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V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
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V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
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V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
V3 basic pm training overview thammasat
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V3 basic pm training overview thammasat

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  • 1. PROJECT MANAGEMENT FUNDAMENTALS Robert J Twiddy Business Strategy Director, PSI Solutions, BangkokThursday, 10 January 13
  • 2. Course Scope l This course does— l This course does not— l Teach the fundamentals, of l Provide training sufficient to project management sit for the PMP exam. l Discuss the role of the However, all techniques, project manager as well as tools, and terminology in team members in managing this course are consistent a project with the PMBOK Guide. l Practice fundamentals of project management “PMP” is a certification mark of the Project Management Institute, Inc., which is registered in the United States and other nations. “PMBOK” is a trademark of the Project Management Institute, Inc., which is registered in the United States and other nations. Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 3. Course Objectives l By the end of this course, you will be able to— l Describe the roles and responsibilities of project managers across the project life cycle l Understand the fundamentals of project management l Being aware of case studies l Know where to obtain further materials and training l Note future support now: l Project Management Institute - www.pmi.org l PMI Bangkok Chapter: http://www.pmithai.org l PMBOK: Project Management Body of Knowledge l http://marketplace.pmi.org/Pages/default.aspx? Category=PMBOKBooks Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 4. Introduction to Project Management ASML Worldwide Project Management Methodology INITIATING PLANNING EXECUTING CLOSING Process Group Process Group Process Group Process Group 1.1 2.1 2.5 3.1 IDENTIFY THE PROJECT OR ESTABLISH THE PROJECT ALLOCATE PROJECT TRACK AND CONTROL THE 4.1 PRODUCT TEAM RESOURCES PROJECT CONDUCT PROJECT HANDOVER 1 2.2 2.6 3.2 SET PROJECT ESTIMATE PROJECT MANAGE PROJECT 4.2 PROCEDURES AND COSTS CHANGE PREPARE LESSONS PROTOCOLS LEARNED READY-TO-INITIATE B 1.2 2.3 2.7 3.3 DETERMINE DEVELOP WORK OPTIMIZE THE PROJECT MANAGE PROJECT RISKS 4.3 STAKEHOLDERS AND BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE PLAN PERFORM ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERSHIP CLOSEOUT C F 1.3 2.4 2.8 3.4 DEVELOP THE PROJECT CREATE THE PROJECT DEVELOP RISK MANAGE VENDORS AND DEFINITION SCHEDULE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONTRACTS D 1.4 2.9 3.5 PREPARE THE BUSINESS ESTABLISH THE PROJECT REPORT PROJECT CASE BASELINE PERFORMANCE A E 2 3 4 READY-TO-PLAN READY-TO-EXECUTE READY-TO-CLOSE Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 5. Objectives l By the end of this unit, you will be able to— l Discuss key characteristics defining a project l Explain the triple constraint that affects projects l Identify the types of key stakeholders on the project l Describe influences on a project, including project organizational structure and common external factors l Describe the dynamics of a project management life cycle l Describe project processes that make up every project Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 6. Why do we need project management tools & techniques? Because we live in a world of limited resources and not enough time. There will always be more to do than time and resources will allow. Project Management tool & techniques, if used regularly & appropriately, help us make more effective use of our time.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 7. What does the term ‘project’ mean to you? Class group exercise • What does the term ‘project’ mean to you and your group? • What do you and your group think of or associate with the term ‘project’?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 8. What Is a Project? l “[A] temporary endeavour undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result” Source: PMBOK® Guide, p. 5 Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 9. Types of Projects New Development Process Infrastructure Improvement Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 10. What Is Project Management? l Project management is— l “[T]he application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements”* l Accomplished through the application and integration of the project management processes of initiating, planning, executing and closing l Achieving desired outcomes in a context of conflicting expectations and changes, using other people’s resources, and having limited authority l Sound project management helps ensure project success *Source: PMBOK® Guide, p. 8 Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 11. Features of a projectThursday, 10 January 13
  • 12. Features of a project • A start and a finish • Is a unique activity with a visible output • May involve uncertainty and risk • Involves a team coming together specifically for the project • A budget • Non repetitive tasks, sequential order • Use of resources (including human resources) • A single point of ultimate responsibility • Clearly defined team roles • Clear aims, objectives, goalsThursday, 10 January 13
