describe a building in which the architecture is subordinate to the overall symbolic form. However, he preferred the "decorated shed" as a model. On November 13, 2006, radio station WBLI rated the Flanders Duck first amongst the 7 wonders of Long Island, just ahead of the Commack Motor Inn
  • FUNCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CULTURAL FRAMEWORK PERCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FORMAL FRAMEWORK LITERAL IMITATION METAPHORICAL ANALOGY LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
  • CITIES ON THE MOVE 6TH , OCTOBER 1999_SILPAKORN UNIVERSITY
  • FUNCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CULTURAL FRAMEWORK PERCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FORMAL FRAMEWORK LITERAL IMITATION METAPHORICAL ANALOGY LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
  • MUSEUM OF LANNA LANTERNS,1999-2000_SILPAKORN UNIVERSITY
  • FUNCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CONSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK CULTURAL FRAMEWORK PERCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FORMAL FRAMEWORK LITERAL IMITATION METAPHORICAL ANALOGY LOGICAL INTERPRETATION
  • DESIGN APPROACH BASIC DESIGN DESIGN AS RESEARCH
  • ARISTOTLE Aristotle (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. He wrote on many subjects, including physics, metaphysics, poetry, theater, music, logic, rhetoric, politics, government, ethics, biology and zoology. Aristotle goes too far in deriving 'laws of the universe' from simple observation and over-stretched reason. Today's scientific method assumes that such thinking without sufficient facts is ineffective, and that discerning the validity of one's hypothesis requires far more rigorous experimentation than that which Aristotle used to support his laws. Aristotle also had some scientific blind spots. He posited a geocentric cosmology that we may discern in selections of the Metaphysics, which was widely accepted up until the 1500s. From the 3rd century to the 1500s, the dominant view held that the Earth was the center of the universe (geocentrism).
  • GEOCENTRIC UNIVERSE In astronomy, the geocentric model is the superseded theory that the Earth is the center of the universe and other objects go around it. Belief in this system was common in ancient Greece. It was embraced by both Aristotle and Ptolemy, and most Ancient Greek philosophers assumed that the Sun, Moon, Star, and naked eye planets circle the Earth. Two common observations were believed to support the idea that the Earth is in the center of the Universe: The first observation is that the stars, sun, and planets appear to revolve around the Earth each day, with the stars circling around the pole and those stars nearer the equator rising and setting each day and circling back to their rising point. The second is the common sense perception that as the Earth is solid and stable it is not moving—but is at rest.
  • GALILEO GALILEI Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. His achievements include improvements to the telescope and consequent astronomical observations, and support for Copernicanism. Galileo has been called the "father of modern observational astronomy," the "father of modern physics," the "father of science," and "the Father of Modern Science." Stephen Hawking says, "Galileo, perhaps more than any other single person, was responsible for the birth of modern science."
  • GALILEO GALILEI’S OBSERVATION On 7 January 1610 Galileo observed with his telescope what he described at the time as "three fixed stars, totally invisible by their smallness," all close to Jupiter, and lying on a straight line through it. Observations on subsequent nights showed that the positions of these "stars" relative to Jupiter were changing in a way that would have been inexplicable if they had really been fixed stars. On 10 January Galileo noted that one of them had disappeared, an observation which he attributed to its being hidden behind Jupiter. Within a few days he concluded that they were orbiting Jupiter: He had discovered three of Jupiter's four largest satellites (moons). He discovered the fourth on 13 January. A planet with smaller planets orbiting it did not conform to the principles of Aristotelian Cosmology, which held that all heavenly bodies should circle the Earth, and many astronomers and philosophers initially refused to believe that Galileo could have discovered such a thing
  • HELIOCENTRIC UNIVERSE In astronomy, heliocentrism is the theory that the Sun is at the center of the Universe. The word came from the Greek (ήλιος Helios = sun and κέντρον kentron = center). Historically, heliocentrism was opposed to geocentrism , which placed the Earth at the center. Though discussions on the possibility of heliocentrism date to classical antiquity, it was not until 1,800 years later, however, in the 16th century, that the Polish mathematician and astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus presented a fully predictive mathematical model of a heliocentric system, which was later elaborated and expanded by Johannes Kepler.