  • 13. The Triple Constraint Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 14. Managing Projects Using the Triple Constraint l Balancing the three “sides” while managing the project l Combining art and science l Ongoing effort to define, refine, and re-refine project l Based on a foundation of process management Process Management Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 15. A Note on Senior Management’s Expectations and the Triple Constraint Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 16. Project Life Cycle l Projects are usually divided into phases l Beginning - Middle - End l Collectively, these phases make up the project life cycle l Different project-types have different life cycles! l Development l Infrastructure l Process Improvement Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 17. Project Life Cycles Examples Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 18. Project Management Processes l Project management processes provide l A tool-box of processes to accomplish specific deliverables l An iterative approach to creating and maintaining project documents l Living documentation that is continually refined during project life cycle l For use whenever necessary during life of project Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 19. Project Process and Content Processes Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 20. What can go wrong !Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 21. 21 Common Project Management Process Steps ASML Worldwide Project Management Methodology INITIATING PLANNING EXECUTING CLOSING Process Group Process Group Process Group Process Group 1.1 2.1 2.5 3.1 IDENTIFY THE PROJECT OR ESTABLISH THE PROJECT ALLOCATE PROJECT TRACK AND CONTROL THE 4.1 PRODUCT TEAM RESOURCES PROJECT CONDUCT PROJECT HANDOVER 1 2.2 2.6 3.2 SET PROJECT ESTIMATE PROJECT MANAGE PROJECT 4.2 PROCEDURES AND COSTS CHANGE PREPARE LESSONS PROTOCOLS LEARNED READY-TO-INITIATE B 1.2 2.3 2.7 3.3 DETERMINE DEVELOP WORK OPTIMIZE THE PROJECT MANAGE PROJECT RISKS 4.3 STAKEHOLDERS AND BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE PLAN PERFORM ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERSHIP CLOSEOUT C F 1.3 2.4 2.8 3.4 DEVELOP THE PROJECT CREATE THE PROJECT DEVELOP RISK MANAGE VENDORS AND DEFINITION SCHEDULE MANAGEMENT PLAN CONTRACTS D 1.4 2.9 3.5 PREPARE THE BUSINESS ESTABLISH THE PROJECT REPORT PROJECT CASE BASELINE PERFORMANCE A E 2 3 4 READY-TO-PLAN READY-TO-EXECUTE READY-TO-CLOSE Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 22. Exercise Class group exercise • Please work as a team to select the project for your table group to use for the remainder of the class l At this point the participants will choose a project to use in the creation of the various project management templates that are discussed in the remainder of the courseThursday, 10 January 13
  • 23. Key Messages l “A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result”* l “Project management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements” l Every project has a life cycle with identifiable phases and activities l The triple constraint of time, cost, and scope underlies every project l Core Values of Customers, People, Quality and Entrepreneurship are an integral part of every project Unit 0/ SlideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 24. Learning Objectives  Describe the five project management (PM) process groups, the typical level of activity for each, and the interactions among them.  Understand how the PM process groups relate to the PM knowledge areas.  Discuss how organizations develop information technology PM methodologies to meet their needs. 2Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 25. Learning Objectives  Review a case study of an organization applying the PM process groups to manage an information technology project, and understand the contribution that effective project initiation, project planning, project execution, project monitoring and controlling, and project closing make to project success. 3Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 26. Project Management Process Groups  A process is a series of actions directed toward a particular result.  Project management can be viewed as a number of interlinked processes.  The project management process groups include:  Initiating processes  Planning processes  Executing processes  Monitoring and controlling processes  Closing processes 4Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 27. Level of Activity and Overlap of Process Groups Over Time 5Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 28. What Went Wrong? Philip A. Pell, PMP, commented on how the U.S. IRS needed to improve its project management process. “Pure and simple, good, methodology-centric, predictable, and repeatable project management is the SINGLE greatest factor in the success (or in this case failure) of any project…The project manager is ultimately responsible for the success or failure of the project.”* *Pell, Phillip A., Comments posted on CIO Magazine Web site on article “For the IRS, There’s No EZ Fix” . 6Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 29. Media Snapshot  Just as information technology projects need to follow the project management process groups, so do other projects, such as the production of a movie.  Processes involved in making movies might include screenwriting (initiating), producing (planning), acting and directing (executing), editing (monitoring and controlling), and releasing the movie to theaters (closing).  Many people enjoy watching the extra features on a DVD that describe how these processes lead to the creation of a movie…This acted “…not as promotional filler but as a serious and meticulously detailed examination of the entire filmmaking process.”*  Project managers in any field know how important it is to follow a good process. *Jacks, Brian, “Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Extended Edition (New Line),” Underground Online (accessed from www.ugo.com ). 7Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 30. Mapping the Process Groups to the Knowledge Areas  You can map the main activities of each PM process group into the nine knowledge areas by using the PMBOK® Guide  Note that there are activities from each knowledge area under the planning process group.  All initiating activities are part of the project integration management knowledge area. 8Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 31. Relationships Among Process Groups and Knowledge Areas 9Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 32. Relationships Among Process Groups and Knowledge Areas (cont’d) 10Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 33. Developing an IT Project Management Methodology  Just as projects are unique, so are approaches to project management.  Many organizations develop their own project management methodologies, especially for IT projects.  BlueCross BlueShield of Michigan used the PMBOK® Guide to develop their IT project management methodology.  Six Sigma projects and the Rational Unified Process (RUP) framework use project management methodologies. 11Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 34. What Went Right? • Jordan Telecom (JT), Jordan’s only telecom operator, introduced new customized project management processes to improve efficiency and reduce costs in its Information Technology department… • JT created three lines of processes based on the size of the project: high, medium, or low... • Rula Ammuri, JT’s Chief Information Officer, believes this new methodology will result in a 40-50 percent increase in productivity.* Al-Tamimi, Fairooz, “Jordanian Company Uses PMI Methods to ‘Go Global’, Improve Productivity,” PMI Today . 12Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 35. Case Study: JWD Consulting’s Project  This case study provides an example of what’s involved in initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing an IT project.  This case study provides a big picture view of managing a project. 13Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 36. Level of Activity and Overlap of Process Groups Over Time 14Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 37. Project Initiation  Initiating a project includes recognizing and starting a new project or project phase.  Some organizations use a pre-initiation phase, while others include items such as developing a business case as part of the initiation.  The main goal is to formally select and start off projects.  Key outputs include:  Assigning the project manager.  Identifying key stakeholders.  Completing a business case.  Completing a project charter and getting signatures on it. 15Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 38. Project Initiation Documents  Business case: See example  Charter: See example  Every organization has its own variations of what documents are required to initiate a project. It’s important to identify the project need, stakeholders, and main goals. 16Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 39. Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 40. Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 41. Level of Activity and Overlap of Process Groups Over Time 19Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 42. Project Planning  The main purpose of project planning is to guide execution.  Every knowledge area includes planning information (see example).  Key outputs included in the JWD project include:  A team contract.  A scope statement.  A work breakdown structure (WBS).  A project schedule, in the form of a Gantt chart with all dependencies and resources entered.  A list of prioritized risks (part of a risk register).  See sample documents 20Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 43. JWD Consulting Intranet Site Project Baseline Gantt Chart 21Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 44. List of Prioritized Risks 22Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 45. Level of Activity and Overlap of Process Groups Over Time 23Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 46. Project Executing  Project execution usually takes the most time and resources.  Project managers must use their leadership skills to handle the many challenges that occur during project execution.  See example lists the executing processes and outputs. Many project sponsors and customers focus on deliverables related to providing the products, services, or results desired from the project.  A milestone report (see example on page 100) can keep the focus on completing major milestones. 24Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 47. Part of Milestone Report 25Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 48. Level of Activity and Overlap of Process Groups Over Time 26Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 49. Project Monitoring and Controlling  Involves measuring progress toward project objectives, monitoring deviation from the plan, and taking corrective action to match progress with the plan.  Affects all other process groups and occurs during all phases of the project life cycle.  Outputs include performance reports, requested changes, and updates to various plans. 27Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 50. Project Closing  Involves gaining stakeholder and customer acceptance of the final products and services.  Even if projects are not completed, they should be formally closed in order to reflect on what can be learned to improve future projects.  Outputs include project archives and lessons learned, which are part of organizational process assets.  Most projects also include a final report and presentation to the sponsor or senior management. 28Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 51. Chapter Summary  The five project management process groups are initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing.  You can map the main activities of each process group to the nine knowledge areas.  Some organizations develop their own information technology project management methodologies.  The JWD Consulting case study provides an example of using the process groups and shows several important project documents. 29Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 52. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 53. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what? One of the the benefits of project management techniques is the opportunity to clarify roles.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 54. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what? One of the the benefits of project management techniques is the opportunity to clarify roles. • Project sponsor – person who’s paying for itThursday, 10 January 13
  • 55. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what? One of the the benefits of project management techniques is the opportunity to clarify roles. • Project sponsor – person who’s paying for it • Project champion - person who wants to see it happenThursday, 10 January 13
  • 56. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what? One of the the benefits of project management techniques is the opportunity to clarify roles. • Project sponsor – person who’s paying for it • Project champion - person who wants to see it happen • Project manager – will ensure it happensThursday, 10 January 13