  • BELIEF & TRUTH
  • SCIENTIFIC METHOD Characterizations : Observations, Definitions, Measurements Hypothesis Development Predictions Experiments : Independent, Dependent, and Control Variable/ Interpret Data, Analyze Data, and Draw Conclusion Retest
  • Scientists are like architects who build buildings of different sizes and shapes and who can be judged only after the event, i.e., only after they have finished their structure. It may stand up, it may fall down-nobody knows. PAUL FEYERABEND, INTRODUCTION TO AGAINST METHOD
  • INTUITION & LOGIC
  • ANTOIO GAUDI Antonio Gaudํ (1852-1926) was a Spanish Catalan architect who belonged to the Modernist style (Art Nouveau) movement and was famous for his unique and highly individualistic designs. It is widely acknowledged that Gaudi is a part of Barcelona. His first works were designed in the style of gothic architecture and traditional Catalan architectural modes, but he soon developed his own distinct sculptural style. French architect Eugene Viollet-le-Duc, who promoted an evolved form of gothic architecture, proved a major influence on Gaudํ. But the student surpassed the master architect and contrived highly original designs – irregular and fantastically intricate. Some of his greatest works, most notably La Sagrada Famํlia, have an almost hallucinatory power.
  • SANGRADA FAMILIA, BARCELONA, SPAIN , BY ANTONIO GAUDI , 1883 The Sagrada Familia was designed by Antoni Gaudํ (who worked on the project for over 40 years. Gaudi devoted the last 15 years of his life entirely to the endeavor. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2026. On the subject of the extremely long construction period, Gaudํ is said to have remarked, "My client is not in a hurry." After Gaudํ's death in 1926, work continued under the direction of Dom่nech Sugranyes until interrupted by the Spanish Civil War in 1936. Parts of the unfinished church and Gaudํ's models and workshop were destroyed during the war by Catalan anarchists. The present design is based on reconstructed versions of the lost plans as well as on modern adaptations. Since 1940 the architects Francesc Quintana, Isidre Puig Boada, Lluํs Bonet i Gari and Francesc Cardoner have carried on the work. The current director and son of Lluํs Bonet, Jordi Bonet i Armengol, has been introducing computers into the design and construction process since the 1980s. Mark Burry of New Zealand serves as Executive Architect and Researcher. Sculptures by J. Busquets, Etsuro Sotoo and the controversial Josep Subirachs decorate the fantastical fa็ades.
  • STEREOSTATIC MODEL In Gaudํ's hanging model a system of threads represents columns, arches, walls and vaults. Sachets with lead shot resemble the weight of small building parts. Gaudํ spent ten years working on studies for the design, and developing a new method of structural calculation based on a stereostatic model built with cords and small sacks of pellets. The outline of the church was traced on a wooden board (1:10 scale), which was then placed on the ceiling of a small house next to the work site.
  • CATENARY MODEL In physics and geometry, the catenary is the theoretical shape a hanging chain or cable will assume when supported at its ends and acted on only by its own weight.
  • CATENARIES FOR DIFFERENT VALUES OF THE PARAMETER ‘A’
  • Cords were hung from the points where columns were to be placed. Small sacks filled with pellets, weighing one ten- thousandth part of the weight the arches would have to support, were hung from each catenaric arch formed by the cords. Photographs were taken of the resulting model from various angles, and the exact shape of the church's structure was obtained by turning them upside-down obtaining therefore the form, absolutely precise and exact, of the structure of the building, without having to have conducted an operation of calculation and without possibility of error. The forms of cords corresponded to the lines of tension of the prim structure and when inverting the photo, the lines of pressure of the compressed structure were obtained. An absolutely exact and simple method, giving an example of the intuitive and elementary methods that Gaudํ applied in its architecture and that allowed him to obtain balanced forms very similar to which nature offers.
  • HYPERBOLIC PARABOLOID HELICOID HYPERBOLOID OF REVOLUTION ADVANCED GEOMETRY STUDIES, THE SECOND ORDER SURFACES
  • ADVANCED GEOMETRY STUDIES, THE SECOND ORDER SURFACES
  • CASA MILA, BARCELONA, SPAIN, ANTOIO GAUDI
  • CASA MILA Catenary arches under the roof of Gaudํ's Casa Milเ, Barcelona, Spain
  • CASA BATLLO’ , BARCELONA, SPAIN, ANTOIO GAUDI
  • FREI OTTO Otto studied architecture in Berlin before being drafted into the Luftwaffe as a fighter pilot in the last years of World War II. It is said that he was interred in a French POW camp and, with his aviation engineering training and lack of material and an urgent need for housing, began experimenting with tents for shelter. After the war he studied briefly in the United States and visited Erich Mendelsohn, Mies van der Rohe, Richard Neutra, and Frank Lloyd Wright. He began private practice in Germany in 1952. His saddle-shaped cable-net music pavilion at the Bundesgartenschau (Federal Garden Exposition) in Kassel brought him his first significant attention. He earned a doctorate about tensioned constructions in 1954..