  • 57. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what? One of the the benefits of project management techniques is the opportunity to clarify roles. • Project sponsor – person who’s paying for it • Project champion - person who wants to see it happen • Project manager – will ensure it happens • Project team – will make it happenThursday, 10 January 13
  • 58. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what? One of the the benefits of project management techniques is the opportunity to clarify roles. • Project sponsor – person who’s paying for it • Project champion - person who wants to see it happen • Project manager – will ensure it happens • Project team – will make it happen • Stakeholders – those affected by it and with an interest in it, but not necessarily part of it.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 59. Roles in projects – who is responsible for what? One of the the benefits of project management techniques is the opportunity to clarify roles. • Project sponsor – person who’s paying for it • Project champion - person who wants to see it happen • Project manager – will ensure it happens • Project team – will make it happen • Stakeholders – those affected by it and with an interest in it, but not necessarily part of it. • Audience – we’ll consider them later!Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 60. Attributes of an effective project manager Group exercise • What you think are the attributes/qualities required to be an effective project manager?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 61. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically areThursday, 10 January 13
  • 62. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skillsThursday, 10 January 13
  • 63. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitudeThursday, 10 January 13
  • 64. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitude • Adaptable, flexible.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 65. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitude • Adaptable, flexible. • Fair – respecting different people’s viewpointsThursday, 10 January 13
  • 66. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitude • Adaptable, flexible. • Fair – respecting different people’s viewpoints • Committed to the team and the project’s goalsThursday, 10 January 13
  • 67. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitude • Adaptable, flexible. • Fair – respecting different people’s viewpoints • Committed to the team and the project’s goals • Decisive and realisticThursday, 10 January 13
  • 68. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitude • Adaptable, flexible. • Fair – respecting different people’s viewpoints • Committed to the team and the project’s goals • Decisive and realistic • Excellent communication skillsThursday, 10 January 13
  • 69. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitude • Adaptable, flexible. • Fair – respecting different people’s viewpoints • Committed to the team and the project’s goals • Decisive and realistic • Excellent communication skills • LeadershipThursday, 10 January 13
  • 70. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Excellent time management skills • ‘Can do’ proactive attitude • Adaptable, flexible. • Fair – respecting different people’s viewpoints • Committed to the team and the project’s goals • Decisive and realistic • Excellent communication skills • Leadership • AssertivenessThursday, 10 January 13
  • 71. Attributes of an effective project manager – typically are • Be prepared to ‘roll up their sleeves and get their hands dirty’ • Foresight • Planning skills • Knowledge of the subject / area of work • Be prepared to walk, if necessary i.e. leave! • A sense of humour ?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 72. The tools of & for project management • There are numerous tools which can be for managing projects, some of them complex, some of them simple. • We will look at over a dozen tried and tested tools and techniques which can be used for effective project management.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 73. Our tools for today • QUAD Chart analysis • The QUAD chart is a very simple yet extremely effective tool. Project scoping – enables you to define what you do before you start. • Stakeholder analysis – simple version helps you understand and manage the different relationships that matter to the project.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 74. The QUAD chart • A very simple yet powerful tool. • Used to help us clarify exactly what our project is all about.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 75. Quad ChartThursday, 10 January 13
  • 76. Project Management Simulation Exercise • We will carry out a simulated projectThursday, 10 January 13
  • 77. Project Management Simulation Exercise “The Gourmet Breakfast” • We are going to use a relatively simple example of something that you should be familiar with in order for you to be able to understand and practice on a real life project.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 78. The ProblemThursday, 10 January 13
  • 79. The Problem • Just got up? • Feeling kind of hungry? • Fancy a nice breakfast ? • What choice do we have?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 80. Decisions, DecisionsThursday, 10 January 13
  • 81. Let’s make a full cooked English breakfastThursday, 10 January 13
  • 82. Class exercise - Your MissionThursday, 10 January 13
  • 83. Class exercise - Your Mission • To produce a simple project plan for producing a full English Breakfast.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 84. Class exercise - Your Mission • To produce a simple project plan for producing a full English Breakfast. • We will be using this project to illustrate the use of the following: – Quad Chart Analysis including • Project Scoping • Stakeholders and Stakeholder Analysis • Desired Outcomes (Critical Success Factors) • Secondary benefitsThursday, 10 January 13
  • 85. Why a breakfast? • We will use the Breakfast as it’s a simple example of something where you should all have a similar level of basic knowledge. • Let’s view making the breakfast as a project in its own right. • It meets most of the criteria for/attributes of a project doesn’t it? Does it? Let’s checkThursday, 10 January 13
  • 86. Attributes of a project • A start and a finish • Is a unique activity • May involve uncertainty and risk • Usually involves a team coming together specifically for the project • A budget • Non repetitive tasks • Use of resources (including human resources) • A single point of ultimate responsibility • Clearly defined team rolesThursday, 10 January 13
  • 87. The Quad ChartThursday, 10 January 13
  • 88. Guided TourThursday, 10 January 13
  • 89. Guided Tour TITLE OF PROJECT – SNAPPY ACRONYM DESCRIPTORThursday, 10 January 13
  • 90. Guided Tour TITLE OF PROJECT – SNAPPY ACRONYM DESCRIPTOR WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHAT FOR? WHAT IS THE RESULT?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 91. Guided Tour TITLE OF PROJECT – SNAPPY ACRONYM DESCRIPTOR WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHO IS PROJECT FOR? WHAT FOR? WHO WILL BENEFIT (OR NOT)? WHAT IS THE RESULT? WHO WILL IT INVOLVE?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 92. Guided Tour TITLE OF PROJECT – SNAPPY ACRONYM DESCRIPTOR WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHO IS PROJECT FOR? WHAT FOR? WHO WILL BENEFIT (OR NOT)? WHAT IS THE RESULT? WHO WILL IT INVOLVE? GOALS! WHAT MAKES THE PROJECT A SUCCESS?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 93. Guided Tour TITLE OF PROJECT – SNAPPY ACRONYM DESCRIPTOR WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHO IS PROJECT FOR? WHAT FOR? WHO WILL BENEFIT (OR NOT)? WHAT IS THE RESULT? WHO WILL IT INVOLVE? WHEN ARE WE FINISHED? GOALS! WHAT CAN BE MEASURED? WHAT MAKES THE PROJECT A SUCCESS? HOW DO I MEASURE SUCCESS?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 94. First a simple example for making a cup of tea. Our first QUAD chart could look something like the one on the next slideThursday, 10 January 13
  • 95. Example - Make A Cup of TeaThursday, 10 January 13
  • 96. Example - Make A Cup of Tea 1. To make a cup of teaThursday, 10 January 13
  • 97. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea! 1. To make a cup of teaThursday, 10 January 13
  • 98. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea! 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea makerThursday, 10 January 13
  • 99. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea! 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. The tea drinkersThursday, 10 January 13
  • 100. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea! 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. To quench the thirst 2. The tea drinkers 3. To stimulate the mindThursday, 10 January 13
  • 101. Example - Make A Cup of Tea 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. To quench the thirst 2. The tea drinkers 3. To stimulate the mindThursday, 10 January 13
  • 102. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea to quench the thirst and stimulate the mind 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. To quench the thirst 2. The tea drinkers 3. To stimulate the mindThursday, 10 January 13
  • 103. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea to quench the thirst and stimulate the mind 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. To quench the thirst 2. The tea drinkers 3. To stimulate the mind 1. Made an acceptable cup of tea 2. Quenched the thirst 3. Stimulated the mindThursday, 10 January 13
  • 104. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea to quench the thirst and stimulate the mind 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. To quench the thirst 2. The tea drinkers 3. To stimulate the mind 1. Made an acceptable cup of tea 1. Audible noises of satisfaction from 2. Quenched the thirst drinkers. Requests for a second cup 3. Stimulated the mindThursday, 10 January 13
  • 105. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea to quench the thirst and stimulate the mind 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. To quench the thirst 2. The tea drinkers 3. To stimulate the mind 1. Made an acceptable cup of tea 1. Audible noises of satisfaction from 2. Quenched the thirst drinkers. Requests for a second cup 3. Stimulated the mindThursday, 10 January 13
  • 106. Example - Make A Cup of Tea To make a cup of tea to quench the thirst and stimulate the mind 1. To make a cup of tea 1. The tea maker 2. To quench the thirst 2. The tea drinkers 3. To stimulate the mind 1. Made an acceptable cup of tea 1. Audible noises of satisfaction from 2. Quenched the thirst drinkers. Requests for a second cup 3. Stimulated the mind 2. Increased conversation Absence of snoring or yawningThursday, 10 January 13
  • 107. But first another techniqueThursday, 10 January 13
  • 108. Tool and Technique BRAINSTORMINGThursday, 10 January 13
  • 109. BrainstormingThursday, 10 January 13
  • 110. Brainstorming • Brainstorming was coined in the 1940s by Alex Osborne a US advertising executive.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 111. Brainstorming • Brainstorming was coined in the 1940s by Alex Osborne a US advertising executive. • It works by temporarily removing the social blocks which we all have which prevent us from being creative. Blocks such as: – Feeling our ideas will be ridiculed – Feeling we don’t know enough to voice an opinion – Focusing on simple solutions rather than taking a riskThursday, 10 January 13
  • 112. Brainstorming • Brainstorming is essentially a method for being creative in groups, particularly useful for creative problem solving. • ‘Popcorning’ is the new name for brainstormingThursday, 10 January 13
  • 113. The rules of brainstorming • No judgement or criticism of an idea • Quantity of ideas is more important than quality • Freewheeling - rapid a spontaneous ideas • Mutating and combining ideas – one person’s idea stimulates ideas from another person • No answer or idea belongs to a person, they belong to the group • Answers and ideas must be produced rapidlyThursday, 10 January 13
  • 114. Brainstorming how to do it • 1 question or problem is posed • 2 people in a group take turns to answer • 3 each suggestion is written down by a note taker • 4 repeat the process until the group run out of ideas • 5 Select, filter and choose the most appropriate ideas.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 115. Your MissionThursday, 10 January 13