  • Membrane Surface Formation
  • Suspended Shape Formation
  • Minimal Path Formation
  • TOYO ITO Toyo Ito (1941) is considered "one of the world's most innovative and influential architects" (Designboom). Ito is known for creating extreme conceptual architecture, in which he seeks to melt the physical and virtual worlds. He is a leading exponent of architecture that addresses issues of the contemporary notion of a 'simulated' city.
  • IMAGE IMITATION AESTHETIC INTERPRETATION MECHANICAL UNDERSTANDING LOGIC FORMATION UNDERSTANDING
  • BEIJING NATIONAL AQUATICS CENTER Water Cube design was chosen from 10 proposals in an international architectural competition for the aquatic center project. The Water Cube was designed and built by a consortium made up of PTW Architects (an Australian architecture firm) . The outer wall is based on the Weaire–Phelan structure, a structure devised from the natural formation of bubbles in soap foam.The complex Weaire–Phelan pattern was developed by slicing through bubbles in soap foam, resulting in more irregular, organic patterns than foam bubble structures proposed earlier by the scientist Kelvin.[ Using the Weaire–Phelan geometry, the Water Cube's exterior cladding is made of 4,000 ETFE bubbles, some as large as 9.14 meters (30 feet) across, with seven different sizes for the roof and 15 for the walls.
  • THE FRACTAL SHAPE FORM OF A ROMANESCO BROCCOLI
  • THE GOLDEN RATIO The golden ratio is known by a few different names, such as: The Golden Ratio. The Golden Mean. Phi. The Divine Section. The Golden Section. The Golden Cut. The Golden Proportion. The Divine Proportion. Most of all, mathematicians call it “Phi” (Phidias) or use the Greek letter Phi is a proportion that is found throughout nature, art and architecture. If you maintain a ratio of small elements to larger elements that is the same ratio of larger elements to the whole, then the result is something that is extraordinarily pleasing to the eye. It can also be expressed as AB:BC = BC: AC Beauty and balance can be achieved by using the golden ratio. The ratio is 1:1.618… (it goes on forever)
  • THE MOST BEAUTIFUL THING WE CAN EXPERIENCE IS THE MYSTERIOUS. IT IS THE SOURCE OF ALL TRUE ART AND SCIENCE. ALBERT EINSTEIN
  • COMPUTER-AIDED TECHNOLOGIES CAD COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN CAD is the use of computer technology for the design of objects, real or virtual. CAM COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING is the use of computer-based software tools that assist engineers and machinists in manufacturing or prototyping product components.
  • ATTRACTOR An attractor is a set to which a dynamical system evolves after a long enough time. That is, points that get close enough to the attractor remain close even if slightly disturbed. Geometrically, an attractor can be a point, curve, a manifold, or even a complicated set with a fractal structure known as a strange attractor. Describing the attractors of chaotic dynamical systems has been one of the achievements of chaos theory
  • http://www.flotsam-uk.net/main.html
  • FLOTSAM
  • RULE-BASED AGGREGATION, 1ST WORKSHOP_2005, AA SCHOOL COMPONENT PRIMITIVES TAURUS RINGS : CLOSED LOOPS, FIXED ONLY WITH EXTERNAL CONNECTIONS, WITHOUT INTERLOCKING CONNECTIONS
  • RULES OF AGGREGATION BIFURCATIONS,HELICAL GROWTH ORIENTATIONS DEFORM-ROTATE : MASS PRODUCE A MINIMUM OF 50 COMPONENTS,AND BEGIN TO ASSEMBLE A LARGER AGGREGATION
  • RULES OF VARIATION SCALE/SIZE & DIMENSIONAL DEFORMATION
  • RXN’S CXN,PARAMETRIC URBANISM, 2006-2007, AA SCHOOL THEODORE SPYROPOULOS STUDIO_ADAPTIVE ECOLOGIES
  • EMERGE
  • COMPUTER-AIDED TECHNOLOGIES CAD COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN CAD is the use of computer technology for the design of objects, real or virtual. CAM COMPUTER-AIDED MANUFACTURING is the use of computer-based software tools that assist engineers and machinists in manufacturing or prototyping product components.
  • FABRICATION CUTTING MILLING ADDING