  • 116. Your Mission • Class exercise • To produce a simple project plan QUAD and associated List of Assumptions for approval by Andrew for producing a full English Breakfast.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 117. Your Mission • Class exercise • To produce a simple project plan QUAD and associated List of Assumptions for approval by Andrew for producing a full English Breakfast.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 118. Or • You can try one of the following projects if you prefer. • Organise a stag do or hen party night out • Plan a staff away day social event • Plan a family holidayThursday, 10 January 13
  • 119. Guided TourThursday, 10 January 13
  • 120. Guided Tour PROJECT NAME SNAPPY ACRONYMThursday, 10 January 13
  • 121. Guided Tour PROJECT NAME SNAPPY ACRONYM WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHAT FOR? WHAT IS THE RESULT?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 122. Guided Tour PROJECT NAME SNAPPY ACRONYM WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHO IS PROJECT FOR? WHAT FOR? WHO WILL BENEFIT (OR NOT)? WHAT IS THE RESULT? WHO WILL IT INVOLVE?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 123. Guided Tour PROJECT NAME SNAPPY ACRONYM WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHO IS PROJECT FOR? WHAT FOR? WHO WILL BENEFIT (OR NOT)? WHAT IS THE RESULT? WHO WILL IT INVOLVE? GOALS! WHAT MAKES THE PROJECT A SUCCESS?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 124. Guided Tour PROJECT NAME SNAPPY ACRONYM WHY IS PROJECT BEING DONE? WHO IS PROJECT FOR? WHAT FOR? WHO WILL BENEFIT (OR NOT)? WHAT IS THE RESULT? WHO WILL IT INVOLVE? WHEN ARE WE FINISHED? GOALS! WHAT CAN BE MEASURED? WHAT MAKES THE PROJECT A SUCCESS? HOW DO I MEASURE SUCCESS?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 125. Assumptions • If we assume too much then we make an ass of you and me (ass u me) • So….make a list of assumptions which go with your QUAD chart. Then we can be sure that we, as project manager, have the same base set of assumptions and understandings as everyone else involved in the project.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 126. Mind your Language ! “The project is structured around a multifaceted incremental work plan combining novel content design based on new pedagogical paradigms blended with the e-learning environments to facilitate hybrid mode of delivery” Extract from GENIUS project based at Reading University – one of nominees for a Golden Bull award for gobbledygook from Plain English campaign 2005 Make sure you use appropriate language – Plain English is best http://www.plainenglish.co.uk/goldenbull.html Plain English web site also has free guide on alternative words to useThursday, 10 January 13
  • 127. Stakeholder - definitionThursday, 10 January 13
  • 128. Stakeholder - definition A stakeholder is, for our purposes at the moment, “a person or organisation who is affected by or impacted by what you are trying to do” – This may of course be negatively as well as positively! – It includes the members of the Project Team and the Customer(s)Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 129. Stakeholders 4 things to do with themThursday, 10 January 13
  • 130. Stakeholders 4 things to do with them • List themThursday, 10 January 13
  • 131. Stakeholders 4 things to do with them • List them • Try to understand their likely perspective - how might they react to the project?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 132. Stakeholders 4 things to do with them • List them • Try to understand their likely perspective - how might they react to the project? • Assess their relative importanceThursday, 10 January 13
  • 133. Stakeholders 4 things to do with them • List them • Try to understand their likely perspective - how might they react to the project? • Assess their relative importance • Act appropriately with the stakeholder throughout the project – identify and decide what action you may need to takeThursday, 10 January 13
  • 134. Stakeholders • In the next session we will look at stakeholders in more detail – and compare stakeholders with audiences • Taking account of them and their views is important to the success of your project.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 135. Group exercise • Produce a stakeholder analysis chart, using the simple version on the next slide, or the handout.Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 136. One version of the stakeholder analysisThursday, 10 January 13
  • 137. Website has other versions • www.hull.ac.uk/workbasedlearning/Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 138. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 139. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 140. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 141. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 142. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 143. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 144. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 145. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 146. Where Have We Been?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 147. Were might we go ?Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 148. Were might we go ? SECONDARY BENEFITS (UNMEASURABLE)Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 149. Were might we go ? VALUES WHAT IS THE MOTIVATION? PASSION ETHICS SECONDARY BENEFITS (UNMEASURABLE)Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 150. What if you can’t think of a project? • Make up a realistic scenario. For example: • Cleaning and servicing your car. • Installing a bathroom suite • Marketing a new product • Digging up and concreting over the garden • The choice is yours……Thursday, 10 January 13
  • 151. Learning Objectives  Describe the five project management (PM) process groups, the typical level of activity for each, and the interactions among them.  Understand how the PM process groups relate to the PM knowledge areas.  Discuss how organizations develop information technology PM methodologies to meet their needs. 2Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 152. Questions ?? rtwiddy@coepm.net 0904 212 043Tuesday, 8 January 13
  • 153. World’s Largest Gas Separation Plant Finished On Time and Under Budget CASE STUDYWorld’s Largest Gas Separation PlantFinished On Time and Under BudgetSamsung Engineering Co., Ltd. Uses Knowledge Areas from PMI’s A Guideto the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) toImplement Integration Methods in Construction Project Background In September 2007, PTT Public Company Ltd. (PTT) commissioned Samsung Engineering Co., Ltd. (SECL) to build the PTT Gas Separation Plant #6 (GSP-6) in Rayong, Thailand. The plant, which was valued at US$630 million, powers Thailand’s growing petrochemical, commercial, domestic and transport markets. In particular, the plant recovers ethane, propane, and other components from natural gas. Samsung Engineering’s project team handled the project management, engineering, procurement, construction and commissioning work on a lump-sum turn-key basis. Challenges The project, which was honored as a 2011 recipient of the Project Management Institute Distinguished Project Award, faced substantial challenges. With approximately 300 tie-in points among existing plants within the PTT gas complex area, there had to be a large degree of sensitivity in coordination from the planning stage through completion. Another challenge occurred in September 2009 when the Supreme Court of Thailand issued an injunction to suspend the GSP-6 project—along with 65 other projects in the region—for an environmental and health assessment. This resulted in an 11-month hiatus. All the while, Samsung Engineering president and CEO Park Ki-Seok with PMI president Samsung Engineering was working on several and CEO, Mark A. Langley other high-profile projects in Thailand that required extensive resources.
  • 154. World’s Largest Gas Separation Plant Finished On Time and Under Budget Solutions The GSP-6 project team overcame these challenges by applying concurrent engineering techniques to shorten the engineering process, which enabled them to start construction early. Leveraging all nine Knowledge Areas from A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), the team also implemented the following integration methods: ■■ Combined the project teams from the GSP-6 project and other projects to minimize interfacing discrepancies, which are common when dealing with multiple adjacent projects. ■■ Integrated multiple construction contracts and subcontractors, including shared equipment, fabrication yards and manpower to increase efficiency. ■■ Integrated the construction workforce with the facility’s operational staff to form a task force that allowed uninterrupted operations of the adjacent facilities during the construction period and during the pre- commissioning and commissioning phases. Results The GSP-6 project was successfully completed on 25 January 2011, on time and under budget, after 19,304,700 accident-free hours. The plant is now the largest gas separation plant in the world in terms of the number of production through-fractionation units. Samsung Engineering cited project risk management, project communications management and project human resources management as instrumental in the successful delivery of this project. The techniques, processes and lessons learned from the project were recorded and reviewed to ensure the same best practices are applied to achieve success in future projects. With a strong foundation of PMI’s project management practices, Samsung Engineering has been able to build a strong track record of projects in Thailand and raise its profile in the region. “The project’s ambitious timeline, along with challenges like resource shortages, working around existing plants and government delays, forced us to look beyond traditional project management practices,” said Samsung Engineering’s president and CEO, Park Ki-Seok. “With the help of PMI’s standards, which led to successful implementation practices—particularly regarding risk management, communication management and human resource management—the project team continually surpassed expectations.” © 2012 Project Management Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. “PMI” and the PMI logo are marks of Project Management Institute, Inc. 2 For a comprehensive list of PMI marks, contact the PMI Legal Department. ORG-6035-2012(06-2012)
  • 155. PROJECT MANAGEMENT IMPROVES LENOVO’S STRATEGY EXECUTION AND CORE COMPETITIVENESSI. BackgroundIn recent years, the personal computer (PC) industry has been developing by leaps andbounds. Global sales of PCs totaled 230 million units in 2006, representing a 9 percentincrease over the previous year. Lenovo has a product line that includes everything fromservers and storage devices to printers, printer supplies, projectors, digital products,computing accessories, computing services and mobile handsets, all in addition to itsprimary PC business, which made up 96 percent of the company’s turnover as of thesecond quarter of 2007.Since its acquisition of IBM’s Personal Computing Division in May 2005, Lenovo has beenaccelerating its business expansion into overseas markets. The company transferred itscorporate headquarters from Beijing, China to Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. Today, thegroup has branch offices in 66 countries around the globe. It conducts business in 166countries and employs over 25,000 people worldwide. Lenovo is organized into fourgeographical units: Greater China, America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, and the Middle East andAfrica (EMEA). Within each unit there are functional departments that include production,transportation, supply chain management, marketing and sales. Sales outside of GreaterChina compromised 59 percent of the company’s total turnover in the second quarter of2007.II. ChallengesBefore 2004, multinational PC makers like Dell and HP were experiencing difficultieslocalizing their business in the Chinese market and thus did not pose a serious competitivethreat to Lenovo. However, their operations began to have a major impact on Lenovomarket share in 2004, particularly among key accounts—mandating better execution andcore competitiveness in order to increase market share and improve businessperformance.III. SolutionsIn order to address these challenges, Lenovo proposed substantial changes to its businessmodel and strategy in 2004, employing a project-focused approach to develop itscorporate strategy. Specific steps taken were:Implementing project management as the tool for executing corporate strategy 1. After confirming the company’s overall corporate strategy, Lenovo set about organizing priority tasks that required multi-department cooperation into projects, referred to as strategic projects. Strategic projects differ from R&D projects in that 1
  • 156. time and cost cannot be used as yardsticks for success. Such projects may be about expanding into new markets, solving underlying problems, enhancing organizational efficiency, integrating strategic resources or improving employee satisfaction or capabilities. In the past, some strategic planning had not been followed up on sufficiently but the application of strategic project management solved this problem; strategic projects began to actually be executed and generated results. 2. Lenovo also established a Project Management Office (PMO) to coordinate strategic projects. Beginning in 2004 and early 2005, Lenovo put in place the processes and the organizational structure for its PMO. It also formalized the relationships between strategic leaders and the PMO and budgeted resources for the office. Subsequently, all of Lenovo’s other departmental regulations needed to conform to PMO regulations, with detailed regulations being outlined by specific business departments. However, Lenovo’s PMO did not interfere with projects administratively; rather it offered training and established standardized procedures. Lenovo employees see the PMO as a kind of resource rather than an administrative facility. Designating a PMO as an administrative facility is one of several things that have doomed such offices in the past, but Lenovo’s office has thrived, winning the company’s excellent team award. The company believes that certain conditions must exist in order to successfully utilize project management: First, a company must face a challenge (i.e. an external factor that demands it to do so); second, the office must be prioritized by the company leadership; third, the office must be led by a professional team in order to guarantee that company-specific systems are developed; and finally, it must conform with the company’s organizational culture and be appreciated. Otherwise it’s hard to execute. 3. Lenovo also earmarked money for strategic implementation. Previously, completed strategic plans were not financially supported. But with the strategic shift, the leadership set aside additional money to execute projects outside of the original budget and to provide bonuses for those involved—paving the way for the successful execution of strategic plans.Valuing project management professionals 1. Lenovo sent its top talent in project management to take the PMP® certification exam and apply project management standards. PMP® certification is developed and managed by Project Management Institute (PMI) which is the largest professional project management institute in the world. The PMP certification is the most authoritative and influential of its kind and is the only certification genuinely recognized and accepted globally within the project management discipline. PMP® certification conforms to A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), the standards issued by PMI. The PMBOK® Guide is also recognized and accepted internationally by premier authorities in standards. After Lenovo’s acquisition deal with IBM’s PC business, Lenovo project managers needed a shared platform to communicate with and manage teams in different countries. As the de- 2
  • 157. facto global standard for project management, the project management standards of PMI helped Lenovo standardize its processes. Starting from its functional departments (e.g. R&D, supply chain management, etc.) Lenovo selected a group of key professionals to receive training in project management and sit for the PMP® certification. The returning professionals catalyzed project management in their respective functional departments and trained other team members. 2. A hierarchy of project management positions was introduced within the company, in line with the position structure set up by the company’s human resources department. Lenovo Corporate Research & Development introduced this position structure between 2000 and 2001. Different levels for engineers included assistant engineer, deputy engineer in charge, engineer in charge, managing engineer etc. Professionals were appraised by experts annually on two fronts: First, based on their knowledge base, namely their background and relevant understanding; second, based on their performance, for example their ingenuity in R&D. In 2006, Lenovo kicked-off a global reshuffling of its positions. As an example, the company’s sales division is broken up into sequential levels such as assistant salesperson, sales manager and consultant. Positions are associated with salaries, but company regulations limit the percentage of employees at each level. For example, top-level positions can only occupy five percent of a given team. Full-time project managers can advance within the company’s project management hierarchy. There are over 100 full-time project managers in Lenovo, but nearly all staff of lenovo have participated in some projects. The hierarchy builds a professional ladder for project managers, serving as a channel for project management career development.IV. Major AchievementsLenovo’s experimentation in project management significantly advanced thetransformation in its corporate strategy and improved its business model. The company’sproject-oriented approach improved teamwork and leveled the playing field; team cultureand corporate culture have been promoted; an innovative spirit has been instilled; andinternational integration has been improved. In terms of the market results, Lenovo’sadaptation of project management has improved the company’s core competitiveness withimproved delivery and customer satisfaction. In turn, distinctive performance wasdelivered: In 2006, the company had a market share of seven percent in the global PCmarket, led only by Dell and HP. Its total turnover was USD 14.6 billion, a rise of 10 percentover the previous year. 3

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